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A Patient Dies After a Ransomware Attack Hits a Hospital
The outage resulted in a significant delay in treatment. German authorities are investigating the perpetrators on suspicion of negligent manslaughter.
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Når du spiser en cashewnød, går en hel frugt til spilde. Det vil 27-årige Marianne lave om på
Den tropiske frugt skal laves til karameller og bruges i drinks.
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Spørg Fagfolket: Hvorfor hælder rundkørsler udad?
En læser undrer sig over hældingen på rundkørsler, der for nogen kan gøre det svært at komme rundt. Det svarer Vejdirektoratet på.
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg Leaves a Nuanced Legacy on Environmental Issues
Her jurisprudence involved complex considerations of climate change lawsuits and greenhouse gas emissions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Hands, face, space? Johnson's Covid message has got priorities wrong, scientists warn
Physical distancing, far more than washing hands, is the most critical factor in preventing spread of the virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The latest drive to help halt the spread of Covid-19 has been criticised by senior scientists for placing insufficient emphasis on the issues of ventilation and the need to stay apart from others. They say the government's "h
51min
Capturing the Faces of Climate Migration
A Times Magazine series examines how climate change will force millions worldwide to move. Recently, Meridith Kohut photographed people on the front lines of this shift. In America.
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What Republican Senators Say in Private
N early every reporter in Washington has experienced it: A Republican member of Congress says, "Off the record," shifts into a quieter voice, and expresses how much he or she doesn't like President Donald Trump. Soon after, you watch this same elected official speak up in favor of the president—or, more often, avoid saying anything meaningful at all. Sometimes it concerns the same issue that they
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New first-line treatment option for metastatic kidney cancer
The results of the phase 3 CheckMate 9ER trial have provided a new first-line treatment option for patients with metastatic kidney cancer. The late breaking results are presented at ESMO 2020.
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The tipping points at the heart of the climate crisis
Many parts of the Earth's climate system have been destabilised by warming, from ice sheets and ocean currents to the Amazon rainforest – and scientists believe that if one collapses others could follow The warning signs are flashing red. The California wildfires were surely made worse by the impacts of global heating. A study published in July warned that the Arctic is undergoing " an abrupt cli
2h
RBG's Life, in Her Own Words
Just days ago, on Thursday evening, the National Constitution Center awarded the 2020 Liberty Medal to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. At the justice's request, we recorded her favorite opera singers and special friends offering personal tributes in words and music. The tribute video is a moving, inspiring, and now heartbreaking celebration of her achievements as one of the most influential figures
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Who Benefits from Public Green Space?
The High Line in New York shows that can be the wealthy, who flock to live nearby, driving up property values and driving out long-term, low-income residents — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4 Reasons to Doubt Mitch McConnell's Power
To use power, you must have it. On the night of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell announced that a Trump nominee to replace Ginsburg would receive a vote on the floor of the Senate. That announcement promised a use of power without hesitation or compunction, an abrupt reversal of the supposed rule that blocked an Obama nomination nine months before the 20
3h
Ten minutes of massage or rest will help your body fight stress
Study shows that short, easy-to-apply relaxation techniques can activate the body's regenerative system for fighting stress — offering new perspective on how we can treat stress-related disease
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Invasive shrimp-sucking parasite continues northward Pacific expansion
Researchers have identified an invasive blood-sucking parasite on mud shrimp in the waters of British Columbia's Calvert Island. The discovery represents the northern-most record of the parasite on the West Coast and is likely an indication of its ability to spread without human transport.
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Wildfire on the rise since 1984 in Northern California's coastal ranges
High-severity wildfires in northern coastal California have been increasing by about 10 percent per decade since 1984, according to a new study.
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Howie Hawkins Is No Kanye West
Howie Hawkins may be the Green Party's presidential nominee, but he isn't Jill Stein—or at least, he can't be, because he's not on the ballot in as many swing states as Stein was in 2016. Courts in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania decided this week to keep his party's ticket off of the 2020 ballots. But Hawkins told me he's not Kanye West either, even though Republican operatives have been helping both
3h
Ancient human footprints in Saudi Arabia give glimpse of Arabian ecology 120000 years ago
Using high resolution paleoecological information obtained from fossilized footprints, a new study presents ~120 thousand-year-old human and animal footprints from an ancient lake bed in northern Arabia. These findings represent the earliest evidence for humans in this part of the world and show that human and animal movements and landscape use were closely linked.
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Shift in West African wildmeat trade suggests erosion of cultural taboos
New research has demonstrated a clear fluctuation in the trade of wildmeat in and around the High Niger National Park in Guinea, West Africa.
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Uncovering the clock that sets the speed of embryo development
Why do pregnancies last longer in some species than others? Researchers have found the clock that sets the speed of embryonic development and discovered the mechanism is based on how proteins are made and dismantled. The study could also help us understand how different mammals evolved from one another and help refine methods for regenerative medicine.
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Humans develop more slowly than mice because our chemistry is different
Scientists have found that the 'segmentation clock' — a genetic network that governs the body pattern formation of embryos — progresses more slowly in humans than in mice because the biochemical reactions are slower in human cells. The differences in the speeds of biochemical reactions may underlie differences between species in the tempo of development.
4h
Many practitioners are not prescribing HIV prevention medication
Only about 54% of medical practitioners surveyed say they have prescribed pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, to HIV-vulnerable patients, according to a new study.
4h
New method adds and subtracts for sustainability's true measure
Policies around the world seek clear paths to sustainability, but it takes a broad look to know their true impact.
4h
The Phish scale: New tool helps IT staff see why users click on fraudulent emails
Researcher have developed a new tool called the Phish Scale that could help organizations better train their employees to avoid a particularly dangerous form of cyber attack known as phishing.
4h
Algorithm boosts efficiency, nutrition for food bank ops
A systems engineers examined data from a busy New York state food bank and, using a new algorithm, found ways to better allocate food and elevate nutrition in the process.
4h
Mathematicians May Have Figured Out How 'Stone Forests' Form
An NYU team thinks it's finally unlocked the secret to how these mysterious landforms get their interesting shape.
