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New design principles for spin-based quantum materials
As our lives become increasingly intertwined with technology—whether supporting communication while working remotely or streaming our favorite show—so too does our reliance on the data these devices create. Data centers supporting these technology ecosystems produce a significant carbon footprint—and consume 200 terawatt hours of energy each year, greater than the annual energy consumption of Iran
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Big Ten football players will get daily COVID-19 tests, but that might not be enough
Big 10 football players are set to return to conference play in October of 2020. (Pexels/) The Big Ten conference announced Wednesday morning that their 2020-2021 college football season will resume later this fall, with daily rapid testing in place, contradicting a previous statement from August that the season would be indefinitely postponed. It's a big measure, but some worry it may not be eno
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Trump's TikTok Circus Will Have Lasting Consequences
The larger issues around China's technological rise aren't going away.
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Your wash cycle pollutes land and oceans
Synthetic microfibers from our washing machines contribute more to pollution than we thought, according to new research. The amount of synthetic microfiber we shed into our waterways has been of great concern over the last few years, and for good reason: Every laundry cycle releases in its wastewater tens of thousands of tiny, near-invisible plastic fibers whose persistence and accumulation can a
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Are the Oregon wildfires a view into the future?
The wildfires spreading at stunning rates across Oregon, Washington, and California are due in part to climate change, but in some areas it's hard to say whether devastating burns are an anomaly or a sign of things to come, wildfire experts say. The large, fast-spreading Holiday Farm Fire east of Springfield, Oregon is a wake-up call for how quickly even worst-case scenarios for wildfire risk can
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Anti-resonant hollow-core optical fiber reduces 'noise'
A new hollow optical fiber greatly reduces the "noise" interfering with the signals it transmits compared to the single-mode fibers now widely used, researchers at the University of Rochester report.
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Buffalo-based study aims to connect the dots on food access
A new University at Buffalo study based in Western New York is the first that simultaneously examined the preferences of community members and compared those with the community-based programs and resources available to identify the most viable strategies for addressing disparities in healthy food consumption.
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Jaws: Classic Film, Crummy Science
45 years after the movie made everyone afraid to wade into the ocean, it's not too late to remind viewers of the truth about sharks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Self-induced ultrafast demagnetization limits the amount of light diffracted from magnetic samples at soft x-ray energies
Free electron X-ray lasers deliver intense ultrashort pulses of x-rays, which can be used to image nanometer-scale objects in a single shot. When the x-ray wavelength is tuned to an electronic resonance, magnetization patterns can be made visible. When using increasingly intense pulses, however, the magnetization image fades away. The mechanism responsible for this loss in resonant magnetic scatte
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8 must-read books on the psychedelic experience
Hundreds of millions of dollars are pouring into psychedelics companies right now. With loosening restrictions on clinical research, new therapeutic modalities are being investigated for anxiety, depression, and more. The psychedelic literature is rich with anecdotal accounts and clinical studies. UC Berkeley recently announced the launch of its center for psychedelic research and education, than
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Tom Norris, Marine Mammal Acoustician, Dies at 55
Norris, who founded the research firm Bio-Waves, furthered the study of marine mammals using passive acoustic monitoring technology he designed himself.
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Americans won't be able to download TikTok or WeChat from Sunday
What's happening? The US Commerce Department has issued an order banning Americans from downloading Chinese-owned apps TikTok and WeChat; it's due to come into effect on Sunday, September 20. Existing users in the US will still be able to use the apps, but they won't receive updates or patches from Sunday onwards, and the apps will both disappear from Google's and Apple's US app stores. This anno
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Photographs From the Last Quiet Places on Earth
Little can compare to the healing power of silence
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Cancer Is on the Rise Among Young People
Over the past decade, cancers associated with obesity show some of the most troubling increases affecting young adults and adolescents.
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new alteration in the brain of people with Alzheimer's discovered
New research led by Spanish scientists suggest that the altered glycosylation could determine that the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) is processed by the amyloidogenic (pathological) pathway, giving rise to the production of the beta-amyloid, a small protein with a tendency to cluster forming the amyloid plaques characteristic of Alzheimer's disease.
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Gene therapy corrects the cardiac effects of Friedreich's ataxia
Gene therapy was successfully used to overcome the cardiac effects of Freidreich's ataxia (FA) in a mouse model of the disease
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Rochester researchers document an optical fiber beyond compare
A new anti-resonant hollow core optical fiber produces a thousand times less "noise" interfering with signals it transmits compared to the single-mode fibers now widely used. This is the lowest level ever recorded from interference caused by acoustic phonons arising from the glass in the fiber at room temperatures, researchers at the University of Rochester report.
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How the brain's inner clock measures seconds
UCLA researchers have pinpointed a second hand to the brain's internal clock. By revealing how and where the brain counts and represents seconds, the UCLA discovery will expand scientists' understanding of normal and abnormal brain function.
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New design principles for spin-based quantum materials
A new design criteria for enhancing the spin lifetime of a class of quantum materials could support Internet of Things devices and other resource-intensive technologies.
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Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
Traces of violence on 1700 year old skeletons allow researchers to reconstruct warfare and sacrifices of nomads in Siberia. An international and interdisciplinary team of anthropologists, archaeologists and specialists in forensic sciences performed a detailed and revealing analysis of the traumas found on the skeletal remains.
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Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry.
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Nose's response to odors more than just a simple sum of parts
Based on highly sensitive recordings of neuron activity in the noses of mice, researchers have found that olfactory sensory neurons can exhibit suppression or enhancement of response when odors are mixed, overturning a long-standing view that the response is a simple sum with more complex processing only happening at later stages.
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Mosquito-borne viruses linked to stroke
A deadly combination of two mosquito-borne viruses may be a trigger for stroke, new research has found.
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Canada unveils 'swirl, gargle and spit' Covid test for school-aged children
Test, which is only offered to children in British Columbia, involves gargling saline solution and spitting it into a tube Authorities in Canada have unveiled a new non-invasive coronavirus test that avoids the need for intrusive nasal swabs, in a development which they hope will making testing easier and more accessible for students as they return to schools. The new testing method, unveiled Thu
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WHO Says Europe Is Headed Into Another Potential Pandemic Crisis
Experts say that "pandemic fatigue" is causing numbers of confirmed cases of COVID-19 to surge in parts of Europe, CNBC reports . Numbers are rising in both France and Spain. In some instances, the number of new cases is outpacing peak numbers back in April. Both countries even surpassed the per capita-adjusted numbers in the US. Officials suspect France's return to tourism — particularly allowin
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New design principles for spin-based quantum materials
Professor James Rondinelli's new design criteria for enhancing the spin lifetime of a class of quantum materials could support Internet of Things devices and other resource-intensive technologies.
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Toy storage options to help you reclaim your home
Teach organization early on. (Hannah Rodrigo via Unsplash/) There is no arguing that your life changes overnight when you become a parent. In addition to the added responsibilities, there's the whole question of what to do with all the stuff. And it only gets worse as they get older, and the toys get bigger. Without the right storage toys can overrun your space. The best way to tackle the issues
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Most space travellers are men despite slow rise in female astronauts
Early space travellers were younger men, but the average age has risen since the 1960s. More women are also now going to space, but they only make up 64 of the 566 to have left Earth
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The Books Briefing: How to Remake America
The Constitution denied Danielle Allen's enslaved ancestors the right to full citizenship—but she still believes in its ability to shape America for the better . Revisiting documents and moments from this country's founding to parse how they can guide our future is the the central idea of The Atlantic 's new series " Making America Again ." The project offers a look at the United States' profound
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Thoughtfully designed watering cans
Gentle sprinkles. (Markus Winkler via Unsplash/) It can be tempting to water your plants with the remnants of a glass of water, but your houseplants—or your urban garden—deserve better. A great watering can is not only an essential tool, but also a quality of life upgrade for anyone who has to water plants regularly. They come in a variety of thoughtful designs, optimized for the type of plants y
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Affordable and stylish sectional sofas for any home
Quality additions to your living room. (Becca Tapert via Unsplash/) Couches are undoubtedly one of the centerpieces of a home, and sectionals especially can make a space more inviting. If you're moving or redecorating, purchasing a comfortable and spacious couch to convene and cuddle is a must. Gather for family movie nights, cozy up with your partner, or have a chill weekend hang with your roomm
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Solar storm forecasts for Earth improved with help from the public
Scientists used observations recorded by members of the public to increase accuracy of computer model predictions of when harmful CMEs will hit Earth.
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Biologists create new genetic systems to neutralize gene drives
Addressing concerns about gene drive releases in the wild, scientists have developed two new genetic systems that halt or eliminate gene drives after release. Created in fruit flies, the e-CHACRs and ERACRs are powerful gene drive control mechanisms that were meticulously developed and tested at the genetic and molecular levels.
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Engineers produce a fisheye lens that's completely flat
Engineers have designed a wide-angle lens that is completely flat. It is the first flat fisheye lens to produce crisp, 180-degree panoramic images.
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Mapping the 1.6 billion people who live near forests
Global maps of places where people and forests coexist show that an estimated 1.6 billion people live within 5 kilometers of a forest. The assessment, based on data from 2000 and 2012, showed that of these 1.6 billion 'forest-proximate people,' 64.5 percent were located in tropical countries, and 71.3 percent lived in countries classified as low or middle income by the World Bank.
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Researchers develop simple method to 3D print milk products
Additive free, multimaterial 3D printing is achieved for milk-based products without temperature control.
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Unverricht-Lundborg disease is more common in Finland than elsewhere in the world
Based on reported cases, Unverricht-Lundborg disease, also known as progressive myoclonic epilepsy-1A, EPM1, is more common in Finland than anywhere else in the world, a new study finds.
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Promising computer simulations for stellarator plasmas
The turbulence code GENE (Gyrokinetic Electromagnetic Numerical Experiment), has proven to be very useful for the theoretical description of turbulence in the plasma of tokamak-type fusion devices. Extended for the more complex geometry of stellarator-type devices, computer simulations with GENE now indicate a new method to reduce plasma turbulence in stellarator plasmas. This could significantly
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How researchers look at the bird brain in action
How do birds make decisions and which brain regions are particularly active when they solve tasks? Researchers are investigating these questions. So far, only anesthetized birds and therefore passive experiments could be examined using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the examination of brain processes during active tasks was not possible. Now the researchers have constructe
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VLBA makes first direct distance measurement to magnetar
Using the VLBA, astronomers have made the first direct geometric measurement of the distance to a magnetar. This precision measurement to one of the most magnetic objects in the Universe could help scientists determine if such objects are responsible for generating the mysterious Fast Radio Bursts.
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Dune Is a Hard Book to Adapt
Anyone who's seen David Lynch's 1984 film knows Frank Herbert's book doesn't translate easily to the screen.
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Complex phonological tests are useful for diagnosing reading dysfunction
HSE University researchers have confirmed that the level of phonological processing skills in children can impact their ability to master reading. Complex phonological tests are best suited to detect phonological impairment. The study was published on September 6, 2020, in the Journal of Research in Reading.
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Hurricane Sally's Major Flooding Exposes Flaws in FEMA Maps
Tens of thousands of homeowners face financial losses because they were not considered to be in a flood zone and were not required to have insurance — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sometimes Food Fights Back
When a species of microalgae gets inside a zooplankton that feeds on it, it smothers the grazer's eggs and disrupts reproduction.
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Biologists create new genetic systems to neutralize gene drives
Addressing concerns about gene drive releases in the wild, scientists have developed two new genetic systems that halt or eliminate gene drives after release. Created in fruit flies, the e-CHACRs and ERACRs are powerful gene drive control mechanisms that were meticulously developed and tested at the genetic and molecular levels.
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Is Covid's end closer than we think? | Letters
Up to half the world's population may have natural immunity to coronavirus, writes Prof Moin Saleem . Plus Dr David Grimes on the evidence that vitamin D provides some protection Your article ( 'Confounding': Covid may have already peaked in many African countries , 16 September) hints that there may be natural immunity in African countries where Covid-19 has settled down. This is likely to be tr
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Could Tattoo Ink Be Used to Detect Cancer?
A new study on medical imaging agents shows common pigments and dyes could help with early diagnosis
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Engineers produce a fisheye lens that's completely flat
Engineers at MIT and the University of Massachusetts at Lowell have designed a wide-angle lens that is completely flat. It is the first flat fisheye lens to produce crisp, 180-degree panoramic images.
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The Progressive Case for a TikTok Sale
A principled, hands-off approach to the internet was easier to defend in the 1990s. Today it makes no sense.
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Exhume President Warren G. Harding? Family Feuds in Court
DNA evidence is persuasive that James Blaesing, 70, is the grandson of the 29th president and his mistress. But his cousins are upset by his plan to exhume Harding's remains with a reality TV crew.
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Ford VP Disses Cybertruck, Calling Electric F-150 a "Real" Work Truck
The Shade A Ford executive just threw some serious shade at the automaker's competition. During a media briefing this Wednesday, Ford's president of the Americas and international markets Kumar Galhotra said that Ford's upcoming all-electric F-150 pickup truck will be a "real" work truck" — not a "lifestyle" truck like Tesla's upcoming Cybertruck or GMC's Hummer EV, Teslarati reports . "While all
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CU researchers call for national ethics guidelines when student health surveys uncover suicide-risk
In a report published today in the highly influential American Journal of Bioethics, the researchers describe a student health survey team that discovered a Colorado school with extremely high rates of suicide risk, and a lack of ethical guidance on whether or how to intervene. The researchers are calling for national ethics guidelines when student health surveys uncover suicide-risk "hot spots."
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More than a billion school meals not served during pandemic: Study
A new study estimates that more than 1.15 billion breakfasts and lunches for low-income children were not served in school as a result of school closures between March 9 and May 1. States and school districts have developed innovative solutions to meet the nutritional needs of low-income children and respond to the rapidly growing food insecurity crisis, yet the number of replacement meals is like
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Knowledge gained, questions remain on severe COVID-19 infections
Authors of this editorial review the evidence for the management of patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) that may apply to patients with severe COVID-19, what has been learned about treatment of these patients, and the gaps in knowledge that remain.
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Yale succeeds with a more inclusive approach to heart transplants
Doctors at Yale New Haven Hospital used a more aggressive selection process to more than quadruple the number of heart transplants performed there while maintaining positive patient outcomes, according to a new study.
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Biologists create new genetic systems to neutralize gene drives
Addressing concerns about gene drive releases in the wild, UC San Diego scientists and their colleagues have developed two new genetic systems that halt or eliminate gene drives after release. Created in fruit flies, the e-CHACRs and ERACRs are powerful gene drive control mechanisms that were meticulously developed and tested at the genetic and molecular levels.
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Mapping the 1.6 billion people who live near forests
Global maps of places where people and forests coexist show that an estimated 1.6 billion people live within 5 kilometers of a forest. The assessment, based on data from 2000 and 2012 and published September 18 in the journal One Earth, showed that of these 1.6 billion "forest-proximate people," 64.5 percent were located in tropical countries, and 71.3 percent lived in countries classified as low
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Bolsonaro's Indigenous land mining policy a billion-dollar backfire
Research has found a proposal to regulate mining of Indigenous lands in Brazil's Amazon rainforest could affect more than 863,000 square kilometres of forest and harm the nation's economy.
