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World's largest DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors—the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond.
6h
Stor undersøgelse smadrer vikinge-myter: De var hverken lyshårede eller skandinaviske
Mange vikinger var mørkhårerede. fordi de havde dna fra Sydeuropa og Asien.
6h
Så meget CO2 kan naturen optage, hvis hele verden blev vegetarer
Hvis vi spiste mindre kød, kunne vi omlægge landbrugsjord til naturlige økosystemer, der kunne opsuge CO2 fra atmosfæren.
11h

LATEST

Podcast: COVID-19 is helping turn Brazil into a surveillance state
Leading discussions about the global rules to regulate digital privacy and surveillance is a somewhat unusual role for a developing country to play. But Brazil had been doing just that for over a decade . But in 2014 Edward Snowden's bombshell about the US National Security Agency's digital surveillance activities included revelations that the agency had been spying on Brazil's state-controlled o
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Oculus Quest 2 Review: The Best Way to VR
Sometimes the sequel is better, the Quest 2 is a virtually flawless improvement on the original.
25min
Oncotarget: ATM inhibition overcomes resistance to histone deacetylase inhibitor
The cover for issue 37 of Oncotarget features Figure 7, "The combination of romidepsin and KU60019 is synergistic in a xenograft model of MCL," by Scotto, et al. which reported that the antiproliferative effect induced by histone deactylase inhibitors is associated with the up-regulated expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. Paradoxically, the increased expression of p21 correlat
29min
Researchers discover effective pathway to convert CO2 into ethylene
The scientists developed nanoscale copper wires with specially shaped surfaces to catalyze a chemical reaction that reduces greenhouse gas emissions while generating ethylene — a valuable chemical simultaneously.
29min
Masks Are 'Most Important, Powerful Public Health Tool,': Live Covid-19 Updates
President Trump urged Republicans to 'go for the much higher numbers' in stalled negotiations over another economic recovery package, undercutting his party's push for a bare-bones plan.
31min
China to Launch Space Mining Bot
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Utilitarianism and Autonomous Vehicles – March 2019
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This Startup Is Growing Sushi-Grade Salmon From Cells in a Lab
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Doctors are preparing to implant the world's first human bionic eye
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The Future of College: Are We in the Midst of an Education Revolution?
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Oil Demand Has Collapsed, And It Won't Come Back Any Time Soon
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This Company Just Opened Reservations for Public Air Taxi Flights
Ticket to Ride German startup Volocopter just announced that it's taking reservations for electric air taxi rides on board its VoloCity aircraft. Tickets for the "VoloFirst" experience go for 300 euros (about $350) and can be reserved with a ten percent deposit. You'll have to be quick: the company only made 1000 presale tickets available. A Long Wait You'll also have to wait up to three long yea
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Get Award-Winning Design With The EarFun Air True Wireless BT 5.0 Earbuds
By the end of 2020, we'll have bought 240 million pairs of earbuds . Ever since Apple introduced the AirPods, the market has been flooded with options as people find the discreet design and battery case mean more music in your ears and fewer distractions on your calls. EarFun staked out a place in the market early, and the EarFun Air has cemented it. They arrived on the market with both a CES 202
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Uber's "Safety Driver" During Deadly Self-Driving Car Crash Charged With Negligent Homicide
On March 18, 2018 at around 10pm, one of Uber's self-driving Volvo SUVs was involved in a deadly crash in Tempe, Arizona, killing 49-year-old Elaine Herzberg, who was walking her bicycle across the road. The car wasn't entirely unsupervised — a human "safety driver" was behind the wheel during the fatal crash. The grisly incident became a major turning point in the development of self-driving car
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Deliver Elegant Apps With The Prestige Adobe Suite UI/UX Certification Bundle
Good design is crucial to, well, everything. Every time you use something without having to think about it, you're experiencing a good user interface (UI) and user experience (UX). It's particularly crucial in software; On average, an app has five days to impress a user before it goes in the trash. Stop and think about how many apps you've downloaded, and then dismissed because it was too annoyin
47min
Fires continue to rage in US as smoke reaches Europe
Devastating wildfires that have ravaged the US West Coast continued to rage on Wednesday as smoke from the deadly blazes spread across the country and even reached Europe.
58min
From Seeing to Analyzing
Download this poster to learn how live-cell analysis allows researchers to dig deeper!
1h
Researchers 3-D print tiny multicolor microstructures
Researchers have developed an automated 3-D printing method that can produce multicolor 3-D microstructures using different materials. The new method could be used to make a variety of optical components including optical sensors and light-driven actuators as well as multimaterial structures for applications such as soft robotics and medical applications.
1h
'Spellbreak' Conjures Up a Unique Spin on Battle Royale
So many games in the format lean on the same old tropes. This one has wizards instead.
1h
California Wildfire Beaten Back, for Now, on Famous Mt. Wilson
The mountain is home to two historic telescopes and many other scientific instruments, along with a billion dollars' worth of broadcast transmission towers.
1h
Multi-stakeholder communication is key for better monitoring of marine ecosystems
A sustained dialogue must be established between molecular ecologists, policymakers and other stakeholders for DNA-based approaches to be adopted in marine monitoring and assessment, according to KAUST scientists and colleagues.
1h
Satellite finds a strengthening tropical storm Noul
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Noui as it continued to organize and intensify.
1h
Endangered wildlife, habitat burned in Washington's wildfires
Entire wildlife areas have been destroyed and endangered populations of animals gravely depleted by wildfires burning in Eastern Washington.
1h
Minimally invasive ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release improves long-term outcomes
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release quickly improves hand function and reduces hand discomfort; improvement persisted beyond one year. Thus, ultrasound-guided carpal tunnel release may be a safe, effective, and less invasive alternative to traditional surgery.
1h
A novel approach to childhood obesity prevention
A novel taxonomic approach to obesity prevention using existing U.S. obesity prevention
1h
Researchers 3D print tiny multicolor microstructures
Researchers have developed an automated 3D printing method that can produce multicolor 3D microstructures using different materials. The new method could be used to make a variety of optical components including optical sensors and light-driven actuators as well as multimaterial structures for applications such as soft robotics and medical applications.
1h
Multi-stakeholder communication is key for better monitoring of marine ecosystems
A sustained dialogue must be established between molecular ecologists, policymakers and other stakeholders for DNA-based approaches to be adopted in marine monitoring and assessment, according to KAUST scientists and colleagues.
1h
Endangered wildlife, habitat burned in Washington's wildfires
Entire wildlife areas have been destroyed and endangered populations of animals gravely depleted by wildfires burning in Eastern Washington.
1h
Bio-Rad Introduces StarBright Violet 515 Dyefor Flow Cytometry
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader of life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of StarBright Violet 515 (SBV515) Dye, the first of a new range of unique fluorescent nanoparticles, for use in flow cytometry.
1h
Scientists identify gene family key to unlocking vertebrate evolution
New research finds that the traits that make vertebrates distinct from invertebrates were made possible by the emergence of a new set of genes 500 million years ago, documenting an important episode in evolution where new genes played a significant role in the evolution of novel traits in vertebrates.
1h
A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, a PhD student has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider.
1h
Researchers demonstrate record speed with advanced spectroscopy technique
Researchers have developed an advanced spectrometer that can acquire data with exceptionally high speed. The new spectrometer could be useful for a variety of applications including remote sensing, real-time biological imaging and machine vision.
1h
Biologists developing global citizen network to monitor insect abundance
Biologists are building a volunteer network of citizen scientists to help monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies.
1h
The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies.
1h
Fast calculation dials in better batteries
A simpler and more efficient way to predict the performance of batteries will lead to better batteries, according to engineers.
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Scientists Discover Way To Induce Altered State Of Mind Without Drugs
The drug ketamine can cause an out-of-body experience. Scientists have been able to induce this altered state in a person without drugs. The ability to control dissociation could help many patients.
1h
Researchers demonstrate record speed with advanced spectroscopy technique
Researchers have developed an advanced spectrometer that can acquire data with exceptionally high speed. The new spectrometer could be useful for a variety of applications including remote sensing, real-time biological imaging and machine vision.
1h
Fast calculation dials in better batteries
A simpler and more efficient way to predict the performance of batteries will lead to better batteries, according to engineers.
1h
Colorado's famous aspens expected to decline due to climate change
Using computer modeling, researchers simulated how the distribution of quaking aspen, a native tree known for its brilliant yellow and orange foliage in fall and the sound of its trembling leaves, will change amid rising temperatures over the next 100 years.
1h
Physicists develop basic principles for mini-labs on chips
Colloidal particles have become increasingly important for research as vehicles of biochemical agents. In future, it will be possible to study their behavior much more efficiently than before by placing them on a magnetized chip. A research team has discovered that colloidal rods can be moved on a chip quickly, precisely, and in different directions. A pre-programmed magnetic field even enables th
1h
Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change
New research shows that a wide variety of marine animals — from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks — already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow. The findings provide a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters will harbor less oxygen, some stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a given species may not be in the future.
1h
Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
Researchers capture the structure of PARP enzymes at work, leading to a new understanding of DNA repair that may aid cancer treatments targeting the process.
1h
Brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences
Scientists identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality.
1h
Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers have documented what biologists call a 'host shift' of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut palms and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica.
1h
Mercury concentrations in Yukon river fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
The concentration of mercury in the fish in Alaska's Yukon River may exceed the EPA's human health criterion by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming are not constrained, according to new research.
1h
Point-of-care biomarker assay for traumatic brain injury
Intracranial abnormalities on CT scan in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be predicted by glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) levels in the blood.
1h
Turkish scientists and physicians face criminal investigations after criticizing COVID-19 policies
Questioning official case numbers and warning about health worker deaths trigger accusations of "misinforming the public" and "causing panic"
1h
For the First Time, a Cryptocurrency Exchange Is Becoming a US Bank
Making Bank The Wyoming Banking Board just voted to approve Kraken, a San Francisco-based cryptocurrency exchange, as a special purpose depository institution (SPDI). In other words, it's the first crypto exchange in the country poised to become a bank, as CoinDesk reports . "By becoming a bank we get direct access to federal payments infrastructure, and we can more seamlessly integrate banking a
2h
As pandemic progressed, people's perceived risks went up
A recent study documents how personal risk assessment and protective behaviors are linked.
2h
New Viking DNA research yields unexpected information about who they were
In the popular imagination, Vikings were fearsome blonde-haired warriors from Scandinavia who used longboats to carry out raids across Europe in a brief but bloody reign of terror. But the reality is more complex, says SFU Archaeology Prof. Mark Collard.
2h
Reducing colorectal cancer disparities among African american men
Out of any other racial group, African American men have the lowest five-year survival rate for colorectal cancer (CRC). Yet, published research on effective strategies to increase screening for this group specifically are minimal.
2h
T cells take the lead in controlling SARS-CoV-2 and reducing COVID-19 disease severity
A multi-layered, virus-specific immune response is important for controlling SARS-CoV-2 during the acute phase of the infection and reducing COVID-19 disease severity, with the bulk of the evidence pointing to a much bigger role for T cells than antibodies. A weak or uncoordinated immune response, on the other hand, predicts a poor disease outcome.
2h
Better communication helps translate molecular tools
Multi-stakeholder collaboration is key for the adoption of molecular approaches that can facilitate accurate, cheaper and faster monitoring of marine ecosystems.
2h
Scientists explain how diverse species coexist in microbial communities
Diversity in many biological communities is a sign of an ecosystem in balance. When one species dominates, the entire system can go haywire. For example, the uncontrolled overgrowth of certain oceanic algae species causes toxic red tides that kill fish and other sea life, and sicken humans. On a more individual level, the human gut hosts a large community of different bacteria that is crucial for
2h
NASA sees tropical storm Karina's night moves
Tropical Storm Karina was making night moves like the old Bob Seger song. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Tropical Storm Karina's nighttime movement as it moved away from the Baja California peninsula of Mexico. Infrared data showed the storm was weakening.
2h
Scientists explain how diverse species coexist in microbial communities
Diversity in many biological communities is a sign of an ecosystem in balance. When one species dominates, the entire system can go haywire. For example, the uncontrolled overgrowth of certain oceanic algae species causes toxic red tides that kill fish and other sea life, and sicken humans. On a more individual level, the human gut hosts a large community of different bacteria that is crucial for
2h
Novel photoresist enables 3D printing of smallest porous structures
Researchers have developed a photoresist for two-photon microprinting. It has now been used for the first time to produce three-dimensional polymer microstructures with cavities in the nano range. The scientists report how porosity can be controlled during printing and how this affects light scattering properties of the microstructures.
2h
Researchers ask: how sustainable is your toothbrush?
Researchers have examined the sustainability of different models of the most commonly used oral health product – the toothbrush – to ascertain which is best for the planet and associated human health.
2h
Siberia's permafrost erosion has been worsening for years
The Arctic is warming faster than any other region on the planet. As a result, permafrost that is thousands of years old is now being lost to erosion. As measurements gathered on the Lena River show, the scale of erosion is alarming.
2h
Rapid 3D printing with visible light
3D printing has driven innovations in fields ranging from art to aerospace to medicine. However, the high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light used in most 3D printers to cure liquid resins into solid objects limits the technique's applications. Visible-light curing, which would be more appropriate for some uses, such as tissue engineering and soft robotics, is slow. Now, researchers have developed photo
2h
Device could help detect signs of extraterrestrial life
Although Earth is uniquely situated in the solar system to support creatures that call it home, different forms of life could have once existed, or might still exist, on other planets. But finding traces of past or current lifeforms on other worlds is challenging. Now, researchers have developed a fully automated microchip electrophoresis analyzer that, when incorporated into a planetary rover, co
2h
Engineers improve signal processing for small fiber optic cables
Tiny circuits can go the distance. Researchers have mapped a noise-reducing magneto-optical response that occurs in fiber-optic communications, opening the door for new materials technologies.
2h
Can pumping up cold water from deep within the ocean halt coral bleaching?
Rising ocean temperatures cause marine heat waves, which place stress on living coral animals, as well as the photosynthetic algae on which they depend for energy. A new study is showing potential for the use of artificial upwelling (AU)– or the application of cooler, deep water — as a way to mitigate the thermal stress on corals.
2h
A quantum thermometer for measuring ultra-cold temperatures
In everyday life, measuring temperature is pretty straightforward. But in the quantum world, which deals with the super small and the ultra-cold, determining how hot or cold something is starts to get more challenging. Now researchers have described a quantum process that uses a single atom as a thermometer to sensitively measure the temperature of an ultra-cold gas.
2h
There Won't Be a Clear End to the Pandemic
(Gueorgui Pinkhassov / Magnum) The pandemic has rendered many activities unsafe, but thankfully it can't stop us from fantasizing about them. A common balm that people reach for is the sentence construction "When this is over, I'm going to ____." It seems to help, if only in a fleeting way, for them to imagine all of the vacations they'll go on, all of the concerts they'll attend, and all of the
2h
NASA imagery reveals Paulette became a strong extratropical cyclone
Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low-pressure area. As Hurricane Paulette transitioned into an extra-tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of the powerful storm, and the National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the system.
2h
Discoveries made in how immune system detects hidden intruders
Research led by Dr. Wonmuk Hwang has led to better understanding on how components of the body's immune system find intruding or damaged cells, which could lead to novel approaches to viral and cancer treatments.
2h
New gene implicated in neuron diseases
Healthy NEMF helps the cell recycle garbled protein fragments. But several mutant forms resulted in neuromuscular, neurodegenerative or other ALS-like disease, the scientists found.
2h
Medical robotic hand? Rubbery semiconductor makes it possible
A medical robotic hand could allow doctors to more accurately diagnose and treat people from halfway around the world, but currently available technologies aren't good enough to match the in-person experience. Now researchers have reported that they have designed and produced a smart electronic skin and a medical robotic hand capable of assessing vital diagnostic data by using a newly invented rub
2h
Princeton scientists explain how diverse species coexist in microbial communities
In their paper appearing September 11, 2020 in the journal eLife, Princeton researchers Amir Erez, Jaime Lopez, Ned Wingreen and colleagues use mathematical modeling to explore how species diversity in a bacterial community is affected when the nutrients the microbes depend upon are only seasonally available.
2h
Liquid water at 170 degrees Celsius
Using an X-ray laser, a research team has investigated how water heats up under extreme conditions. In the process, the scientists were able to observe water that remained liquid even at temperatures of more than 170 degrees Celsius. The investigation revealed an anomalous dynamic behavior of water, which is of fundamental importance for investigations of sensitive samples using X-ray lasers.
2h
A quantum thermometer for measuring ultra-cold temperatures
In everyday life, measuring temperature is pretty straightforward. But in the quantum world, which deals with the super small and the ultra-cold, determining how hot or cold something is starts to get more challenging. Now researchers have described a quantum process that uses a single atom as a thermometer to sensitively measure the temperature of an ultra-cold gas.
2h
Scientists Slam Dubious Research Claiming COVID Is a Bioweapon
Earlier this week, a New York Post headline trumpeted that a new paper was "claiming COVID-19 was made" in a "Wuhan lab." The idea of a country releasing a genetically engineered bioweapon to create international havoc is a splashy claim — one you might expect from a salacious infectious disease thriller. But now, numerous experts are saying the paper's conclusions are dubious. In an interview wi
2h
Turbulence affects aerosols and cloud formation
Chat with an atmospheric scientist for more than a few minutes, and it's likely they'll start advocating for a planetary name change. Planet Ocean-Cloud is much more fitting than Earth, they'll say, when so much of our planet's life systems are affected by the interactions of clouds and the oceans.
2h
NASA finds coldest cloud tops on hurricane Teddy's western side
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm. Infrared imagery revealed that the strongest storms were on Teddy's western side.
2h
Sony built a tiny mirrorless camera with a full-frame sensor inside
Attaching high-end lenses to a tiny camera looks slightly awkward. (Sony /) At first glance, Sony's new A7C camera would fit right in with the company's mid-level A6000-series cameras. Instead of a smaller APS-C sensor inside, however, Sony has crammed the full-frame sensor (the same size as a frame of 35mm film) from the A7 III into a more compact, rangefinder-style body. Compared to the rest of
2h
Apples nye ur vil spotte corona
Uret kommer med iltmåler – og det er ikke så tosset en idé, mener overlæge.