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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through September 19)
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE How to Give A.I. a Pinch of Consciousness Chris Baraniuk | OneZero "That higher, attentive level of processing is not always necessary — or even desirable — but it seems to be crucial for humans to learn new skills or adapt to unexpected challenges. A.I. systems and robots could potentially avoid the stupidity that currently plagues them if only they could gain the same ab
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Weekend reads: Retracting racist and sexist work; The Lancet learns from a retraction; Trump administration interferes with publications
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: The retraction of 23 papers, and block of 35 more, … Continue reading
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Covid-19 Live Updates: C.D.C. Changes Guidance on Testing
A surge of infections in the Southwest and Midwest is partly driving an uptick in cases nationally. The eight remaining members of the Supreme Court are expected to hear arguments next month via telephone.
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A Bluetooth Flaw Leaves Billions of Devices Vulnerable
Indictments against Iranian hackers, a Veterans Affairs data breach, and more of the week's top security news.
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Democracy Will Only Work If the Social Media Giants Grow Up
The former chair of the Federal Election Commission argues that the integrity of the 2020 election is largely in the hands of Facebook and Twitter.
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The 6 Best Laptop Stands (2020): Adjustable, Portable, and More
Help your back and posture by raising your computer screen up to eye level.
5h
Ugens debat: Hvad skal elbilerne koste?
Intet er sikkert om fremtidens priser på el- og plugin­hybridbiler efter første del af Eldrup­kommissionens rapport. Men bilimportørerne er begyndt at regne på scenarierne, og de fik mange læsere til tasterne på ing.dk.
5h
Has The Stress of COVID Affected Our Brains?
A preprint reports increases in the volume of parts of the brain after lockdown
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UC study sheds light on cancer treatment, COVID-19
University of Cincinnati researchers have found that certain treatments for cancer may increase the chance of death if they contract COVID-19.
5h
What's Causing the Mass Bird Die-Off in the Southwest?
Thousands of migrating birds have died, perhaps starved by drier conditions related to climate change or by having to fly inland to avoid wildfire smoke.
6h
MIT lancerer samme vandteknologi som dansk startup – 10 år efter
PLUS. AquaDania har gode resultater med at rense vand med solenergi. Nu har forskere fra et amerikansk og et kinesisk universitet udviklet en lignende teknologi. Parterne er i dialog om, hvorvidt det danske patent kan blive krænket.
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Antebellum Isn't Just Bad—It's Vile
This story contains spoilers for the film Antebellum . Antebellum is the kind of film that requires true storytelling daring to pull off. A horror movie that blurs history, fantasy, and darkest nightmare, it would only work with the cleverest calibration, striking a balance between thrills and social commentary that recalls the films of Jordan Peele or the best episodes of Black Mirror . But Ante
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Why Teens Are Falling for TikTok Conspiracy Theories
Conspiracies like Pizzagate are all over the social media platform. Here's why they've found an audience there.
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How to Set Your Own Default Browser and Email App in iOS 14
Not into Safari or Apple Mail? With the next update, you can (finally) customize your preferences. Here's what to know before you get started.
7h
The 943-Dimensional Chess of a Trustworthy Covid-19 Vaccine
Scientists want public confidence. The White House wants an October Surprise. The FDA wants to avoid looking political. Big Pharma wants a win. You're in the middle.
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19 Best Weekend Deals: Cameras, Apple Gear, and Games
The new 8th-generation iPad is already slightly discounted, alongside headphones, laptops, and PS4 titles like 'Ghosts of Tsushima'.
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Dansk cancervaccine viser forbløffende gode resultater i klinisk studie
Kombinationen af immunterapi og IDO/PD-L1-peptid-vaccine viser overraskende gode resultater i patienter med metastaserende modermærkekræft.
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Prognosen fortsat elendig for patienter med småcellet lungekræft
Der har været store fremskridt inden for behandling af ikke-småcellet lungekræft de seneste år, men det halter gevaldigt bagefter for patienter med småcellet lungekræft, viser dansk forskning.
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No, We Weren't 'Suckers' or 'Losers'
If Donald Trump had been on the battlefield with me in Iraq back in November 2004, I doubt I ever would've made it home. In the Army, part of our soldier's creed involves never leaving a fallen comrade behind. The only reason I am alive today is that, after a rocket-propelled grenade exploded in the Black Hawk helicopter I was co-piloting, my buddies embodied that creed. They thought I was dead b
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Første nye behandling i mange år til metastaserende nyrekræft kan være på vej
Resultater fra et nyt fase 3-studie præsenteret på ESMO åbner op for den første nye førstelinjebehandling til patienter med metastaserende nyrekræft i mange år.
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Kvinder med højrisiko-brystkræft kan med fordel PET-skannes
40 pct. af kvinder med brystkræft, som deltog i et nyt dansk studie fra OUH, fik ændret deres behandling efter supplerende PET-skanning i udredningen for brystkræft.
8h
Startup vil gøre CNC-fræsning til plug'n'play
PLUS. Med en pakkeløsning bestående af CNC-fræser, software, skærende værktøj m.v. vil Vaerks gøre det hurtigt og billigt at fremstille prototyper.
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My New York City Kids Are Getting an Education in Failed Leadership
For weeks now, I've been the unpopular parent on the playground predicting with certainty for anyone who cared to listen that our children would not enter a public-school building in New York City this year. And sadly, I may be proved right. For the second time this month, Mayor Bill de Blasio has delayed the start of in-person school , largely because of a staffing shortage . New York City has d
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Infrared eyes on Enceladus: Hints of fresh ice in northern hemisphere
Scientists used data gathered by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during 13 years of exploring the Saturn system to make detailed images of the icy moon—and to reveal geologic activity.
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COVID-19 bringer cancerforskning og -behandling i knæ
På kræftkongressen ESMO står det ifølge forskningsresultater klart, at COVID-19 har ramt kræftområdet hårdt både i forhold til behandling og forskning.
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Patienter og pårørende forstår ikke præmissen bag fase 1-kræftforsøg
Ny dansk forskning viser, at kræftpatienter og pårørende ikke altid har forstået, hvad det vil sige at være med i et fase 1-forsøg med et kræftmiddel – også selvom patienterne har valgt at deltage.
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California wildfire smoke blankets parts of Canada
Smoke from California and Oregon wildfires has cloaked Canada's third-largest city of Vancouver—known for its majestic mountain views and fresh ocean breezes—in the dirtiest air in the world this week.