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A patient has died after ransomware hackers hit a German hospital
For the first time ever, a patient's death has been linked directly to a cyberattack. Police have launched a "negligent homicide" investigation after ransomware disrupted emergency care at Düsseldorf University Hospital in Germany. The victim : Prosecutors in Cologne say a female patient from Düsseldorf was scheduled to undergo critical care at the hospital when the September 9 attack disabled sy
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America has a long history of forced sterilization
that has targeted people who were poor, disabled, or incarcerated and people of color. (Pixabay/) A nurse who worked at an immigration detention center in Ocilla, Georgia has raised concerns about what she says is a high number of hysterectomies performed on immigrant women. A complaint filed on behalf of the whistleblower , Dawn Wooten, by several advocacy groups on Monday also alleges that med
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'Scientific American' Breaks 175 Years Of Tradition, Endorses A Presidential Nominee
Laura Helmuth of Scientific American says the decision to break tradition was both unanimous and quick: "We took this decision very seriously. You don't give up 175 years of tradition for nothing." (Image credit: Lerexis/Getty Images)
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VLBA makes first direct distance measurement to magnetar
Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) have made the first direct geometric measurement of the distance to a magnetar within our Milky Way Galaxy—a measurement that could help determine if magnetars are the sources of the long-mysterious Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs).
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Tesla Competitor Lucid Beats Model S Prototype Record on Racetrack
Record Breakers About a year ago, Tesla's Model S set the "record for fastest 4 door ever at Laguna Seca" in California, according to CEO Elon Musk . The move was likely intended to throw the gauntlet at Porsche's feet, as the record was set mere days after the German carmaker's announcement of the Taycan — which turned out to be a worthy competitor . But now Player 3 has entered the game. Lucid,
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New mathematical tool can select the best sensors for the job
In the 2019 Boeing 737 Max crash, the recovered black box from the aftermath hinted that a failed pressure sensor may have caused the ill-fated aircraft to nose dive. This incident and others have fueled a larger debate on sensor selection, number and placement to prevent the reoccurrence of such tragedies. Researchers have now developed a comprehensive mathematical framework that can help enginee
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'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. Further investigation uncovered proteins that act as compasses and motors, guiding the divisions of individual cells to create the overall pattern of the leaf.
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Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism
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Algorithms uncover cancers' hidden genetic losses and gains
Limitations in DNA sequencing technology make it difficult to detect some major mutations often linked to cancer, such as the loss or duplication of parts of chromosomes. Now, methods developed by computer scientists will allow researchers to more accurately identify these mutations in cancerous tissue, yielding a clearer picture of the evolution and spread of tumors than was previously possible.
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Biologists create new genetic systems to neutralize gene drives
In the past decade, researchers have engineered an array of new tools that control the balance of genetic inheritance. Based on CRISPR technology, such gene drives are poised to move from the laboratory into the wild where they are being engineered to suppress devastating diseases such as mosquito-borne malaria, dengue, Zika, chikungunya, yellow fever and West Nile. Gene drives carry the power to
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Mapping the 1.6 billion people who live near forests
Global maps of places where people and forests coexist show that an estimated 1.6 billion people live within 5 kilometers of a forest. The assessment, based on data from 2000 and 2012 and published September 18 in the journal One Earth, showed that of these 1.6 billion "forest-proximate people," 64.5 percent were located in tropical countries, and 71.3 percent lived in countries classified as low
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Bolsonaro's Indigenous land mining policy a billion-dollar backfire
Research has found a proposal to regulate mining of Indigenous lands in Brazil's Amazon rainforest could affect more than 863,000 square kilometers of forest and harm the nation's economy.
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New mathematical tool can select the best sensors for the job
In the 2019 Boeing 737 Max crash, the recovered black box from the aftermath hinted that a failed pressure sensor may have caused the ill-fated aircraft to nose dive. This incident and others have fueled a larger debate on sensor selection, number and placement to prevent the reoccurrence of such tragedies. Researchers have now developed a comprehensive mathematical framework that can help enginee
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Biologists create new genetic systems to neutralize gene drives
In the past decade, researchers have engineered an array of new tools that control the balance of genetic inheritance. Based on CRISPR technology, such gene drives are poised to move from the laboratory into the wild where they are being engineered to suppress devastating diseases such as mosquito-borne malaria, dengue, Zika, chikungunya, yellow fever and West Nile. Gene drives carry the power to
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What magic tricks can reveal about free will | Alice Pailhès
Are you in control of your choices? Magic tricks might reveal otherwise, says scientist and illusionist Alice Pailhès. Watch closely as she performs magic tricks that unveil how your brain works, how you can be subtly influenced and what that means for free will and your day-to-day life. Did she guess your card right?
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Malcolm Gladwell live | How to re-examine everything you know
Add event to your calendar In a time when we're all forced to be distant, we are directed into mind states of introspection, examination, and, too often, confusion. Malcolm Gladwell joins Big Think Live to discuss this unique moment in time with Radiolab's Latif Nasser. Together, they'll dive into Gladwell's latest season of Revisionist History, as well as the choices journalists and media figure
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Researchers discover a novel family of toxins used in bacterial competition
Toxic protein inhibits cell wall synthesis in rival bacteria. Discovery helps explain how pathogens cause imbalances in established microbial communities and could pave the way to the development of novel anti-microbial compounds.
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Mapping the decision-making pathways in the brain
Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified a new area of the brain that could be involved in cost-benefit decision-making.
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Who stole the light?
Free electron X-ray lasers deliver intense ultrashort pulses of x-rays, which can be used to image nanometer-scale objects in a single shot. When the x-ray wavelength is tuned to an electronic resonance, magnetization patterns can be made visible. When using increasingly intense pulses, however, the magnetization image fades away. The mechanism responsible for this loss in resonant magnetic scatte
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The TikTok ban is coming, but you can still download the app—for now
Watch Gordon Ramsey dance now because TikTok may be totally banned by November. (Stan Horaczek /) Swipe through TikTok this morning and you'll notice that the vibe is decidedly panicky. Today, an order from the US Commerce Department set a September 20th deadline for the major app stores to pull TikTok from their services. It will still be allowed to operate for users who already have the app ins
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Sharks flee in terror when killer whales show up
A new study finds that sharks will flee areas they met orcas in for up to a year. Killer whales are known to eat sharks, but it is unknown if the sharks are fleeing because they know that too. The discovery will change our understanding of how marine ecosystems evolve. Orcas, also known as "killer whales," are pretty cool. They're usually friendly despite their nickname, and are in an elite club
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Shedding light on the development of efficient blue-emitting semiconductors
Scientists have discovered a new alkali copper halide, Cs5Cu3Cl6I2, that emits pure blue light. The combination of the two halide ions, chloride and iodide, gives the material a crystalline structure made of zigzag chains and peculiar properties that result in highly efficient photoluminescence. This novel compound could be readily used to produce relatively inexpensive and eco-friendly white LEDs
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Sugar promotes sperm longevity in pig reproductive tract
For many livestock species, artificial insemination (AI) is standard. But it can be tricky to achieve success the first time, thanks to variability in ovulation timing across the herd. A new study identifies a naturally occurring sugar that slows the maturation of sperm in pigs, opening up the possibility of extending sperm storage time within the female reproductive tract and increasing the chanc
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Why do so few young people vote?
Why do so few young people in the United States vote? Researchers have investigated. For some reason, there's a big gap between young Americans' intention to vote and the chance that they will actually do it. Duke University professor D. Sunshine Hillygus says she's heard it all about why young people don't vote: "that young people are apathetic, that they're disinterested, that they are selfish
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China Planning to Launch Lunar Sample Return Mission in November
Preparing for Liftoff According to satellite imagery and ship tracking data, China is preparing to launch its Chang'e-5 sample return mission to the Moon, SpaceNews reports . The mission will attempt to return around two kilograms of samples — the first lunar sample mission launched by any country since the early 1970s. Components of the Long March 5 rocket launching the mission are on the way to
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New roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligence
New Roles for Clinicians in the Age of Artificial Intelligencehttps://doi.org/10.15212/bioi-2020-0014 Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this opinion article the authors Fengyi Zeng, Xiaowen Liang and Zhiyi Chen from The Third Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, China consider new roles for clinicians in the age of artificial intelligen
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Mosquito-borne viruses linked to stroke
A deadly combination of two mosquito-borne viruses may be a trigger for stroke, new University of Liverpool research published in the The Lancet Neurology has found.
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Increasing the effectiveness of immunotherapy against skin cancer
Researchers at the University of Bern have discovered a mechanism in the body's own immune system which is responsible for the maturation and activation of immune cells. In the fight against skin cancer, the results have the potential to help immunotherapies succeed, even in patients for whom they have so far been ineffective.
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After developing CRISPR test, UConn researchers validate clinical feasibility for COVID-19 testing
In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering– a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering–began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Today, the method is one step closer to being a cutting-edge diagnostics technology for rapid d
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Most homemade masks are doing a great job, even when we sneeze, study finds
Studies indicate that homemade masks help combat the spread of viruses like COVID-19 when combined with frequent hand-washing and physical distancing. Many of these studies focus on the transfer of tiny aerosol particles; however, researchers say that speaking, coughing and sneezing generates larger droplets that carry virus particles. Because of this, mechanical engineer Taher Saif said the estab
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Ten minutes of massage or rest will help your body fight stress
Study shows that short, easy-to-apply relaxation techniques can activate the body's regenerative system for fighting stress–offering new perspective on how we can treat stress-related disease
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VLBA makes first direct distance measurement to magnetar
Using the VLBA, astronomers have made the first direct geometric measurement of the distance to a magnetar. This precision measurement to one of the most magnetic objects in the Universe could help scientists determine if such objects are responsible for generating the mysterious Fast Radio Bursts.
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Ig Nobel Prizes reward research on helium-huffing alligators and knives made of feces
Thirtieth annual tribute to bizarre experiments goes digital
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Melting glacier floods Arctic coal mine, highlighting climate change irony
On July 26, Svalbard's only active coal mine, Gruve 7, was reported to be flooded by its operators, Store Norske Spitsbergen Kulkompani. It had been shut down earlier this year due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic; now plans to reopen the mine will now be delayed even further as a result. Glacial meltwater entered the mine through a crevasse at the junction between the overlying ice cap and glacie
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Life in the toxic clouds of Venus
Read a preview of Launchpad, our free weekly newsletter in which resident space expert Leah Crane fills you in on all the very latest news on our exploration of our solar system – and beyond.
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Shedding light on the development of efficient blue-emitting semiconductors
Scientists have discovered a new alkali copper halide, Cs5Cu3Cl6I2, that emits pure blue light. The combination of the two halide ions, chloride and iodide, gives the material a crystalline structure made of zigzag chains and peculiar properties that result in highly efficient photoluminescence. This novel compound could be readily used to produce relatively inexpensive and eco-friendly white LEDs
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Who Will Get a COVID-19 Vaccine First? Access Plans Are Taking Shape
Advisory groups around the world have released guidance to prioritize healthcare workers and those in front-line jobs — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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When Your Job Turns You Into a Brand, You Need a Friend to Be Human With
Each installment of The Friendship Files features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks with two best-selling authors, Margaret Stohl and Veronica Roth. When Veronica's first book, Divergent , came out, she was overwhelmed by its success. Margaret took Veronica under her wing "li
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Incognito by David Eagleman or The Brain by the same author?
I recently read 'The Brain', I found it to be a great introduction book with lots of experiments. I am planning to read 'Incognito' by the same author, is it different or are there repitition? Please let me know your thoughts on the two books! submitted by /u/rstone_9 [link] [comments]
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Applying Ancient Chinese Philosophy To Artificial Intelligence – NOEMA
submitted by /u/Futures_Bot [link] [comments]
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A hypothesis about how spiritual enlightenment works
What is spiritual enlightenment really and how can we explain the insights coming from it? Here are my speculations on the topic. Spiritual enlightenment is usually characterized (partly) by a few insights: (1) Everything is one. (2) You are everything. (3) The self doesn't exist. (1) To understand (1) you have to understand what "everything" means. "Everything" is not supposed to be understood a
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Neuronal Computation Underlying Inferential Reasoning in Humans and Mice
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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Q&A: what the new Covid rules mean for north-west England and Yorkshire
What are the new restrictions coming in on Tuesday and whom do they apply to? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Tougher coronavirus restrictions have been announced in large parts of north-west England, West Yorkshire and the Midlands from Tuesday, as the UK health secretary, Matt Hancock, refused to rule out a national lockdown in the face of surging infections. But w
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Arctic sea ice is being increasingly melted from below by warming Atlantic water
Each September, scientists like me look out for the point when the Arctic's meager summer fizzles out and sea ice begins to grow once more. This point is known as the annual sea ice minimum extent. It has declined consistently over the past 15 years, and 2019 was the second lowest after 2012 in 42 years of continuous satellite records. This year's minimum is imminent, and there is already even les
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The brain's memory abilities inspire AI experts in making neural networks less 'forgetful'
Artificial intelligence (AI) experts report that they have successfully addressed what they call a 'major, long-standing obstacle to increasing AI capabilities' by drawing inspiration from a human brain memory mechanism known as 'replay.'
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Consumers value difficult decisions over easy choices
Researchers found that disfluency, or the difficulty for an individual to process a message, increases people's attitudes toward that message after a time delay.
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Europe's old-growth forests at risk
A new study presents the first comprehensive assessment of the conservation status of primary forests in Europe — and shows that many of them are not protected and at risk of being destroyed. The researchers conclude that formal conservation of these forests should be a top priority for countries to meet their climate change and biodiversity goals.
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Keys to control the 'driver of cancer's aggressiveness'
A dangerous protein named SNAI2 helps cancers metastasize and shields cancer from both the immune system and chemotherapy. Worse, SNAI2 is in a family of proteins that are notoriously hard to fight with drugs. But now researchers have found a way to use the cell's recycling system to control SNAI2, providing a new possibility for treatments.
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Venus: Could It Really Harbor Life? New Study Springs a Surprise
Earth's sister planet, Venus, has not been regarded as a high priority in the search for life. Its surface temperature of around 450°C is thought to be hostile to even the hardiest of micro-organisms, and its thick, sulfurous, and acidic atmosphere has kept the surface almost completely free from visiting spacecraft. We have only had the briefest of glimpses of a barren landscape from the two Rus
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Development of high-sensitivity, wide-IF band heterodyne receiver in THz frequency range
The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology has developed a unique superconducting hot electron bolometer mixer (HEBM) using magnetic materials. The 2 THz band HEBM produced this time has a low noise performance of about 570 K (DSB), which is about 6 times the quantum noise limit, and a wide IF band characteristic of about 6.9 GHz, which is about 3 GHz larger than the conve
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Hot Stuff: Unusual thermal diode rectifies heat in both directions
You can feel it on your laptop and mobile phone. It's behind your refrigerator and office copy machine. While heat is desirable for appliances like a coffee maker, it can jeopardize the reliability and safety of electronic systems in other devices, causing premature failure at best and explosions at worst.