2h
Attractive laundry hampers that make your dirty clothes look a little better
Style upgrades for your laundry bin. (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/) Laundry is a part of your life, whether you drop it off at a service, haul it to a laundromat, or do it yourself at home. There is nothing like a ratty laundry bag or an old plastic laundry bin to make your laundry an eye sore. It's time for an upgrade. Whether you want a classic design, a utilitarian look, or something resembling
2h
Fleece garments are cosy — but pollute land as well as water
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02632-7 Many plastic microfibres filtered out of waste water end up in landfills and at other terrestrial sites.
2h
As Wildfires Rage, California Presses Insurers to Cut Rates
But the changes could backfire, experts say, pushing more insurers to stop offering coverage in areas where fire risk is rising because of climate change.
2h
Loneliness doubled for older adults early in pandemic
Loneliness doubled among older adults in the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, a new poll shows. Staying close to home and avoiding crowded places can help older adults reduce their risk of COVID-19. But the new national poll suggests it comes with a cost, especially for those with health challenges. According to the findings from the National Poll on Healthy Aging, in June of this year, 56%
2h
World's largest DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors – the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond. Now cutting-edge DNA sequencing of more than 400 Viking skeletons from archaeological sites scattered across Europe and Greenland will rewrite the history books.
2h
Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
The eyes of the fruit fly are covered by a thin and transparent coating with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. Researchers discovered that the coating only consists of two ingredients: retinin and corneal wax. They succeeded in artificially reproducing the phenomenon on different kinds of surface. This process, which is very inexpensive and is based on biodegradable materials, could have
2h
Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations.
2h
Scientist searches for stellar phosphorus to find potentially habitable exoplanets
A scientist has identified stellar phosphorus as a probable marker in narrowing the search for life in the cosmos. She has developed techniques to identify stars likely to host exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets, and proposes that upcoming studies target stellar phosphorus to find systems with the greatest probability for hosting life as we know it.
2h
Reprogramming brain cells enables flexible decision-making
Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations. Researchers have utilized a mouse model to reveal which neurons in the brain are in command in guiding adaptive behavior. Their new study contributes to our understanding of decision-making processes in healthy and infirm people.
2h
Liquid water at 170 degrees Celsius
Using an X-ray laser, a research team has investigated how water heats up under extreme conditions. In the process, the scientists were able to observe water that remained liquid even at temperatures of more than 170 degrees Celsius. The investigation revealed an anomalous dynamic behavior of water, which is of fundamental importance for investigations of sensitive samples using X-ray lasers.
2h
Did our early ancestors boil their food in hot springs?
Scientists have found evidence of hot springs near sites where ancient hominids settled, long before the control of fire.
2h
Scenes From the 2020 Tour de France
The 107th Tour de France cycling race—delayed more than two months due to the coronavirus pandemic—began in Nice on August 29, as 22 teams of riders started their journey through central and southern France in 20 stages. The entire tour covers a distance of 3,484 km and will conclude in Paris on September 20. Gathered here are images from the first 17 stages of the 2020 Tour de France.
2h
NASA-NOAA satellite finds a strengthening tropical storm Noul NASA-NOAA's Suom
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the South China Sea and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Noui as it continued to organize and intensify.
2h
The persistence of plastic
The amount of synthetic microfiber we shed into our waterways has been of great concern over the last few years, and for good reason: Every laundry cycle releases in its wastewater tens of thousands of tiny, near-invisible plastic fibers whose persistence and accumulation can affect aquatic habitats and food systems, and ultimately our own bodies in ways we have yet to discover.
2h
NASA sees tropical storm Karina's night moves
Tropical Storm Karina was making night moves like the old Bob Seger song. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Tropical Storm Karina's nighttime movement as it moved away from the Baja California peninsula of Mexico. Infrared data showed the storm was weakening.
2h
Feds Charge Chinese Hackers With Ripping Off Video Game Loot From 9 Companies
A group known as Barium allegedly attacked hundreds of targets around the globe—and manipulated in-game goods and currency.
2h
The Immune Hallmarks of Severe COVID-19
Researchers are trying to make sense of immune systems gone haywire and develop biomarkers to predict who will become the sickest from a coronavirus infection.
3h
Astronomers Detect First-Ever Planet Closely Orbiting a White Dwarf
For the first time, a team of astronomers has detected a planet orbiting a white dwarf at a very close distance, circling it every 34 hours. Most excitingly, the discovery indicates that planets could eventually end up in a white dwarf's habitable zone — where they would theoretically be able to sustain life. The planet, dubbed WD 1586b and weighing in at 13.8 times the mass of Jupiter, orbits it
3h
Burping Cows Try New Diet
Adding seaweed to cows' diets could help reduce methane production and help curb climate change. Burping Cows Try New Diet Video of Burping Cows Try New Diet Creature Wednesday, September 16, 2020 – 14:30 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) — Scientists have found that when cows digest a certain species of red algae seaweed, called Asparagopsis taxiformis , it creates a compound
3h
University of Michigan Grad Students Strike over COVID-19 Policy
Student workers have cited a lack of transparency and a failure to implement rapid and widespread testing among their many concerns regarding the school's response to the pandemic.
3h
Ancient footprints in Saudi Arabia show how humans left Africa
Around 120,000 years ago in what is now northern Saudi Arabia, a small band of homo sapiens stopped to drink and forage at a shallow lake that was also frequented by camels, buffalo and elephants bigger than any species seen today.
3h
People act less selfishly when somebody's watching
The less we know about what is expected of us in a given situation, the more likely we are to act selfishly, researchers report. This applies both to our degree of financial generosity, as well as to the extent to which we adhere to coronavirus guidelines , according to the new study. The researchers conducted what are known as "behavioral economics experiments" on 268 Danish participants. In the
3h
NASA finds coldest cloud tops on hurricane Teddy's western side
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm. Infrared imagery revealed that the strongest storms were on Teddy's western side.
3h
Researchers have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector
Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum München and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed the world's smallest ultrasound detector. It is based on miniaturized photonic circuits on top of a silicon chip. With a size 100 times smaller than an average human hair, the new detector can visualize features that are much smaller than previously possible, leading to what is known as super-resol
3h
Turbulence affects aerosols and cloud formation
Turbulent air in the atmosphere affects how cloud droplets form. New research from Michigan Technological University's cloud chamber changes the way clouds, and therefore climate, are modeled.
3h
A 'cell-less' therapy may regenerate heart tissue without cell transplant risks
Ling Gao and colleagues have developed a strategy that uses exosomes – tiny membrane-bound sacs secreted by cells – to mimic the heart-regenerating effects of cardiac cell transplants, while potentially avoiding risks associated with whole-cell transplants.
3h
Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes.
3h
Seismic monitoring may improve early warnings for glacial lake outburst floods
Vibrations in the ground may help to improve advanced warnings about sudden floods that result from glacial melting, according to a study published today in Science Advances.
3h
Discovery of a new mass extinction
It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record. In a new paper, published today in Science Advances, an international team has identified a major extinction of life 233 million years ago that triggered the dinosaur takeover of the world. The crisis has been called the Carnian Pluvial Episode.
3h
Mapping cavefish brains leads to neural origin of behavioral evolution
While studied for nearly a century, little is known about how cavefish brains differ. A study is the first to look inside their brains with millimeter resolution to start to understand how the individual neurons and brain regions that drive complex behaviors, including sleep and feeding have evolved. This work has broad implications for the understanding of how brains evolve in many different anim
3h
Domestic horses probably did not originate in Anatolia
Domestic horses likely did not originate in Anatolia as previously suspected, according to a new study of ancient horse remains dating as far back as 9000 BCE. Instead, they may have been introduced to the peninsula — which makes up most of modern-day Turkey — and the nearby Caucasus region from the Eurasian Steppe by about 2000 BCE, during the Bronze Age.
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Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
The eyes of the fruit fly are covered by a thin and transparent coating with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. Researchers discovered that the coating only consists of two ingredients: retinin and corneal wax. They succeeded in artificially reproducing the phenomenon on different kinds of surface. This process, which is very inexpensive and is based on biodegradable materials, could have
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Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations.
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Australia's Stinging Trees: Please Do Not Pet Them
Scientists have found a potent chemical that might give Australian giant stinging trees their extraordinarily painful punch.
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The Vikings Were More Complicated Than You Might Think
One of the biggest surveys ever of ancient DNA offers new evidence of who the Vikings were and where they went raiding and trading.
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People's life goals relate to their personality type
A new study suggests that for the most part, people formulate goals consistent with their personality traits.
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Epidemics and pandemics can exacerbate xenophobia, bigotry
Instincts developed to protect us from illnesses can generalize into avoidance of healthy individuals who simply look, speak or live differently.
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World's oldest animal sperm found in tiny crustaceans trapped in Myanmar amber
New research has led to the discovery of world's oldest animal sperm inside a tiny crustacean trapped in amber around 100 million years ago in Myanmar.
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Can life survive a star's death? Webb telescope can reveal the answer
When stars like our sun die, all that remains is an exposed core — a white dwarf. A planet orbiting a white dwarf presents a promising opportunity to determine if life can survive the death of its star, according to researchers.
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Potential COVID-19 drug azithromycin may increase risk for cardiac events
Azithromycin — a commonly-prescribed antibiotic — also is being investigated as a potential treatment for COVID-19. Researchers have found that azithromycin by itself is not associated with an increase in cardiac events; however, if the drug is taken with certain other drugs that affect the electrical functioning of the heart, then cardiac events increased.
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Fish, seaweed inspire slippery surfaces for ships
Fish and seaweed secrete a layer of mucus to create a slippery surface, reducing their friction as they travel through water. A potential way to mimic this is by creating lubricant-infused surfaces covered with cavities. As the cavities are continuously filled with the lubricant, a layer is formed over the surface.
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Energy harvesting goes organic, gets more flexible
The race is on to create natural biocompatible piezoelectric materials for energy harvesting, electronic sensing, and stimulating nerves. A group of researchers has explored peptide-based nanotubes and reports using a combination of ultraviolet and ozone exposure to generate a wettability difference and an applied field to create horizontally aligned polarization of nanotubes on flexible substrate
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Elements of surprise: Neutron stars contribute little, but something's making gold
Neutron star collisions do not create the quantity of chemical elements previously assumed, a new analysis of galaxy evolution finds. The research also reveals that current models can't explain the amount of gold in the cosmos – creating an astronomical mystery. The work has produced a new-look Periodic Table, showing the stellar origins of naturally occurring elements from carbon to uranium.
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Scientists uncover a novel approach to treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy
Scientists have shown that pharmacological (drug) correction of the content of extracellular vesicles released within dystrophic muscles can restore their ability to regenerate muscle and prevent muscle scarring. The study reveals a promising new therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable muscle-wasting condition, and has far-reaching implications for the field of reg
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The gene expression network regulating queen brain remodeling after insemination and its parallel use in ants with reproductive workers
Caste differentiation happens early in development to produce gynes as future colony germlines and workers as present colony soma. However, gynes need insemination to become functional queens, a transition that initiates reproductive role differentiation relative to unmated gynes. Here, we analyze the anatomy and transcriptomes of brains during this differentiation process within the reproductive
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Extinction and dawn of the modern world in the Carnian (Late Triassic)
The Carnian Pluvial Episode (Late Triassic) was a time of global environmental changes and possibly substantial coeval volcanism. The extent of the biological turnover in marine and terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. Here, we present a meta-analysis of fossil data that suggests a substantial reduction in generic and species richness and the disappearance of 33% of marine genera. This
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Cavefish brain atlases reveal functional and anatomical convergence across independently evolved populations
Environmental perturbation can drive behavioral evolution and associated changes in brain structure and function. The Mexican fish species, Astyanax mexicanus , includes eyed river-dwelling surface populations and multiple independently evolved populations of blind cavefish. We used whole-brain imaging and neuronal mapping of 684 larval fish to generate neuroanatomical atlases of surface fish and
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Seismic observations, numerical modeling, and geomorphic analysis of a glacier lake outburst flood in the Himalayas
Glacial lake outburst floods (GLOFs) are a substantial hazard for downstream communities in vulnerable regions, yet unpredictable triggers and remote source locations make GLOF dynamics difficult to measure and quantify. Here, we revisit a destructive GLOF that occurred in Bhutan in 1994 and apply cross-correlation–based seismic analyses to track the evolution of the GLOF remotely (~100 kilometer
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Polysaccharide length affects mycobacterial cell shape and antibiotic susceptibility
Bacteria control the length of their polysaccharides, which can control cell viability, physiology, virulence, and immune evasion. Polysaccharide chain length affects immunomodulation, but its impact on bacterial physiology and antibiotic susceptibility was unclear. We probed the consequences of truncating the mycobacterial galactan, an essential linear polysaccharide of about 30 residues. Galact
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Evidence for extreme export of Arctic sea ice leading the abrupt onset of the Little Ice Age
Arctic sea ice affects climate on seasonal to decadal time scales, and models suggest that sea ice is essential for longer anomalies such as the Little Ice Age. However, empirical evidence is fragmentary. Here, we reconstruct sea ice exported from the Arctic Ocean over the past 1400 years, using a spatial network of proxy records. We find robust evidence for extreme export of sea ice commencing a
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Medial forebrain bundle structure is linked to human impulsivity
Comparative research indicates that projections from midbrain dopamine nuclei [including the ventral tegmental area (VTA)] to the ventral striatum [including the nucleus accumbens (NAcc)] critically support motivated behavior. Using diffusion-weighted imaging and probabilistic tractography in humans, we characterized the trajectory and structure of two tracts connecting the VTA and NAcc, as well
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Rainfall triggers more deep-seated landslides than Cascadia earthquakes in the Oregon Coast Range, USA
The coastal Pacific Northwest USA hosts thousands of deep-seated landslides. Historic landslides have primarily been triggered by rainfall, but the region is also prone to large earthquakes on the 1100-km-long Cascadia Subduction Zone megathrust. Little is known about the number of landslides triggered by these earthquakes because the last magnitude 9 rupture occurred in 1700 CE. Here, we map 993
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A Shh/Gli-driven three-node timer motif controls temporal identity and fate of neural stem cells
How time is measured by neural stem cells during temporal neurogenesis has remained unresolved. By combining experiments and computational modeling, we define a Shh/Gli-driven three-node timer underlying the sequential generation of motor neurons (MNs) and serotonergic neurons in the brainstem. The timer is founded on temporal decline of Gli-activator and Gli-repressor activities established thro
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Water-ion permselectivity of narrow-diameter carbon nanotubes
Carbon nanotube (CNT) pores, which mimic the structure of the aquaporin channels, support extremely high water transport rates that make them strong candidates for building artificial water channels and high-performance membranes. Here, we measure water and ion permeation through 0.8-nm-diameter CNT porins (CNTPs)—short CNT segments embedded in lipid membranes—under optimized experimental conditi
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Ancient DNA shows domestic horses were introduced in the southern Caucasus and Anatolia during the Bronze Age
Despite the important roles that horses have played in human history, particularly in the spread of languages and cultures, and correspondingly intensive research on this topic, the origin of domestic horses remains elusive. Several domestication centers have been hypothesized, but most of these have been invalidated through recent paleogenetic studies. Anatolia is a region with an extended histo
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Annexin A1-dependent tethering promotes extracellular vesicle aggregation revealed with single-extracellular vesicle analysis
Extracellular vesicles (EVs) including plasma membrane–derived microvesicles and endosomal-derived exosomes aggregate by unknown mechanisms, forming microcalcifications that promote cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death worldwide. Here, we show a framework for assessing cell-independent EV mechanisms in disease by suggesting that annexin A1 (ANXA1)–dependent tethering induces EV aggr
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A VH1-69 antibody lineage from an infected Chinese donor potently neutralizes HIV-1 by targeting the V3 glycan supersite
An oligomannose patch around the V3 base of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) is recognized by multiple classes of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). Here, we investigated the bNAb response to the V3 glycan supersite in an HIV-1–infected Chinese donor by Env-specific single B cell sorting, structural and functional studies, and longitudinal analysis of antibody and virus repertoires. Monocl
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3D curvature-instructed endothelial flow response and tissue vascularization
Vascularization remains a long-standing challenge in engineering complex tissues. Particularly needed is recapitulating 3D vascular features, including continuous geometries with defined diameter, curvature, and torsion. Here, we developed a spiral microvessel model that allows precise control of curvature and torsion and supports homogeneous tissue perfusion at the centimeter scale. Using this s
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Air/water interfacial assembled rubbery semiconducting nanofilm for fully rubbery integrated electronics
A rubber-like stretchable semiconductor with high carrier mobility is the most important yet challenging material for constructing rubbery electronics and circuits with mechanical softness and stretchability at both microscopic (material) and macroscopic (structural) levels for many emerging applications. However, the development of such a rubbery semiconductor is still nascent. Here, we report t
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Electrically driven photon emission from individual atomic defects in monolayer WS2
Quantum dot–like single-photon sources in transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) exhibit appealing quantum optical properties but lack a well-defined atomic structure and are subject to large spectral variability. Here, we demonstrate electrically stimulated photon emission from individual atomic defects in monolayer WS 2 and directly correlate the emission with the local atomic and electronic s
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An elaborate sweep-stick code in rat barrel cortex
In rat barrel cortex, feature encoding schemes uncovered during broadband whisker stimulation are hard to reconcile with the simple stick-slip code observed during natural tactile behaviors, and this has hindered the development of a generalized computational framework. By designing broadband artificial stimuli to sample the inputs encoded under natural conditions, we resolve this disparity while
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Neurotoxic peptides from the venom of the giant Australian stinging tree
Stinging trees from Australasia produce remarkably persistent and painful stings upon contact of their stiff epidermal hairs, called trichomes, with mammalian skin. Dendrocnide -induced acute pain typically lasts for several hours, and intermittent painful flares can persist for days and weeks. Pharmacological activity has been attributed to small-molecule neurotransmitters and inflammatory media
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Photopyroelectric microfluidics
Precision manipulation of various liquids is essential in many fields. Unlike solid objects, fluids are intrinsically divisible, enriching their fundamental operations with merging, dispensing, and splitting on top of moving. Fluids are sticky as well, calling for their lossless manipulation to prevent mass loss and contamination. We present photopyroelectric microfluidics that meet all the requi
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Atomic-scale characterization of mature HIV-1 capsid stabilization by inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6)
Inositol hexakisphosphates (IP 6 ) are cellular cofactors that promote the assembly of mature capsids of HIV. These negatively charged molecules coordinate an electropositive ring of arginines at the center of pores distributed throughout the capsid surface. Kinetic studies indicate that the binding of IP 6 increases the stable lifetimes of the capsid by several orders of magnitude from minutes t
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FUNDC1 interacts with FBXL2 to govern mitochondrial integrity and cardiac function through an IP3R3-dependent manner in obesity
Defective mitophagy is causally linked to obesity complications. Here, we identified an interaction between mitophagy protein FUNDC1 (FUN14 domain containing 1) and receptor subunit of human SCF (SKP1/cullin/F-box protein) ubiquitin ligase complex FBXL2 as a gatekeeper for mitochondrial Ca 2+ homeostasis through degradation of IP3R3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type 3). Loss of FUNDC1 i
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COVID-19 may one day come and go like the flu, but we're not there yet
Researchers predict that, as more people recover from COVID-19 and develop immunity, variables like temperature and humidity may have a larger impact on the spread of the virus. (Pexels/) Since the novel coronavirus was first detected in December, it has spread around the world and flourished in all kinds of climates. But over time COVID-19 is likely to become a seasonal problem that peaks in win
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Nytt test ska avslöja värdelös medicin
Metformin är den vanligaste medicinen mot typ 2-diabetes. Men hela 30 procent av patienterna har ingen nytta av tabletterna. Nu har svenska forskare utvecklat ett blodprov som på förhand kan visa om medicinen kommer att fungera eller inte.