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Storms Alpha and Beta named for Greek alphabet, second time ever
Meteorologists were forced to break out the Greek alphabet Friday to name Atlantic storms for only the second time ever after the 2020 hurricane season blew through their usual list, ending on Tropical Storm Wilfred.
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Kniv af frossen lort og en alligator på helium: Her er tre vindere af årets alternative nobelpris
Ig Nobelprisen skal få folk til at grine og derefter tænke.
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Pointed tips on aluminum 'octopods' increase catalytic reactivity
Points matter when designing nanoparticles that drive important chemical reactions using the power of light.
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Why more hospital visits occur just before a thunderstorm
Analyzing data from Medicare and the National Weather Service confirms that more people, particularly older people with respiratory illness, make more hospital visits on the eve of thunderstorms. University of Oregon economist Eric Zou had heard the stories that visits to the emergency room increase when a thunderstorm arrives. The abiding theory was the rain that fell with the thunderstorm cause
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In South Korea, Covid-19 Comes With Another Risk: Online Bullies
The country's extensive response has been praised around the world but has led to harassment and slander, raising questions about privacy protections.
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On Venus, Cloudy With a Chance of Microbial Life
Astrobiologists shift their gaze, and speculations, to Earth's broiling sister planet.
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Mount Wilson Observatory, Icon of Cosmology, 'Declared Safe' From Fires
The birthplace of modern cosmology "has been declared safe" from the wildfires that have ravaged the surrounding area in Southern California.
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New York and Boston maintain their lead
Nature, Published online: 19 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02578-w The two US cities have a peerless partnership for life sciences.
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A guide to the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 19 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02580-2 A description of the terminology and methodology used in this supplement, and a guide to the functionality available free online at natureindex.com.
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Nature Index's top five science cities, by the numbers
Nature, Published online: 19 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02576-y Sizing up the success of the world's science hotspots.
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Science cities seek new connections
Nature, Published online: 19 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02579-9 In a commentary on high-impact research outputs across 245 cities, György Csomós, Zsófia Viktória Vida and Balázs Lengyel explore changing patterns.
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Beijing, the seat of science capital
Nature, Published online: 19 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02577-x China's powerhouse holds firm as the number one city in the Nature Index.
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The top cities for research in the Nature Index
Nature, Published online: 19 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02575-z A look at the inputs that result in high scientific research outputs.
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Animal magnetism: Bacteria may help creatures sense Earth's magnetic fields
Some animals can navigate via magnetism, though scientists aren't sure how. Research shows that some of these animals contain magnetotactic bacteria. These bacteria align themselves along the magnetic field's grid lines. It's one of the more fascinating discoveries of the last several decades: the growing list of animals who can navigate the Earth's magnetic grid to get where they need to go. Fro
12h
Medical experts v anti-vaxxers: the Covid-19 information battle
Scientists face potential struggle to convince people of vaccine safety as celebrities join misinformation chorus Full report: engagement with anti-vaccine Facebook posts trebles Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On one side is the "anti-vax" movement, a constellation of groupings drawn from across the ideological spectrum, far-right opportunists and celebrities includ
13h
Space oddity: Australia launches 35kg commercial rocket into atmosphere
Dart rocket, which is just 3.4m long, is part of Australia's $7bn investment in space technologies A small commercial rocket has been launched from Australia to the edge of space for the first time. The Dart rocket, carrying an air force radio prototype, was launched from the Koonibba rocket range in South Australia on Saturday. Continue reading…
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Här byggs Sveriges första kolonilott i havet
Sveriges första havskolonilott är snart klar att användas. Där ska havets resurser odlas, skördas och senare ätas: bland annat alger, musslor och ostron. – Vi kan inte bara äta fisk, utan måste äta organismer längre ner i näringsväven, säger Maria Bodin, samordnare för projektet Scary Seafood, vid Göteborgs universitet.
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Svenska alger ska göra nötkött klimatvänligt
Kor släpper ut växthusgasen metan när de rapar och släpper sig. En alg från Australien som tillsats i fodret sänker halten med 99 procent – men korna tycker att den smakar illa. Nu testar forskare om smakligare alger från Sverige kan ge klimatvänligt kött.
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Why Erdogan wants to turn Istanbul into an island
The Bosporus is three times busier than the Suez Canal, and getting worse. To resolve marine congestion, Turkey wants to build a 'second Bosporus'. The controversial project would alter local geography – and may have unintended consequences. Special status "It does not befit Turkey to think small or to act small," Recep Teyyip Erdogan said last December, countering critics of his Istanbul Canal p
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Victoria reports 21 new coronavirus cases and seven deaths as Brett Sutton apologises to Afghan community
State's chief health officer says it was 'inappropriate' to single out migrant community in Casey Melbourne anti-lockdown protesters arrested and chased by police on horseback Follow today's coronavirus live blog How Victoria's Covid lockdown protests are galvanising Australia's right Marathon Dan: Victorian premier Daniel Andrews briefs media on coronavirus 77 days in a row Victoria's chief heal
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Study: Private prisons result in more inmates, longer sentences
After adopting strict sentencing laws in the '80s and '90s, many states have turned to for-profit prisons to handle growing prison populations. A new study in Labour Economics found that privately-run prisons correlate with a rise in incarceration rates and sentence lengths. While evidence is mixed, private prisons do not appear to improve recidivism or cost less than state-run facilities. The '8
14h
The Ruth Bader Ginsburg Fandom Was Never Frivolous
In 2014, Kate Livingston created a quirky Halloween costum e for her 12-week-old son. It featured a black, sleeved onesie. And a white silken collar. And a pair of large, plastic-rimmed glasses. Livingston snapped a picture of the cosplaying infant—he provided the cool scowl—and then added a caption, in blunt all-caps, to the photo she took: "I DISSENT." Ruth Baby Ginsburg was born. Justices of t
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Tools for Mars are being developed in preparation for colonization
Researchers at the Singapore University of Technology and Design constructed Mars-ready tools in preparation for colonization. The team chose chitin as a cheap and abundant material to fashion a wrench and habitat. Chitin occurs naturally in arthropod exoskeletons, fungus, and fish scales. In 1963, a spaceship crash-landed on Earth. The vehicle was carrying one Martian, a very man-like creature w
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Causal inference in genetic trio studies [Genetics]
We introduce a method to draw causal inferences—inferences immune to all possible confounding—from genetic data that include parents and offspring. Causal conclusions are possible with these data because the natural randomness in meiosis can be viewed as a high-dimensional randomized experiment. We make this observation actionable by developing a conditional…
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GRIP1 regulates synaptic plasticity and learning and memory [Neuroscience]