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Chimpanzees in volatile habitats evolved to behave more flexibly
One of the reasons humans are so resilient is our ability to mold our behavior to ever changing situations. It wasn't so long ago that many of us hugged when we met. In the middle of a pandemic, in which close contact between people can help spread a deadly virus, we now stand (often awkwardly) two meters apart. This is just one example of our ability to adapt to changing circumstances that can ot
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Snabbtest kan ge skräddarsydd antibiotikabehandling
Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har utvecklat en ny metod för att snabbt, enkelt och billigt kunna ta reda på hur effektiva två kombinerade antibiotika är på att stoppa bakteriers tillväxt. Den nya metoden är enkel för laboratorier att använda och kan ge ökade möjligheter för att skräddarsy läkemedelsbehandlingen vid bakterieinfektioner. Kombinationer av antimikrobiella medel sätts alltid in vid
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Chimpanzees in volatile habitats evolved to behave more flexibly
One of the reasons humans are so resilient is our ability to mold our behavior to ever changing situations. It wasn't so long ago that many of us hugged when we met. In the middle of a pandemic, in which close contact between people can help spread a deadly virus, we now stand (often awkwardly) two meters apart. This is just one example of our ability to adapt to changing circumstances that can ot
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Leslie Iversen obituary
Neuropharmacologist who searched for new gateways for drugs to treat the brain and mind Afflictions of the mind and brain, from stroke to schizophrenia, remain among the most challenging to treat, even after more than half a century of discoveries about the brain's biochemistry and how it responds to drugs. The neuropharmacologist Leslie Iversen, who has died aged 82, devoted his career to making
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Frozen poo and narcissists' eyebrows studies win Ig Nobel prizes
Gongs also awarded for research into vibrating earthworms, French kissing and bellowing alligators The annals of science brim with researchers who pushed the boundaries of sense and good taste in a laudable quest for knowledge. With the unveiling of the 30th annual Ig Nobel awards , another case shall be added. To test the validity of a story in a work of ethnographic literature, Metin Eren, an a
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Trump Admin to Shut Down TikTok App Downloads on Sunday
App Store Ban The Trump Administration is officially barring Chinese-owned mobile apps WeChat and TikTok from US app stores starting Sunday, The New York Times reports . Critics say it'll strike a grave blow to Americans' free speech rights and set a worrying precedent. The move also follows a lengthy back and forth between the president and TikTok, an app owned by Chinese multinational ByteDance
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Strukturerade lärarsamtal kan höja NO-undervisningen
Samtal om undervisning i naturvetenskap kan ge lärare möjlighet till ämnesdidaktisk utveckling. Men att bara sitta ner och prata räcker inte. Ska hela lärarkollegiet utvecklas krävs att samtalen karaktäriseras av både ett komplext innehåll och en hög grad av interaktion, visar forskning från Göteborgs universitet. I diskussionen om lärares professionsutveckling finns ett grundantagande att om lär
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3D model may lead to new pulmonary fibrosis treatments
A new 3D bioengineered model of lung tissue is poking holes in decades worth of flat, Petri dish observations into how the deadly disease pulmonary fibrosis progresses, researchers say. The causes of pulmonary fibrosis are not fully understood, but the condition is marked by scar tissue that forms inside the lungs. That scar tissue stiffens the walls of the lungs' air sacs, called alveoli, or, at
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Human genetics: A look in the mirror
Who are we? Where did we come from? How did we get here? Throughout the ages, humans have sought answers to these questions, pursuing wisdom through religion, philosophy, and eventually science. Evolutionary analyses published by Genome Biology and Evolution (GBE) allow us to peer into the mirror and better understand ourselves as a species, bringing us closer than ever to uncovering the answers t
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Human genetics: A look in the mirror
Who are we? Where did we come from? How did we get here? Throughout the ages, humans have sought answers to these questions, pursuing wisdom through religion, philosophy, and eventually science. Evolutionary analyses published by Genome Biology and Evolution (GBE) allow us to peer into the mirror and better understand ourselves as a species, bringing us closer than ever to uncovering the answers t
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Survey explores impact of technology-facilitated abuse
A team from The University of Queensland, Queensland University of Technology and University College London is examining how domestic and sexual violence survivors are being impacted by Internet of Things (IoT) technology, which enables everyday devices to collect, send and receive data.
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It's time to for us to revisit Venus to uncover its many mysteries
The discovery of a possible sign of life on Venus highlights our ignorance of what is going on within its swirling clouds and on its furnace-like surface. It's time to go there and find some answers, writes Peter Gao
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Most fertility-tracking apps are unreliable but free apps work best
An analysis of fertility-tracking apps available in the UK and Canada found that many use flawed methods to predict periods, and they should not be relied on to help conceive or as a contraceptive tool
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Evolutionary paths: Scientists have found new patterns in protein evolution
Russian scientists studied the trends in the evolution of amino acid sequences of proteins in vertebrates and insects. External factors can be considered as a reason for positive selection affecting genomic positions and serve as an essential aspect of the rapid evolution. But the effect of epistasis is manifested in positions under negative selection, as a result of which substitutions occur less
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Neil deGrasse Tyson speaks out on space, politics, and science outreach
The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.
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Confidence in the authorities' handling of COVID-19 provides good mental health
How did you react in March, when the country went into lock-down due to the coronavirus? Psychology experts at UiT The Arctic University of Norway have studied our reaction patterns and mental health in this one of a kind global crisis.
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Actively speaking two languages protects against cognitive impairment
A study has shown that Alzheimer's patients with a higher degree of bilingualism receive a later diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment
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Glyphosate residue in manure fertilizer decrease strawberry and meadow fescue growth
A new study finds that glyphosate residue from herbicides in manure fertilizer decrease the growth of strawberry and meadow fescue as well as runner production of strawberry.
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How researchers look at the bird brain in action
How do birds make decisions and which brain regions are particularly active when they solve tasks? Researchers from Bochum are investigating these questions. So far, only anesthetized birds and therefore passive experiments could be examined using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the examination of brain processes during active tasks was not possible. Now the researchers hav
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Potential for fisheries co-management shaped by interplay between formal, informal fisheries institutions
Integrating local norms and fishermen's knowledge into fisheries regulations helps increase trust in fisheries management institutions and can make it easier for co-management to work.
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Potential for fisheries co-management shaped by interplay between formal, informal fisheries institutions
Integrating local norms and fishermen's knowledge into fisheries regulations helps increase trust in fisheries management institutions and can make it easier for co-management to work.
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Measuring air pollution in a post-COVID-19 world
Air pollution is one of the biggest environmental problems of our time. According to a new report from the European Environment Agency (EEA), air pollution now contributes to one in eight deaths in Europe. Observations from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite have been vital in tracking the evolution of air pollution, specifically nitrogen dioxide concentrations, across Europe.
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The four most promising worlds for alien life in the solar system
The Earth's biosphere contains all the known ingredients necessary for life as we know it. Broadly speaking these are: liquid water, at least one source of energy, and an inventory of biologically useful elements and molecules.
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Quizzes improve academic performance
Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new meta-analysis. The researchers found in addition to frequency, immediate feedback from instructors also seemed to positively impact student performance.
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Q&A: Bailout of financial sector during Great Recession was a bad deal for taxpayers
U.S. taxpayers did not earn a fair return on the 2008 government bailout of financial institutions, according to new research from the University of Michigan's Ross School of Business.
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The detection of phosphine in Venus' clouds is a big deal, and here's how we can find out if it really is life
On Sept. 14, 2020, a new planet was added to the list of potentially habitable worlds in the Solar System: Venus.
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Too tall to live: Death of two giraffes by lightning strike suggests increased height risk
Ciska P. J. Scheijen, a conservationist at Rockwood Conservation, a nature park in South Africa, is wondering if giraffes are at greater risk of being struck by lightning due to their great height. In his paper published in the African Journal of Ecology, he notes that two giraffes in his park in South Africa were recently killed by a lightning strike.
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Researchers validate clinical feasibility for CRISPR-based COVID-19 testing at point of care
In March, researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering—a shared department in the schools of Dental Medicine, Medicine, and Engineering—began to develop a new, low-cost, CRISPR-based diagnostic platform to detect infectious diseases, including HIV virus, the novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). Today, the method is one step closer to being a cutting-edge diagnostics technology for rapid dete
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FULL EPISODE: Stream "Dodgeball Thunderdome" featuring @David Dobrik
S1 E3: "Exploding Red Ball" A tattooed trainer flexes her muscles against a martial arts master. A benchwarmer in search of a comeback takes aim at a sporty single mom. With $25,000 on the line, only the strong survive the Thunderdome. Stream More Full Episodes of Dodgeball Thunderdome: https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/dodgeball-thunderdome/ Watch Dodgeball Thunderdome hosted by David Dobrik, Er
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Too tall to live: Death of two giraffes by lightning strike suggests increased height risk
Ciska P. J. Scheijen, a conservationist at Rockwood Conservation, a nature park in South Africa, is wondering if giraffes are at greater risk of being struck by lightning due to their great height. In his paper published in the African Journal of Ecology, he notes that two giraffes in his park in South Africa were recently killed by a lightning strike.
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How planetary nebulae get their shapes
About 7.5 billion years from now, our sun will have converted most of its hydrogen fuel into helium through fusion, and then burned most of that helium into carbon and oxygen. It will have swollen to a size large enough to fill the solar system nearly to the current orbit of Mars, and lost almost half of its mass in winds. At this stage the very hot remnant star will ionize the ejected material, l
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How researchers look at the bird brain in action
How do birds make decisions and which brain regions are particularly active when they solve tasks? Researchers from the Department of Biopsychology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) are investigating these questions. So far, only anesthetized birds and therefore passive experiments could be examined using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the examination of brain processes dur
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Potential new drug to mitigate SARS-CoV-2 infection consequences
Researchers at the University of Malaga study how '4-PBA' treatment modulates the inflammatory response in severe cases of COVID-19
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Scientists predict economically important traits of crops
Researchers developed a new mathematical model to predict economic performance of crops. It can assist the breeders to obtain the plants with the highest possible quality.
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Nose's response to odors more than just a simple sum of parts
Based on highly sensitive recordings of neuron activity in the noses of mice, researchers from Kyushu University have found that olfactory sensory neurons can exhibit suppression or enhancement of response when odors are mixed, overturning a long-standing view that the response is a simple sum with more complex processing only happening at later stages.
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Promising computer simulations for stellarator plasmas
The turbulence code GENE (Gyrokinetic Electromagnetic Numerical Experiment), developed at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at Garching, Germany, has proven to be very useful for the theoretical description of turbulence in the plasma of tokamak-type fusion devices. Extended for the more complex geometry of stellarator-type devices, computer simulations with GENE now indicate a new met
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SUTD researchers develop simple method to 3D print milk products
Additive free, multimaterial 3D printing is achieved for milk-based products without temperature control
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New way to halt leukemia relapse shown promising in mice
Drugs tackling chronic myelogenous leukemia have completely transformed prognoses of patients over the last couple of decades, with most cases going into remission. But drug resistance can occur, leading to relapses. Targeting the lipids involved in regulating part of a leukemia stem cell's life span offers a potential second route to defeat the disease–and solid tumorous cancers as well.
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Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
Traces of violence on 1700 year old skeletons allow researchers to reconstruct warfare and sacrifices of nomads in Siberia. An international and interdisciplinary team of anthropologists, archaeologists and specialists in forensic sciences led by Marco Milella from the University of Bern performed a detailed and revealing analysis of the traumas found on the skeletal remains.
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Aberrant electronic and structural alterations in pressure tuned perovskite NaOsO3
In summary, a comprehensive temperature-dependent electrical transport, Raman scattering, synchrotron XRD, and DFT study has been carried out to understand the effect of external pressure on perovskite NaOsO3.
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Predicting the future of liver-safe drugs
Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) working with an international team have developed a Polygenic Risk Score using previous genomic studies that may help predict drug-induced liver injury. This score was validated on genomic data, cell cultures and organoids for several potentially hepatotoxic drugs, and may inform a screening test that can predict adverse responses both to a
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Unverricht-Lundborg disease is more common in Finland than elsewhere in the world
Based on reported cases, Unverricht-Lundborg disease, also known as progressive myoclonic epilepsy-1A, EPM1, is more common in Finland than anywhere else in the world, a new study finds.
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Solar storm forecasts for Earth improved with help from the public
Scientists used observations recorded by members of the public to increase accuracy of computer model predictions of when harmful CMEs will hit Earth.
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Coronavirus-induced carbon dioxide emission reductions are not yet detectable in the atmosphere
Based on current data measured in the energy, industry, and mobility sectors, restrictions of social life during the corona pandemic can be predicted to lead to a reduction of worldwide carbon dioxide emissions by up to eight percent in 2020. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), cumulative reductions of about this magnitude would be required every year to reach the go
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How researchers look at the bird brain in action
How do birds make decisions and which brain regions are particularly active when they solve tasks? Researchers from the Department of Biopsychology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) are investigating these questions. So far, only anesthetized birds and therefore passive experiments could be examined using the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Thus, the examination of brain processes dur
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Psychologists suggest using magic tricks to learn more about how the minds of animals work
A small team of psychology researchers at the University of Cambridge has published a Perspective piece in the journal Science suggesting that magic tricks be used by researchers seeking to learn more about how the minds of animals work. In their paper, the group proposes that researchers seek to learn the answer to three main questions: Are animals fooled by such tricks? Which part of a given tri
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To cut food waste, we may need to pay more for what we eat
How can we reduce food waste? Although the Swiss population are aware of the problem, they misjudge where most food waste is generated, ETH political scientists conclude. The general public support cutting food waste, even if this means food will cost more.
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Botanists unearth new 'vampire plant' in UK carpark
,Scientists Dr. Chris Thorogood at the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, and Dr. Fred Rumsey at London's Natural History Museum have just described a new form of a strange parasitic "vampire" plant known as "common broomrape."
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New stem cell technique could create placenta tissue
Researchers have made an unexpected stem cell discovery that could lead to new treatments for placenta complications during pregnancy. It's possible to reprogram adult skin cells into cells similar to human embryonic stem cells that can then be used to develop tissue from human organs, but the same process can't yet create placenta tissue. These stem cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (
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Psychologists suggest using magic tricks to learn more about how the minds of animals work
A small team of psychology researchers at the University of Cambridge has published a Perspective piece in the journal Science suggesting that magic tricks be used by researchers seeking to learn more about how the minds of animals work. In their paper, the group proposes that researchers seek to learn the answer to three main questions: Are animals fooled by such tricks? Which part of a given tri
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Botanists unearth new 'vampire plant' in UK carpark
,Scientists Dr. Chris Thorogood at the University of Oxford Botanic Garden, and Dr. Fred Rumsey at London's Natural History Museum have just described a new form of a strange parasitic "vampire" plant known as "common broomrape."
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Monarch butterflies' spectacular migration is at risk, and an ambitious new plan aims to save it
One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.
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Mutant virus: should we be worried that Sars-CoV-2 is changing ?
Scientists tracking the virus have uncovered a major mutation, but it may not be as scary as it sounds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists have had eyes on Sars-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, since the beginning of this pandemic. They can see it is evolving, but it is happening at a glacial pace compared with two other viruses with pandemic potential:
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Monarch butterflies' spectacular migration is at risk, and an ambitious new plan aims to save it
One of nature's epic events is underway: Monarch butterflies' fall migration. Departing from all across the United States and Canada, the butterflies travel up to 2,500 miles to cluster at the same locations in Mexico or along the Pacific Coast where their great-grandparents spent the previous winter.
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New study tracks COVID-19's effects on small tech firms
A new study by the UO's Lauren Lanahan seeks to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on small high-tech firms and track the challenges and opportunities they face as the crisis continues to unfold.