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Using chitin, a bioinspired material, to manufacture tools and shelters on Mars
A simple manufacturing technology based on chitin, one of the most ubiquitous organic polymers on Earth, could be used to build tools and shelters on Mars, according to a study published September 16 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Javier Fernandez of Singapore University of Technology and Design, and colleagues.
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Database of parliamentarians' tweets opens new research opportunities
Researchers have compiled a new database of tweets from parliament members from 26 European countries and illustrated how this resource could help address challenges in the burgeoning field of Twitter research. Livia van Vliet of the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, and colleagues present the new database and findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on September 16, 2020.
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Diet and prior training show no impact on cognitive decline in aging pet dogs
A new study of older pet dogs found that problem solving, sociability, boldness and dependency decline with age, and reported no associations between an enriched diet, lifelong training experiences, and measures of behavior and cognition after a one-year diet period. A team of researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria, and University of Liverpool, UK present these findi
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Native stinging tree toxins match the pain of spiders and scorpions
The painful toxins wielded by a giant Australian stinging tree are surprisingly similar to the venom found in spiders and cone snails, University of Queensland researchers have found.
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Most landslides in western Oregon triggered by heavy rainfall, not big earthquakes
Researchers at the University of Washington, Portland State University and the University of Oregon have shown that deep-seated landslides in the central Oregon Coast Range are triggered mostly by rainfall, not by large offshore earthquakes.
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Mapping cavefish brains leads to neural origin of behavioral evolution
For more than 1 million years, independent cavefish populations that are geographically and hydrologically isolated from one another have evolved to include about 29 different populations. Among them, the tiny Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, which comprises river-dwelling surface fish and multiple independently evolved populations of blind cavefish. Many of the behaviors between these cavefish
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Seismic monitoring may improve early warnings for glacial lake outburst floods
Vibrations in the ground may help to improve advanced warnings about sudden floods that result from glacial melting, according to a study published today in Science Advances.
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Synthetic clothing fibers contribute vast amounts of plastic pollution on land
176,500 metric tons of synthetic microfibers—chiefly polyester and nylon—are released every year onto terrestrial environments across the globe, according to a new study in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Jenna Gavigan and colleagues at the University of California at Santa Barbara. The microfibers are shed from clothing during washing, and the amount ending up on land now exceeds the amount t
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Discovery of a new mass extinction
It's not often a new mass extinction is identified; after all, such events were so devastating they really stand out in the fossil record. In a new paper, published today in Science Advances, an international team has identified a major extinction of life 233 million years ago that triggered the dinosaur takeover of the world. The crisis has been called the Carnian Pluvial Episode.
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Så ska folkvaldas twittrande kartläggas
När enskilda politiker skickar ut kommentarer på världsscenen är en plattform den överlägset mest populära: mikrobloggen Twitter, med dess maximalt 240 tecken långa inlägg. I tidigare studier där stora mängder inlägg analyserats har det handlat om enskilda länder eller personers twittrande under en viss period. Ofta har skillnader i metod gjort studierna svårjämförbara sinsemellan.
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Energy harvesting goes organic, gets more flexible
The race is on to create natural biocompatible piezoelectric materials for energy harvesting, electronic sensing, and stimulating nerves. A group of researchers has explored peptide-based nanotubes and reports using a combination of ultraviolet and ozone exposure to generate a wettability difference and an applied field to create horizontally aligned polarization of nanotubes on flexible substrate
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From leprosy to COVID-19, how stigma makes it harder to fight epidemics
Animosity directed at COVID-19 patients has roots in ancient social stigma around infectious disease
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An 'uncoordinated' immune response may explain why COVID-19 strikes some hard, particularly the elderly
Multiple arms of secondary immune response need to respond in sync to coronavirus
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Plastic pollution: Washed clothing's synthetic mountain of 'fluff'
Scientists calculate how many tiny fibres our polyester and nylon garments lose in the wash.
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Climate crisis 233m years ago reshaped life on Earth, say scientists
Volcanic eruptions drove global heating, causing mass extinctions and ushering in dinosaur era A mass extinction event sparked by a sudden shift in climate more than 200m years ago reshaped life on Earth and ushered in the age of the dinosaurs, scientists claim. An international team reviewed geological evidence and the fossil record and found that enormous volcanic eruptions in what is now weste
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Diet and prior training show no impact on cognitive decline in aging pet dogs
A new study of older pet dogs found that problem solving, sociability, boldness and dependency decline with age, and reported no associations between an enriched diet, lifelong training experiences, and measures of behavior and cognition after a one-year diet period. A team of researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria, and University of Liverpool, UK present these findi
3h
Native stinging tree toxins match the pain of spiders and scorpions
The painful toxins wielded by a giant Australian stinging tree are surprisingly similar to the venom found in spiders and cone snails, University of Queensland researchers have found.
3h
Mapping cavefish brains leads to neural origin of behavioral evolution
For more than 1 million years, independent cavefish populations that are geographically and hydrologically isolated from one another have evolved to include about 29 different populations. Among them, the tiny Mexican tetra, Astyanax mexicanus, which comprises river-dwelling surface fish and multiple independently evolved populations of blind cavefish. Many of the behaviors between these cavefish
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NASA imagery reveals Paulette became a strong extratropical cyclone
Tropical cyclones can become post-tropical before they dissipate, meaning they can become sub-tropical, extra-tropical or a remnant low-pressure area. As Hurricane Paulette transitioned into an extra-tropical storm, NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of the powerful storm, and the National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the system.
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People's life goals relate to their personality type, UC Davis study suggests
A new University of California, Davis, study suggests that for the most part, people formulate goals consistent with their personality traits.
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CDC Director Says COVID-19 Vaccine Likely Won't Be Widely Available Until Next Year
Emphasizing the continued importance of masks, Robert Redfield said that while first responders may have early access to a vaccine, broader access is not likely for six to nine months after approval. (Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)
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Security software for autonomous vehicles
Before autonomous vehicles participate in road traffic, they must demonstrate conclusively that they do not pose a danger to others. New software prevents accidents by predicting different variants of a traffic situation every millisecond.
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Imaging agent spotlights inflammation
Researchers have created a new PET imaging agent that detects signs of inflammation. Such a tracer could aid diagnosis and study of diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to cancer to COVID-19.
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Sharp slowdown in release of Covid tests in England hits efforts to stop virus
Anger mounts as Britain faces weeks of testing shortages
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The megafires and pandemic expose the lies that frustrate action on climate change | Tim Flannery
If there was a moment of true emergency in the fight to preserve our climate, it is now This is part of a series of essays by Australian writers responding to the challenges of 2020 I was in Melbourne in late January, watching as more and more people donned face masks to protect themselves against the bushfire smoke that had thickened the air for weeks and that was causing hundreds of deaths. Tur
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Blood, saliva and tears for Covid tests
TikTok deal closer, Snowflake more than doubles, iOS14 available
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How Quickly Can a Girl Go Viral on TikTok?
A girl sits alone on an ugly couch, stroking a plastic fish and mouthing the words to Jason Derulo's "Ridin' Solo." Her eyes are bloodshot. She puts on sunglasses to cover them up, just as Derulo says he does in the song. This video , uploaded to TikTok in July, has more than 11.4 million views. It was posted by @mooptopia, who emerged from nowhere at the beginning of July and has since become an
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A ferry protein in the pancreas protects it from the stress induced by a high-fat diet
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have now uncovered a key mechanism by which pancreatic function is maintained in response to a high-fat diet. A protein present in pancreatic insulin-producing cells protects them from damage under the stress induced by a high-fat diet. As the world increases its intake of high-fat foods and as type 2 diabetes incidence rises as a result, th
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5 reasons you really should get a flu shot this year
Doctors and health experts have no way of predicting what will happen this fall when COVID-19 and the flu circulate in the US at the same time. But they have an urgent message: Get a flu shot. Even if you've never gotten the vaccination before, experts say, do it this year. "This year, if we don't do things right, the flu has the potential to take a much greater toll." Wearing masks , washing han
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Covid-19 Vaccines Will Be Free for Americans, Warp Speed Officials Say
Despite the president's statements about military involvement in the vaccine rollout, officials said that for most people, "there will be no federal official who touches any of this vaccine."
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New data processing module makes deep neural networks smarter
Artificial intelligence researchers have improved the performance of deep neural networks by combining feature normalization and feature attention modules into a single module that they call attentive normalization. The hybrid module improves the accuracy of the system significantly, while using negligible extra computational power.
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We need to go to Venus as soon as possible
Venus has long played second fiddle to its redder, smaller, and more distant sibling. Given how inhospitable we've learned Venus to be, we've spent the majority of the last century pinning some of our biggest hopes of finding signs of extraterrestrial life on Mars. That all changed this week. On Monday it was announced that a peculiar gas called phosphine had been spotted in the clouds above Venu
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Hurricane Sally unleashes flooding along the Gulf Coast
Hurricane Sally lumbered ashore near the Florida-Alabama line Wednesday with 105 mph (165) winds and rain measured in feet, not inches, swamping homes and trapping people in high water as it crept inland for what could be a long, slow and disastrous drenching across the Deep South.
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Minnesota moose will not be listed as federally endangered species
Minnesota and Midwestern moose will not be listed as a federally endangered species, putting to bed a petition that's been under review for five years.
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Will 2020 change the way you work forever?
In some ways, the events of 2020 may end up transforming the workplace for good, organizational psychologist Songqi Liu argues. Between the surge of furloughs and job losses related to COVID-19, the large-scale transition to remote work, the erosion of work-life balance for working parents, and the greater emphasis on diversity and inclusion, "this year is upending a lot of workplace norms," says
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Immune 'cloaking' in cancer cells and implications for immunotherapy
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London, The Institute of Cancer Research, London, and the Moffitt Cancer Centre have created a mathematical model that can determine the impact of the immune system on tumour evolution.
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Tortoise hatchlings are attracted to faces from birth
Tortoises are born with a natural preference for faces, according to new research from scientists at Queen Mary University of London, the University of Trento and the Fondazione Museo Civico Rovereto.
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World's oldest animal sperm found in tiny crustaceans trapped in Myanmar amber
An international collaboration between researchers at Queen Mary University of London and the Chinese Academy of Science in Nanjing has led to the discovery of world's oldest animal sperm inside a tiny crustacean trapped in amber around 100 million years ago in Myanmar.
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Pandemics and epidemics could exacerbate racism xenophobia
Human beings share these same biological impulses as other animals to separate into modular social groups. However, when pathogens are spreading, humans tend to also adopt behaviors that are "hyper vigilant and particularly error prone," against those with different phenotypes.
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Enormous planet quickly orbiting a tiny, dying star
Thanks to a bevy of telescopes in space and on Earth — and even a pair of amateur astronomers in Arizona — astronomers have discovered a Jupiter-sized planet orbiting at breakneck speed around a distant white dwarf star.
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Factors inherent to obesity could increase vulnerability to COVID-19
Conditions related to obesity, including inflammation and leaky gut, leave the lungs of obese patients more susceptible to COVID-19 and may explain why they are more likely to die from the disease, scientists say. They suggest that drugs used to lower inflammation in the lungs could prove beneficial to obese patients with the disease.
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New way of controlling conductivity of materials at the nanoscale
A new discovery is an important step towards smaller, more advanced electronics. And maybe more environmentally friendly gadgets, too.
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1 in 10 COVID-19 patients return to hospital after being sent home from ER
A new study finds patients with low pulse oximetry readings or fever were more than three times as likely to require hospitalization after their initial discharge as compared to other COVID-19 patients.
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Minnesota moose will not be listed as federally endangered species
Minnesota and Midwestern moose will not be listed as a federally endangered species, putting to bed a petition that's been under review for five years.
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Researchers discover new photoactivation mechanism for polymer production
A team of researchers from North Carolina State University has demonstrated a way to use low-energy, visible light to produce polymer gel objects from pure monomer solutions. The work not only poses a potential solution to current challenges in producing these materials, it also sheds further light on the ways in which low energy photons can combine to produce high energy excited states.
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Colorado's famous aspens expected to decline due to climate change
Along three scenic drives through Colorado's Rocky Mountains in fall, tourists will see less of a brilliant golden tree in the next 100 years, researchers from North Carolina State University projected in a new study.
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Biologists developing global citizen network to monitor insect abundance
A U of A biologist is part of an international team of researchers building a volunteer network of citizen scientists to help monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies.
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A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, Ph.D. student under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel at the Biomaterials research group at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider. The previously unknown arachnids are native to the central cordillera, not far from the Pacific c
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Biologists developing global citizen network to monitor insect abundance
A U of A biologist is part of an international team of researchers building a volunteer network of citizen scientists to help monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies.
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Researchers demonstrate record speed with advanced spectroscopy technique
Researchers have developed an advanced spectrometer that can acquire data with exceptionally high speed. The new spectrometer could be useful for a variety of applications including remote sensing, real-time biological imaging and machine vision.
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A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, Ph.D. student under the supervision of Prof. Dr. Thomas Scheibel at the Biomaterials research group at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider. The previously unknown arachnids are native to the central cordillera, not far from the Pacific c
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Reforestation can only partially restore tropical soils
Tropical forest soils play a crucial role in providing vital ecosystem functions. They provide nutrients for plants, store carbon and regulate greenhouse gases, as well as storing and filtering water, and protection against erosion. Scientists at the University of Göttingen and the University of Minnesota in the U.S. have investigated how the properties and ecosystem functions of tropical soils ch
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Sunfleck use research needs appropriate experimental leaves
"All the roads of learning begin in the darkness and go out into the light." This quote is often attributed to Hippocrates and exhibits a double level of relevance in photosynthesis research. The use of light by plant leaves to drive photosynthesis is often studied in steady state environments, but most plant leaves are required to adjust to fluctuations in incident light every day. The research i
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Sunfleck use research needs appropriate experimental leaves
"All the roads of learning begin in the darkness and go out into the light." This quote is often attributed to Hippocrates and exhibits a double level of relevance in photosynthesis research. The use of light by plant leaves to drive photosynthesis is often studied in steady state environments, but most plant leaves are required to adjust to fluctuations in incident light every day. The research i
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West Coast Wildfire Smoke Hits NYC, Causing Weird-Looking Sunsets
Fire in the Sky Smoke from the devastating wildfires that have swept across the West Coast this past week has now reportedly drifted all the way across the United States — manifesting as as a haze and intense, reddish sunsets. A photo taken by a Futurism staffer last night in Queens shows the setting sun hanging in the sky like an eerie, reddish-orange dot. Expect Haze In a tweet highlighted by G
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Lex letter from London: braving the UK's 'Brovid' markets
There is some undoubted alignment between administrative competence and investor confidence
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Scientists identify gene family key to unlocking vertebrate evolution
New University of Colorado Boulder-led research finds that the traits that make vertebrates distinct from invertebrates were made possible by the emergence of a new set of genes 500 million years ago, documenting an important episode in evolution where new genes played a significant role in the evolution of novel traits in vertebrates.
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Reaching 90% PL quantum yield in 1-D metal halide by pressure-suppressed nonradiative loss
Low-dimensional perovskite-related metal halides have emerged as a new class of light-emitting materials with tunable broadband emission from self-trapped excitons (STEs). Although various types of low-dimensional structures have been developed, fundamental understating of the structure-property relationships for this class of materials is still very limited, and further improvement of their optic
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Climate crisis ages fish, amphibians and reptiles
Climatic conditions are changing at an unprecedented rate, affecting mainly fish, amphibians and reptiles, ectothermic animals that are unable to generate their own internal heat. With heat waves and rising temperatures, these organisms experience not only increased growth rates and heat stress, but also further aging.
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Controlled dynamics of colloidal rods
Colloidal particles have become increasingly important for research as vehicles of biochemical agents. In future, it will be possible to study their behavior much more efficiently than before by placing them on a magnetized chip. A research team from the University of Bayreuth reports on these new findings in the journal Nature Communications. The scientists have discovered that colloidal rods can
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Eksperter om klimaaftalen med Aalborg Portland: Det er langt fra nok
Aalborg Portland burde have forpligtet sig på at blive CO2-neutrale, lyder det fra Klimarådet.
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Scientists identify gene family key to unlocking vertebrate evolution
New University of Colorado Boulder-led research finds that the traits that make vertebrates distinct from invertebrates were made possible by the emergence of a new set of genes 500 million years ago, documenting an important episode in evolution where new genes played a significant role in the evolution of novel traits in vertebrates.
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Climate crisis ages fish, amphibians and reptiles
Climatic conditions are changing at an unprecedented rate, affecting mainly fish, amphibians and reptiles, ectothermic animals that are unable to generate their own internal heat. With heat waves and rising temperatures, these organisms experience not only increased growth rates and heat stress, but also further aging.
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Scientists update genome editing technology
Researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Pavlov University, ITMO University, and the University of Hamburg compared their developed carriers for delivery of genome editing (GE) tools with other available analogs. The review of current studies was published in the in the journal Biomaterials.
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Can life survive a star's death? Webb telescope can reveal the answer
When stars like our sun die, all that remains is an exposed core—a white dwarf. A planet orbiting a white dwarf presents a promising opportunity to determine if life can survive the death of its star, according to Cornell University researchers.
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NASA finds wind shear not letting up on Tropical Storm Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Vicky as it continued moving through the eastern North Atlantic Ocean fighting strong wind shear. Outside winds are pushing at the storm and weakening it.