Hebbian plasticity is a key mechanism for higher brain functions, such as learning and memory. This form of synaptic plasticity primarily involves the regulation of synaptic α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR) abundance and properties, whereby AMPARs are inserted into synapses during long-term potentiation (LTP) or removed during long-term depression (LTD). The…
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Transcription factor expression defines subclasses of developing projection neurons highly similar to single-cell RNA-seq subtypes [Neuroscience]
We are only just beginning to catalog the vast diversity of cell types in the cerebral cortex. Such categorization is a first step toward understanding how diversification relates to function. All cortical projection neurons arise from a uniform pool of progenitor cells that lines the ventricles of the forebrain. It…
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Learning probabilistic neural representations with randomly connected circuits [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The brain represents and reasons probabilistically about complex stimuli and motor actions using a noisy, spike-based neural code. A key building block for such neural computations, as well as the basis for supervised and unsupervised learning, is the ability to estimate the surprise or likelihood of incoming high-dimensional neural activity…
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Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in a cat owned by a COVID-19-affected patient in Spain [Agricultural Sciences]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the etiological agent of COVID-19, is considered a zoonotic pathogen mainly transmitted human to human. Few reports indicate that pets may be exposed to the virus. The present report describes a cat suffering from severe respiratory distress and thrombocytopenia living with a family…
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Don't let COVID-19 disrupt campus climate surveys of sexual harassment [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Surveying a campus community about sexual harassment can be a daunting task during normal times. It's especially daunting during a pandemic. Institutional leaders may balk at committing scarce resources to survey efforts. Some may wonder how to interpret results that look dramatically different from prior assessments. Also, they may worry…
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Computational generation of an annotated gigalibrary of synthesizable, composite peptidic macrocycles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Peptidomimetic macrocycles have the potential to regulate challenging therapeutic targets. Structures of this type having precise shapes and drug-like character are particularly coveted, but are relatively difficult to synthesize. Our laboratory has developed robust methods that integrate small-peptide units into designed scaffolds. These methods create macrocycles and embed condensed heterocycles
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Amid Record-Breaking Fires, Debate Over Blame
Reactions to the West Coast's wildfires have been polarized. Some progressive politicians emphasized the role of climate change, while some conservative commentators, along with President Donald J. Trump, downplayed the effect of climate change, instead blaming the blazes solely on poor forest management.
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Generation of three-dimensional heart organoids
Researchers engineered three-dimensional functional heart organoids resembling the developing heart. By exposing mouse embryonic stem cells to two key proteins during heart development, the researchers were able to form heart organoids with structural, functional, and molecular similarities to the embryonic heart during development. This method could be used to study heart development and to scree
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Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Today, researchers are defying a classical theory from American physicist Josiah Willard Gibbs, with proof of a five-phase equilibrium, something that many scholars considered impossible.
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Shape matters for light-activated nanocatalysts
Points matter when designing nanoparticles that drive important chemical reactions using the power of light, according to recent research.
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Undersea earthquakes shake up climate science
Sound generated by seismic events on the seabed can be used to determine the temperature of Earth's warming oceans.
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What Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Death Means for America
Updated on September 18, 2020, at 8:47 p.m. ET. A furious battle over a Supreme Court vacancy is arguably the last thing the United States needs right now. The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg today represents a devastating loss for feminists who held up the 87-year-old as an icon of women's rights, and as a bulwark protecting abortion rights and a wide range of other progressive ideals on a
18h
South Korea's megachurches take on government in coronavirus battle
Mass protests against pandemic restrictions have exposed the country's religious fissures
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Coronavirus live news: Trump pledges vaccine for all by April as Melbourne faces more protests
Number of cases worldwide passes 30 million; Victoria announces 21 new Covid-19 cases and seven more deaths; UK faces possible second national lockdown. Follow all the developments Mutant virus: should we be worried that Sars-CoV-2 is changing ? UK entering second wave of virus, Johnson warns 'Shocking': Trump under fire from ex-adviser for Covid failures 1.33am BST Mexico has reported 4,841 new
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The Atlantic Daily: Start Preparing for Winter
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Moises Saman / Magnum The coronavirus isn't going away this winter. In fact, the U.S. outbreak is poised to get worse. Don't pin your hopes on a vaccine, either. Anthony Fauci, the director of th
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All-optical method sets record for ultrafast high-spatial-resolution imaging: 15 trillion frames per second
Scientists have recently developed an all-optical ultrafast imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolutions, as well as a high frame rate. Because the method is all-optical, it's free from the bottlenecks that arise from scanning with mechanical and electronic components.
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All-optical method sets record for ultrafast high-spatial-resolution imaging: 15 trillion frames per second
Scientists have recently developed an all-optical ultrafast imaging system with high spatial and temporal resolutions, as well as a high frame rate. Because the method is all-optical, it's free from the bottlenecks that arise from scanning with mechanical and electronic components.
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Thousands of dying birds out West could reveal an even bigger environmental tragedy
We have noticed that the majority of species collected are insectivores and long-distance migrants, such as swallows, wood-pewees, empidonax flycatchers, and warblers. (4/9) pic.twitter.com/dPoR1QFqtz — Allison Salas (@salasphorus) September 13, 2020
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Trump's April vaccine forecast puts him at odds with experts
US president's prediction comes as CDC reverses course on testing guidelines
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Innovation and the magic art of pushing water uphill
If we desperately want a technology to work, laws of physics will rearrange to make it possible
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Undersea earthquakes shake up climate science
Sound generated by seismic events on the seabed can be used to determine the temperature of Earth's warming oceans.
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Evidence-based vocational rehab practices raise employment rates after spinal cord injury
Evidence-based practices that are raising post-injury employment rates include the individualized placement support model of supported employment, and vocational resource facilitation (VRF), according to Dr. John O'Neill at Kessler Foundation. He cited gains seen with the implementation of VRF for newly injured individuals in a Craig H. Neilsen Foundation funded project. "Of the patients recruited
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3 Ways to Help Save Monarch Butterflies and Other Pollinators
Monarchs face an uncertain future. Their numbers have plummeted in recent decades. Here are some ways you can help.