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Why we need a global citizens' assembly on gene editing
Developments in gene editing are often met with moral panic. Every new announcement raises outrage over the audacity of scientists "playing God." The existence of mutant mosquitoes and designer babies are often framed as threats—evidence that science fiction has crossed over into real life.
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Gen Z Has a Plan to Save the Election—Starting With the Polls
Poll workers, who skew elderly, are in short supply during the pandemic. Meet some of the young people trying to make up the gap.
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Netflix's 'Ratched' Is a Plea for Mental Health Care
The show attempts to address flaws in the health care system—and in failing to do so, proves how much more attention mental illness needs.
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Taking the temperature of the ocean by measuring the speed of sound waves passing through it
A team of researchers from the California Institute of Technology and the Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed a way to detect changes in ocean temperatures by measuring sound waves generated by underwater earthquakes. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how their system works and how well it worked when tested.
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Why we need a global citizens' assembly on gene editing
Developments in gene editing are often met with moral panic. Every new announcement raises outrage over the audacity of scientists "playing God." The existence of mutant mosquitoes and designer babies are often framed as threats—evidence that science fiction has crossed over into real life.
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The 5 Best Cheap Phone Plans (2020): Alternatives to the Big Carriers
If you're a Verizon, T-Mobile, or AT&T subscriber, these networks may save you a lot of money each month.
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Streaming Services Are Abusing the + Sign and It Must End
In the beginning, there was ESPN+, then Disney+. Now that CBS All Access is becoming Paramount+, it's time to call a moratorium.
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Apple One Could Be a Bundle of Problems
Plus: U2's iPod partnership, the public sector's need for tech minds, and unwelcome hurricane visitors.
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Engineers produce a fisheye lens that's completely flat
To capture panoramic views in a single shot, photographers typically use fisheye lenses—ultra-wide-angle lenses made from multiple pieces of curved glass, which distort incoming light to produce wide, bubble-like images. Their spherical, multipiece design makes fisheye lenses inherently bulky and often costly to produce.
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Resonant tunneling diode oscillators for terahertz-wave detection
A semiconductor device that is promising for both generating and detecting terahertz radiation has been demonstrated by physicists at RIKEN. This may aid the development of high-performance integrated solutions for terahertz imaging and sensing applications as well as for high-speed, next-generation wireless communications systems.
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Coordination of hormonal signaling and nutrient metabolism drives critical life-cycle transition
A biologist at RIKEN has discovered the way in which steroid signaling regulates the breakdown of sugar molecules in fruit flies so as to provide the energy larvae need to enter the pupal stage. This finding could have much wider implications that may extend to life-stage changes in people.
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Strong relationships help kids catch up after 6 months of COVID-19 school closures
Many Canadian children are now returning to their classrooms after schools shut down in March to stem the spread of COVID-19.
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Solar storm forecasts for Earth improved with help from the public
Solar storm analysis carried out by an army of citizen scientists has helped researchers devise a new and more accurate way of forecasting when Earth will be hit by harmful space weather.Scientists at the University of Reading added analysis carried out by members of the public to computer models designed to predict when coronal mass ejections (CMEs)—huge solar eruptions that are harmful to satell
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Coordination of hormonal signaling and nutrient metabolism drives critical life-cycle transition
A biologist at RIKEN has discovered the way in which steroid signaling regulates the breakdown of sugar molecules in fruit flies so as to provide the energy larvae need to enter the pupal stage. This finding could have much wider implications that may extend to life-stage changes in people.
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Increasing the effectiveness of cancer treatments: Anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy
Researh teams of Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have uncovered how to increase the efficacy of anti-PD-L1 immunotherapy. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, and bioinformatics approaches, they discovered that the nuclear localization of PD-L1 is controlled by acetylation at a single, specific, Lys site. In the nucleus, PD-L1 controls the expr
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Nano-microscope gives first direct observation of the magnetic properties of 2D materials
Widefield nitrogen-vacancy microscope solves problem of there being no way to tell exactly how strongly magnetic a 2D material was.
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Human genetics: A look in the mirror
Genome Biology and Evolution's latest virtual issue highlights recent research published in the journal within the field of human genetics.
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Stroke patients with COVID-19 have increased inflammation, stroke severity and death
Stroke patients who also have COVID-19 showed increased systemic inflammation, a more serious stroke severity and a much higher rate of death, compared to stroke patients who did not have COVID-19, according a retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study of 60 ischemic stroke patients admitted to UAB Hospital between late March and early May 2020.
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Smokers increasingly using e-cigarettes to quit, New Zealand survey shows
People who smoke are increasingly using e-cigarettes to try to quit smoking, a study by researchers at the University of Otago, Wellington, has found.
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How the coronavirus hijacks human cells to spread itself
Researchers have discovered a method the coronavirus uses to manipulate human cells to ensure its own replication. This knowledge will help develop drugs and vaccines to fight the coronavirus. A virus takes control of an infected cell because every virus depends on the resources and molecular machines of the cell to multiply. This also applies to SARS-CoV-2, the virus that has caused the COVID-19
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The Pulsar Chart That Became a Pop Icon Turns 50: Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures
A classic data visualization brought an astronomical curiosity to music lovers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Q&A: Powerful, double-decker bus-sized microscopes help scientists uncover possible COVID-19 treatment
Researchers at UBC's faculty of medicine are working with microscopes—some up to 13 feet tall—to help prevent and treat COVID-19.
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Q&A: Powerful, double-decker bus-sized microscopes help scientists uncover possible COVID-19 treatment
Researchers at UBC's faculty of medicine are working with microscopes—some up to 13 feet tall—to help prevent and treat COVID-19.
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Lighting the way to infrared detection
EPFL physicists propose a new path to detect infrared radiation with outstanding sensitivity, allowing detection of signals as low as that of a single quantum of light.
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Newly-described fossils reveal an ancient origin for New Zealand penguins
New Zealand is surrounded by highly productive oceans that attract seabirds from around the world, forming a global hotspot for seabird diversity. Establishing how and when this hotspot formed has been challenged by a lack of fossil discoveries connecting New Zealand's living seabirds to their ancient relatives.
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Christians want more support from churches on faith/work issues, study shows
Christians want more support from their places of worship when it comes to navigating ethical matters and other issues in the workplace, according to a new study from researchers with Rice University's Religion and Public Life Program (RPLP). In addition, many want churches to offer programming that fits the schedules of working professionals.
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Effects of West Coast wildfires go beyond evacuations and air quality
While the continuing West Coast wildfires have forced people to evacuate homes, the dirty air is trapping others indoors, impacting mood and exposing people to toxic particles. What's more, rainfall hitting charred areas could trigger landslides.
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Shifting identities: Performing sexual selves on social media
Sex is fascinating, important, and sometimes scary. Sex is a normal part of life. Yet, the multiplicity and richness of sexual practices on social media rarely make it into everyday conversations.
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Can revegetation return solar photovoltaic site soil to its untouched glory?
Projected to satisfy upwards of 30% of global electrical demand by 2100, solar photovoltaic (PV) technology has ushered in a new dawn for renewable, sustainable energy. Though promising, expansion of the energy technology is not without challenges.
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Johnson warns UK faces second wave of coronavirus
Country on notice new national restrictions may be needed and London told additional measures 'increasingly likely'
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Metroens skaber: »Jeg har aldrig forsøgt at snyde nogen«
PLUS. Det var den rigtige beslutning at skære antallet af vogne i et metrotog ned, da den første metro blev anlagt, fastslår metrodirektør Anne-Grethe Foss.
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Scientists 'scent train' honeybees to boost sunflowers' seed production
If you want a dog to hunt something down, it helps to let them sniff an item to pick up the scent. Now, researchers have found that scent training honeybees might work in a similar way — and that this approach could make bees more efficient in pollinating crops. The findings show that honeybees given food scented with sunflower odors led to a significant increase in sunflower crop production.
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Supercooled water is a stable liquid, scientists show for the first time
First-ever measurements provide evidence that extremely cold supercooled water exists in two distinct structures that co-exist and vary in proportion dependent on temperature.
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Review of The Social Dilemma
I just watched the Netflix documentary, The Social Dilemma, and found it extremely interesting, if flawed. The show is about the inside operation of the big social media tech companies and the impact they are having on society. Like all documentaries – this one has a particular narrative, and that narrative is a choice made by the filmmakers. These narratives never reflect the full complexity of
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Professor angriber metroens forældre: »De burde holdes ansvarlige«
PLUS. Når metroen allerede er for lille, skyldes det, at Metroselskabets ledelse snød på vægten i 1990'erne, lyder anklagen fra ekspert i megaprojekter.
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The psychology of fake news
The brain can be untrustworthy when it comes to deciphering fake news, and especially when headlines are repeated, presented with photos, or generally easy to imagine, experts from The Australia National University (ANU) have found.
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The secret to perfectly crispy fried chicken
Get the recipe for Saveur's Readers' Favorite Fried Chicken Recipe » Simply seasoned and fried, with a thin, crisp coating and tender, juicy meat, the fried chicken at Martha Lou's Kitchen is some of the best Saveur's editors have ever tasted. Get the recipe for Saveur's Readers' Favorite Fried Chicken Recipe » (Kat Craddock/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . Just about everyone lov
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What's in Wildfire Smoke, and How Dangerous Is It?
Blazes on the West Coast are spewing a haze clear across the country. Along the way, the complex chemistry of what we inhale gets even more complex.
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Apple Wants You to Smash That Subscribe Button
This week, we break down Apple's latest announcements, from new hardware to its push into bundles and home workouts.
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Journal retracts paper claiming smarter people are more likely to use a condom to avoid HIV
A psychology journal has retracted a 2020 paper purporting to find that smarter people are more likely to use a condom during sex to avoid HIV. The new study, by researchers from Singapore and the United States led by Sean Lee of the Singapore Management University School of Social Sciences, appeared in Personality and Individual … Continue reading
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Image: Mesh reflector for shaped radio beams
This prototype 2.6-m diameter metal-mesh antenna reflector represents a big step forward for the European space sector: versions can be manufactured to reproduce any surface pattern that antenna designers wish, something that was previously possible only with traditional solid antennas.
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The observation of Bloch ferromagnetism in composite fermions
Composite fermions are exotic quasi-particles found in interacting 2-D fermion systems at relatively large perpendicular magnetic fields. These quasi-particles, which are composed of an electron and two magnetic flux quanta, have often been used to describe a physical phenomenon known as the fractional quantum Hall effect.
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The circular economy could save our broken water system
Society is consuming water at an ever-increasing rate while water pollution and global warming continue to limit the availability of water, a cluster of problems that could slash future economic development by at least a third.
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Frossen afføring dur ikke til knive
De skøre Nobelpriser, Ig Nobelpriserne, er blevet uddelt for 30. gang. I år blev forskning i afføringsknive og regneorme-vibrationer hædret.
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ZShield: Unproven Protection from SARS-CoV-2 Infection, Especially for Kids
If it seems to good to be true, it probably is. And ZShield face shields being marketed to the general public certainly fits that description, especially when it comes to their use by children.
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Scientists Find First-Ever Planet Orbiting Dead Star
Humanity has identified thousands of exoplanets , so you'd think we've got a pretty good handle on where to look for them. And yet, the universe keeps surprising us. A new study led by Andrew Vanderburg of the University of Wisconsin-Madison reveals a possible exoplanet some 80 light-years away. The solar system is very strange, though. The planet is orbiting a stellar remnant , a dead star known
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Is the UK government ready for a Covid winter?
A scientific report in July made several recommendations to avoid a resurgence. We look at the government response In mid-July, an Academy of Medical Sciences report urged the government to use the remainder of the summer to prepare for a second wave of coronavirus during the winter. Commissioned by the government's chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, the 79-page study warned that a r
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Where Joe Biden Is Underperforming Hillary Clinton
J oe Biden leads Donald Trump by a solid margin—about 7 percentage points nationally, as of this writing. He's built his advantage by improving on Hillary Clinton's 2016 success with suburban voters, seniors, and college-educated white Americans. But when it comes to Latinos, Biden may have a problem. Although he's dramatically outpacing Trump among Latinos overall, he's falling behind Clinton's
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The Election's Biggest Threat Is No Longer the Postal Service
P resident Donald Trump stood on a North Carolina tarmac earlier this month, Air Force One idling behind him, and urged his supporters to commit a crime. He said they should cast the ballots they received in the mail—just as he has done many times in the past—and then they should go to their polling place on Election Day and test the system by trying to vote again. "Let them send it in, and let t
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Cyclone Ianos, a Rare 'Medicane,' Batters Ionian Islands of Greece
Ianos, a rare hurricane-strength Mediterranean storm, slammed into Greece's western islands, bringing lashing rain and gales.
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Rocket Lab Could Beat NASA Back to Venus in the Search for ET
After years of neglect, Earth's other neighbor is back in the spotlight following a major discovery. A private rocket company may be the first to visit.
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Companies Can Track Your Phone's Movements to Target Ads
Brands are seeking new ways to customize messages. A startup that gathers data on when you pick up your phone, or when you go out on a run, can help.
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How to Use a Second Monitor With Your Laptop
Need a little more desktop real estate, or just tired of hunching over a small screen all day? Here's how to give your back—and eyes—a break.
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A Grassroots Effort to Fight Misinformation during the Pandemic
As COVID-19 spread, several organizations worked together to create Ask a Scientist — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Searching for life on Venus is a stab in the colossal dark
Researchers insist that only alien lifeforms would explain their detection of phosphine
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PODCAST: Metroen skal bygges om. Ingeniør udfordrer management-bullshit
Det bliver snart nødvendigt at udvide metrostationerne i København. Det vil koste milliarder og give store gener for passagererne. Ingeniørkomiker udstiller varmluftsstrategier udtænkt af ledere med, der lider af PISS (Pinagtigt Idio­tisk Sludder-Syndrom).
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Can an Algorithm Help Solve Political Paralysis?
As faith in government hits historic lows, organizers in the U.K. are trying a new math-based approach to democracy. Would it work in the bitterly divided U.S? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bättre datorsimulering ger snabbare utveckling av nya bilar
Utveckling av nya bilar kräver avancerade datorsimuleringar. Bland annat simuleras själva plåtformningen för att förutse defekter som veckbildning och sprickor i plåten. Med bättre simuleringar, som även omfattar maskinerna i fabriken, kan ledtiderna vid bilutveckling kortas, visar forskning vid BTH. Volvo Cars i Olofström använder i stor utsträckning datorsimuleringar vid utveckling av nya bilar
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Are cooler heads needed on climate change?
Two controversial authors take aim at the scare stories — and puncture a few myths on the way
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Can an Algorithm Help Solve Political Paralysis?