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Scientists update genome editing technology
Researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) in collaboration with colleagues from the Pavlov University, ITMO University, and the University of Hamburg compared their developed carriers for delivery of genome editing (GE) tools with other available analogs. The review of current studies was published in the in the journal Biomaterials.
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NASA to film an Estée Lauder ad in space as the ISS opens for business
NASA is trying to turn the ageing International Space Station into a hub for commerce and has partnered with the likes of Estée Lauder and Adidas
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Researchers discover new photoactivation mechanism for polymer production
A team of researchers has demonstrated a way to use low-energy, visible light to produce polymer gel objects from pure monomer solutions. The work not only poses a potential solution to current challenges in producing these materials, it also sheds further light on the ways in which low energy photons can combine to produce high energy excited states.
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Colorado's famous aspens expected to decline due to climate change
Using computer modeling, researchers simulated how the distribution of quaking aspen, a native tree known for its brilliant yellow and orange foliage in fall and the sound of its trembling leaves, will change amid rising temperatures over the next 100 years.
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Fast calculation dials in better batteries
A simpler and more efficient way to predict the performance of batteries will lead to better batteries, according to Rice University engineers.
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The unintended consequence of becoming empathetic
Many people want to become more empathetic. But, these changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies.
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Mercury concentrations in Yukon River Fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
First of its kind research estimates potential releases of mercury from thawing permafrost in high and low emissions scenarios. The researchers predicts that by 2200, the mercury emitted into the atmosphere annually by thawing permafrost could compare with current global anthropogenic emissions under a high emissions scenario.
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Perfectionists may be more prone to helicopter parenting, study finds
The negative effects of over-parenting on children are well documented, but less is known about why certain people become helicopter parents. A new study suggests perfectionism is one driver.
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Nye krav om mundbind: Anbefalinger hviler på et spinkelt grundlag
Mundbind har en effekt, men det er meget usikkert, hvor stor den er.
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A new discovery in regenerative medicine
Researchers have made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
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Biologists developing global citizen network to monitor insect abundance
A University of Arkansas biologist is part of an international team of researchers is building a volunteer network of citizen scientists to help monitor the abundance of dragonflies and damselflies.
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Researchers demonstrate record speed with advanced spectroscopy technique
Researchers have developed an advanced spectrometer that can acquire data with exceptionally high speed. The new spectrometer could be useful for a variety of applications including remote sensing, real-time biological imaging and machine vision.
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A new species of spider
During a research stay in the highlands of Colombia conducted as part of her doctorate, Charlotte Hopfe, PhD student at the University of Bayreuth, has discovered and zoologically described a new species of spider.
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Transplanted Stem Cells Produce Sperm in Sterilized Livestock
The technique is designed for breeding genetically superior farm animals, but may have additional conservation and medical applications.
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The ISS Is About to Get Its First Commercial Airlock
Commercial Airlock A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is about to carry what will soon become the International Space Station's first privately-built airlock . The airlock, called Bishop and built by aerospace company Nanoracks, is designed to get payloads from inside the space station into the openness of space. The company has previously built standardized boxes for space-based experiments and tiny satel
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COVID-19 and Smoke Inhalation Symptoms are Hard to Tell Apart
Whether it's a cough or a sore throat, doctors in areas affected by the recent wildfires must determine whether symptoms are caused by the coronavirus, smoke, or even the flu — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The rhythm of the night: How music can help insomnia
Even in sleep, we partake in the becoming of the world," to utter the echo in Czesław Miłosz's poem "A Magic Mountain." Lying awake at night, I have sometimes found myself turning this idea over in my head. Like millions of slumberless souls, I have suffered with regular bouts of insomnia, which, in my case, were triggered by overworking, psychological pressure, and obsessive thoughts. Insomniac
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That Mushroom Motorcycle Jacket Will Never Go Out of Style
Leather goods made of fungi are versatile and sustainable, a new study finds.
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Scientists identify gene family key to unlocking vertebrate evolution
New University of Colorado Boulder-led research finds that the traits that make vertebrates distinct from invertebrates were made possible by the emergence of a new set of genes 500 million years ago, documenting an important episode in evolution where new genes played a significant role in the evolution of novel traits in vertebrates.
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Genes chart Vikings' spread across Europe
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02659-w Mapping the migration of the Vikings, and the world's smallest ultrasound device.
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Why do we blame individuals for economic crises? | Liene Ozoliņa
In 2008, the global financial crisis decimated Latvia. As unemployment skyrocketed, the government slashed public funding and raised taxes, while providing relief to the wealthy and large businesses — all without backlash or protest from struggling citizens. Sociologist Liene Ozoliņa examines how Latvian officials convinced their people to accept responsibility for the country's failing economy –
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Eli Lilly reports first, promising results for an antibody against COVID-19
More results expected soon from similar trials
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Excellent pencils for school, work, and beyond
Always have the right utensil ready to go. (Lewis Keegan via Unsplash /) When your kid's halloween giveaway pencil doesn't cut it and the cheapo colored pencil is too frustratingly faint for your mandala coloring, it's time to upgrade. We've gathered selections of high quality, highly durable, excellently pigmented options to tackle any job. Whether scribbling your first multiplication facts or s
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Letter: Frank Barnaby obituary
Four decades ago, when I was a researcher getting to grips with the complexities of the politics and physics of plutonium for my PhD, I contacted Frank Barnaby , then director of the peace research organisation Sipri in Stockholm. With characteristic good humour he found time in his busy schedule to share his knowledge. His life's work has made our planet a better and safer place, and I will be a
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Can pumping up cold water from deep within the ocean halt coral bleaching?
The risk of severe coral bleaching—a condition in which corals lose their symbiotic algae, called zooxanthellae—is five times more frequent today than it was forty years ago. Coral bleaching is a direct result of global warming, where rising temperatures cause marine heat waves, which place stress on the living coral animals, as well as the photosynthetic algae on which they depend for energy. Thi
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Could a Car-Sonar Perimeter Shield Police From an Ambush?
All-new 2020 Police Interceptor Utility, with standard hybrid all-wheel-drive powertrain, will save police agencies and taxpayers as much as $5,700 per vehicle annually in fuel costs* over current Police Interceptor Utility equipped with 3.7-liter gas engine One question after the ambush shooting of two California cops sitting in their police car Saturday: How many ways could it have been avoided
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The list of retracted COVID-19 papers is up to 33
To the list of COVID-19 papers that have been retracted so far, add this: The Korean Journal of Anesthesiology has retracted an article it published last month on ventilating COVID patients because it was nearly identical to one that had appeared in a different journal three months earlier. The offending article, "Noninvasive versus invasive ventilation: … Continue reading
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Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?
Results from studies in both experimental and theoretical physics may help to improve antibacterial surfaces. The research work was recently published in the journal Nanoscale.
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Researchers ask, how sustainable is your toothbrush?
Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have examined the sustainability of different models of the most commonly used oral health product—the toothbrush—to ascertain which is best for the planet and associated human health.
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Mercury concentrations in Yukon river fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
The concentration of mercury in the fish in Alaska's Yukon River may exceed the EPA's human health criterion by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming are not constrained, according to scientific research funded in part by NASA. This first of its kind research estimates potential releases of mercury from thawing permafrost under high and low carbon emissions scenarios. The rese
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Can pumping up cold water from deep within the ocean halt coral bleaching?
The risk of severe coral bleaching—a condition in which corals lose their symbiotic algae, called zooxanthellae—is five times more frequent today than it was forty years ago. Coral bleaching is a direct result of global warming, where rising temperatures cause marine heat waves, which place stress on the living coral animals, as well as the photosynthetic algae on which they depend for energy. Thi
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Replicating a genome starts with a twist, a pinch, and a bit of a dance
The most basic activity of a living thing is to turn one copy of its genome into two copies, crafting one cell into two. That replication event begins with a set of proteins—the Origin of Replication Complex (ORC). And, with some cancers and developmental diseases linked to ORC proteins, structural biologists need to see how the complex works so they can understand how it might go wrong. Cold Spri
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The best weighted vests for your next tough workout
Up your intensity. (Natalie Runnerstrom via Unsplash /) Ready to take your workout to the next level? Weighted vests could be the answer. These wearable exercise tools contain small weights, which add an extra layer of effort to your strength training routine. Simply slip on the vest as you go about your usual activities—whether that's a casual walk in the park or an intense cardio session—and yo
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Controlled dynamics of colloidal rods
Colloidal particles have become increasingly important for research as vehicles of biochemical agents. In future, it will be possible to study their behaviour much more efficiently than before by placing them on a magnetised chip. A research team from the University of Bayreuth has discovered that colloidal rods can be moved on a chip quickly, precisely, and in different directions. A pre-programm
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Can life survive a star's death? Webb telescope can reveal the answer
When stars like our sun die, all that remains is an exposed core – a white dwarf. A planet orbiting a white dwarf presents a promising opportunity to determine if life can survive the death of its star, according to Cornell University researchers.
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Multi-institutional collaborative effort to create a cell map of the human heart
Researchers from the? Masonic Medical Research Institute (MMRI), the Precision Cardiology Lab (PCL) of the Broad Institute at MIT and Harvard, Bayer USA, Massachusetts General Hospital, and University of Pennsylvania collaborated to uncover some pressing questions about the biology of the heart. While understanding the mechanisms causal to human heart disease remain active areas of research for ma
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NASA finds wind shear not letting up on Tropical Storm Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Vicky as it continued moving through the eastern North Atlantic Ocean fighting strong wind shear. Outside winds are pushing at the storm and weakening it.
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Women hold prominent roles, publish more in 'open science' vs. 'reproducibility' model
An international group of researchers examined the two paths that scientists are following to improve science: the movement for reproducibility and the movement for open science. They have very distinct cultures, with two distinct literatures produced by two groups of researchers with little crossover. Their investigation also suggests that one of the movements — open science — promotes greater
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The accident preventers
Before autonomous vehicles participate in road traffic, they must demonstrate conclusively that they do not pose a danger to others. New software developed at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) prevents accidents by predicting different variants of a traffic situation every millisecond.
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Accurate labels like 'aerosol' or 'chemicals' increase perceived risks of e-cigarette use
Researchers at George Mason University found that students perceived e-cigarette emissions to be more harmful when accurate labels such as 'chemicals' and 'aerosols' were used to describe emissions, compared to tobacco industry coined jargon like 'vapor.' Students who viewed questions about 'aerosol' or 'chemical' were more likely to perceive secondhand exposure to e-cigarettes to be 'harmful/very
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Blonde Scandinavians or well-travelled Southern Europeans? Research busts myths of Vikings
Our notion of the Scandinavian Viking very likely stems from films rather than history. In reality, their genome contains lots of genes from Southern and Eastern Europe, which also implies that they had dark rather than blonde hair. And within the Scandinavian borders, the Vikings did not really mix genetically; instead, they travelled abroad on plundering raids. This is revealed by new research f
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Eyeglasses and COVID-19
Researchers in this observational study examined the association between wearing eyeglasses daily and susceptibility to COVID-19.
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Machine learning models identify kids at risk of lead poisoning
Machine learning can help public health officials identify children most at risk of lead poisoning, enabling them to concentrate their limited resources on preventing poisonings rather than remediating homes only after a child suffers elevated blood lead levels, a new study shows.
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Stanford team pinpoints brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences
Stanford scientists identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality.
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A white dwarf's surprise planetary companion
For the first time, an intact, giant exoplanet has been discovered orbiting close to a white dwarf star. This discovery shows that it is possible for Jupiter-sized planets to survive their star's demise and settle into close orbits around the remaining stellar ember, near the habitable zone. This foretells one possible future for our own Solar System when the Sun ages into a white dwarf.
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Adverse pregnancy outcomes, risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women
This observational study looked at whether adverse pregnancy outcomes such as preterm delivery, gestational diabetes and low birth weight are associated with an increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women, independent of traditional risk factors.
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Breast cancer surgery type, quality of life among younger women
Researchers investigated differences in quality of life and other outcomes (including physical functioning, body image, sexual health, anxiety and depressive symptoms) by type of breast cancer surgery (such as mastectomy or breast conserving surgery) in women 40 and younger.
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Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
The eyes of the fruit fly are covered by a thin and transparent coating with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. Researchers from the University of Geneva and Lausanne discovered that the coating only consists of two ingredients: retinin and corneal wax. They succeeded in artificially reproducing the phenomenon on different kinds of surface. This process, which is very inexpensive and is ba
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Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations.
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Building bridges: PARP enzymes bring broken DNA together
St. Jude researchers capture the structure of PARP enzymes at work, leading to a new understanding of DNA repair that may aid cancer treatments targeting the process.
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KU astronomer helps confirm first-ever planet found orbiting white dwarf
A University of Kansas astronomer played a key role on the team that today announced the first-ever discovery of a planet orbiting a white dwarf. The finding, published in Nature, shows the likely presence of a Jupiter-sized planet, named WD 1856 b, orbiting the smaller star remnant every 34 hours.
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Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change
New research from the University of Washington shows that a wide variety of marine animals — from vertebrates to crustaceans to mollusks — already inhabit the maximum range of breathable ocean that their physiology will allow. The findings provide a warning about climate change: Since warmer waters will harbor less oxygen, some stretches of ocean that are breathable today for a given species may
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A new discovery in regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Monash University and Duke-NUS researchers have made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
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Research reveals an enormous planet quickly orbiting a tiny, dying star
Thanks to a bevy of telescopes in space and on Earth — and even a pair of amateur astronomers in Arizona — a University of Wisconsin-Madison astronomer and his colleagues have discovered a Jupiter-sized planet orbiting at breakneck speed around a distant white dwarf star.
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How Dantu Blood Group protects against malaria – and how all humans could benefit
The secret of how the Dantu genetic blood variant helps to protect against malaria has been revealed for the first time by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, the University of Cambridge and the KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Kenya. The team found that red blood cells in people with the rare Dantu blood variant have a higher surface tension that prevents them from being invaded
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World's largest DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors – the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond. Now cutting-edge DNA sequencing of more than 400 Viking skeletons from archaeological sites scattered across Europe and Greenland will rewrite the history books.
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Temple researchers discover new path to neuron regeneration after spinal cord injury
The astrocytic glial cell has the unique ability to form scar tissue around damaged neurons. The presence of scar tissue is associated with inhibitory effects on the regrowth of mature neurons that are damaged by spinal cord injury. Recent evidence suggests, however, that these inhibitory effects are reversible, and in new work, Temple and Penn scientists show that astrocytic glial cells can in fa
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Replicating a genome starts with a twist, a pinch, and a bit of a dance
The most basic activity of a living thing is to turn one copy of its genome into two copies, crafting one cell into two. That replication event begins with a set of proteins—the Origin of Replication Complex (ORC). And, with some cancers and developmental diseases linked to ORC proteins, structural biologists need to see how the complex works so they can understand how it might go wrong. Cold Spri
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Device could help detect signs of extraterrestrial life
Although Earth is uniquely situated in the solar system to support creatures that call it home, different forms of life could have once existed, or might still exist, on other planets. But finding traces of past or current lifeforms on other worlds is challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have developed a fully automated microchip electrophoresis analyzer that, when
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Home of 'Asian unicorn' becomes nature reserve in Vietnam
Research by the University of Leeds has helped secure the highest government protection for internationally-important Vietnamese forests.
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NASA observes Hurricane Sally making early morning landfall in Alabama
NASA's Aqua satellite and the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided views of the strength, extent and rainfall potential as Hurricane Sally was making landfall during the morning hours of Sept. 16.
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Physicists make electrical nanolasers even smaller
Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and King's College London cleared the obstacle that had prevented the creation of electrically driven nanolasers for integrated circuits. The approach, reported in a recent paper in Nanophotonics, enables coherent light source design on the scale not only hundreds of times smaller than the thickness of a human hair but even smaller th
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Rapid 3-D printing with visible light
3-D printing has driven innovations in fields ranging from art to aerospace to medicine. However, the high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light used in most 3-D printers to cure liquid resins into solid objects limits the technique's applications. Visible-light curing, which would be more appropriate for some uses, such as tissue engineering and soft robotics, is slow. Now, researchers reporting in ACS C
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Home of 'Asian unicorn' becomes nature reserve in Vietnam
Research by the University of Leeds has helped secure the highest government protection for internationally-important Vietnamese forests.
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Blonde skandinaver eller berejste sydeuropæere? Ny forskning gør op med vikinger-myter
Ny forskning fra Københavns Universitet viser, at vikingerne havde mange gener fra Syd- og Østeuropa…
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Dark hair was common among Vikings, genetic study confirms
Research reveals Vikings were genetically diverse group and not purely Scandinavian They may have had a reputation for trade, braids and fearsome raids, but the Vikings were far from a single group of flaxen-haired, sea-faring Scandinavians. A genetic study of Viking-age human remains has not only confirmed that Vikings from different parts of Scandinavia set sail for different parts of the world
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Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others. In many cases, these changes, especially service cuts, have disproportionately affected areas where lower-income and more vulnerable groups live, according to a new study from McGill Univers
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How cigarette butts can be recycled into bricks: A step-by-step plan
Researchers have shown how industries could work together to recycle cigarette butts into bricks, in a step-by-step implementation plan for saving energy and solving a global littering problem.
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Siberia's permafrost erosion has been worsening for years
The Arctic is warming faster than any other region on the planet. As a result, permafrost that is thousands of years old is now being lost to erosion. As measurements gathered on the Lena River by AWI experts show, the scale of erosion is alarming: every year, roughly 15 meters of the riverbanks crumble away. In addition, the carbon stored in the permafrost could worsen the greenhouse effect.
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COVID-19 virus uses heparan sulfate to get inside cells
Researchers discovered that the SARS-CoV-2 virus can't grab hold of cell receptor ACE2 without a carbohydrate called heparan sulfate, which is also found on lung cell surfaces — disrupting that interaction with a repurposed drug may help treat COVID-19.
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'Viking' was a job description, not a matter of heredity, massive ancient DNA study shows
Study reveals family histories of black-haired Vikings who set forth—and died—far from home
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The superconducting quasicharge qubit
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2687-9 A fundamental superconducting qubit is introduced: 'blochnium' is dual to the transmon, relies on a circuit element called hyperinductance, and its fundamental physical variable is the quasicharge of the Josephson junction.
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Reverse and forward engineering of Drosophila corneal nanocoatings
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2707-9 The building blocks of the nanostructures observed on Drosophila corneas are determined, and then used to create artificial nanostructures with anti-reflective and anti-adhesive properties.
