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Egypt tomb: Sarcophagi buried for 2,500 years unearthed in Saqqara
The 27 wooden coffins are said to have lain undisturbed inside a well at an ancient necropolis.
1h
Why there is no speed limit in the superfluid universe
Physicists from Lancaster University have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit in a continuation of earlier Lancaster research.
11h
Svensk elselskab vil udbrede vindmøller med trætårne
Modvion og Vattenfall har indgået et samarbejde, som de håber kan begrænse mængden af CO2, der udledes under produktionen af vindmøller, med 25 procent.
6h
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LATEST

The CDC finally acknowledged that COVID-19 is airborne—and then took it back
This little girl is demonstrating exactly why your mask should always be over your nose and mouth. (Gustavo Fring/Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including tips on cleaning groceries , ways to tell if your symptoms are just allergies , and a tutorial on making your own mask . Many countries have started to lift restrictions and open up their borders, but that doesn't mean
5min
Study reveals racial disparities in clinical trial recruitment
In a new study published in Clinical Trials, researchers led by Stephen Juraschek, MD, PhD (Medicine, BIDMC) compared four electronic-based and four traditional recruitment methods for clinical trials to determine how different strategies may impact enrollment of groups traditionally under-represented in the medical literature.
11min
Researchers identify new type of superconductor
Until now, the history of superconducting materials has been a tale of two types: s-wave and d-wave.Now, Cornell researchers – led by Brad Ramshaw, the Dick & Dale Reis Johnson Assistant Professor in the College of Arts and Sciences – have discovered a possible third type: g-wave.
11min
Think you have chemical intolerance? Answer 3 questions
To increase screening of chemical intolerance, researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have developed and validated a three-question survey that can be incorporated into patient visits within a minute.
11min
Nanoparticle SARS-CoV-2 model may speed drug discovery for COVID-19
Scientists have developed a new tool that mimics how the virus that causes COVID-19 infects a cell, potentially speeding the search for treatments against the disease. The tool is a fluorescent nanoparticle probe that uses the spike protein on the virus surface to bind to cells and trigger the process that pulls the virus into cells. The probe could be used to rapidly gauge how drugs and compounds
11min
USC/Princeton study finds middle-aged americans report more pain than the elderly
Middle-aged Americans report more pain than the elderly. Pain is more prevalent among the two-thirds of U.S. adults without a four-year college degree.
11min
Vem ser dig?
– Det kan ta flera veckor att gå igenom allt. Peter Bergström, chef för informationsteknik på Nationellt forensiskt centrum, NFC, i Linköping, berättar hur bildmaterialet i polisens utredningar kan växa till gigantiska mängder. Det är videor från både offentliga och privata övervakningskameror, plus polisens egna. – Lägg till att alla har en mobil i fickan. Det blir många bilder och mycket video,
12min
Aromatherapy in the Apiary Is What Bees Need
Honeybees were better at pollinating crops after scent training.
17min
Richmond emergency room experienced a surge in opioid overdoses during pandemic
Virginia Commonwealth University researchers have released data showing an alarming surge in opioid-related overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nonfatal opioid overdose visits to the VCU Medical Center emergency department in Richmond increased from 102 between March and June 2019 to 227 between March and June 2020. That's an increase of 123%.
20min
With Fraud Claims Swirling, Nikola EV Truck Founder Heads for the Exit
Nikola Corp., a would-be maker of electric 18-wheelers and pickup trucks, is in even deeper trouble following the sudden departure Sunday of founder and executive chairman Trevor Milton. This came in the wake of claims by short-seller Hindenburg Research that declared Nikola "an intricate fraud." Before the founder bailed and before Hindenburg's report, Nikola this month had signed an agreement w
21min
Making sense of diabetes
Throughout her 38-year nursing career, Laurel Despins has progressed from a bedside nurse to a clinical nurse specialist and has worked in medical, surgical and cardiac intensive care units. She noticed diabetes is rarely referred to as a primary cause of death in itself, yet the disease is a leading contributor to deaths involving heart disease, stroke and cancer.
25min
Near-perfect photon utilization in an air-bridge thermophotovoltaic cell
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2717-7 An air gap embedded within the structure of a thermophotovoltaic device acts as a near-perfect reflector of low-energy photons, resulting in their recovery and recycling by the thermal source, enabling excellent power-conversion efficiency.
37min
Stick-slip model for actin-driven cell protrusions, cell polarization, and crawling [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cell crawling requires the generation of intracellular forces by the cytoskeleton and their transmission to an extracellular substrate through specific adhesion molecules. Crawling cells show many features of excitable systems, such as spontaneous symmetry breaking and crawling in the absence of external cues, and periodic and propagating waves of activity….