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A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
An article address unresolved scientific questions that can help avert future lead poisoning disasters. A better-informed society can prevent such disasters from happening through improved risk assessment, anticipation and management of factors affecting lead release.
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How the seasons might influence brain size
Research suggests that changes in air pressure can cause changes in brain volume, in humans as well as in animals A study by New England researchers looks at how weather and season influence brain size , comparing over three thousand MRI scans and finding small but distinct effects. "Basically, on a stormy day or in the winter, the cerebellum is larger than normal, while the rest of the brain is
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So 2020: New Storm Forms, Named Alpha Because We've Run Out Of Letters
There's only been one other year – 2005 – that Greek names have been needed. The National Hurricane Center on Friday announced storms called Alpha and Beta have formed in the Atlantic. (Image credit: Courtesy of NOAA)
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Trump Now Claims 'Every American' Will Have Coronavirus Vaccine By April
The president has contradicted health experts, and now his own ambitious timeline, for a vaccine against COVID-19. (Image credit: Alex Wong/Getty Images)
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Study links 'sun-seeking behavior' to genes involved in addiction
There are a number of physical and mental health benefits to sun exposure, such as boosted vitamin D and serotonin levels and stronger bones. Addictions are multi-step conditions that, by definition, require exposure to the addictive agent and have also been proven to have a genetic factor. Countless people are exposed to addictive things, but not all become addicted. This is because of the genet
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Shape matters for light-activated nanocatalysts
Points matter when designing nanoparticles that drive important chemical reactions using the power of light, according research from Rice University's Laboratory for Nanophotonics.
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Professors: We Are Begging You to Stop Injecting Yourselves With Homebrewed COVID Vaccines
In a new paper in the journal Science, a team of scientists has a blunt request: please stop injecting yourselves with homebrewed COVID vaccines. Co-author Jacob Sherkow, a University of Illinois law professor, unloaded on citizen scientists experimenting with inoculating against the coronavirus in a strongly worded university press release . "We're all sympathetic to the notion that people want
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Echo Acoustic for Microbiome
The workflow for microbiome whole genome sequencing
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Is this the end of the myth of American exceptionalism?
In "American Rule," Jared Yates Sexton wants to eradicate the myth of American exceptionalism. Since its founding, Sexton writes that America has been constructed to protect the wealthy elite. In this interview, the writer suggests that facing up to our tragic history affords us an opportunity to build something new. Jared Yates Sexton wants to destroy the myth of American exceptionalism. The ass
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Massive damage of rare plants probed at Nevada mine site
State and federal authorities are investigating the mysterious loss of a significant swath of a rare desert wildflower that's being considered for federal protection at a contentious mine site in Nevada with some of the largest untapped lithium deposits in the world.
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Like humans, chimpanzees can suffer for life if orphaned before adulthood
A new study shows that orphaned male chimpanzees are less competitive and have fewer offspring of their own than those who continue to live with their mothers. The remaining puzzle is, what is it that their mothers provide that keeps chimpanzees healthy and competitive?
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Massive damage of rare plants probed at Nevada mine site
State and federal authorities are investigating the mysterious loss of a significant swath of a rare desert wildflower that's being considered for federal protection at a contentious mine site in Nevada with some of the largest untapped lithium deposits in the world.
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A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
Six years after it began, the Flint, Michigan, water crisis remains among the highest-profile emergencies in the United States.
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NASA confirms development of record-breaking tropical storm Wilfred, ending hurricane list
The list of hurricane names is officially used up with the development of the 23rd tropical cyclone of the year. Tropical Storm Wilfred just formed in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 18. Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Wilfred's rainfall rates.
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NASA estimates powerful hurricane Teddy's extreme rainfall
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Hurricane Teddy's rainfall rates. Teddy is a major hurricane in the Central North Atlantic Ocean.
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NASA-NOAA satellite sees tropical depression 22 strengthening in gulf of Mexico
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Tropical Depression 22 in the Gulf of Mexico during the early morning hours of Sept. 18. TD22 is expected to become a tropical storm, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite finds tropical storm Noul fading over Laos
Tropical Storm Noul made landfall in central Vietnam on Sept. 17 and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the storm over Laos. Noul was weakening as it moves toward Thailand where it is forecast to dissipate.
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Scientists Discover 120,000-Year-Old Human Footprints In Saudi Arabia
Scientists discovered 120,000-year-old human footprints in Saudi Arabia along with those of horses and elephants — hinting the region was once more hospitable to people moving out of Africa.
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Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Today, researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University Paris-Saclay are defying a classical theory from American physicist Josiah Willard Gibbs, with proof of a five-phase equilibrium, something that many scholars considered impossible.
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Aqua satellite helps confirm Subtropical Storm Alpha
Subtropical Storm Alpha has formed near the coast of Portugal, becoming the first named storm using the Greek Alphabet list, now that the annual list of names is exhausted. NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery of the new storm.
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The purpose of sleep appears to change when we are toddlers
Sleep in babies seems to mainly help develop new brain connections, but at the age of around two-and-a-half there is an abrupt shift to brain repair
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NASA Finds Evidence of "Fresh Ice" on Saturn's Moon Enceladus
By digging through detailed infrared images of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus — courtesy of NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which met its demise back in 2017 after 13 years of Saturn exploration — NASA scientists say they've found "strong evidence" of fresh ice in the moon's northern hemisphere. The ice, thought to have originated and resurfaced from Enceladus' interior, could be good news for the prospe
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Researchers Say the Purpose of Sleep Shifts During the 'Terrible Twos'
A multidisciplinary team offers up an exact age when REM sleep decreases
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Tequila Might Make You Do Crazy Things — But Not For the Reasons You Think
Science says you can't blame your bad behavior on your beverage of choice.
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Frozen Fecal Knives Honored by 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes
Other recipients of the award for laugh-worthy achievements experimented with alligators on helium and vibrating worms.
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The US military's heat weapon is real and painful. Here's what it does.