As faith in government hits historic lows, organizers in the U.K. are trying a new math-based approach to democracy. Would it work in the bitterly divided U.S? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The U.S. Is on the Path to Destruction
The federal government spends roughly $700 billion a year on the military. It spends perhaps $15 billion a year trying to understand and stop climate change . I thought about those numbers a lot last week, as I tried to stop my toddler from playing in ash, tried to calm down my dogs as they paced and panted in mid-morning dusk light, tried to figure out whether my air purifier was actually protec
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The Weaponization of the Free-Exercise Clause
There was a time when the Constitution's protection of the "free exercise" of religion was a sort of shield, a protection for religious minorities from the prejudices of the powerful. No longer. The Supreme Court's conservative majority is in the process of transforming this First Amendment clause into a sword that politically powerful Christian conservatives can use to strike down hard-fought ad
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Bill Barr's Stinging Attack on Bill Barr
In an administration that tends toward incoherence and lunacy , Bill Barr's great strength is the ability to sound levelheaded. The attorney general is calm, cogent, and logical—and, in contrast to many of his Cabinet colleagues, clearly well studied and qualified for his role. Barr's sober demeanor allows him to make a lot of arguments that sound reasonable and persuasive when delivered, as he d
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How to work out for your mental health
Switching up your routine and taking time for mindfulness are the psychologist-approved methods to making a workout strengthen your mental health. (Pexels/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. It's no secret that y
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YouTube's Plot to Silence Conspiracy Theories
From flat-earthers to QAnon to Covid quackery, the video giant is awash in misinformation. Can AI keep the lunatic fringe from going viral?
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Svårt driva skadeståndsmål vid immateriella intrång
Även omständigheter som inte är direkt kopplade till själva skadan kan vara relevanta när skadestånd vid olagligt spridande av upphovsrättsskyddat och andra immateriella intrång ska fastställas. Principer om skadestånd och processrätt ska fungera som komplement, inte ersätta lagarnas och direktivens särskilda bestämmelser om vad som avgör nivån på ersättningen och vilka omständigheter som ska väg
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Covid-19 News: Live Updates
Israel becomes one of the few countries to impose a second nationwide lockdown. In the U.S., Joe Biden tries to focus the campaign on President Trump's virus performance.
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The Wildfires: What I Saw When Australia Burned
At one point, the wildfires that country experienced seemed to fade from our memory. Not anymore. And what I witnessed there has shaped my thoughts on what's raging here.
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The Undark Interview: A Conversation with Rita Colwell
In her new memoir, "A Lab of One's Own," microbiologist Rita Colwell recounts her struggle with sexism in science. When Colwell earned her Ph.D., training women in the sciences was viewed by many as a waste of time. Nevertheless, she persisted, eventually becoming director of the National Science Foundation.
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Daily briefing: We still don't fully understand fire
Nature, Published online: 17 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02686-7 Despite our intimate familiarity with fire, we still struggle with a complete understanding of it. Plus, fast antigen coronavirus tests and increasingly impenetrable papers.
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Rain-induced bioecological resuspension of radiocaesium in a polluted forest in Japan
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72029-z
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Decoding mitochondrial heterogeneity in single muscle fibres by imaging mass cytometry
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-70885-3
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The potential of Gantry beamline large momentum acceptance for real time tumour tracking in pencil beam scanning proton therapy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71821-1
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Dynamic regulation of the cholinergic system in the spinal central nervous system
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72524-3
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Encoding scheme using quantum dots for single logical qubit information onto four-photon decoherence-free states
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71072-0
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Azobenzene-based sinusoidal surface topography drives focal adhesion confinement and guides collective migration of epithelial cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71567-w
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Sarcoidosis exosomes stimulate monocytes to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines and CCL2
Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72067-7
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The art of asking the right questions
Traditionally, intelligence has been viewed as having all the answers. When it comes to being innovative and forward-thinking, it turns out that being able to ask the right questions is an equally valuable skill. The difference between the right and wrong questions is not simply in the level of difficulty. In this video, geobiologist Hope Jahren, journalist Warren Berger, experimental philosopher
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SPT6-driven error-free DNA repair safeguards genomic stability of glioblastoma cancer stem-like cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18549-8 Cancer stem cells can evade treatment. Here, the authors perform an in vitro screen to identify proteins that are involved in protecting glioma cancer stem cells from therapy and find that SPT6 increases BRCA1 expression and drives error-free DNA repair, thereby ensuring the survival of the cells.
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Structural and mechanistic basis of capsule O-acetylation in Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18464-y Neisseria meningitidis capsular polysaccharide (CPS) is a major virulence factor and vaccine formulations against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A (NmA) contain O-acetylated CPS. Here, the authors provide mechanistic insights into CPS O-acetylation in NmA by determining the crystal structure of the O-acet
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Three-dimensional strain dynamics govern the hysteresis in heterogeneous catalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18622-2 Direct visualisation of site-specific strain variations of catalysts is needed to better understand catalytic properties. Here, the authors determine with attojoule precision that the well-known catalytic hysteresis phenomenon occurs at single particle level and involves three-dimensional strain field.
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Ultrasensitive and visual detection of SARS-CoV-2 using all-in-one dual CRISPR-Cas12a assay
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18575-6 Rapid and early detection of SARS-CoV-2 will aid intervention to stop disease spread. Here the authors present a one-pot CRISPR-based rapid detection system with visual readout.
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Retrieving functional pathways of biomolecules from single-particle snapshots
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18403-x There is a great interest in retrieving functional pathways from cryo-EM single-particle data. Here, the authors present an approach that combines cryo-EM with advanced data-analytical methods and molecular dynamics simulations to reveal the functional pathways traversed on experimentally derived energy lan
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Realization of acoustic spin transport in metasurface waveguides
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18599-y Spin angular momenta play a crucial role in topological phases of matter, in acoustic waves they have been demonstrated recently. Here, the authors present a symmetry-breaking metasurface waveguide that assists backscattering suppression of acoustic waves, because of tight spin-momentum coupling.
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DsbA-L mediated renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis in UUO mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18304-z DsbA-L upregulation prevents lipid-induced renal injury in diabetic nephropathy. Here, the authors show that DsbA-L knockout attenuates tubulointerstitial fibrosis in mice, and show that this occurs via activation of Smad3 and p53, which result in modulation of CTGF, a regulator of kidney fibrosis.
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Letter-writing staved off lockdown loneliness. Now it's getting out the vote.
For the past couple of years, Courtney Cochran hosted a Nashville-based meetup group called the Snail Mail Social Club . Before the pandemic, it involved people gathering, pen and paper in hand, to write letters together. "It was a fun social endeavor," Cochran says. "You got some face-to-face connecting time with people." When the coronavirus made meeting impossible, a friend suggested she set u
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Vikingarna – en blandad genetisk skara
Studien som letts av den danske dna-forskaren Eske Willerslev visar att de nordbor som for i viking inte bara spred sina gener i alla väderstreck – de tog också in gener. Och inte nog med det. Analyser av 442 individer visar att en del som deltog i vikingafärder också kom från fjärran.
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Biodiversitet trues af indførte dyr og planter
PLUS. Et omfattende undersøgelse viser, at biodiversiteten mindskes, når vi bringer planter og dyr fra en verdensdel til en anden. Det gør økosystemerne mere sårbare.
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Hot electrons in a nanowire hard X-ray detector
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18384-x Designing efficient nanowire chip-based electrical and optical devices remains a challenge. Here, the authors present an axial p-n junction GaAs nanowire X-ray detector that enables achieving a spatial resolution of 200 nm; probing the internal electrical field and observing hot electron effects at the nano
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Electron hydrodynamics in anisotropic materials
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18553-y In some materials electrons can behave hydrodynamically, exhibiting phenomena associated with classical viscous fluids. In this theory work, the authors show that the symmetries of the crystal lattices in which the electrons reside can lead to additional unique hydrodynamic effects.
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Cold spells in the Nordic Seas during the early Eocene Greenhouse
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18558-7 The early Eocene was characterized by exceptionally high global temperatures and no polar ice. Here, clumped isotope paleothermometry of glendonite calcite from the Danish Basin shows that these were formed in waters below 5 °C, indicating that regionalised cool episodes punctuated the background warmth of
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Global temperature modes shed light on the Holocene temperature conundrum
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18478-6 Proxy reconstructions show a decreasing trend from the Middle to Late Holocene, which conflicts with model results showing an increasing trend. Statistical analysis of model output shows that these conflicting results originate from two distinct modes of variability, which dominate at different regions and
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A quantitative framework reveals ecological drivers of grassland microbial community assembly in response to warming
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18560-z Studies of microbial community assembly mechanisms typically use metrics for turnover within the whole community. Here, the authors develop an alternative approach based on turnover within lineages and dissect mechanistic change in grassland bacterial assembly under experimental warming.
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Rapid and direct control of target protein levels with VHL-recruiting dTAG molecules
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18377-w The dTAG system is used to rapidly deplete tagged target proteins in vitro and in vivo, but there are context- and protein-specific differences in its effectiveness. Here, the authors develop a second generation dTAG molecule that can degrade previously recalcitrant target proteins in cells and mice.
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An integrated personal and population-based Egyptian genome reference
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-17964-1 North Africans are underrepresented in current genome-wide data sets. Here, the authors provide an Egyptian genome reference, consisting of de novo assembly of the genome of an Egyptian individual and genome-wide genetic variation from a representative cohort of 110 Egyptian individuals.
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Association of APOE e2 genotype with Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's neurodegenerative pathologies
Nature Communications, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18198-x The apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene contains both the major common risk variant associated with clinically diagnosed late onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), APOE e4, and a neuroprotective variant, APOE e2. Here the authors confirm that the e2 allele is protective against Alzheimer's disease neuropathologies, but
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California and Oregon 2020 wildfires in maps, graphics and images
A visual guide to the wildfires ravaging California, Oregon and other western states.
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Microscopy illuminates charcoal's sketchy origins
Nature, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02672-z A large volume of charcoal sold in Europe comes from tropical forests and is often incorrectly labelled, raising questions about whether it was logged illegally.
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Siberia landscape scarred by climate change
Scientists are warning about the consequences of vast swathes of ground thawing in Siberia.
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What maths is involved in stirring a cup of tea?
A professor has won £2.3m for applying complex maths to simple situations – like stirring tea.
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Ekstremt velbevaret: 20.000 år gammel bjørn dukker frem af den frosne jord
Det er ikke det eneste eksempel på fortidsdyr, som er dukket frem på grund af klimaforandringer.
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Twitter indfører sikkerhedstiltag for at forhindre valgkaos
Det sociale medie Twitter stiller krav til bedre sikkerhed for »højt profilerede profiler« forud for præsidentvalget i USA.
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UK coronavirus live: two-week 'circuit break' considered to halt Covid surge in England
Health secretary Matt Hancock refuses to rule out second national lockdown as 'last line of defence' 'Circuit break' plans for England to prevent new lockdown UK test and trace 'barely functional' as 11 million face lockdown NHS worker attacked on London bus in Covid mask row, say police Global coronavirus updates – live 10.34am BST The Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, told LBC that Cobra hasn't met
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Van Morrison criticises 'fascist bullies' in anti-lockdown Covid songs
Songwriter uses new material to condemn UK government, scientists and celebrities Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Van Morrison has described the British government as "fascist bullies disturbing our peace" in one of three new tracks he has written to protest against safety measures to prevent the spread of Covid-19. On No More Lockdown, Morrison sings: Continue readi
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Forskningsprojekt vil teste pakketransport via kollektiv trafik
PLUS. Danskere skal kunne tage en pakke med under armen og bringe den fra én station til en anden, når de alligevel skal med offentlig transport. DSB og flere kommuner samarbejder med erhvervsforsker i Atkins om den klimavenlige pakketransport.
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Poop knives, arachnophobic entomologists win 2020 Ig Nobels
Maybe this year's Ig Nobels, the spoof prizes for dubious but humorous scientific achievement, should have been renamed the Ick Nobels.
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Study suggests substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs are infected with SARS-CoV-2 by their owners
A small study by Canadian veterinary science experts being presented at this ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) suggests that a substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 by their owners. Furthermore, in several cases pets found to be infected had COVID-19-like respiratory symptoms at the time their owner had COVID-19.
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Study suggests substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs are infected with SARS-CoV-2 by their owners
A small study by Canadian veterinary science experts being presented at this ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) suggests that a substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 by their owners. Furthermore, in several cases pets found to be infected had COVID-19-like respiratory symptoms at the time their owner had COVID-19.
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Portræt: »Når man træder ind på scenen som ­formand, skal man også kunne fylde den ud«
#4 Fagpolitikken har fyldt meget i stort set hele Camilla Noelle Rathckes lægeliv, siden hun ved et tilfælde blev fællestillidsmand på Herlev Hospital. Nu er det hendes opgave at levere den fagpolitiske vare til mere end 30.000 lægekolleger og sikre, at Lægeforeningen står stærkt i det danske sundhedsvæsen. For der skal ske noget, mener den nye lægeformand, men bare ikke hjemme i 'fusionskøkkenet
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Immunotherapy improves survival in advanced bladder cancer patients
An immunotherapy drug called 'avelumab' has been shown to significantly improve survival in patients with the most common type of bladder cancer, according to results from a phase III clinical trial led by Queen Mary University of London and Barts Cancer Centre, UK.
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Australia's stinging trees: if the snakes and spiders don't get you, the plants might | Irina Vetter, Edward Kalani Gilding and Thomas Durek
Noxious nettles with venom similar to that of scorpions are helping scientists understand pain and how to control it Australia is home to some of the world's most dangerous wildlife. Anyone who spends time outdoors in eastern Australia is wise to keep an eye out for snakes, spiders, swooping birds, crocodiles, deadly cone snails and tiny toxic jellyfish. But what not everybody knows is that even
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Fastest Growing and Shrinking Large Cities in America
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Chitin-Derived Materials Can be Used to Create Tools & Shelter on Mars
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How to check for biases in Artificial Intelligence?
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NASA work on lattice confinement fusion grabs attention
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Momentum for Basic Income Builds as Pandemic Drags On
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France has renamed its airforce to the French Air and Space Force
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Magtens Top 100: Her er sundhedsvæsenets 100 mest magtfulde
Se listen over de 100 mest magtfulde personer i det danske sundhedsvæsen anno 2020.
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Doctors accuse New Delhi of concealing health workers' deaths
Indian Medical Association says 382 doctors have died as daily cases approach 100,000
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Over Half of COVID-19 Patients in a New Study Are Suffering Long-Term Fatigue
"We are increasingly seeing evidence of 'long COVID'."
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Many Hospitals Charge More Than Twice What Medicare Pays for the Same Care
The gap between rates set for private insurers and employers vs. those by the federal government stirs the debate over a government-run health plan.
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Photos of the Week: Tinside Lido, Log Climber, Dragon Temple
The Sagrada Familia in Barcelona, a hammock on Australian ski slopes, wildfire damage in Oregon, scorched wetlands in Brazil, flooding in Florida from Hurricane Sally, continued protests in Belarus, smoky skies over Seattle, scenes from the Crimean Fashion Week, and much more
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These Small Mammals Snort to a Different Tune
Hyraxes, which live in Africa and the Middle East, punctuate their songs with snorts. And the snorts appear to reflect the animals' emotional state. Jason G. Goldman reports.
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Private health insurers paid hospitals 247% of what medicare would
While recent hospital price transparency initiatives have increased information about procedure-level prices available to patients, employers who pay for most private insurance have little usable information about the prices negotiated on their behalf. A new study based on data from more than half the nation's hospitals finds that prices paid to hospitals nationally during 2018 by privately insure
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These Small Mammals Snort to a Different Tune
Hyraxes, which live in Africa and the Middle East, punctuate their songs with snorts. And the snorts appear to reflect the animals' emotional state. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Den mest magtfulde i det danske ­sundhedsvæsen er… en virus
ANALYSE. Formelt sidder politikere og embedsmænd solidt på toppen af magten i det danske ­sundhedsvæsen. Men 2020 er ikke som nogen andre år, hvor Dagens ­Medicin har forsøgt at kortlægge, hvem der har magten i det danske sundhedsvæsen. I år er den egentlige ­vinder ikke synlig for det blotte øje.