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Red blood cell tension protects against severe malaria in the Dantu blood group
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2726-6 The rare blood group Dantu is known to protect against severe malaria, and a mechanism is proposed here: Dantu red blood cells have a high membrane tension that prevents invasion by malaria parasites.
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A giant planet candidate transiting a white dwarf
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2713-y A giant planet candidate roughly the size of Jupiter but more than 14 times as massive is observed by TESS and other instruments to be transiting the white dwarf star WD 1856+534.
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Evolution of the endothelin pathway drove neural crest cell diversification
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2720-z CRISPR–Cas9-mediated disruption of the endothelin-signalling pathway in the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus and the frog Xenopus laevis were used to delineate ancient and lineage-specific roles of endothelin signalling and provide insights into vertebrate evolution.
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Array programming with NumPy
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2649-2 NumPy is the primary array programming library for Python; here its fundamental concepts are reviewed and its evolution into a flexible interoperability layer between increasingly specialized computational libraries is discussed.
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Slow compression of crystalline ice at low temperature
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2697-7
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Plasmonic enhancement of stability and brightness in organic light-emitting devices
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2684-z Plasmonic effects in organic light-emitting devices, which are normally considered a source of energy loss, are harnessed to enhance the stability of these devices while maintaining operational efficiency.
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Homeostatic mini-intestines through scaffold-guided organoid morphogenesis
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2724-8 Miniature gut tubes grown in vitro from mouse intestinal stem cells are perfusable, can be colonized with microorganisms and exhibit a similar arrangement and diversity of specialized cell types to intestines in vivo.
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The brain rhythms that detach us from reality
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02505-z The rhythmic activity of a single layer of neurons has now been shown to cause dissociation — an experience involving a feeling of disconnection from the surrounding world.
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Prokaryotic viperins produce diverse antiviral molecules
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2762-2
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Deep posteromedial cortical rhythm in dissociation
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2731-9 Dissociative states in mouse and human brains are traced to low-frequency rhythmic neural activity—with distinct molecular, cellular and physiological properties—in the deep retrosplenial cortex and the posteromedial cortex.
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Population genomics of the Viking world
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2688-8 Ancient DNA analyses reveal that Viking Age migrations from Scandinavia resulted in differential influxes of ancestry to different parts of Europe, and the increased presence of non-local ancestry within Scandinavia.
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Planet discovered transiting a dead star
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02555-3 Evidence has been found of a planet circling the smouldering remains of a dead star in a tight orbit. The discovery raises the question of how the planet survived the star's death throes — and whether other planets also orbit the remains.
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Fast coronavirus tests: what they can and can't do
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02661-2 Rapid antigen tests are designed to tell in a few minutes whether someone is infectious. Will they be game changers?
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Reprogramming roadmap reveals route to human induced trophoblast stem cells
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2734-6 Single-cell transcriptomics roadmap of human dermal fibroblasts reprogrammed to primed and naive pluripotency reveals a route for the direct reprogramming of somatic cells into induced trophoblast stem cells.
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Metabolic trait diversity shapes marine biogeography
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2721-y A tight coupling between metabolic rate, efficacy of oxygen supply and the temperature sensitivities of marine animals predicts a variety of geographical niches that better aligns with the distributions of species than models of either temperature or oxygen alone.
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A submicrometre silicon-on-insulator resonator for ultrasound detection
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2685-y The widely available silicon-on-insulator technology is used to develop a miniaturized ultrasound detector, which is 200 times smaller than the wavelengths of sound that it can detect.
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Bridging of DNA breaks activates PARP2–HPF1 to modify chromatin
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2725-7 The PARP2–HPF1 histone-modifying complex bridges two nucleosomes to align broken DNA ends for ligation, initiating conformational changes that activate PARP2 and enable DNA damage repair.
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Plasticity of ether lipids promotes ferroptosis susceptibility and evasion
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2732-8 The cellular organelles peroxisomes contribute to the sensitivity of cells to ferroptosis by synthesizing polyunsaturated ether phospholipids, and changes in the abundances of these lipids are associated with altered sensitivity to ferroptosis during cell-state transitions.
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Stimulus-specific hypothalamic encoding of a persistent defensive state
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2728-4 Persistent neural activity in the mouse hypothalamus encodes aversive emotional states related to specific threatening stimuli.
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New Planet Found Orbiting a Dead Star
For the first time, astronomers have discovered a planet that survived the death throes of its star. white-dwarf-plane_croppedt.jpg Image credits: AleksandrMorrisovich/ Shutterstock Space Wednesday, September 16, 2020 – 11:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — For the first time, an intact world may have been discovered around a white dwarf, suggesting that even after typical stars
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Climate change and forest management have both fueled today's epic Western wildfires
What is driving the wildfires that are ravaging California, Oregon and Washington? President Trump and state officials have offered sharply different views.
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Dna avslöjar vikingarnas resor
En ny stor forskningsstudie visar hur skandinaver erövrade delar av Europa under vikingatiden, från slutet av 700-talet till 1050. Men resultaten visar också hur människor utifrån strömmade in i Skandinavien under samma period.
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Head of Russian Space Program Says Venus Is a "Russian Planet"
Dibs! Russian space agency chief Dmitry Rogozin called Venus a "Russian planet" on Tuesday at an industry exhibition taking place in Moscow. The unusual comment followed the recent high-profile discovery of significant sources of phosphine gas in the planet's atmosphere, a possible sign of life . "Our country was the first and only one to successfully land on Venus," Rogozin said, as quoted by Th
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Waste from the food chain could hold the clue to treating eye infections worldwide
A new laboratory model that can be used to test treatments for preventing and curing eye infections caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses, while also reducing the number of animals used in medical research, has been developed by researchers at the University of Sheffield.
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Marine animals live where ocean is most breathable, ranges may shrink with climate change
As oceans warm due to climate change, scientists are trying to predict how marine animals—from backboned fish to spineless jellyfish—will react. Laboratory experiments indicate that many could theoretically tolerate temperatures far higher than what they encounter today. But these studies don't mean that marine animals can maintain their current ranges in warmer oceans, according to Curtis Deutsch
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Research reveals an enormous planet quickly orbiting a tiny, dying star
Thanks to a bevy of telescopes in space and on Earth—and even a pair of amateur astronomers in Arizona—a University of Wisconsin-Madison astronomer and his colleagues have discovered a Jupiter-sized planet orbiting at breakneck speed around a distant white dwarf star. The system, about 80 light years away, violates all common conventions about stars and planets. The white dwarf is the remnant of a
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Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
The eyes of many insects, including the fruit fly, are covered by a thin, transparent coating made up of tiny protuberances with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. An article published in the journal Nature reveals the secrets of how this nano-coating is made.
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A new discovery in pluripotent stem cells and induced regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Duke-NUS Medical School and Monash University researchers has made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
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Social mobility in England is a 'postcode lottery'
A major new study by the UCL Center for Education Policy and Equalizing Opportunities (CEPEO) with the Institute of Fiscal Studies, has revealed social mobility is "postcode lottery" for young adults in England, highlighting significant differences in career opportunities.
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The best thing for back pain is actually more movement
Stretching and strengthening your back can prevent pain later. (Kike Vega/Unsplash/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. Roughly 80 percent of Americans have back pain at some point in their lives. Historically, ma
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A quantum thermometer for measuring ultra-cold temperatures
In everyday life, measuring temperature is pretty straightforward. But in the quantum world, which deals with the super small and the ultra-cold, determining how hot or cold something is starts to get more challenging. Now, in a collaboration between the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), University College Dublin and Trinity College Dublin, researchers have de
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Mercury concentrations in Yukon river fish could surpass EPA criterion by 2050
The concentration of mercury in the fish in Alaska's Yukon River may exceed the EPA's human health criterion by 2050 if greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming are not constrained, according to scientific research funded in part by NASA
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Can pumping up cold water from deep within the ocean halt coral bleaching?
Rising ocean temperatures cause marine heat waves, which place stress on living coral animals, as well as the photosynthetic algae on which they depend for energy. A new study led by Yvonne Sawall, assistant scientist at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), is showing potential for the use of artificial upwelling (AU)–or the application of cooler, deep water–as a way to mitigate the t
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Viral load predicts mortality rate in hospitalized patients with cancer and COVID-19
Higher viral loads are associated with a greater risk of death among cancer and non-cancer patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), researchers report September 15 in the journal Cancer Cell. Among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, those with hematologic malignancies who had recently been treated for cancer had the highest levels of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviru
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Nicotine vapour more rewarding for adolescents than adults
University of Guelph researchers are the first to discover that adolescents react differently to e-cigarette vapour than adults.
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MTU and Argonne engineers improve signal processing for small fiber optic cables
Tiny circuits can go the distance. Researchers at Michigan Tech have mapped a noise-reducing magneto-optical response that occurs in fiber-optic communications, opening the door for new materials technologies.
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Replicating a genome starts with a twist, a pinch, and a bit of a dance
DNA replication begins with a set of proteins–the Origin of Replication Complex (ORC). Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) researchers published images of the human ORC in exquisite detail, showing how it changes shapes in dramatic ways as it assembles around DNA.
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How vitamin E acetate might injure vapers' lungs
E-cigarette, or vaping, associated lung injury (EVALI) has sickened thousands of people, most under the age of 35. Studies have linked vitamin E acetate, an oily substance in some vaping liquids, to the disorder. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Chemical Research in Toxicology have uncovered a possible mechanism: Vitamin E acetate could increase the fluidity of lung surfactant, causing the surfa
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Rapid 3D printing with visible light
3D printing has driven innovations in fields ranging from art to aerospace to medicine. However, the high-energy ultraviolet (UV) light used in most 3D printers to cure liquid resins into solid objects limits the technique's applications. Visible-light curing, which would be more appropriate for some uses, such as tissue engineering and soft robotics, is slow. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Cen
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Potential COVID-19 drug azithromycin may increase risk for cardiac events
Azithromycin — a commonly-prescribed antibiotic — also is being investigated as a potential treatment for COVID-19. Researchers have found that azithromycin by itself is not associated with an increase in cardiac events; however, if the drug is taken with certain other drugs that affect the electrical functioning of the heart, then cardiac events increased.
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Vulnerable groups affected by public transit cuts amid pandemic
In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, public transport agencies across North America have made significant adjustments to services, including cutting trip frequency in many areas while increasing it in others. In many cases, these changes, especially service cuts, have disproportionately affected areas where lower-income and more vulnerable groups live, according to a new study from McGill Univers
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Waste from the food chain could hold the clue to treating eye infections worldwide
A new laboratory model that can be used to test treatments for preventing and curing eye infections caused by fungi, bacteria and viruses, while also reducing the number of animals used in medical research, has been developed by researchers at the University of Sheffield.
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A new discovery in pluripotent stem cells and induced regenerative medicine
An international collaboration involving Duke-NUS Medical School and Monash University researchers has made an unexpected world-first stem cell discovery that may lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy.
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Opdater historiebøgerne: DNA-analyser viser en helt ny fortælling om vikingerne
En omfattende analyse af vikingegenomer foretaget af Eske Willerslev og Co. viser, at ikke alle vikinger var skandinaver, og der skete en stor genetisk tilførsel til Skandinavien fra Asien og det sydlige Europa længe inden vikingetiden.
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Survey: Half of U.S. job seekers on the hunt because of coronavirus
As of August 2020, United States' unemployment rate remains at 8.4 percent, more than double February 2020's numbers. A new survey, commissioned by Amazon, found that roughly half of today's job seekers are looking as a result of coronavirus. Amazon released survey highlights in advance of its Career Day event, where it will seek to fill some of its 33,000 open corporate and tech positions. The U
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Why San Francisco felt like the set of a sci-fi flick
On Sept. 9, many West Coast residents looked out their windows and witnessed a post-apocalyptic landscape: silhouetted cars, buildings and people bathed in an overpowering orange light that looked like a jacked-up sunset.
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Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a "host shift" of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut trees and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica. The r
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New Video Shows Inside of NASA Contractor's Proposed Lunar Lander
Lander Model Alabama-based military contractor Dynetics has revealed a full-scale model of its human landing system (HLS), designed to return NASA astronauts to the Moon as early as 2024 as part of the agency's Artemis program. The model, about the same size as NASA's Apollo moon lander, is meant to provide engineers with insight into how astronauts will interact with it during actual missions to
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Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a "host shift" of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut trees and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica. The r
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Migration shapes patterns of disease transmission
Long-distance animal migrations can trigger relapse of dormant infections, influencing when and where infection risk peaks, according to a new paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The findings demonstrate that relapse can increase or decrease infection levels in migratory species, depending how deadly the disease is, and where in the migratory range it can be transmitted. As migratory anim
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New method for combating antibiotic resistance in microbes
Bacteria in biofilms are 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics, disinfectants, mechanical treatment, and other types of stress. A chemist from RUDN University suggested a method to prevent the formation of biofilms and reduce the resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial medications. This might help increase the efficiency of antibacterial treatment in the food industry, medicine, and agricultur
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Novel photoresist enables 3-D printing of smallest porous structures
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University have developed a photoresist for two-photon microprinting. It has now been used for the first time to produce three-dimensional polymer microstructures with cavities in the nano range. In Advanced Materials, the scientists report how porosity can be controlled during printing and how this affects light scattering prop
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Migration shapes patterns of disease transmission
Long-distance animal migrations can trigger relapse of dormant infections, influencing when and where infection risk peaks, according to a new paper in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The findings demonstrate that relapse can increase or decrease infection levels in migratory species, depending how deadly the disease is, and where in the migratory range it can be transmitted. As migratory anim
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New method for combating antibiotic resistance in microbes
Bacteria in biofilms are 1,000 times more resistant to antibiotics, disinfectants, mechanical treatment, and other types of stress. A chemist from RUDN University suggested a method to prevent the formation of biofilms and reduce the resistance of bacteria to antimicrobial medications. This might help increase the efficiency of antibacterial treatment in the food industry, medicine, and agricultur
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Molecular 'dances' determine how liquids take up heat
Scientists have uncovered a link between the microscopic movements of particles in a liquid and its ability to absorb heat.
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Device could help detect signs of extraterrestrial life
Although Earth is uniquely situated in the solar system to support creatures that call it home, different forms of life could have once existed, or might still exist, on other planets. But finding traces of past or current lifeforms on other worlds is challenging. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have developed a fully automated microchip electrophoresis analyzer that, when
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One in 10 older dental patients inappropriately prescribed opioids
A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago and the University of Pittsburgh suggests that a significant proportion of older patients receiving opioids at dental visits also use psychotropic medications — a potentially harmful combination. Their findings are published in the journal Pharmacotherapy.
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NASA observes Hurricane Sally making early morning landfall in Alabama
NASA's Aqua satellite and the NASA-NOAA Suomi NPP satellite provided views of the strength, extent and rainfall potential as Hurricane Sally was making landfall during the morning hours of Sept. 16.
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Physicists make electrical nanolasers even smaller
Researchers cleared the obstacle that had prevented the creation of electrically driven nanolasers for integrated circuits. The approach enables coherent light source design on the scale not only hundreds of times smaller than the thickness of a human hair but even smaller than the wavelength of light emitted by the laser. This lays the foundation for ultrafast optical data transfer in the manycor
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Extent of India's COVID nudge campaign revealed
The Government of India's use of nudge theory in the first three months of the pandemic helped to tackle the virus on numerous fronts, a new study suggests.
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Researchers ask: how sustainable is your toothbrush?
Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have examined the sustainability of different models of the most commonly used oral health product – the toothbrush – to ascertain which is best for the planet and associated human health.
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Predicting therapeutic response in depressed teen girls
The risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD) surges during adolescence-particularly for girls. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment, but only about half of girls diagnosed with depression show significant improvement. Researchers at Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital have now identified a non-invasive test of brain function that could help predict who
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Siberia's permafrost erosion has been worsening for years
The Arctic is warming faster than any other region on the planet. As a result, permafrost that is thousands of years old is now being lost to erosion. As measurements gathered on the Lena River by AWI experts show, the scale of erosion is alarming.
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Collaboration yields promising material for quantum computing
Researchers at the Microsoft Quantum Materials Lab and the University of Copenhagen, working closely together, have succeeded in realizing an important and promising material for use in a future quantum computer. For this end, the researchers have to create materials that hold the delicate quantum information and protect it from decoherence.
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Solar cycle 25 has begun
In the past one and a half years, the sun has been rather dull: hardly a sunspot covered its surface, hardly a solar flare hurled radiation and particles into space. As observational data now show, for the last nine months solar activity has been slowly picking up again. Already in December 2019, our star passed its activity minimum, an event which occurs approximately every eleven years. This con
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Analyzing mol­e­c­u­lar struc­tures in more de­tail
Chemistry and structural biology use the standard methods of NMR spectroscopy (NMR = nuclear magnetic resonance) to examine the structure of molecules including large molecules like proteins in solution. The NMR active nuclei, such as hydrogen atoms, are excited using radiofrequency pulses in spectrometers with strong magnetic fields. The different environments of the nuclei can be detected and co
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Liquid water at 170 degrees Celsius: X-ray laser reveals anomalous dynamics at ultra-fast heating
Using the X-ray laser European XFEL, a research team has investigated how water heats up under extreme conditions. In the process, the scientists were able to observe water that remained liquid even at temperatures of more than 170 degrees Celsius. The investigation revealed an anomalous dynamic behavior of water under these conditions. The results of the study, which are published in the Proceedi
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Scientist searches for stellar phosphorus to find potentially habitable exoplanets
A Southwest Research Institute scientist has identified stellar phosphorus as a probable marker in narrowing the search for life in the cosmos. She has developed techniques to identify stars likely to host exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets, and proposes that upcoming studies target stellar phosphorus to find systems with the greatest probability for hosting life a
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Research opens the way to new drugs
Research by a team at Te Herenga Waka–Victoria University of Wellington's School of Biological Sciences dispels the belief that on the assembly line of enzymes there is a "proof-reading" mechanism that ensures molecules are put together in a certain way.
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Image: Spalte Glacier breaks up
This series of four Copernicus Sentinel-2 images captured between 29 June and 24 July 2020, shows a segment of the largest ice shelf in the Arctic break up and shatter into a flotilla of small icebergs totalling an area of around 125 sq km.