An ADS in Arizona in 2017. (U.S. Marine Corps / Lance Cpl. Andrew M. Huff/) Earlier this week, an NPR report uncovered an exchange from June 1, in which a military police officer wanted to know if the D.C. National Guard owned a pain-inducing heat weapon for potentially using on protesters. He also asked about a powerful auditory communication system that's been compared to the "voice of God." Th
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How We Survive the Winter
O n April 13 , Robert Redfield, the director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, appeared on the Today show and assured viewers that the worst was nearly behind us. It had been a month since the last gathering of fans in an NBA arena; a month since the fateful week when Americans began panic-buying bottled water and canned beans. The segment's host, Savannah Guthrie, was broad
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'I'm worried about voters screwing up.' Election scientist tackles 2020 U.S. vote
Charles Stewart III helped launch a "healthy elections" project
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Brain-scanning backpack brings neuroscience into the real world
Wearable device allows brain readings and stimulation on the go
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COVID-19 data scandal prompts tweaks to elite journal's review process
After publishing study based on unverified patient data from Surgisphere, a little-known company, The Lancet promises tighter standards
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Live Covid-19 Tracker and Updates
President Trump acknowledged that an authorized vaccine for "every American" may not be distributed until next year. An Iranian official says the country has become a "red zone" as cases and deaths surge.
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Madrid orders 850,000 people in capital to stay in own areas
Strict new local quarantine rules from Monday as Spain struggles to control new coronavirus wave
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Connecting the dots on food access
A new study simultaneously examined the preferences of community members and compared those with the community-based programs and resources available to identify the most viable strategies for addressing disparities in healthy food consumption.
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Nano-microscope gives first direct observation of the magnetic properties of 2D materials
Widefield nitrogen-vacancy microscope solves problem of there being no way to tell exactly how strongly magnetic a 2D material was.
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Coffee associated with improved survival in metastatic colorectal cancer patients
In a large group of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, consumption of a few cups of coffee a day was associated with longer survival and a lower risk of the cancer worsening, researchers report in a new study.
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Novel mechanism may confer protection against glaucoma
Researchers provides the first evidence that patients with ocular hypertension may exhibit superior antioxidant protection that promotes resistance to the elevated intraocular pressure associated with glaucoma.
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Tweak could boost vaccine protection and cut inflammation
By adding a molecule, researchers have found a way to reduce inflammatory response to vaccines. Adjuvants are a key ingredient of many modern vaccines, working to unleash an immune response that helps protect the body from disease. Many scientists believe that adjuvants are the key to developing new kinds of vaccines for hard-to-vaccinate viruses, like HIV. But adjuvants can cause inflammation at
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Astronomers Spy Phosphine on Venus, a Potential Sign of Life
On Earth, the toxic gas is produced by microbial life. Could the same be true on Venus? Now, the debate begins.
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NASA's aqua satellite helps confirm subtropical storm alpha
Subtropical Storm Alpha has formed near the coast of Portugal, becoming the first named storm using the Greek Alphabet list, now that the annual list of names is exhausted. NASA's Aqua satellite obtained visible imagery of the new storm.
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NASA-NOAA satellite sees tropical depression 22 strengthening in gulf of Mexico
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Tropical Depression 22 in the Gulf of Mexico during the early morning hours of Sept. 18. TD22 is expected to become a tropical storm, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC).
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NASA confirms development of record-breaking tropical storm Wilfred, ending hurricane list
The list of hurricane names is officially used up with the development of the 23rd tropical cyclone of the year. Tropical Storm Wilfred just formed in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 18. Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Wilfred's rainfall rates.
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NASA estimates powerful hurricane Teddy's extreme rainfall
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Hurricane Teddy's rainfall rates. Teddy is a major hurricane in the Central North Atlantic Ocean.
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NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite finds tropical storm Noul fading over Laos
Tropical Storm Noul made landfall in central Vietnam on Sept. 17 and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured an image of the storm over Laos. Noul was weakening as it moves toward Thailand where it is forecast to dissipate.
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A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
In a paper published Sept. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, John R. Scully and Raymond J. Santucci address unresolved scientific questions that can help avert future lead poisoning disasters. A better-informed society can prevent such disasters from happening through improved risk assessment, anticipation and management of factors affecting lead release.
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New method identifies antibody-like proteins with diagnostic and therapeutic potential for SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have used a new high-speed, in vitro selection method to isolate 9 antibody-like proteins (ALPs) that bind to the SARS-CoV-2 virus – 4 of which also exhibited neutralizing activity – within 4 days, according to a new study. While much research has
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US adults experienced increased COVID-19-related mental health challenges as the pandemic unfolded
US adults increasingly experienced symptoms associated with acute stress and depression as COVID-19 cases and deaths skyrocketed between mid-March and mid-April 2020, according to a study of more than 6,500 people from three large, nationally representative cohorts. These
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Study links rising stress, depression in US to pandemic-related losses, media consumption
Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic – such as unemployment – and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the US, according to a groundbreaking University of California, Irvine study.
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Like humans, chimpanzees can suffer for life if orphaned before adulthood
A new study from the Tai Chimpanzee Project in Ivory Coast and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, shows that orphaned male chimpanzees are less competitive and have fewer offspring of their own than those who continue to live with their mothers. The remaining puzzle is, what is it that their mothers provide that keeps chimpanzees healthy and competitive?
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Immune system may have another job — combatting depression
An inflammatory autoimmune response within the central nervous system similar to one linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has also been found in the spinal fluid of healthy people, according to a new Yale-led study comparing immune system cells in the spinal fluid of MS patients and healthy subjects. The research, published Sept. 18 in the journal Science Immunology
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Removal of a gene could render lethal poxviruses harmless
The removal of one gene renders poxviruses – a lethal family of viral infections that are known to spread from animals to humans – harmless, a new study in the journal Science Advances reports.
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Indian monsoon can be predicted better after volcanic eruptions
Large volcanic eruptions can help to forecast the monsoon over India – the seasonal rainfall that is key for the country's agriculture and thus for feeding one billion people. As erratic as they are, volcanic eruptions improve the predictability, an Indian-German research team finds. What seems to be a paradox is in fact due to a stronger coupling between the monsoon over large parts of South and
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UCLA-led team of scientists discovers why we need sleep
Why is sleep so vital to our health? A UCLA-led team of scientists has answered this question and shown for the first time that a dramatic change in the purpose of sleep occurs at the age of about 2-and-a-half.