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Portræt: Coronageneralen, der blev offentligt eje
#2 Søren Brostrøm har en klippefast tro på fagligt velfunderede anbefalinger. Også i situationer, hvor de går imod den siddende regerings holdninger. Det har vi set under det seneste halve års coronakrise, som flere gange har udstillet modsætningsforholdet mellem sundhedsfaglige og politiske anbefalinger.
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Portræt: Den epidemiologiske talnørd
#6 Kåre Mølbak er videnskabsmanden og talnørden, der baserer sine udtalelser på fakta frem for gisninger, og som ikke søger mediernes rampelys.
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Portræt: Infektionsmediciner med international gennemslagskraft
#20 Professor Jens Lundgrens mangeårige forskning på HIV/AIDS-området har givet ham et stort internationalt netværk, som han har kunnet trække på i forbindelse med forskning i mulige behandlinger af patienter med COVID-19.
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Ancient human footprints in Saudi Arabia give glimpse of Arabian ecology 120000 years ago
Using high resolution paleoecological information obtained from fossilized footprints, a new study published in Science Advances presents ~120 thousand-year-old human and animal footprints from an ancient lake bed in northern Arabia. These findings represent the earliest evidence for humans in this part of the world and show that human and animal movements and landscape use were closely linked.
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Portræt: Eneste læge i uvildig ekspertgruppe
#21 Professor Lars Østergaard, Aarhus Universitetshospital, er den sundhedsfaglige repræsentant i den ekspertgruppe, som skal fælde dom over myndighedernes håndtering af coronaudbruddet.
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Portræt: Professoren fra 'fronten'
#40 Pleje af COVID-19-patienter, opstart af kliniske forsøg og mediehenvendelser har i det seneste halve år trukket store veksler på klinisk professor i infektionsmedicin Thomas Benfields tid.
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Portræt: Patienternes ­koncerndirektør
#28 Alle og enhver kan komme og sige, at patienterne er i centrum, er det vigtigste, står forrest osv. osv. osv. Men få kan vise, hvordan sundhedsvæsenet faktisk kan lykkes med at stille sig selv i patienternes skygge. Det kan Dorthe Crüger, og det har nu landet hende et af sundhedsvæsenets topjob.
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KulturKanylen: »Kunst er nødvendigt for mit sjæleliv«
For direktør i Lægemiddelstyrelsen Thomas Senderovitz er kunstneriske oplevelser ikke bare adspredelse, men noget han har brug for i sin hverdag. Beviset på hans kærlighed til kunsten er en tatovering på højre underarm.
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Undersøgelse slår fast: Elektriske chok gennem hjernen redder selvmordstruede
Omkring 1.800 personer får hvert år behandlingen i Danmark.
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Hvorfor var det ikke statsministeren, der stod forrest, da rapporten blev præsenteret?
Det har været en interessant og nedslående uge, hvis man interesserer sig for ulighed i sundhed. Interessant, fordi uligheden atter kom på dagsordenen, efter udgivelsen af en ny rapport fra Sundhedsstyrelsen, skriver Torben Mogensen.
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AI, præcisionsdiagnostik og risk scoring er fremtidens løsninger på proaktiv folkesundhed
Bedre livskvalitet for patienter, øget folkesundhed og lavere hospitalsomkostninger kan vente forude med præcisions diagnostik. Grundlaget er der, men data skal udnyttes.
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These Small Mammals Snort to a Different Tune
Hyraxes, which live in Africa and the Middle East, punctuate their songs with snorts. And the snorts appear to reflect the animals' emotional state. Jason G. Goldman reports. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Melbourne life during coronavirus: share your photos of the highs and lows of 2020
Lopsided sourdough, cupboards full of toilet paper, or matching trackpants. What does your Australia 2020 scrapbook look like? There will be, for most of us living in Melbourne, no holiday snaps to memorialise this year. No big weddings. No gathering of old friends at the comedy festival. Instead our lives, for much of the past six months, have been spent inside our homes and nodding politely to
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Melbourne academics win Ig Nobel prize for research showing worms vibrate like water
Physicist Ivan Maksymov and applied mathematician Andriy Pototsky placed worms on subwoofer in 'what if' moment Blasting a speaker to move garden worms in a regional Victorian backyard might sound more like a high school science experiment than a breakthrough in neuroscience. What started as an exercise in curiosity of two academics from Melbourne's Swinburne University has found vibrations cause
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KU's CISO vil ikke bo under it-chefen: »Informationssikkerhed handler om meget mere end it«
Når organisationer placerer deres CISO under it-chefen, så kan det går ud over informationssikkerhedens kvalitet, advarer Poul Halkjær Nielsen, CISO på Københavns Universitet.
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Not all trauma is the same [Letters (Online Only)]
In a recent Brief Report by Raker et al. (1), the investigators analyze data from a prospective study of young, low-income mothers who survived Hurricane Katrina and apply this to the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to discuss strategies to mitigate the pandemic's indirect effects on survivors. We appreciate…
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Reply to Ng et al.: Not all trauma is the same, but lessons can be drawn from commonalities [Letters (Online Only)]
In their Letter, Ng et al. (1) state that our (2) comparison of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) to Hurricane Katrina is "slightly contrived." We appreciate the opportunity for discussion. However, we maintain that there is much to be learned from prior disasters, including Hurricane Katrina, for anticipating and mitigating…
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Using the curriculum vitae to promote gender equity during the COVID-19 pandemic [Letters (Online Only)]
We commend Malisch et al. on their Opinion (1) on immediate solutions to ensure gender equity during the COVID-19 pandemic given the disproportionate burden placed on women due to childcare and household responsibilities. Given early reports showing fewer women are submitting academic papers during the pandemic (2), we encourage institutions…
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Reply to Arora et al.: Concerns and considerations about using the CV as an equity tool [Letters (Online Only)]
As increasing evidence emerges concerning the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on women academics (1, 2), we hope our work continues to prompt institutions and departments to advance gender equity in tenure and promotion (3). For example, Arora et al. (4) have developed a department-specific rubric to assess COVID-19's impact on…
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Systemic complement activation is associated with respiratory failure in COVID-19 hospitalized patients [Immunology and Inflammation]
Respiratory failure in the acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is hypothesized to be driven by an overreacting innate immune response, where the complement system is a key player. In this prospective cohort study of 39 hospitalized coronavirus disease COVID-19 patients, we describe systemic complement activation and its association…
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Development of a serum miRNA panel for detection of early stage non-small cell lung cancer [Medical Sciences]
Minimally invasive testing for early detection of lung cancer to improve patient survival is a major unmet clinical need. This study aimed to develop and validate a serum multi-microRNA (multimiR) panel as a minimally invasive test for early detection of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) regardless of smoking status, gender,…
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Scientists discover what happens in our brains when we make educated guesses
Researchers have identified how cells in our brains work together to join up memories of separate experiences, allowing us to make educated guesses in everyday life. By studying both human and mouse brain activity, they report that this process happens in a region of the brain called the hippocampus.
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Curve at tip of shoes eases movement but may lead to weaker muscles, problems
The scientists found that the more curved a toe spring is, the less power the foot inside the shoe has to exert when pushing off from the ground while walking. That means foot muscles are doing less work, and this, the researchers hypothesize, may have consequences such as less endurance and make people more susceptible to medical conditions like plantar fasciitis.
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Understanding the movement patterns of free-swimming marine snails
New research looks at the swimming and sinking kinematics of nine species of warm water pteropods (sea snails) to shed light on their ecology, predator-prey interactions, and vertical distributions. By using a high-speed stereophotogrammetry system, investigators were able to focus on how the shell shape, body geometry, and body size affect their swimming behavior from a fluid mechanics perspectiv
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New calculation refines comparison of matter with antimatter
An international collaboration of theoretical physicists has published a new calculation relevant to the search for an explanation of the predominance of matter over antimatter in our universe. The new calculation gives a more accurate prediction for the likelihood with which kaons decay into a pair of electrically charged pions vs. a pair of neutral pions.
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Årelange metrolukninger og mere byggerod forude
PLUS. Københavns metro er for trang om 15 år. Løsningen er at køre med firevognstog. Men det vil koste seks milliarder og medføre enorme gener om få år.
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Curve at tip of shoes eases movement but may lead to weaker muscles, problems
The scientists found that the more curved a toe spring is, the less power the foot inside the shoe has to exert when pushing off from the ground while walking. That means foot muscles are doing less work, and this, the researchers hypothesize, may have consequences such as less endurance and make people more susceptible to medical conditions like plantar fasciitis.
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New calculation refines comparison of matter with antimatter
An international collaboration of theoretical physicists has published a new calculation relevant to the search for an explanation of the predominance of matter over antimatter in our universe. The new calculation gives a more accurate prediction for the likelihood with which kaons decay into a pair of electrically charged pions vs. a pair of neutral pions.
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A scientific first: How psychedelics bind to key brain cell receptor
For the first time, scientists solved the high-resolution structure of these compounds when they are actively bound to the 5-HT2A serotonin receptor on the surface of brain cells. This discovery is already leading to the exploration of more precise compounds that could eliminate hallucinations but still have strong therapeutic effects. Psilocybin – the psychedelic compound in mushrooms – has alrea
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Hubble captures crisp new portrait of Jupiter's storms
Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the famous Great Red Spot region gearing up to change color — again.
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Time-restricted feeding improves health without altering the body's core clock
For the first time, scientists have studied the early effects of time-restricted feeding on the daily periodic oscillations of metabolites and genes in muscle, and metabolites in blood. The findings find that time-restricted feeding does not influence the muscle's core clock, and opens the door to more research on how these observed changes improve health.
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Secret of plant dietary fiber structure revealed
Researchers have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress. This discovery helps explain how plant structures can range from floppy grasses to hard wood trees and is important for understanding dietary fiber properties in nutrition. The findings also have applications in medicine, agriculture and
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0.5°C of additional warming has a huge effect on global aridity
In a simulation study, researchers showed that limiting global warming to 1.5°C rather than 2°C will mitigate aridification in some regions of the world including the Mediterranean, western Europe, and southern Africa. However, Australia and some parts of Asia were simulated to become wetter rather than drier at both 1.5°C and 2°C of warming. These findings reveal the importance of targeted region
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Research shows potential of gene editing in barley
An international team of plant scientists have shown the potential to rapidly improve the quality of barley grain through a genetic tool known as CRISPR or gene editing.
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'Floating' graphene on a bed of calcium atoms
Adding calcium to graphene creates an extremely-promising superconductor, but where does the calcium go? In a new study, a Monash-led team has for the first time confirmed what actually happens to those calcium atoms. Surprising everyone, the calcium goes underneath both the upper graphene sheet and a lower 'buffer' sheet, 'floating' the graphene on a bed of calcium atoms.
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Information itself may be what ends the human race
IBM estimates that humans produce 2.5 quintillion digital data bytes daily. We'll one day reach a point where the number of bits we store outnumber the entirety of atoms on Earth. In the most severe scenario, it takes just 130 years for all the power generated on Earth to be sucked up by digital data creation and storage. Although many places in the world are currently preoccupied by the COVID‐19
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New estimates for the rise in sea levels due to ice sheet mass loss under climate change
An international consortium of researchers under the aegis of CMIP6 has calculated new estimates for the melting of Earth's ice sheets due to greenhouse gas emissions and its impact on sea levels, showing that the ice sheets could together contribute more than 40 cm by the end of 2100.
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Potential target identified for migraine therapy
Researchers have identified the protein GLT-1 as the neurotransmitter glutamate transporter in the brain that is related to cortical spreading depression, a pathological condition that underlies migraines. The researchers found that mice lacking GLT-1, but not other glutamate receptors, were more susceptible to cortical spreading depression than were controls. GLT-1 might therefore be a potential
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Spørg fagfolket: Hvordan kan en faldskærm virke på Mars?
En læser vil gerne vide, hvorvidt en faldskærm ville virke på Mars, siden lufttrykket er anderledes i planetens atmosfære. Det svarer en ansat ved Institut for Fysik og Astronomi (AU) på.
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The Atlantic Daily: New York Is Not Dead
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . SHUTTERSTOCK / PAUL SPELLA / THE ATLANTIC Perhaps no other American city has drawn as much attention—and scrutiny—during this pandemic as New York, the site of a devastating coronavirus wave this
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Ancient Pumpkins Were Nothing Like the Fall Fruit We Know Today
The pumpkin in our pies and lattes was one of the first plants cultivated by prehistoric North Americans some 10,000 years ago.
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'A Very Serious Situation': WHO Says Coronavirus Cases Are Rising In Europe Again
The World Health Organization warned on Thursday that weekly increases have reached a higher rate than during the pandemic's peak in March, with "alarming rates of transmission across the region." (Image credit: David Barrett/AP)
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New UK Covid test is effective but won't impact numbers as hoped
Suitable for clinics but not homes, the DnaNudge test is unlikely to fulfil the government's 'Moonshot' testing goals Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A rapid test for coronavirus made by DnaNudge that was said by ministers to be part of a grand plan to deliver millions of tests in England, works well in hospitals but will not scale up to help the government's " Moons
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Ecologists sound alarm on plastic pollution
Ecologists examining plastic pollution entering oceans, rivers and lakes around the world annually, outline potential impacts of various mitigation strategies over the coming decade. The researchers estimate the scale of human response needed to reduce future emissions and manage what's already floating around out there and recommend a fundamental shift to a framework based on recycling where end-
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The Nintendo 3DS' Surprisingly Social Legacy
Nintendo just discontinued the iconic portable game console, but the real 3DS was the friends we made along the way.
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Positive results for 90-minute Covid-19 test
DnaNudge procedure compares well with others but has not been validated for use in community
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Access to cancer medicines and clinical trials show stark variations across Europe
Access to cancer medicines is highly unequal across Europe both for new drugs in development because of uneven access to clinical trials and for currently approved drugs due to huge disparities in healthcare spending by different countries, according to results from studies presented at ESMO 2020.
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Study suggests substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs are infected with SARS-CoV-2 by their owners, due to presence of antibodies in their blood
A small study by Canadian veterinary science experts being presented at this ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) suggests that a substantial proportion of pet cats and dogs can be infected by SARS-CoV-2 by their owners. Furthermore, in several cases pets found to be infected had COVID-19-like respiratory symptoms at the time their owner had COVID-19.
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Study shows SARS-CoV-2 jumped between people and mink, providing strong evidence of zoonotic transmission
A study investigating SARS-CoV-2 infections across 16 mink farms in the Netherlands, being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that the virus likely jumped between people and mink and back, providing strong evidence that animal to human (zoonotic) transmission is possible.
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Study shows high prevalence of fatigue following SARS-CoV-2 infection independent of COVID-19 disease severity
Research being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that persistent fatigue occurs in more than half of patients recovered from COVID-19, regardless of the seriousness of their infection. The study is by Dr Liam Townsend, St James's Hospital and Trinity Translational Medicine Institute, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland, and coll
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Study shows one quarter of hospitalized young patients aged 18-39 years with COVID-19 developed pneumonia
New research to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online from 23-25 September) shows that one quarter of hospitalized younger patients with COVID-19 aged 18-39 years developed pneumonia, underlining the danger the disease represents to young people.