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Reviewing the quantum material 'engine room'
An Australian collaboration reviews the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), one of the most fascinating and important recent discoveries in condensed-matter physics. QAHE allows zero-resistance electrical 'edge paths' in emerging quantum materials such as topological insulators, opening great potential for ultra-low energy electronics.
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Ancient volcanoes once boosted ocean carbon, but humans are now far outpacing them
A new study of an ancient period that is considered the closest natural analog to the era of modern human carbon emissions has found that massive volcanism sent great waves of carbon into the oceans over thousands of years — but that nature did not come close to matching what humans are doing today.
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Research opens the way to new drugs
Research by a team at Te Herenga Waka–Victoria University of Wellington's School of Biological Sciences dispels the belief that on the assembly line of enzymes there is a "proof-reading" mechanism that ensures molecules are put together in a certain way.
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Great progress for electronic gadgets of the future
Researchers at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) have found a completely new method to check the electronic properties of oxide materials. This opens the door to even tinier components and perhaps more sustainable electronics.
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Image: Making waves in space
The International Space Station is an exciting place for experiments. This one in particular was making waves in space. Called Fluidics, the experiment studies fluid dynamics in microgravity and recently performed another successful round of science on board the Space Station.
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Sharp attention explains why the early bird gets the worm
Many of the characteristics related to auditory attention in birds match those of humans, according to a study from the University at Buffalo.
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Sharp attention explains why the early bird gets the worm
Many of the characteristics related to auditory attention in birds match those of humans, according to a study from the University at Buffalo.
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Neolithic paintings in Spain reveal art was social activity for both sexes
Study of fingerprints left at Los Machos site thousands of years ago reveal age and sex of artists One day, perhaps a little over 7,000 years ago, a man in his 30s and a younger companion dipped their fingers in ochre pigment and set about daubing the walls of a shallow cave in southern Spain with anthropomorphic, circular and geometric designs. Today, thanks to the fingerprints they left behind
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Hurricane Sally hits US Gulf Coast
Hurricane Sally barrelled into the US Gulf Coast early Wednesday, with forecasts of drenching rains that could provoke "historic" and potentially deadly flash floods.
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Women more prone to depression in countries with low gender equality rankings
Overall, the presence of depressive symptoms is highly dependent on cultural congruence, whereas self-esteem is not.
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Metalloxocubes: A new class of neutral Co13O8 clusters with cubic aromaticity
Utilizing the customized deep ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry (DUV-LIMS) technique which takes advantage of efficient photoionization for neutral metal clusters, the authors observe the reaction of cobalt clusters with oxygen and find a stable Co13O8 cluster. Theoretical calculations reveal the global lowest energy structure with a unique cubic structure akin to perovskite, named as
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Pollution exposure linked to stroke risk in people with common heart rhythm disorder
People with atrial fibrillation who are exposed to greater levels of pollution have a higher risk of stroke than their peers who live with less pollution.
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Why do hospital germs bind more strongly to certain surfaces than to others?
Multiresistant bacteria are a serious problem in hospital and healthcare environments. By forming a biofilm, these pathogens can colonize door handles and light switches and their presence on medical implants can lead to serious cases of post-operative infection. A team of physicists at Saarland University has now shown why hospital germs adhere strongly to surfaces from which water simply rolls o
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Scientists look into tropopause to find early signals of persistent strong rainfall
10 days before the peak rainfall, the joint action of the South Asia high and the Okhotsk Sea blocking high compresses the anomaly cold air between the two highs, and forms a narrow and steady cold air transport channel on the inclined isentropic surface.
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Liquid water at 170 degrees Celsius
Using the X-ray laser European XFEL, a research team has investigated how water heats up under extreme conditions. In the process, the scientists were able to observe water that remained liquid even at temperatures of more than 170 degrees Celsius. The investigation revealed an anomalous dynamic behaviour of water, which is of fundamental importance for investigations of sensitive samples using X-
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Microsoft and University of Copenhagen collaboration yields promising material for quantum computing
Researchers at the Microsoft Quantum Materials Lab and the University of Copenhagen, working closely together, have succeeded in realizing an important and promising material for use in a future quantum computer. For this end, the researchers have to create materials that hold the delicate quantum information and protect it from decoherence.
7h
Novel photoresist enables 3D printing of smallest porous structures
Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University have developed a photoresist for two-photon microprinting. It has now been used for the first time to produce three-dimensional polymer microstructures with cavities in the nano range. In Advanced Materials, the scientists involved in the joint Cluster of Excellence 3D Matter Made to Order report how porosity can be c
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SwRI scientist searches for stellar phosphorus to find potentially habitable exoplanets
SAN ANTONIO — Sept. 16, 2020 — A Southwest Research Institute scientist has identified stellar phosphorus as a probable marker in narrowing the search for life in the cosmos. She has developed techniques to identify stars likely to host exoplanets, based on the composition of stars known to have planets, and proposes that upcoming studies target stellar phosphorus to find systems with the greate
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Systematic parental training helps the well-being of preschool children with ADHD
Research findings from Aarhus University and the Central Denmark Region's Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Centre show that quality of life is poorer for preschool children with ADHD compared to children from the control population. But the children's quality of life can be significantly improved using treatment without medication.
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New targets for melanoma treatment
A collaborative study led by Monash University's Biomedicine Discovery Institute and the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Research Institute (ONJCRI) has uncovered new markers (HLA-associated peptides) that are uniquely present on melanoma tumours and could pave the way for therapeutic vaccines to be developed in the fight against melanoma.
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Ancient DNA is revealing the genetic landscape of people who first settled East Asia
The very first human beings originally emerged in Africa before spreading across Eurasia about 60,000 years ago. After that, the story of humankind heads down many different paths, some more well-studied than others.
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Monoclonal Antibody Data
We have a bit of human clinical data from the Eli Lilly/Abcellera collaboration to make a monoclonal antibody therapy against the coronavirus. A full paper is coming soon, the press release says, but for now it looks like this is all we have to go on. It's a mixed assortment of news. On the cheerful side, in mild-to-moderate recently diagnosed patients, a dose of 2800mg of antibody did lower vira
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Skogsbränder gynnar hotade skalbaggar
Under flera år efter den stora branden i Muddus nationalpark 2006 har forskare från SLU studerat hur skalbaggssamhället har förändrats. Det visade sig att hotade och brandberoende skalbaggar fortfarande hittades i brandområdet – mer än ett decennium efter branden. År 2006 var ovanligt torrt och flera stora skogsbränder härjade i Norrbotten, bland annat i Muddus nationalpark. Ett år efter branden
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Grow zero-carbon power to meet climate goals: analysis
All new electricity supply growth worldwide can now come from zero-carbon sources, according to a plan released by businesses and environmental advocates Wednesday that charts the path to a net-zero world by 2050.
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Both naive and memory B cells respond to flu vaccine
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02556-2 Influenza vaccination induces a protective memory immune response. The finding that human naive and memory B cells enter vaccine-induced germinal-centre structures suggests that both cell types aid this memory response.
7h
Modern theory from ancient impacts
It is generally accepted that the inner region of the early solar system was subject to an intense period of meteoric bombardment referred to as the late heavy bombardment. However, researchers have found evidence that suggests this period occurred slightly earlier than thought and was less intense but also more prolonged. Such details about this period could impact theories about the early Earth
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Unraveling a spiral stream of dusty embers from a massive binary stellar forge
With almost two decades of mid-infrared imaging from the largest observatories around the world including the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers was able to capture the spiral motion of newly formed dust streaming from the massive and evolved binary star system WR112. The study reveals the motion of the dusty outflow from the system and identifies WR112 as a highly efficient dust factory that
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10 tips for coping with wildfire smoke, from a public health expert
Wildfires have burned millions of acres in the western United States this year. Tens of thousands have been evacuated and thousands of buildings and other structures destroyed. Thick smoke blankets much of the region—coloring the skies red and orange—and is flowing north into British Columbia and Alberta. Tens of millions of people have been exposed to these hazardous conditions.
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RNA information transfer could be used in repairing DNA
Genomes are routinely subjected to DNA damage. But most cells have DNA repair systems that enforce genome stability and, ideally, prevent diseases like cancer. The trouble gets serious when these systems break down. When that happens, damage such as unrepaired DNA lesions can lead to tumors, and genomic chaos ensues.
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Climate crisis ages fish, amphibians and reptiles
Climatic conditions are changing at an unprecedented rate, affecting mainly fish, amphibians and reptiles, ectothermic animals that are unable to generate their own internal heat. With heat waves and rising temperatures, these organisms experience not only increased growth rates and heat stress, but also further ageing.
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Skoltech research puts exciton-polaritons in their place with new artificial laser-built lattices
Researchers at the Hybrid Photonics Laboratories in Skoltech and Southampton (UK), in collaboration with Lancaster University (UK), have demonstrated a new optical method to synthesize artificial solid-state crystal structures for cavity-polaritons using only laser light. The results could lead to realization of field-programmable polariton circuitry and new strategies to create guided light and r
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Scientists studied color change from green to red in the fluorescent protein
Researchers undertook a detailed study on green-to-red photoconversion (light-induced conversion) of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). In their recent study, scientists from Skoltech and their colleagues describe the molecular mechanism of photoconversion in detail for the first time ever.
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Physical diseases can negatively affect a depression
Patients with a first-time depression diagnosis have an increased risk of the disease worsening and requiring hospitalisation, if they have previously been treated for a physical disease at a hospital. This is shown by research from iPSYCH.
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How cigarette butts can be recycled into bricks: a step-by-step plan
Fired-clay bricks with 1% recycled cigarette butt content are as strong as normal bricks and use less energy to produce. Researchers have now developed a detailed industry plan for implementing cigarette butt recycling into bricks at mass scale.
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Coconut rhinoceros beetle makes unexpected 'host shift' to Guam's cycad trees
Researchers at the Western Pacific Tropical Research Center at the University of Guam have documented what biologists call a "host shift" of the coconut rhinoceros beetle in Guam. The beetle, first documented as an invasive species in Guam in 2007, has been devastating the island's ubiquitous coconut trees and is now also burrowing into Guam's endangered native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica.
7h
Reprogramming brain cells enables flexible decision-making
Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations. Researchers at the Brain Research Institute of the University of Zurich have utilized a mouse model to reveal which neurons in the brain are in command in guiding adaptive behavior. Their new study contributes to our understanding of decision-making processes in healthy and infirm people.
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Unraveling a spiral stream of dusty embers from a massive binary stellar forge
Astronomers using three Maunakea Observatories have discovered one of the most prolific dust-making Wolf-Rayet star systems known, remarkably producing an entire Earth mass of dust every year. It took nearly 20 years of images captured by W. M. Keck Observatory, Subaru Telescope, and Gemini Observatory in Hawaii to capture the spiral motion of this system, called WR 112, move over time.
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Immunotherapy: Enhancing the therapeutic effectiveness of photothermal cancer treatments
Immune checkpoint blockade is the most promising therapy mode of cancer immunotherapy. But the therapeutic efficiency remains low mainly due to immunosuppression. Near-infrared light can be used to stimulate black phosphorus to produce heat, which can then be a specific immunological stimulator for reversing immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. The light-induced black phosphorus (BP) nanosyst
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RNA information transfer could be used in repairing DNA
Genomes are routinely subjected to DNA damage. But most cells have DNA repair systems that enforce genome stability and, ideally, prevent diseases like cancer. The trouble gets serious when these systems break down. When that happens, damage such as unrepaired DNA lesions can lead to tumors, and genomic chaos ensues.
7h
Unraveling a spiral stream of dusty embers from a massive binary stellar forge
With almost two decades of mid-infrared (IR) imaging from the largest observatories around the world including the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers was able to capture the spiral motion of newly formed dust streaming from the massive and evolved binary star system Wolf-Rayet (WR) 112. Massive binary star systems, as well as supernova explosions, are regarded as sources of dust in the Univer
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Humanity at crossroads, biodiversity report cards warn
Developing countries that have been pushing for stronger ecosystems protections have been armed with a cache of evidence, released in a series of biodiversity report cards that warn the world teeters at a crossroads.
7h
Super funds are feeling the financial heat from climate change
The wildfires that have ravaged the US west coast, turning skies orange, are a lurid reminder that climate change looms ever larger as an economic threat.
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COVID-19, risk and rights: The 'wicked' balancing act for governments
COVID-19 has caused a global public health emergency, a global economic emergency, and a global human rights emergency. The crisis is detrimentally affecting all recognized human rights in every country.
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Humanity at crossroads, biodiversity report cards warn
Developing countries that have been pushing for stronger ecosystems protections have been armed with a cache of evidence, released in a series of biodiversity report cards that warn the world teeters at a crossroads.
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Curtin research to guide supply and use of native seeds for global restoration
Lead researcher Dr. Simone Pedrini from the ARC Center for Mine Site Restoration in Curtin's School of Molecular and Life Sciences, said the growing demand for native seeds in ecological restoration and rehabilitation has resulted in a rapidly growing global industry in the sourcing, supply and sale of native seeds.
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This Startup Is Growing Sushi-Grade Salmon From Cells in a Lab
As the ills of factory farming become more pronounced, people are increasingly gravitating towards vegetarian or pescatarian diets. Besides producing a large percentage of our total greenhouse gas emissions , raising livestock uses up a third of the world's arable land to grow feed, not to mention that the animals themselves are often terribly mistreated. Eating fish, then, seems preferable to me
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It's Not Just California. These Places Are Also on Fire.
Extreme temperatures and more severe droughts, the result of human-caused climate change, have created a world that's ready to burn.
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Astronomers discover a 2-km asteroid orbiting closer to the sun than Venus
Astronomers have painstakingly built models of the asteroid population, and those models predict that there will be ~1 km-sized asteroids that orbit closer to the sun than Venus does. The problem is, nobody's been able to find one—until now.
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Curtin research to guide supply and use of native seeds for global restoration
Lead researcher Dr. Simone Pedrini from the ARC Center for Mine Site Restoration in Curtin's School of Molecular and Life Sciences, said the growing demand for native seeds in ecological restoration and rehabilitation has resulted in a rapidly growing global industry in the sourcing, supply and sale of native seeds.
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Dynetics completes building full-scale human landing system test article for evaluation by NASA for Artemis program
Dynetics has announced on its website that it has completed building a human landing system (HLS) for evaluation by NASA. It is now on display at a facility in Huntsville, Alabama. The HLS by Dynetics is one of three HLS designs being evaluated by NASA for use in the Artemis program. The other two companies are Blue Origin and SpaceX.
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A New Algorithm for Graph Crossings, Hiding in Plain Sight
This past October, as Jacob Holm and Eva Rotenberg were thumbing through a paper they'd posted a few months earlier, they realized they had been sitting on something big. For decades computer scientists had been trying to develop a fast algorithm for determining when it's possible to add edges to a graph so that it remains "planar," meaning none of its edges cross each other. But the field had be
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Hurricane Sally Rumbles Onshore with Echoes of Harvey
The storm's torrential rain and life-threatening storm surge are causing major flooding along the Gulf Coast — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Better material for wearable biosensors
Researchers have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate.
7h
The Curious Question of Life on Venus
Venus should be a priority for future visits, but not because of the surprising discovery of biomarker in its atmosphere this week.
7h
Unraveling a spiral stream of dusty embers from a massive binary stellar forge
With almost two decades of mid-infrared imaging from the largest observatories around the world including the Subaru Telescope, a team of astronomers was able to capture the spiral motion of newly formed dust streaming from the massive and evolved binary star system WR112. The study reveals the motion of the dusty outflow from the system and identifies WR112 as a highly efficient dust factory that
7h
Devi mangiare! Why culture may be contributing to disordered eating among women
'You have to eat!' It's a sentiment that illustrates how central food is to Italian culture, but the woman who uttered these words also happens to be struggling with bulimia nervosa.
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Reaching 90% PL quantum yield in 1D metal halide by pressure-suppressed nonradiative loss
Here, we report a significant pressure-induced photoluminescence (PL) enhancement in a one-dimensional hybrid metal halide C4N2H14PbBr4, and the underlying mechanisms are investigated using in situ experimental characterization and first-principles calculations. Under a gigapascal pressure scale, the PL quantum yields (PLQYs) were quantitatively determined to show a dramatic increase from the init
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Oral radiography can reveal chronic coronary artery disease
A study found a link between carotid artery calcification observable in radiographs and coronary artery disease as well as several oral infections.
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Sunfleck use research needs appropriate experimental leaves
The use of light by plant leaves to drive photosynthesis is often studied in steady state environments, but most plant leaves are required to adjust to fluctuations in incident light every day. The research into use of fluctuating light by plant leaves has expanded in recent decades.
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Stop Livin to make lymphoma cells stop living
Researchers at the University of Tsukuba have shown that the protein Livin, an inhibitor of apoptosis or programmed cell death, mediates resistance to immunotherapy in some lymphoma variants. Therapeutically targeting Livin with IAP inhibitors or BET inhibitors may provide a practical strategy for patients with Livin-positive and other refractory B-cell lymphomas.
7h
Generation of three-dimensional heart organoids
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) engineered three-dimensional functional heart organoids resembling the developing heart. By exposing mouse embryonic stem cells to two key proteins during heart development, the researchers were able to form heart organoids with structural, functional, and molecular similarities to the embryonic heart during development. This method could
7h
Great progress for electronic gadgets of the future
A new discovery is an important step towards smaller, more advanced electronics. And maybe more environmentally friendly gadgets, too.
7h
Scientists updated genome editing technology
International scientific group compared their developed carriers for delivery of genome editing (GE) tools with other available analogues. The research of current studies were published in the in the journal Biomaterials.
7h
Reviewing the quantum material 'engine room', QAHE
An Australian collaboration reviews the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), one of the most fascinating and important recent discoveries in condensed-matter physics. QAHE allows zero-resistance electrical 'edge paths' in emerging quantum materials such as topological insulators, opening great potential for ultra-low energy electronics.
7h
Paleontology: The oldest known sperm cells
An international team of paleontologists has discovered giant sperm cells in a 100-million year-old female ostracod preserved in a sample of amber. Clearly, the tiny crustacean had mated shortly before being entombed in a drop of tree resin.
7h
Choosing the right cover crop to protect the soil
Research helps farmers pick the best cover crops to keep their soil and nutrients in the field.
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Better material for wearable biosensors
Researchers have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate.
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Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown.
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Late childhood peer group status linked to heightened adult circulatory disease risk
Late childhood peer group status may be linked to a heightened risk of developing circulatory system disease — conditions that affect the normal functioning of the heart and blood vessels — in later life, indicates new research.