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Size and sleep: New research reveals why little things sleep longer
Using data from humans and other mammals, a team of scientists including researchers from the Santa Fe Institute has developed one of the first quantitative models that explains why sleep times across species and during development decrease as brains get bigger. Crucially, the model identifies a sharp transition at around 2.4 years of age, where sleep patterns change in humans as the primary purpo
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The week in wildlife – in pictures
The best wildlife pictures from around the world, from golden frogs to homebound birds Continue reading…
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UK entering second wave of coronavirus, Boris Johnson warns
PM set to impose measures across country as experts say death toll could be as high as in first spike unless behaviour changes Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain is entering a second wave of coronavirus, Boris Johnson has said as scientists expressed fears the death toll could be as high as in the first spike without a rapid change in public behaviour. Related:
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Postweaning maternal care increases male chimpanzee reproductive success
Humans are unusual among animals for continuing to provision and care for their offspring until adulthood. This "prolonged dependency" is considered key for the evolution of other notable human traits, such as large brains, complex societies, and extended postreproductive lifespans. Prolonged dependency must therefore have evolved under conditions in which reproductive success is gained with pare
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Unraveling why we sleep: Quantitative analysis reveals abrupt transition from neural reorganization to repair in early development
Sleep serves disparate functions, most notably neural repair, metabolite clearance and circuit reorganization. Yet the relative importance remains hotly debated. Here, we create a novel mechanistic framework for understanding and predicting how sleep changes during ontogeny and across phylogeny. We use this theory to quantitatively distinguish between sleep used for neural reorganization versus r
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Fingerprint of volcanic forcing on the ENSO-Indian monsoon coupling
Coupling of the El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Indian monsoon (IM) is central to seasonal summer monsoon rainfall predictions over the Indian subcontinent, although a nonstationary relationship between the two nonlinear phenomena can limit seasonal predictability. Radiative effects of volcanic aerosols injected into the stratosphere during large volcanic eruptions (LVEs) tend to alter EN
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Human footprints provide snapshot of last interglacial ecology in the Arabian interior
The nature of human dispersals out of Africa has remained elusive because of the poor resolution of paleoecological data in direct association with remains of the earliest non-African people. Here, we report hominin and non-hominin mammalian tracks from an ancient lake deposit in the Arabian Peninsula, dated within the last interglacial. The findings, it is argued, likely represent the oldest sec
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Intermolecular vibrations mediate ultrafast singlet fission
Singlet fission is a spin-allowed exciton multiplication process in organic semiconductors that converts one spin-singlet exciton to two triplet excitons. It offers the potential to enhance solar energy conversion by circumventing the Shockley-Queisser limit on efficiency. We study the primary steps of singlet fission in a pentacene film by using a combination of TG and 2D electronic spectroscopy
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Electrical control of single-photon emission in highly charged individual colloidal quantum dots
Electron transfer to an individual quantum dot promotes the formation of charged excitons with enhanced recombination pathways and reduced lifetimes. Excitons with only one or two extra charges have been observed and exploited for very efficient lasing or single–quantum dot light-emitting diodes. Here, by room-temperature time-resolved experiments on individual giant-shell CdSe/CdS quantum dots,
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Viral cGAMP nuclease reveals the essential role of DNA sensing in protection against acute lethal virus infection
Cells contain numerous immune sensors to detect virus infection. The cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) recognizes cytosolic DNA and activates innate immune responses via stimulator of interferon genes (STING), but the impact of DNA sensing pathways on host protective responses has not been fully defined. We demonstrate that cGAS/STING activation is required to resist lethal poxvirus infectio
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High-frequency magnetoacoustic resonance through strain-spin coupling in perpendicular magnetic multilayers
It is desirable to experimentally demonstrate an extremely high resonant frequency, assisted by strain-spin coupling, in technologically important perpendicular magnetic materials for device applications. Here, we directly observe the coupling of magnons and phonons in both time and frequency domains upon femtosecond laser excitation. This strain-spin coupling leads to a magnetoacoustic resonance
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Artificial cells drive neural differentiation
We report the construction of artificial cells that chemically communicate with mammalian cells under physiological conditions. The artificial cells respond to the presence of a small molecule in the environment by synthesizing and releasing a potent protein signal, brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Genetically controlled artificial cells communicate with engineered human embryonic kidney cells
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RELATe enables genome-scale engineering in fungal genomics
CRISPR-Cas9–based screening with single-guide RNA (sgRNA) libraries has emerged as a revolutionary tool for comprehensive analysis of genetic elements. However, genome-scale sgRNA libraries are currently available only in a few model organisms. The traditional approach is to synthesize thousands to tens of thousands of sgRNAs, which is laborious and expensive. We have developed a simple method, R
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Single-molecule imaging reveals control of parental histone recycling by free histones during DNA replication
During replication, nucleosomes are disrupted ahead of the replication fork, followed by their reassembly on daughter strands from the pool of recycled parental and new histones. However, because no previous studies have managed to capture the moment that replication forks encounter nucleosomes, the mechanism of recycling has remained unclear. Here, through real-time single-molecule visualization
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Structural insights into ADP-ribosylation of ubiquitin by Deltex family E3 ubiquitin ligases
Cellular cross-talk between ubiquitination and other posttranslational modifications contributes to the regulation of numerous processes. One example is ADP-ribosylation of the carboxyl terminus of ubiquitin by the E3 DTX3L/ADP-ribosyltransferase PARP9 heterodimer, but the mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that independently of PARP9, the conserved carboxyl-terminal RING and DTC (Deltex ca
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TbRAP1 has an unusual duplex DNA binding activity required for its telomere localization and VSG silencing
Localization of Repressor Activator Protein 1 (RAP1) to the telomere is essential for its telomeric functions. RAP1 homologs either directly bind the duplex telomere DNA or interact with telomere-binding proteins. We find that Trypanosoma brucei RAP1 relies on a unique double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) binding activity to achieve this goal. T. brucei causes human sleeping sickness and regularly switche
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Chaos-assisted tunneling resonances in a synthetic Floquet superlattice
The field of quantum simulation, which aims at using a tunable quantum system to simulate another, has been developing fast in the past years as an alternative to the all-purpose quantum computer. So far, most efforts in this domain have been directed to either fully regular or fully chaotic systems. Here, we focus on the intermediate regime, where regular orbits are surrounded by a large sea of