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Interim data from early US COVID-19 hotspot show mortality and seriousness of disease were not associated with race/ethnicity
A study of interim data from two hospitals in an early US COVID-19 hotspot, to be presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September), shows that race and ethnicity were not significantly associated with higher in-hospital COVID-19 mortality, and that rates of moderate, severe, and critical forms of COVID-19 were similar between racial and ethnic groups.
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Editorial Expression of Concern: Living annulative π-extension polymerization for graphene nanoribbon synthesis
Nature, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2756-0
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Author Correction: Coupling dinitrogen and hydrocarbons through aryl migration
Nature, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2722-x
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'Total failure' on English river water quality
Pollutants still blight all of England's rivers, lakes and streams, the Environment Agency says.
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Spider-like toxins found in Australia's stinging trees
A team of scientists say this explains why those stung feel intense pain lasting for days or even weeks.
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Alligator on gas snaps up Ig Nobel prize
The 2020 Ig Nobel prizes honour crocodilian vocalisations, narcissistic eyebrows and vibrating worms.
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Seven footprints may be the earliest evidence of humans on the Arabian Peninsula
Experts say discovery of 120,000-year-old prints could shed new light on spread of Homo sapiens out of Africa A set of seven footprints made at a lake about 120,000 years ago have been hailed as the earliest evidence of modern humans on the Arabian Peninsula – a discovery experts say could shed light on the spread of our species out of Africa. The path by which Homo sapiens spread around the worl
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The Oculus Quest 2 is the best VR headset you can buy
The new strap is comfortable to wear but not kind to haircuts. (Stan Horaczek /) When Facebook released its Oculus Quest headset in 2019, it tried to address a conundrum that has confounded consumer-oriented VR from the start. It was a huge step up from flimsy headsets designed to hold your phone and even Facebook's own mobile VR product, the now-discontinued Oculus Go. What's more, the Quest did
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Coronavirus Australia live update: national cabinet split over quarantine and flight caps – latest news
Scott Morrison tells states to increase capacity of hotel quarantine programs, but WA to oppose the move. Follow live Follow our global coronavirus live blog Flight caps fight looms at national cabinet as Morrison pledges pandemic health funding 'A moment of cheer': 100-year-old Victorian man leaves hospital after surviving coronavirus fight 'I volunteered to be a human guinea pig for a Covid vac
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Mathematical modelling to prevent fistulas
It is better to invest in measures that make it easier for women to visit a doctor during pregnancy than measures to repair birth injuries. This is the conclusion from mathematicians, using Uganda as an example.
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Electric Vehicle Company Admits It Faked Fuel-Cell Semi Truck Demo
Nicola One tractor Numerous companies are trying to perfect electric vehicles. Tesla has a particularly large following, but traditional automakers like Chevrolet and GM are also trying to get a piece of the emerging EV market. That's why General Motors signed a deal with Nikola Motor Company, which, like Elon Musk's Tesla, is named after inventor Nikola Tesla. Reports now claim that Nikola has b
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Is 99 Degrees Considered a Fever?
If you've ever found yourself wondering whether a thermometer reading means you're sick, you're not alone.
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Supercool experiment reveals water is actually two liquids in one
Supercooling liquid water to temperatures lower than ever achieved before has revealed new evidence that water is two liquids in one
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Covid-19 news: New cases in England up 167% since end of August
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Training bees to prefer certain flower scents boosts seed production
Feeding honeybees scented food makes them more likely to visit flowers with that scent, boosting pollination rates and crop yields
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Your shoes could be increasing the risk of a painful foot condition
Shoes that raise the toes away from the ground make walking easier but weaken the foot, which might increase the risk of a painful condition called plantar fasciitis
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Sound analysis hints sirens have an evolutionary link with wolf howls
Wolf howls may have served as a danger signal to our ancestors – and modern emergency sirens may be an effective way to alert us because they sound like howls
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Watch titan triggerfish jump out of the water to catch and eat crabs
Titan triggerfish that live in the Red Sea will deliberately launch themselves onto the beach to catch and eat ghost crabs crawling along the shore
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BepiColombo may be able to search for signs of life as it passes Venus
The BepiColombo spacecraft is about to pass Venus on its way to Mercury, and there is a plan to use it to look for phosphine, a gas that may indicate life in Venus's atmosphere
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Apple's new watch has a blood oxygen monitor – what is it good for?
Apple's new Series 6 smart watch can measure blood oxygen levels, which could potentially be useful to track the health of people already diagnosed with covid-19 or a range of other conditions, but more data is needed to confirm its accuracy
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Australian stinging tree injects animals with spider-venom-like toxin
Australian stinging trees, species of which can grow up to 35 metres tall, inject toxins that cause pain in the same way as animal venoms found in spiders and scorpions
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Washing our clothes has created 5.6 million tonnes of microfibre waste
Since 1950, 5.6 million tonnes of microplastic microfibres have been dumped on land and in the sea through clothes washing – and the rate of release is increasing
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Five scientists tell us what happens next with the covid-19 pandemic
After nine months and a million deaths, we ask experts in the field whether they think we are over the worst of the pandemic and what the future looks like
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Coronavirus death toll nears 1 million – how did we get here?
Despite a global health response, the coronavirus pandemic has claimed nearly a million lives since it first emerged in Wuhan, China. How did we get here?
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Scientists dismiss new claims that the coronavirus was made in a lab
A self-styled whistle-blower has claimed to have proof that the coronavirus was made in a Chinese government laboratory, but scientists say there is no evidence this is true
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These 120,000-year-old footprints offer early evidence for humans in Arabia
Tracks also provide rare snapshot of ancient people interacting with animals
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Racial Profiling Concerns Amid Crackdown on Scholars' China Ties
Several organizations suggest that a case against a University of Kansas professor is the latest example of the US government targeting researchers for their ethnicity.
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For the Big Ten, the Money Was Just Too Tempting
The coronavirus pandemic is still ravaging America, just as it was in August, when the college presidents and chancellors of the Big Ten Conference decided against playing football in the fall. The only thing that's changed is that the same leaders now feel far more comfortable with the risks. The Big Ten's announcement this week that college football will begin the weekend of October 23 isn't ca
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European Space Agency awards Hera asteroid mission to German firm
Deal worth £118m covers design, manufacturing and testing of ESA's first planetary defence mission The European Space Agency has awarded a €129m (£118m) contract to the German space company OHB . The deal covers the design, manufacturing and testing of Hera, the ESA's first planetary defence mission. Hera is the European contribution to an experiment called the asteroid impact and deflection asse
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Hubble Catches Massive New Storm Brewing on Jupiter
Jupiter Storm Last month, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took a gorgeous new close-up image of Jupiter some 406 million miles from Earth, with the planet's icy moon Europa pictured off to the left. In addition to the iconic Great Red Spot region, scientists were able to spot a brand new storm brewing — and it's a big one. Credit: NASA, ESA, STScI New Storms Brewing Stretched along Jupiter's mid-no
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Who gets a COVID vaccine first? Access plans are taking shape
Nature, Published online: 17 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02684-9 Advisory groups around the world release guidance to prioritize health-care workers and those in front-line jobs.
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Second national lockdown proposed by UK scientific advisers
Government's advisory bodies look at restrictions to coincide with October school half-term
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NASA finds tropical storm Noul packing a punch
Powerful storms with heavy rainmaking capabilities appeared over the coast of central Vietnam in NASA provided infrared imagery on Sept. 17.
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How the Revolutionary Thinker Alexander von Humboldt Helped to Create the Smithsonian
The 19th-century polymath continues to influence the Institution's research; a major Smithsonian exhibition explains how and why
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Innovative New Whale Detection System Aims to Prevent Ships From Striking Animals
Whale Safe launches in Southern California waters to help reduce deaths of the iconic marine mammals
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Polarization over energy and climate in Canada
Positive Energy today released new survey results examining Canadians' views on the role of oil and gas in Canada's current and future economy, and the respective roles of federal and provincial governments in the country's energy and climate future. This novel survey explores how party affiliation, ideology, region, gender, and age may influence opinions on these topics. The survey, conducted by
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Use TikTok to build the perfect workout
"So, this guy has some cool workouts but… Oh! A new dancing challenge!" (Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels/) Even with gyms reopening at limited capacity, it's still safer to exercise at home or outdoors. So, we're dubbing this September Muscle Month to help you keep up your fitness, power, and health in socially distant times. Within the bottomless pit of content that is TikTok, there's a place where
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New study estimates nearly 90,000 cancer cases diagnosed in adolescents and young adults
A new report examining cancer in adolescents and young adults (AYAs), defined as diagnoses occurring during ages 15 to 39, provides updated estimates of the contemporary cancer burden in this age group, predicting that 89,500 cases and 9,270 deaths will occur in 2020 in the United States.
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Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) Sample Preparation
Download this white paper to learn the best practices for optimizing sample homogenization in NGS nucleic acid extraction!
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The Atlantic launches Atlantic Brand Partners
Today The Atlantic introduces Atlantic Brand Partners , an interdisciplinary collective that brings together the capabilities of a full-service agency, media company, creative studio, and live events group to offer a singular experience for clients. Driven by a common set of values, Atlantic Brand Partners draws from our combined expertise to deliver a truly integrated, end-to-end marketing exper
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Race to rescue animals as Brazilian wetlands burn
Wildlife guide Eduarda Fernandes steers a speedboat up the Piquiri river in western Brazil, scanning the horizon for jaguars wounded in the wildfires ripping through the Pantanal, the world's biggest tropical wetlands.
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'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
The stem cells tasked with creating and maintaining biological tissues have a difficult job. They have to precisely divide to form new specialized cells, which are destined to different fates even though they contain identical DNA. An obvious question then is: How do the cells divide in all the right ways to produce a healthy tissue? This was the grand motivating question for Andrew Muroyama, a po
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What Even Is 'Coordinated Inauthentic Behavior' on Platforms?
No one knows, not even the policy writers or enforcers. And the ambiguity is exacerbating threats to our electoral process.
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'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
The stem cells tasked with creating and maintaining biological tissues have a difficult job. They have to precisely divide to form new specialized cells, which are destined to different fates even though they contain identical DNA. An obvious question then is: How do the cells divide in all the right ways to produce a healthy tissue? This was the grand motivating question for Andrew Muroyama, a po
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Study shows quizzes improve academic performance
About a year ago, a conversation during a faculty meeting piqued Marcus Crede's interest. A senior faculty member in Iowa State University's Department of Psychology said that he believed frequent quizzes help students better grasp classroom material. Crede, an associate professor of psychology, was skeptical that something as simple as a quiz could positively impact students' academic performance
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Invasive shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion
Researchers have identified an invasive blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia's Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northern-most record of the parasite on the West Coast and is likely an indication of its ability to spread without human transport.
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Invasive shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion
Researchers have identified an invasive blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia's Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northern-most record of the parasite on the West Coast and is likely an indication of its ability to spread without human transport.
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NASA finds a fading wispy Tropical Depression Vicky
NASA's Terra satellite found Vicky to be a shadow of its former self, devoid of precipitation around its low-level center. Any precipitation had been pushed far to the northeast from wind shear. Vicky looked like a wispy ring of clouds on visible satellite imagery and nearby Hurricane Teddy is not helping.
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New method adds and subtracts for sustainability's true measure
From loaning pandas to welcoming tourists to hike to sacred monuments, to regulating the sale of wild animals for meat, policies across the world seek to forge clear paths to sustainability.
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John Najarian, Pioneering Transplant Surgeon, Dies at 92
He was known for taking on difficult cases, many involving children. An anti-rejection drug he developed led to a scandal, but he was vindicated.
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Imaging probe to visualize Alzheimer's disease-related gamma-secretase in the brain
Scientists have developed a molecular imaging probe to reveal Alzheimer's-related γ-secretase in rodents and macaques with translational potentials in humans
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Genetic adaptation to climate change is swift in crop pests
By comparing genetic variants differing in the two fly populations, researchers found that polygenic traits led to the quickness of adaptation; many genes, each with very small effects, worked together to determine the rate of development. The research illustrates that crop pests and insect disease vectors with similar biology may rapidly respond to changing climates by a similar genetic mechanism
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Best CBD Oil Reviews – Top 15 CBD Oil for Sale
If you're looking for an all-natural fix to ailments such as insomnia, pain relief, anxiety, and many more then this is a must-read. We have a list of the best CBD oil that you can find by 2020!
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'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. Further investigation uncovered proteins that act as compasses and motors, guiding the divisions of individual cells to create the overall pattern of the leaf.
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Invasive shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion
Researchers have identified an invasive blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia's Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northern-most record of the parasite on the West Coast and is likely an indication of its ability to spread without human transport.
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Rapid blood test could detect brain injury in minutes, study shows
A blood protein test could detect the severity of head trauma in under 15 minutes, according to a recent study.
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New mathematical tool can select the best sensors for the job
In the 2019 Boeing 737 Max crash, the recovered black box from the aftermath hinted that a failed pressure sensor may have caused the ill-fated aircraft to nose dive. This incident and others have fueled a larger debate on sensor selection, number and placement to prevent the reoccurrence of such tragedies.Texas A&M University researchers have now developed a comprehensive mathematical framework t
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New research shows how fast our brains are at 'recording' new words
How much time does a brain need to learn a new word? A team of Skoltech researchers and their colleagues monitored changes in brain activity associated with learning new words and found that cortical representations of the sound and meaning of these words may form in just 1 to 2 hours after exposure without any night's sleep consolidation, as earlier research suggested. This research has implicati
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NRL, NCATS scientists develop method to safely study COVID-19, other contagious diseases
Scientists and researchers at NRL and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences collaborate to develop SARS-CoV-2 nanoparticle probes that are used to study fundamental interactions between SARS-CoV-2 Spike proteins and human cells.
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COVID-19 news from Annals of Internal Medicine
1. Social distance proves key as respiratory route found to be the most common way to spread COVID-19 ; 2. Novel, rapidly deployable community isolation quarantine facilities help to manage COVID-19
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New method adds and subtracts for sustainability's true measure
Policies across the world seek clear paths to sustainability, but it takes a broad look to know their true impact.
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Tweets show vapers rarely use e-cigarettes to quit smoking or improve health
The vast majority of Twitter users who vape with JUUL e-cigarettes are not using the devices to stop smoking or to improve their health, according to a research team led by University of Utah Health scientists. The researchers say this finding, which challenges JUUL's stated mission of improving smokers' lives, could help hone anti-smoking and vaping efforts targeted at Twitter users, particularly
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NASA finds tropical storm Noul packing a punch
Powerful storms with heavy rainmaking capabilities appeared over the coast of central Vietnam in NASA provided infrared imagery on Sept. 17.