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Bee brain size found to be related to diet diversity
An international team of researchers has found that the size of a bee's brain appears to be related to what it eats. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of bee brains and what they learned about them.
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Coffee Rust Is Going to Ruin Your Morning
I n the southern corner of Guatemala, outside the tiny mountain town of San Pedro Yepocapa, Elmer Gabriel's coffee plants ought to be leafed-out and gleaming. It is a week before Christmas, the heart of the coffee-harvesting season, and if his bushes were healthy, they would look like holiday trees hung with ornaments, studded with bright-red coffee cherries. But in a long row that stretches down
7h
Bee brain size found to be related to diet diversity
An international team of researchers has found that the size of a bee's brain appears to be related to what it eats. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of bee brains and what they learned about them.
7h
In Nicaragua, Forests and Indigenous Communities Face Threats
In the past 30 years, large swaths of Nicaragua's Caribbean forests have been destroyed for agriculture and logging. The transformation has recently intensified, with accelerating deforestation and increasingly deadly conflicts between newly-arrived settlers and Indigenous and Afro-descendant communities.
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The climate crisis is a national security threat to the US. We already see the effects | Sherri Goodman and Kate Guy
National security leaders view climate change as a 'threat multiplier' that makes the homeland vulnerable Climate change is not a distant problem for future generations to worry about. Instead, the dangers of climate change are touching the lives of more Americans with each passing day. As the historic wildfires, hurricanes, floods, heatwaves and storms hitting the country this summer demonstrate
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Efter to år på havets bund: Microsoft-datacenter virker stadig
Små datacentre under vand kan være en pålidelig og energivenlig løsning til små cloud-tjenester. For elektronikken i serverne ser ud til at klare sig bedre i lufttætte rum uden besøg af teknikere.
8h
Nordjyske lægevagter er blevet lettere at afsætte
Den nye lægevagtsaftale i Region Nordjylland har gjort det lettere at fordele vagterne blandt de praktiserende læger. PLO-formand håber, at det kan gavne rekrutteringen i landets mest lægefattige region.
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Tailored education system to benefit kidney transplant patients
Researchers find their computer-tailored education system, 'Your Path to Transplant' increases knowledge and readiness to pursue kidney transplant.
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Factors inherent to obesity could increase vulnerability to COVID-19
Conditions related to obesity, including inflammation and leaky gut, leave the lungs of obese patients more susceptible to COVID-19 and may explain why they are more likely to die from the disease, UTSW scientists say in a new article published online in eLife. They suggest that drugs used to lower inflammation in the lungs could prove beneficial to obese patients with the disease.
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Tail regeneration in lungfish provides insight into evolution of limb regrowth
Researchers at UChicago find that the molecular mechanisms underlying tail regeneration in West African lungfish are similar to those seen in amphibians, suggesting the trait evolved in a common ancestor.
8h
Modern theory from ancient impacts
It is generally accepted that the inner region of the early solar system was subject to an intense period of meteoric bombardment referred to as the late heavy bombardment. However, researchers have found evidence that suggests this period occurred slightly earlier than thought and was less intense but also more prolonged. Such details about this period could impact theories about the early Earth
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Reforestation can only partially restore tropical soils
Tropical forest soils play a crucial role in providing vital ecosystem functions. They provide nutrients for plants, store carbon and regulate greenhouse gases, as well as storing and filtering water, and protection against erosion. Scientists at the University of Göttingen and Minnesota investigated how the properties and ecosystem functions of tropical soils change when forests are cut down, and
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Lessons from coronavirus surveillance testing in Seattle-area homeless shelters
A coronavirus surveillance study undertaken at Seattle-area homeless shelters, starting as the pandemic emerged, provides possible community-based strategies for detecting SARS-CoV-2 infections and protecting homeless populations, as well as others in close-living quarters such as prisons, refugee camps and evacuation centers.
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32-årig læge får særlig tilladelse til at oprette lægepraksis i Suldrup
På et ekstraordinært møde i Region Nordjyllands Praksisplanudvalg blev det i sidste uge besluttet at lade en ung, nyuddannet læge flytte sit ydernummer til Suldrup, syd for Aalborg
8h
Det skiljer Belarus från andra länder i gamla östblocket
Trettio år efter murens fall revolterar den belarusiska befolkningen mot diktatorn Lukasjenko, som lett "den sista Sovjetstaten" sedan 1996. Varför nu? Och hur ser egentligen relationen ut mellan Ryssland och Belarus? Professorn i Europastudier Barbara Törnquist-Plewa har följt utvecklingen av Belarus sedan nationen grundades efter Sovjetimperiets fall. Professorn i Europastudier Barbara Törnquis
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Why Are 2 Million People Still Getting Netflix DVDs by Mail?
The company still gets a healthy slice of revenue from disc rentals—but the service has suffered as a result of the pandemic.
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Ethical Tech Starts With Addressing Ethical Debt
The rise of "zoombombing" is just the latest example of why developers need to plan for harmful misuses as much as potential costly bugs.
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Five new giant radio galaxies discovered
With the help of citizen scientists, astronomers have detected five new giant radio galaxies (GRGs). The new GRGs have sizes ranging from 2.3 to 2.6 million light years, and have been identified at redshift between 0.28 and 0.43. The finding is reported in a paper published September 8 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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It's Not Just the West. These Places Are Also on Fire.
Extreme temperatures and more severe droughts, the result of human-caused climate change, have created a world that's ready to burn.
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Haderup mister sit lægehus
Lægerne i Sunds lukker deres lægepraksis i den lille midtjyske by Haderup 1. november. Det var ellers håbet, at satellitklinikken kunne blive et skoleeksempel på, hvordan man skaffer læger til yderområderne.
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TV ads for psoriasis and eczema medications portray few people of color
Commercials from pharmaceutical companies advertising medication to treat psoriasis and eczema lack people from racial and ethnic minorities, according to research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
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What Ancient Mass Extinctions Tell Us about the Future
Carbon dioxide has done plenty of damage before — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Meteorite study calls into doubt a popular theory about the early solar system
It is generally accepted that the inner region of the early solar system was subject to an intense period of meteoric bombardment referred to as the late heavy bombardment. However, researchers have found evidence that suggests this period occurred slightly earlier than thought and was less intense but also more prolonged. Such details about this period could impact theories about the early Earth
8h
Ely Lilly Claims Experimental Drug Protects Covid-19 Patients
A so-called monoclonal antibody lowered levels of the coronavirus and prevented hospitalizations. The research has not yet been vetted by independent experts.
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A New System for Cooling Down Computers Could Revolutionize the Pace of Innovation
A Swiss team has created tiny, fluid-filled channels in microchips to spirit away heat and save energy
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'Confounding': Covid may have already peaked in many African countries
One explanation for virus not behaving as expected could be previous exposure to other infections, experts tell MPs Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The coronavirus pandemic has peaked earlier than expected in many African countries, confounding early predictions, experts have told MPs. Scientists do not yet know why, but one hypothesis is the possibility of people ha
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»Når man træder ind på scenen som ­formand, skal man også kunne fylde den ud«
#4 Fagpolitikken har fyldt meget i stort set hele Camilla Noelle Rathckes lægeliv, siden hun ved et tilfælde blev fællestillidsmand på Herlev Hospital. Nu er det hendes opgave at levere den fagpolitiske vare til mere end 30.000 lægekolleger og sikre, at Lægeforeningen står stærkt i det danske sundhedsvæsen. For der skal ske noget, mener den nye lægeformand, men bare ikke hjemme i 'fusionskøkkenet
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Volontärerna bevarar gamla fartyg och mår själva bättre
Volontärarbete för att skydda historiska fartyg i Norge skapar värden både för det norska samhället och för frivilligarbetarna själva, visar en avhandling i kulturvård vid Göteborgs universitet. Kulturvårdaren Erik Goth Småland har undersökt hur fartygsbevarandet i Norge har utvecklats under de senaste hundra åren. Han har studerat samhällsengagemanget för de historiska fartygen, undersökt volont
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Auditory attention works alike in birds and people
Many of the characteristics related to auditory attention in birds match those of humans, according to a new study. The findings offer insights into evolutionary survival mechanisms. Though previous research had explored auditory attention in animals , anthropomorphism clouded the experiments, essentially putting the cart before the horse, according to Micheal Dent, professor of psychology at the
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Forskare om möjligt liv på Venus: "Helt oväntat"
För snart 50 år sedan gav David Bowie ut låten "Life on Mars". Nu visar det sig att det kanske är på planeten Venus som liv först kommer att hittas. Något som glädjer Andreas Johnsson, som forskar om liv på Mars. − Det känns riktigt kul, ändå! Jag tycker att båda dessa planeter har otroligt fascinerade historier att berätta, historier som finns etsade i sten och landskap. På både Mars och Venus h
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Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sust
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Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sust
9h
Injectable hydrogel could someday lead to more effective vaccines
Vaccines have curtailed the spread of several infectious diseases, such as smallpox, polio and measles. However, vaccines against some diseases, including HIV-1, influenza and malaria, don't work very well, and one reason could be the timing of antigen and adjuvant presentation to the immune system. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Central Science developed an injectable hydrogel that allows sust
9h
Protesterna i Belarus – inget nytt med polisvåld mot oppositionella
Demonstranter misshandlas av säkerhetsstyrkor, människor grips och sätts i fängelse. Protesterna i Belarus, som började i samband med valet i augusti, är några av de största landet har sett, men misstankar om manipulerade val och korruption är inget nytt. Inte heller polisens våld mot politiska motståndare. Så vad är det som är annorlunda sommaren 2020? Kan historien ge svar? De folkliga proteste
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Where Conspiracy Reigns
Illustrations by Eren Su Kibele Yarman As the 20th century began, conspiracy was simply how Brazilian politics got done. Paranoia was everywhere, and often warranted. Secret plotting and military coups were routine across the political spectrum. And by the end of the Cold War, citizens in Brazil's young democracy had inherited a world of deep-seated suspicions, and would have to look back on a di
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How to train a machine to see 3-D in the dark
Researchers at the Australian National University (ANU) have developed a new way to create an almost perfect hologram in near darkness.
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New mineral, 'priscillagrewite,' named in honor of renowned Nebraska geologist
The greatest Christmas present Priscilla Grew received last year was an email.
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Scientists look into tropopause to find early signals of persistent strong rainfall
The flooding season had just ended in China. Persistent strong precipitation events in many regions of China resulted in severe flooding disasters in the just passed summer of 2020. It is of great significance to capture precursor signals of persistent strong precipitation events.
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Tail regeneration in lungfish provides insight into evolution of limb regrowth
For most vertebrates, losing a limb is permanent, but a lucky few species—such as salamanders and tadpoles—have the ability to completely regrow complex body parts. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon may be the key to developing new kinds of regenerative medicine, giving us the power to heal spinal cord injuries and other severely damaged tissues.
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Press play
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02628-3 Suspended for safety.
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Daily briefing: How clinical trials can bounce back from COVID-19 disruption
Nature, Published online: 15 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02654-1 Coronavirus-vaccine efforts have shown us how clinical trials can be bolder. Plus: the mathematics of impossibility and red flags in Russian vaccine-trial results.
9h
Tail regeneration in lungfish provides insight into evolution of limb regrowth
For most vertebrates, losing a limb is permanent, but a lucky few species—such as salamanders and tadpoles—have the ability to completely regrow complex body parts. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon may be the key to developing new kinds of regenerative medicine, giving us the power to heal spinal cord injuries and other severely damaged tissues.
9h
AI and Peer Review
Could Artificial Intelligence be the tool we need to fix the problems with science?
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Is the Internet Conscious? If It Were, How Would We Know?
As always, our tech advice columnist is here to help.
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Netflix's 'Challenger' Is a Gripping Look at NASA in Crisis
A new four-part documentary about the ill-fated Challenger mission highlights the risk of putting bureaucracy before science in human spaceflight
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How to Play Xbox and PC Games on Your Android Phone
Microsoft's Game Pass Ultimate cloud-enabled gaming service launched (formerly called Project xCloud). Here's how to check it out.
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A Utah Company Claims It Invented Contact Tracing Tech
Blyncsy wants states using Apple and Google technology to pay it $1 per resident. It may not win, but the patent tussle could deter others from adopting apps.
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Get around your phone more quickly than you already are
A great way to reduce screen time is to simply be faster. (Paul Hanaoka / Unsplash/) We spend a lot of time on our phones, so finding time-saving shortcuts can help us get more stuff done or free up some precious minutes to enjoy anything that doesn't require staring at a screen. The right Android and iOS shortcut might prevent you from missing your train by helping you send that email faster. Or
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Glass tables cause a lot of nasty injuries
Faulty glass in tables can cause life-threatening injuries, according to a new study. Stricter regulation of glass used in tables could prevent millions of injuries a year, the research shows. "It is imperative to push for stricter regulation as consumers of glass tables should not be incurring life-threatening trauma injuries due to neglect of manufacturers in not using tempered glass ," says st
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Life on Venus? Breakthrough Initiatives Funds Study of Possible Biosignature
A team of scientists will examine the astrobiological prospects for phosphine on Earth's hellish twin — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sufjan Stevens's Problem With America
One stipulation was made before I interviewed Sufjan Stevens by phone last month. It would be nice, a publicist wrote along with a smiley face in an email, to avoid questions about the "50 States Project" "where possible." This was an understandable thing to ask. Stevens first attracted notice with two albums, 2003's Michigan and 2005's Illinois , whose orchestral folk-pop was inspired by their t
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Synthetic biologists have created a slow-growing version of the coronavirus to give as a vaccine
WELLCOME COLLECTION In the 1950s, Albert Sabin was searching for an improved polio vaccine. To that end, his lab infected the brains of mice, chimpanzees, and monkeys with the virus that causes the disease. They wanted to see if the pathogen would change and if weakened forms might arise. They eventually isolated versions of the polio virus that could still infect people but didn't cause paralysi
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NASA Administrator: Artemis Could Revisit Apollo Moon Sites
NASA is still working to get the Space Launch System (SLS) ready to fly on its first demo flight, but the first real SLS mission will be to send humans back to the moon. NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine has suggested that NASA may reevaluate its proposed landing zone for the Artemis moon mission. Rather than heading to the south pole, the mission might pay a visit to Apollo sites from the 60s a
9h
Vi har lige tændt for 5G – men 6G er allerede på vej
6G bliver nemlig nødvendigt for at kunne sende data uden forsinkelse. For eksempel mellem selvkørende biler.
9h
Paleontology — The oldest known sperm cells
An international team of paleontologists has discovered giant sperm cells in a 100-million year-old female ostracod preserved in a sample of amber. Clearly, the tiny crustacean had mated shortly before being entombed in a drop of tree resin.
10h
The SAT and the ACT Will Probably Survive the Pandemic—Thanks to Students
Over the summer, more than 400 colleges decided to stop requiring the SAT or the ACT for admissions, because the pandemic had made taking the tests (or even finding a location to take them) so difficult. Some institutions, such as Harvard, Princeton, and Yale, said their test-optional policy applied only to the high-school graduating class of 2021. Others, including Tufts University and the Colle
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Decreasing wildfires observed over Central Africa
Referred to as the "fire continent" by NASA, Africa is surprisingly a crucial hot spot for blazes. Global satellite images have shown that on an average August day, it is home to at least 70 percent of the 10,000 wildfires burning worldwide and 50 percent of fire-related carbon emissions.
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Scientists use big data to sway elections and predict riots — welcome to the 1960s
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02607-8 A cold-war-era corporation targeted voters and presaged many of today's big-data controversies.
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There's No Better Time to Be an Amateur Radio Geek
Once considered a nerdy basement hobby, lo-fi transmissions from ordinary folks save lives during wildfires, hurricanes, and other climate disasters.
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America's Top Science Journal Has Had It With Trump
The editor of Science has abandoned staid academic-speak to take on falsehoods in the White House—decorum be damned.
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How an Epic Series of Tech Errors Hobbled Miami's Schools
It started with the district hiring a little-known virtual charter school company, which led to balky connections and an even more troublesome curriculum.
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Short cut to breed better non-GMO crops
Utrecht scientists have demonstrated a new non-GMO technology to develop new crops at a fraction of the cost of traditional breeding. By engineering the genes of bacteria that surround the plants, the scientists obtained the same outcome as adjusting genes from the plant itself. They have published their findings in New Phytologist.
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Anonymous Peer Review: Truth or Trolling?
When reviewers of journal articles are hidden behind a curtain, they can get away with unethical behavior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A new way to search for dark matter reveals hidden materials properties
New research from Chalmers, together with ETH Zürich, Switzerland, suggests a promising way to detect elusive dark matter particles through previously unexplored atomic responses occurring in the detector material.
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Harnessing DNA molecules for disease detection and electronics
DNA molecules express heredity through genetic information. However, in the past few years, scientists have discovered that DNA can conduct electrical currents. This makes it an interesting candidate for roles that nature did not intend for this molecule, such as smaller, faster and cheaper electric circuits in electronic devices, and to detect the early stages of diseases like cancer and COVID-19
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How scientists around the world track the solar cycle
Every morning, astronomer Steve Padilla takes a short walk from his home to the base of a tower that soars 150 feet above the ground. Tucked in the San Gabriel Mountains, about an hour's drive north from Los Angeles, the Mount Wilson Observatory has long been a home for space science—it's Padilla's home too, one of the perks to his work as Mount Wilson's sun observer. Mount Wilson has several sola
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Liquid carbon characterized using a free electron laser
From common soot to precious diamonds, carbon is familiar in many guises, but there have been little more than glimpses of carbon in the liquid form. Researchers at the FERMI Free Electron Laser (FEL) source have now not only generated a liquid carbon sample, but have characterized its structure, tracking the ultrafast rearrangements of electron bonding and atomic coordinates that take place as th
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Researchers synthesize artificial solid-state crystal structures using laser light
Researchers at the Hybrid Photonics Laboratories in Skoltech and Southampton (U.K.), in collaboration with Lancaster University (U.K.), have demonstrated a new optical method to synthesize artificial solid-state crystal structures for cavity polaritons using only laser light. The results could lead to the realization of field-programmable polariton circuitry and new strategies to create guided lig
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Short cut to breed better non-GMO crops
Utrecht scientists have demonstrated a new non-GMO technology to develop new crops at a fraction of the cost of traditional breeding. By engineering the genes of bacteria that surround the plants, the scientists obtained the same outcome as adjusting genes from the plant itself. They have published their findings in New Phytologist.
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Europe's primary forests: What to protect? What to restore?