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Expanding and optimizing 3D bioprinting capabilities using complementary network bioinks
A major challenge in three-dimensional (3D) bioprinting is the limited number of bioinks that fulfill the physicochemical requirements of printing while also providing a desirable environment for encapsulated cells. Here, we address this limitation by temporarily stabilizing bioinks with a complementary thermo-reversible gelatin network. This strategy enables the effective printing of biomaterial
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Reprogrammable shape morphing of magnetic soft machines
Shape-morphing magnetic soft machines are highly desirable for diverse applications in minimally invasive medicine, wearable devices, and soft robotics. Despite recent progress, current magnetic programming approaches are inherently coupled to sequential fabrication processes, preventing reprogrammability and high-throughput programming. Here, we report a high-throughput magnetic programming stra
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Snapshot spectral imaging with parallel metasystems
Spectral imagers divide scenes into quantitative and narrowband spectral channels. They have become important metrological tools in many areas of science, especially remote sensing. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a snapshot spectral imager using a parallel optical processing paradigm based on arrays of metasystems. Our multi-aperture spectral imager weighs less than 20 mg and sim
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USP15 suppresses tumor immunity via deubiquitylation and inactivation of TET2
TET2 DNA dioxygenase is frequently mutated in human hematopoietic malignancies and functionally inactivated in many solid tumors through a nonmutational mechanism. We recently found that TET2 mediates the interferon-JAK-STAT pathway to stimulate chemokine expression and tumor infiltration of lymphocytes (TILs). TET2 is monoubiquitylated at K1299, which promotes its activity. Here, we report that
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Revisiting the PD-1 pathway
Programmed Death-1 (PD-1; CD279) is an inhibitory receptor induced in activated T cells. PD-1 engagement by its ligands, PD-L1 and PD-L2, maintains peripheral tolerance but also compromises anti-tumor immunity. Blocking antibodies against PD-1 or its ligands have revolutionized cancer immunotherapy. However, only a fraction of patients develop durable antitumor responses. Clinical outcomes have r
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NASA Has Figured Out a New Way to Safely Land on the Moon
NASA has built a brand new system that could make landing on Moon and Mars a whole lot less risky — and it already has plans to test it out on an upcoming mission. The agency's Safe and Precise Landing Integrated Capabilities Evolution (SPLICE) project aims to improve landing safety by combining a suite of laser sensors, a camera, a high-speed computer, and some sophisticated algorithms — all of
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Like humans, chimpanzees can suffer for life if orphaned before adulthood
Researchers observed three chimpanzee communities of the Tai National Park. They kept full demographic records and collected fecal samples to conduct paternity tests on all new community members, for up to 30 years. Catherine Crockford, the lead author, says: "When we study our closest living relatives, like chimpanzees, we can learn about the ancient environmental factors that made us human. Our
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Removal of a gene could render lethal poxviruses harmless
The removal of one gene renders poxviruses—a lethal family of viral infections that are known to spread from animals to humans—harmless, a new study in the journal Science Advances reports.
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Indian monsoon can be predicted better after volcanic eruptions
Large volcanic eruptions can help to forecast monsoons over India. This seasonal rainfall is key for the country's agriculture and thus for feeding 1 billion people. As erratic as they are, volcanic eruptions improve the predictability, an Indian-German research team finds. What seems to be a paradox is, in fact, due to a stronger coupling between the monsoon over large parts of South and South-Ea
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Why orange skies fill us with a sense of impending doom
It is LITERALLY Blade Runner 2049 in California right now. pic.twitter.com/FAggbTQeNB — Kevin L. Lee (@Klee_FilmReview) September 9, 2020
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Like humans, chimpanzees can suffer for life if orphaned before adulthood
Researchers observed three chimpanzee communities of the Tai National Park. They kept full demographic records and collected fecal samples to conduct paternity tests on all new community members, for up to 30 years. Catherine Crockford, the lead author, says: "When we study our closest living relatives, like chimpanzees, we can learn about the ancient environmental factors that made us human. Our
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Removal of a gene could render lethal poxviruses harmless
The removal of one gene renders poxviruses—a lethal family of viral infections that are known to spread from animals to humans—harmless, a new study in the journal Science Advances reports.
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Covid-19 news: UK government won't rule out second national lockdown
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Lack of UK airport tests aiding Covid-19 spread, scientists warn
Sage experts say poor quarantine compliance is also bringing virus into country Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Government scientists have warned of a "developing situation" over people bringing coronavirus into the UK after travelling abroad and returning home without being tested. People who travel overseas are required to quarantine for two weeks on their return u
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How Jimi Hendrix's London Years Changed Music
"It's so lovely now," Jimi Hendrix said in his muzzy mumble, his topplingly elegant, close-to-gibberish, discreetly space-traveling undertone, onstage one night in 1967 at the Bag O'Nails in London. "I kissed the fairest soul brother of England, Eric Clapton—kissed him right on the lips." This is one of many groovy scenes recorded in Philip Norman's new Hendrix biography, Wild Thing . The fairest
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Daily briefing: Genes map how the Vikings spread across Europe
Nature, Published online: 18 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02693-8 Genetics reveals which Vikings went where during the influential Viking Age. Plus, how to get a COVID-19 vaccine to those who need it most and what happens when you read a paper every single day.
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Flooding affects more than 1 million across East Africa
Flooding has affected well over a million people across East Africa, another calamity threatening food security on top of a historic locust outbreak and the coronavirus pandemic.
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Self-induced ultrafast demagnetization limits the amount of light diffracted from magnetic samples at soft x-ray energies
Free electron X-ray lasers deliver intense ultrashort pulses of x-rays, which can be used to image nanometer-scale objects in a single shot. When the x-ray wavelength is tuned to an electronic resonance, magnetization patterns can be made visible. When using increasingly intense pulses, however, the magnetization image fades away. The mechanism responsible for this loss in resonant magnetic scatte
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Mapping the decision-making pathways in the brain
Scientists have identified a new area of the brain that could be involved in cost-benefit decision-making.
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New high-speed test shows how antibiotics combine to kill bacteria
Researchers have developed a new method to determine – rapidly, easily and cheaply – how effective two antibiotics combined can be in stopping bacterial growth. The new method is simple for laboratories to use and can provide greater scope for customizing treatment of bacterial infections.
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Københavns Kommune standser skandaleramt højhusbyggeri
Beregningerne af statikken i Njals Tårn er ufuldstændige og tager ikke i tilstrækkelig grad højde for støbeskel og byggeaffald i fundamentet, lyder det fra Københavns Kommune, der nu stopper byggeriet af det 86 meter høje tårn.
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