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Six ways to make your ATV even more rugged
The author has been putting Suzuki's King Quad 750axi to the test in Alaska this year. (Tyler Freel/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . In Alaska, ATVs are critical tools for many hunters. They're also important in the daily lives of just about everyone who lives outside the cities. This is rugged country, and most of our adventures (and chores) take us off blacktop roads and into
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Tesla Driver Pulled Over Going 93 MPH While Completely Asleep
Catching Zs Canadian cops say they pulled over a Tesla that was traveling at 93 miles per hour — while the driver was completely asleep, with the seat pulled down like a bed. "The officer was able to obtain radar readings on the vehicle, confirming that it had automatically accelerated up to exactly 150 km/h [93 mph]," the Royal Canadian Mounted Police said in a statement to Global News . Speed R
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Metformin for type 2 diabetes patients or not? Researchers now have the answer
Metformin is the first-line drug that can lower blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients. One third of patients do not respond to metformin treatment and 5 per cent experience serious side effects, which is the reason many choose to stop medicating. Researchers have now identified biomarkers that can show in advance how the patient will respond to metformin treatment via a simple blood test.
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Climate change impacts astronomical observations
Already, climate change is having an impact on the conditions of space observation at the Very Large Telescope in the Atacama Desert. In future, new telescopes will have to be adapted to the expected changes, a new study.
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Ocean acidification puts deep-sea coral reefs at risk of collapse
Deep-sea coral reefs face challenges as changes to ocean chemistry triggered by climate change may cause their foundations to become brittle, a study suggests.
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New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method to determine—rapidly, easily and cheaply—how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth. The new method is simple for laboratories to use and can provide greater scope for customizing treatment of bacterial infections. The study is published in PLOS Biology.
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New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method to determine—rapidly, easily and cheaply—how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth. The new method is simple for laboratories to use and can provide greater scope for customizing treatment of bacterial infections. The study is published in PLOS Biology.
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OHSU-VA research suggests strategies to reduce missed appointments
New research from Oregon Health & Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System suggests that a little finesse and a thoughtful approach could go a long way toward reducing a vexing problem in the health care system: missed appointments.
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Study shows quizzes improve academic performance
Students who are quizzed over class material at least once a week tend to perform better on midterm and final exams compared to students who did not take quizzes, according to a new Iowa State University meta-analysis. The researchers found in addition to frequency, immediate feedback from instructors also seemed to positively impact student performance.
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The acrobatic hydra shows off: How environmental cues can affect behavior
A duo from Columbia University and the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) has begun to crack the neural code behind Hydra's simplest behavior, called contraction bursts. The team found that the concentration of dissolved particles in the surrounding water affects the activity of a neural circuit in one of Hydra's nerve nets, which can trigger a specific set of muscle cells to contract the torso.
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New virtual screening tool eases, accelerates routine diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension
The COVID-19 pandemic has increasing numbers of doctors caring for patients virtually. While critical to protecting patient health during a pandemic, however, virtual care presents unique challenges, especially when it comes to diagnosis. Now, cardiologists at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, have come up with a virtual screening tool that greatly simplifies the process of d
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The Atlantic Festival Evening Event Schedule Announced, September 21–24 from 7–8:30PM
Music: Jon Batiste, The Atlantic's music director Video: Don Mischer Productions Tim Cook joins opening night of The Atlantic Festival, September 21, in conversation with Jeffrey Goldberg Bob Woodward to appear on closing night of festival on September 24 Festival features interviews with José Andrés, the Reverend Dr. William J. Barber II interviewed by Laurene Powell Jobs, Hillary Rodham Clinton
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Sally leaves trail of destruction across Gulf Coast
Shellshocked residents were cleaning up on Thursday after Hurricane Sally left a trail of destruction in US coastal towns stretching from Alabama to the top of the Florida panhandle.
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Self-imaging of a molecule by its own electrons
Researchers have shown that high-resolution movies of molecular dynamics can be recorded using electrons ejected from the molecule by an intense laser field.
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Why Wasn't Uber Charged in a Fatal Self-Driving Car Crash?
Authorities charged the vehicle's "safety driver" with criminal negligence, but not the company that developed the technology.
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Lightning storm, easterly wind: How the wildfires got so bad
It began as a stunning light show on a mid-August weekend—lightning bolts crackling in the skies over Northern and Central California, touching down in grasslands and vineyards.
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Regeringens klimavagthund angriber elbil-regnestykke: Det bliver slet ikke så dyrt at få en million elbiler
Om ti år er en elbil både billigere at købe og køre i end en benzinbil, siger Klimarådet.
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From support function to growth engine: The future of AI and customer service
When it comes to imagining the future, customer service often gets painted in a dystopian light. Take the 2002 sci-fi film Minority Report . Tom Cruise's John Anderton walks into the Gap, an identity recognition system scans him, and a hologram asks about a recent purchase. There's something unsettling in this vignette—an unsolicited non-human seems to know everything about you (or, as in the mov
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Why kids need special protection from AI's influence
Algorithms can change the course of children's lives. Kids are interacting with Alexas that can record their voice data and influence their speech and social development. They're binging videos on TikTok and YouTube pushed to them by recommendation systems that end up shaping their worldviews. Algorithms are also increasingly used to determine what their education is like, whether they'll receive
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Satellite catches nighttime view of major hurricane Teddy
An early morning infrared image of Hurricane Teddy taken from NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite shows the proximity of the strengthening hurricane to the Lesser Antilles island chain and Puerto Rico. Teddy is a major hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.
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Reduction in insomnia symptoms associated with non-invasive neurotechnology
For people with chronic insomnia, a good night's sleep is elusive. But what if insomnia symptoms could be alleviated by simply listening to one's own brainwaves?
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Fructose and glucose in high fructose corn syrup deliver a one-two punch to health
Consuming high fructose corn syrup appears to be as bad for your health as consuming sugar in the form of fructose alone, according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Davis. The study reports health risks related to the type of sugar consumed, but also reveals novel risks when sugars are combined, which has important implications for dietary guidelines.
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Altitude key to mapping mesquite, bluestem growth
In Texas, mesquite trees are as common as football, thunderstorms and hot summer nights. It is a staple of outdoor cooking and prevalent in almost every part of the state.
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Hubble captures crisp new portrait of Jupiter's storms
This latest image of Jupiter, taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope on Aug. 25, 2020, was captured when the planet was 406 million miles from Earth. Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the famous Great Red Spot region gearing up to change color—again.
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Antibody-Based Drug May Reduce COVID-19 Hospitalizations: Study
Eli Lilly reports a 72 percent reduction in hospitalization risk among patients who received its monoclonal antibody compared to those who received a placebo.
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Curbing land clearing for food production is vital to reverse biodiversity declines
Preserving terrestrial biodiversity requires more ambitious land-conservation targets to be established and met. At the same time, 'bending the curve' on biodiversity loss needs more efficient food production, and healthier and less wasteful consumption and trade. If undertaken with 'unprecedented ambition and coordination,' these efforts provide an opportunity to reverse terrestrial biodiversity
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Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
Researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history.
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Could breadfruit be the next superfood? Researchers say yes
A fruit used for centuries in countries around the world is getting the nutritional thumbs-up from a team of researchers. Breadfruit, which grows in abundance in tropical and South Pacific countries, has long been a staple in the diet of many people. The fruit can be eaten when ripe, or it can be dried and ground up into a flour and repurposed into many types of meals.
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Higher dementia risk in women with prolonged fertility
Women with a longer reproductive period had an elevated risk for dementia in old age, compared with those who were fertile for a shorter period, a population-based study.
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Discovery of microbes with mixed membranes sheds new light on early evolution of life
Current research suggests that more complex life-forms, including humans, evolved from a symbiosis event between bacteria and another single-celled organism known as archaea. However, evidence of a transition period in which the two organisms mixed where nowhere to be found. That is, until now. In the deep waters of the Black Sea, a team of scientists found microbes that can make membrane lipids o
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Self-imaging of a molecule by its own electrons
Researchers have shown that high-resolution movies of molecular dynamics can be recorded using electrons ejected from the molecule by an intense laser field.
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Altitude key to mapping mesquite, bluestem growth
In Texas, mesquite trees are as common as football, thunderstorms and hot summer nights. It is a staple of outdoor cooking and prevalent in almost every part of the state.
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Almost 10m under local lockdown across UK
Experts question effectiveness of policy on its own as coronavirus cases rise around country
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New study identifies wheat varieties that resist the destructive stripe rust disease
Stripe rust is one of the most destructive wheat diseases in the world, especially in the United States. While the disease can be controlled by chemicals, those may be harmful to humans, animals, and the environment and the application can cost millions of dollars to wheat production. Rather than use chemicals, many farmers would prefer to grow wheat varieties that resist stripe rust and the devel
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PET/MRI improves lesion detection, reduces radiation exposure
A single-center observational study of more than 1,000 oncological examinations has demonstrated that positron emission tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (PET/MRI) facilitates cancer staging as well as PET/computed tomography (PET/CT) and improves lesion detectability in select cancers, potentially helping to promote fast, efficient local and whole-body staging in one step.
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Hubble captures crisp new image of Jupiter and Europa
This latest image of Jupiter, taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope on Aug. 25, 2020, was captured when the planet was 653 million kilometres from Earth. Hubble's sharp view is giving researchers an updated weather report on the monster planet's turbulent atmosphere, including a remarkable new storm brewing, and a cousin of the Great Red Spot changing color — again. The new image also feat
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Algorithms uncover cancers' hidden genetic losses and gains
Limitations in DNA sequencing technology make it difficult to detect some major mutations often linked to cancer, such as the loss or duplication of parts of chromosomes. Now, methods developed by Princeton computer scientists will allow researchers to more accurately identify these mutations in cancerous tissue, yielding a clearer picture of the evolution and spread of tumors than was previously
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Scientists sound alarm on plastic pollution
A new study shows that despite global commitments to address plastic pollution, growth in plastic waste, or 'plastics emissions' continues to outpace reduction. What's more, the study shows that even if governments around the world adhere to their ambitious commitments to curb plastic pollution, annual plastic emissions may increase more than six-fold by 2030.
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New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers at Uppsala University have developed a new method to determine – rapidly, easily and cheaply – how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth. The new method is simple for laboratories to use and can provide greater scope for customising treatment of bacterial infections. The study is published in PLOS Biology.
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Humans develop more slowly than mice because our chemistry is different
Scientists have found that the "segmentation clock"–a genetic network that governs the body pattern formation of embryos–progresses more slowly in humans than in mice because the biochemical reactions are slower in human cells. The differences in the speeds of biochemical reactions may underlie differences between species in the tempo of development.
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Do-it-yourself COVID-19 vaccines fraught with public health problems
"Citizen scientists" developing homemade COVID-19 vaccines may believe they're inoculating themselves against the ongoing pandemic, but the practice of self-experimentation with do-it-yourself medical innovations is fraught with legal, ethical and public health issues, says a new paper co-written by University of Illinois law professor Jacob S. Sherkow.
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Does a healthy diet counter the ill-effects of obesity?
A healthy quality Mediterranean-like diet partially modifies the association between obesity and cardiovascular mortality, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Karl Michaëlsson of Uppsala University, Sweden, and colleagues.
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Hospitals miss mental illness diagnosis in more than a quarter of patients
Severe mental illness diagnoses are missed by clinicians in more than one quarter of cases when people are hospitalised for other conditions, finds a new study led by UCL researchers, published in PLOS Medicine.
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COVID-19 could cause declines in life expectancy
A new analysis of period life expectancy around the world shows that the COVID-19 pandemic could cause a short-term decline in life expectancy in many regions of the world.
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Ecologists sound alarm on plastic pollution
Research led by ecologists at the University of Toronto examining plastic pollution entering oceans, rivers and lakes around the world annually, outlines potential impacts of various mitigation strategies over the coming decade. The researchers estimate the scale of human response needed to reduce future emissions and manage what's already floating around out there and recommend a fundamental shif
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Toyota reveals plan to turn trucks into emissions-free 'power plants'
Carmaker is to begin testing proposal to fit its Dyna vehicles with hydrogen fuel cells Portable emissions-free "power plants" could soon hit the road under plans by Toyota to fit some of the company's light-duty trucks with hydrogen fuel cells that can generate electricity. The world's second-largest carmaker will begin testing the plan to fit a Toyota Dyna with hydrogen fuel cells in Japan late
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New study identifies wheat varieties that resist the destructive stripe rust disease
Stripe rust is one of the most destructive wheat diseases in the world, especially in the United States. While the disease can be controlled by chemicals, those may be harmful to humans, animals, and the environment and the application can cost millions of dollars to wheat production. Rather than use chemicals, many farmers would prefer to grow wheat varieties that resist stripe rust and the devel
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NASA analyzes rainfall and rainmaking capability in Hurricane Sally
NASA satellites provided a look at the rainfall potential in Hurricane Sally before and after it made landfall in southern Alabama. NASA's Aqua satellite and IMERG analysis were used to analyze the storm's flooding potential.
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Great filing cabinets for your home office
Does your office look like this? Get more organized. (Wesley Tingey via Unsplash/) What starts with a few innocent bills can—before you know it—become an overwhelming document pile you're forced to tear through in a panic looking for your lost passport. Despite our reliance on electronic storage, we still need efficient and secure cabinets to store our important personal papers. The beauty of it
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Climate change: Earthquake 'hack' reveals scale of ocean warming
Using sound waves from underwater earthquakes, researchers can more accurately measure sea temperatures.
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Shedding light on the development of efficient blue-emitting semiconductors
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered a new alkali copper halide, Cs5Cu3Cl6I2, that emits pure blue light. The combination of the two halide ions, chloride and iodide, gives the material a crystalline structure made of zigzag chains and peculiar properties that result in highly efficient photoluminescence. This novel compound could be readily used to produce rela
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Sugar promotes sperm longevity in pig reproductive tract
For many livestock species, artificial insemination (AI) is standard. But it can be tricky to achieve success the first time, thanks to variability in ovulation timing across the herd.
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Wildfire on the rise since 1984 in Northern California's coastal ranges
High-severity wildfires in northern coastal California have been increasing by about 10 percent per decade since 1984, according to a study from the University of California, Davis, that associates climate trends with wildfire.
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Venus' ancient layered, folded rocks point to volcanic origin
An international team of researchers has found that some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history.
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All-optical method sets record for ultrafast high-spatial-resolution imaging
High-speed cameras can take pictures in quick succession. This makes them useful for visualizing ultrafast dynamic phenomena, such as femtosecond laser ablation for precise machining and manufacturing processes, fast ignition for nuclear fusion energy systems, shock-wave interactions in living cells, and certain chemical reactions.
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Consumers value difficult decisions over easy choices
Let's say you want to purchase a camera, and you're comparing two different advertisements. In one, the font, colors, and layout make the information easy to read. The other has an obscure style that takes more time for you to understand. If you decide to purchase the second camera with the more confusing advertisement, new research out of Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute shows that, over time, yo
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New calculation refines comparison of matter with antimatter
An international collaboration of theoretical physicists—including scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and the RIKEN-BNL Research Center (RBRC)—has published a new calculation relevant to the search for an explanation of the predominance of matter over antimatter in our universe. The collaboration, known as RBC-UKQCD, also includes scientists
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Sugar promotes sperm longevity in pig reproductive tract
For many livestock species, artificial insemination (AI) is standard. But it can be tricky to achieve success the first time, thanks to variability in ovulation timing across the herd.
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Shoes with 'toe spring' may increase risk of injury, study finds
Upwards curvature means foot muscles do less work, potentially weakening them over time They may feel comfy, but wearing shoes that curve upwards at the front may be weakening your foot muscles and increasing your risk of injury. This curvature, known as a "toe spring", is a common feature of many shoes, especially trainers. It helps the front part of the foot to roll forwards when walking or run
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