Primary forests are forests without any signs of past human use and where ecological processes are not disrupted by human influence. These forests are of outstanding ecological value. They are an irreplaceable part of our natural heritage and critical for conserving forest biodiversity. In Europe, where millennia of land use have transformed forested landscapes, very few such primary forests remai
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Population Density Does Not Doom Cities to Pandemic Dangers
Crowding, connections among communities and other factors seem to better explain infection and mortality rates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Socialt engagemang riskfaktor för lärare
En av tio lärare i Sverige är drabbade av stressrelaterad utmattning – en 50 procent högre andel än hos övriga yrkesgrupper. – De lärare som har ett starkt socialt patos och engagerar sig djupt i elever och kollegor är mest utsatta, säger Ola Nordhall vid Högskolan i Gävle. I sin forskning har Ola Nordhall undersökt 800 lärare och funnit att lärare som, förutom den reguljära arbetsinsatsen, inves
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Population Density Does Not Doom Cities to Pandemic Dangers
Crowding, connections among communities and other factors seem to better explain infection and mortality rates — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sharp slowdown in release of Covid tests in England hits virus efforts
Proportion of people getting positive results by end of day after being tested plummets from 63% to 8%
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The Reason Trump Isn't Trying to Save the Economy
T he fate of an incumbent president is exquisitely sensitive to economic conditions . Incumbents tend to lose elections when the economy is weak (e.g., George H. W. Bush's defeat in 1992) and win when it's strong (e.g., Bill Clinton's romp four years later). The 2020 economy is worse than weak; it is, for many, an outright catastrophe. Look beyond the healthy housing market and the stock market,
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Trähusen var avgörande för svenska städers utveckling före 1800-talet
De var flyttbara, varma och lätta att massproducera, och de representerade alla sociala skikt i samhället. Trähusen hade en fundamental betydelse i det tidigmoderna Sveriges stadsmiljö visar en avhandling i arkeologi vid Göteborgs universitet. Samtidigt är de enda historiska husen som bevarats oftast av sten. – Något som förvånade mig var att husbyggnation i korsvirkesteknik var så vanlig utanför
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Iran and the Palestinians Lose Out in the Abraham Accords
Israel and two Arab Gulf states, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, have formally and publicly established diplomatic relations. The White House is calling the agreements "The Abraham Accords," and President Donald Trump, in typically understated fashion, announced that "there's going to be peace in the Middle East." (Spoiler alert: no.) The U.A.E. and Bahrain are the third and fourth Arab cou
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What Is Good Teaching?
Editor's Note: In 1988, a teacher most commonly had 15 years of experience. In recent years, that number is closer to just three years leading a classroom. The "On Teaching" series focuses on the wisdom of veteran teachers. R enee Moore still remembers the young man who changed the way she taught. It was 1999, and Moore was teaching at the nearly all-Black Broad Street High School in the rural to
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Do You Speak Fox?
A ll happy families are alike; some unhappy families are unhappy because of Fox News. You might have come across the articles ( "I Lost My Dad to Fox News" / "Lost Someone to Fox News?" / "'Fox News Brain': Meet the Families Torn Apart by Toxic Cable News" ), or the Reddit threads, or the support groups on Facebook, as people have sought ways to mourn loved ones who are still alive. The discussio
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Springer Nature journal takes eight months to retract paper after US government misconduct finding
A Springer Nature journal waited eight months to retract a paper flagged by the Office of Research Integrity for containing fabricated data — a delay the publisher blames on "staff changes and human error." The 2014 article in Neuropsychopharmacology by Alexander Neumeister included "falsified and/or fabricated research methods and results," according to the findings of … Continue reading
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Plug-in hybrids are a 'wolf in sheep's clothing'
Although marketed as a green option, the cars cause more polluting than is claimed, campaigners say.
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Mere end én genstand om dagen kan øge risiko for forhøjet blodtryk hos diabetespatienter
Patienter med type 2-diabetes bør være ekstra varsomme med, hvor meget alkohol de drikker om ugen. Et nyt studie tyder på, at indtager de mere end otte genstande om ugen, kan det lede til forhøjet blodtryk.
11h
FN-rapport om biodiversitet: Vi har kurs mod den sjette masseuddøen
PLUS. Verdens biodiversitet er i frit fald, og det er ikke lykkedes at opfylde et eneste af de 20 biodiversitetsmål, som vi enedes om for ti år siden.
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Renässans för hållbart trädgårdshantverk
Många skötselmetoder i våra trädgårdar tar inte hänsyn till miljöpåverkan och biologisk mångfald. Därför kan andra redskap och metoder behövas. Hantverksmetoder från förr kan ge en hållbarare trädgårdsskötsel, visar forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Häckklippning med huggsvärd och stångskära. Vält i stället för gräsklippare. I en ny doktorsavhandling presenteras historiska hantverksmetoder, s
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Outforskade mikrofossil i berggrunden kan avslöja livets utveckling
Fossil av mikroskopiskt liv i berggrunden är ett outforskat forskningsområde. Dessa livsformer har haft stor betydelse för livets utveckling på jorden och fossilen finns i stora delar av jordskorpan. Forskare vid Naturhistoriska riksmuseet pekar ut outforskade fossil av mikroskopiskt liv i berggrunden på flera kilometers djup. Därmed ökar paleontologernas arbetsfält flerfaldigt. Forskaren Magnus
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Boganmeldelse: Hvad er elektricitet egentlig?
PLUS. Det komplicerede el- og energisystem forklaret med masser af grafik og letforståelige forklaringer.
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Singapore vil teste obligatorisk corona-tracking som adgangskrav til events
Singapore har lanceret en fysisk enhed til smitteopsporing som supplement til appen. samtidig er der blevet annonceret en forsøgsordning, hvor tracking-løsningerne bliver obligatoriske for at deltage i udvalgte events.
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Smoke from US fires reaches Europe, satellite data shows
Smoke from the fires devastating swathes of the US West Coast has reached as far as Europe, the European Union's climate monitoring service said Wednesday in its assessment of the "unprecedented" blazes.
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Australia doubles down on fossil fuels, firing up critics
The Australian government's plan for a "gas-fired recovery" of its coronavirus-hit economy ignited fears Wednesday that it would lock in fossil fuel dependence for another generation in a country already ravaged by climate change.
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T-rex skeleton could fetch record price at New York auction
The skeleton of a 40-foot (12-meter) dinosaur nicknamed "Stan", one of the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex specimens ever found, will be auctioned in New York next month and could set a record for a sale of its kind.
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Covid-19 News: Live Updates
President Trump urged Republicans to 'go for the much higher numbers' in stalled negotiations over another economic recovery package, undercutting his party's push for a bare-bones plan.
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How a giant short-faced bear reached the California Channel Islands
Researchers at the University of Oklahoma, the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History, University of Oregon, and others report the unexpected discovery of an isolated short-faced bear toe bone from California's Channel Islands, presenting a puzzling scenario for how the largest mammalian carnivore to ever walk North America ended up in an island cave.
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Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown. The study carried out by researchers from FAI Farms, the University of Bristol and The Norwegian University of Life Sciences, is published today [16 September], in Scientific Reports.
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Middle-aged adults with healthy heart habits may lower high blood pressure risk years later
Middle-aged adults who didn't have high blood pressure and had positive health factors, as identified by the American Heart Association's Life's Simple 7 scale, were less likely to develop high blood pressure years later.Each one-point increase in the Life's Simple 7 score was linked to a 6% decreased risk of high blood pressure.
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Heart transplants from severely obese donors show comparable outcomes for patients
An analysis of more than 26,000 heart transplant patients found that recipients of hearts from donors with severe obesity had similar post-transplant outcomes to recipients with non-obese donors. Nearly 40% of US adults are obese, and the prevalence of severe obesity has doubled over the past 15 years.
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Regeringen enig med Aalborg Portland: Landets største CO2-udleder skal reducere 30 pct.
Cementproducenten får løfter om rammevilkår og hjælp til teknologiudvikling til gengæld for at reducere sin udledning.
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Small-scale volcanic aerosols variability, processes and direct radiative impact at Mount Etna during the EPL-RADIO campaigns
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71635-1
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Identifying a stochastic clock network with light entrainment for single cells of Neurospora crassa
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72213-1
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Improvement of nerve imaging speed with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering rigid endoscope using deep-learning noise reduction
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72241-x
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Mechanism for the reactivation of the peroxidase activity of human cyclooxygenases: investigation using phenol as a reducing cosubstrate
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71237-x
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Modulation of TRPV-1 by prostaglandin-E2 and bradykinin changes cough sensitivity and autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm in healthy subjects
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72062-y Modulation of TRPV-1 by prostaglandin-E 2 and bradykinin changes cough sensitivity and autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm in healthy subjects
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The effect of Mass Drug Administration for trachoma on antibodies to Chlamydia trachomatis pgp3 in children
Scientific Reports, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71833-x
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Schoolchildren should be next in line for Covid tests, says UK minister
Robert Buckland admits government faces 'real challenges' over testing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Schoolchildren and their parents should be next in line for Covid-19 tests after the NHS and social care, the UK justice secretary, Robert Buckland, has suggested, as he admitted the government was facing "real challenges" in its testing programme. Buckland's commen
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The Progressive Activist Begging the Left to Stop Owning Itself
Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET on September 16, 2020. when word got out in early March that Joe Biden's campaign had invited the progressive pollster Sean McElwee to a meeting on climate policy, some on the far left were outraged. Sure, Bernie Sanders's presidential prospects weren't looking great, but the senator had not yet suspended his campaign. So why , McElwee's critics demanded to know, would he
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A T. Rex Skeleton Arrives in Rockefeller Center Ahead of Auction
Christie's is hoping to break records with its sale of the dinosaur, nicknamed Stan, which will be on public view through Oct. 21.
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A pandemic is no time to cut the European Research Council's funding
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02620-x Europe's flagship science agency will be crucial to a post-coronavirus world. Slashing its budget will be a senseless act.
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Deregulated immune cell recruitment orchestrated by FOXM1 impairs human diabetic wound healing
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18276-0 Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) represent a complex disease with limited treatment options. Here, the authors compare human RNASeq patient data from DFU, oral mucosa and skin acute wounds, identifying FOXM1 as a mediator of macrophage and neutrophil recruitment, which contributes to disease pathogenesis and is d
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Improved haplotype inference by exploiting long-range linking and allelic imbalance in RNA-seq datasets
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18320-z Haplotype reconstruction of distant genetic variants is problematic in short-read sequencing. Here, the authors describe HapTree-X, a probabilistic framework that uses differential allele-specific expression to better reconstruct paternal haplotypes from diploid and polyploid genomes.
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IRF1-mediated downregulation of PGC1α contributes to cardiorenal syndrome type 4
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18519-0 The pathogenic mechanisms of cardiorenal syndrome type 4 (CRS4) remain unclear. Here, the authors identify IRF1-PGC1α axis-mediated myocardial energy metabolism remodeling as a contributor to CRS4 pathogenesis, thus providing potential new targets for reducing cardiovascular events in CKD patients.
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Author Correction: Identification and characterization of Cardiac Glycosides as senolytic compounds
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18714-z
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Glioma-initiating cells at tumor edge gain signals from tumor core cells to promote their malignancy
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18189-y Intratumoural spatial heterogeneity is crucial to enhance therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma. Here, the authors show a paracrine signaling mechanism where glioblastoma-initiating cells located in the tumour edge elevate their malignancy by interaction with core-located tumour cells.
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Reductions in commuting mobility correlate with geographic differences in SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in New York City
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18271-5 New York City is one of the areas most affected by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in the United States, and there has been large variation in rates of hospitalisation and death by city borough. Here, the authors show that boroughs with the largest reduction in daily commutes also had the lowest SARS-CoV-2 prevalen
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Haploinsufficiency of RREB1 causes a Noonan-like RASopathy via epigenetic reprogramming of RAS-MAPK pathway genes
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18483-9 Mutations in RAS-MAPK pathway genes are implicated in Noonan-spectrum, yet up to 20% of cases have unknown cause. Here, the authors identify RREB1 underlying a 6p microdeletion RASopathy-like syndrome and show that RREB1, SIN3A and KDM1A form a transcriptional repressive complex to control methylation of MA
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Author Correction: Targeting QKI-7 in vivo restores endothelial cell function in diabetes
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18712-1
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How a giant short-faced bear reached the California Channel Islands
The California Channel Islands are renowned for their archaeological, biological and paleontological significance and richness, containing some of the most important early human sites in North America. This importance is only growing with new excavation, chemical, and biomolecular techniques, expanding our vision of this dynamic ecosystem and its enduring importance to humans and wildlife alike.
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Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown. The study carried out by researchers from FAI Farms, the University of Bristol and The Norwegian University of Life Sciences, is published today in Scientific Reports.
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Prestigious US science journal to back Biden in first endorsement in 175-year history
Scientific American says Trump has damaged US 'because he rejects evidence and science' In a break with its 175-year tradition, the prestigious US magazine Scientific American has for the first time endorsed a candidate in a US presidential election – the Democratic party nominee, Joe Biden. The magazine has taken the line because, it says, "Donald Trump has badly damaged the US and its people –
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Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown. The study carried out by researchers from FAI Farms, the University of Bristol and The Norwegian University of Life Sciences, is published today in Scientific Reports.
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Latinos Report Financial Strain As Pandemic Erodes Income And Savings
An NPR poll finds 72% of Latino households in the United States are facing serious financial problems — double the share of whites who report this. Major health problems are mounting, too. (Image credit: Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images)
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Färre behandlas för hjärtinfarkt under pandemin
Under coronapandemin har färre vårdats för en hjärtinfarkt jämfört med samma period under de föregående fem åren, enligt siffror från det nationella registret Swedeheart. Som mest var skillnaden mellan kurvorna knappt 25 procent i hela landet, runt påsk. Sedan i juni har gapet minskat till omkring åtta procent.
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'Why wait for it?' How to predict a pandemic
Strides are being made towards an open access atlas that could predict where dangerous animal-borne viruses will next appear How do you predict where a deadly tropical disease such as Ebola, possibly the most virulent in the world, will appear next? Since it first emerged in a small town on the edge of a Congolese forest, it has broken out in seven other African countries, often thousands of mile
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The horn-like knobs on a giraffe's head can be a deadly lightning rod
Being the tallest animals on the planet, giraffes are threatened by lightning strikes. For the first time scientists have described in detail such a hit, which killed two giraffes in South Africa
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Brown Danube: How Belgrade's sewers taint Europe's famous river
Just down the road from Belgrade's historic city centre, gates open for trucks to pass to the banks of the Danube, where they dump raw sewage into Europe's venerated river.
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As Brazil's wetlands burn, rain is 'only hope'
Lieutenant Silva's face is grim as he watches his firefighters try—and fail—to control one of the thousands of wildfires ravaging Brazil's Pantanal, the world's biggest tropical wetlands.
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Fish exposed to noise pollution likely to die early: study
Fish stressed by noise are less able to fight off disease and prolonged exposure can lead to an early death, according to research on the consequences of man-made clamour on the natural world.
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Covid-kreativ: Ingeniører laver iltapparat af sodavandsmaskine
PLUS. I marts fik udviklingsdirektøren hos SodaStream et overraskende opkald fra en læge: Kunne han lave en sodavandsmaskine om til et iltapparat? Ingeniørerne gik straks i gang.
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Fish exposed to noise pollution likely to die early: study
Fish stressed by noise are less able to fight off disease while prolonged exposure can lead to an early death, according to research published Tuesday, the latest outlining the consequences of man-made clamour on the natural world.
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Water shortages in US West likelier than previously thought
There's a chance water levels in the two largest man-made reservoirs in the United States could dip to critically low levels by 2025, jeopardizing the steady flow of Colorado River water that more than 40 million people rely on in the American West.
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Hurricane Sally gains strength as it nears southern US
Hurricane Sally picked up strength as it edged towards the US Gulf Coast early Wednesday, with forecasts of drenching rains that could provoke "historic" and potentially deadly flash floods.
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'The moment the dream died': inside a Netflix series on the Challenger disaster
Challenger: The Final Flight, a four-part docuseries produced by JJ Abrams, retells an infamous tragedy from those who were there The fourth and final episode of Netflix's Challenger: The Final Flight, a JJ Abrams-produced documentary series on the defining space shuttle disaster, opens with anonymous home footage from a yard in Florida on 28 January 1986. A bright pillar of rocket combustion sli
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Welsh seagrass meadow sows hope for global restoration
Project to revive climate-boosting wonder plant in Pembrokeshire could spur similar schemes Seagrass is a wonder plant but unrecognised and sorely neglected. This is a flowering plant with long ribbon-like leaves that often grows in the sea in lush underwater meadows. It is an unsung hero in the fight to clean up carbon dioxide and the climate emergency. Its credentials are astonishing: it absorb
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Winds kick up century old volcanic ash in Alaska
While western U.S. states were suffering from hazy red skies from wildfires, Alaska was dealing with an air quality problem born a century ago.
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Mexico identifies submerged wreck of Mayan slave ship
Archaeologists in Mexico said Tuesday they have identified a ship that carried Mayan people into virtual slavery in the 1850s, the first time such a ship has been found.
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Parenting brain switch, vanishing journals and COVID-19 in kids
Nature, Published online: 16 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02597-7 The latest science news, in brief.
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Evergreen needles act as air quality monitors
Every tree, even an evergreen, can be an air quality monitor. That's the conclusion of researchers at the University of Utah who measured the magnetism of particulate matter on the needles of evergreen trees on the U campus. That measurement, they found, correlated to general air quality, suggesting that analysis of the needles—a relatively simple and low-cost process—could provide a high-resoluti
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Biggest fish in the sea are girls
A decade-long study of the iconic fish has found male whale sharks grow quickly, before plateauing at an average adult length of about eight or nine meters.
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Biggest fish in the sea are girls
A decade-long study of the iconic fish has found male whale sharks grow quickly, before plateauing at an average adult length of about eight or nine meters.
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Researchers create better material for wearable biosensors
Biosensors that are wearable on human skin or safely used inside the body are increasingly prevalent for both medical applications and everyday health monitoring. Finding the right materials to bind the sensors together and adhere them to surfaces is also an important part of making this technology better. A recent study from Binghamton University, State University of New York offers one possible
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Choosing the right cover crop to protect the soil
Farmers around the world are keen to protect their most important asset: their soil. The soil supports and enriches their crops. But the relatively thin layer of topsoil can readily wash away into streams, carrying unwanted nutrients with it.
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