38min
Convergent molecular, cellular, and cortical neuroimaging signatures of major depressive disorder [Neuroscience]
Major depressive disorder emerges from the complex interactions of biological systems that span genes and molecules through cells, networks, and behavior. Establishing how neurobiological processes coalesce to contribute to depression requires a multiscale approach, encompassing measures of brain structure and function as well as genetic and cell-specific transcriptional data. Here,…
38min
Ecological divergence and hybridization of Neotropical Leishmania parasites [Population Biology]
The tropical Andes are an important natural laboratory to understand speciation in many taxa. Here we examined the evolutionary history of parasites of the Leishmania braziliensis species complex based on whole-genome sequencing of 67 isolates from 47 localities in Peru. We first show the origin of Andean Leishmania as a…
38min
The cytoplasmic tail of human mannosidase Man1b1 contributes to catalysis-independent quality control of misfolded alpha1-antitrypsin [Biochemistry]
The failure of polypeptides to achieve conformational maturation following biosynthesis can result in the formation of protein aggregates capable of disrupting essential cellular functions. In the secretory pathway, misfolded asparagine (N)-linked glycoproteins are selectively sorted for endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) in response to the catalytic removal of terminal alpha-link
38min
Low genetic diversity may be an Achilles heel of SARS-CoV-2 [Commentaries]
Scientists worldwide are racing to develop effective vaccines against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of the COVID-19 pandemic. An important and perhaps underappreciated aspect of this endeavor is ensuring that the vaccines being developed confer immunity to all viral lineages in the global population. Toward…
38min
Localized foundering of Indian lower crust in the India-Tibet collision zone [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The deep structure of the continental collision between India and Asia and whether India's lower crust is underplated beneath Tibet or subducted into the mantle remain controversial. It is also unknown whether the active normal faults that facilitate orogen-parallel extension of Tibetan upper crust continue into the lower crust and…
38min
Prevalence of neural collapse during the terminal phase of deep learning training [Applied Mathematics]
Modern practice for training classification deepnets involves a terminal phase of training (TPT), which begins at the epoch where training error first vanishes. During TPT, the training error stays effectively zero, while training loss is pushed toward zero. Direct measurements of TPT, for three prototypical deepnet architectures and across seven…
38min
Stable homotopy groups of spheres [Mathematics]
We discuss the current state of knowledge of stable homotopy groups of spheres. We describe a computational method using motivic homotopy theory, viewed as a deformation of classical homotopy theory. This yields a streamlined computation of the first 61 stable homotopy groups and gives information about the stable homotopy groups…
38min
Strain engineering of the charge and spin-orbital interactions in Sr2IrO4 [Physics]
In the high spin–orbit-coupled Sr2IrO4, the high sensitivity of the ground state to the details of the local lattice structure shows a large potential for the manipulation of the functional properties by inducing local lattice distortions. We use epitaxial strain to modify the Ir–O bond geometry in Sr2IrO4 and perform…
38min
Correction for Liu et al., {beta}-Arrestin2 is a critical component of the GPCR-eNOS signalosome [Corrections]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "β-Arrestin2 is a critical component of the GPCR–eNOS signalosome," by Songling Liu, Louis M. Luttrell, Richard T. Premont, and Don C. Rockey, which was first published May 13, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1922608117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 11483–11492). The editors wish to note that the following competing…
38min
Evolution of vertebrate gill covers via shifts in an ancient Pou3f3 enhancer [Developmental Biology]
Whereas the gill chambers of jawless vertebrates open directly into the environment, jawed vertebrates evolved skeletal appendages that drive oxygenated water unidirectionally over the gills. A major anatomical difference between the two jawed vertebrate lineages is the presence of a single large gill cover in bony fishes versus separate covers…
38min
Unusually efficient CUG initiation of an overlapping reading frame in POLG mRNA yields novel protein POLGARF [Genetics]
While near-cognate codons are frequently used for translation initiation in eukaryotes, their efficiencies are usually low (<10% compared to an AUG in optimal context). Here, we describe a rare case of highly efficient near-cognate initiation. A CUG triplet located in the 5′ leader of POLG messenger RNA (mRNA) initiates almost…
38min
A map of decoy influence in human multialternative choice [Economic Sciences]
Human decisions can be biased by irrelevant information. For example, choices between two preferred alternatives can be swayed by a third option that is inferior or unavailable. Previous work has identified three classic biases, known as the attraction, similarity, and compromise effects, which arise during choices between economic alternatives defined…
38min
Targeting the histone demethylase PHF8-mediated PKC{alpha}-Src-PTEN axis in HER2-negative gastric cancer [Cell Biology]
Targeted treatments for advanced gastric cancer (GC) are needed, particularly for HER2-negative GC, which represents the majority of cases (80 to 88%). In this study, in silico analyses of the lysine histone demethylases (KDMs) involved in diverse biological processes and diseases revealed that PHD finger protein 8 (PHF8, KDM7B) was…
38min
Vitamin D3 receptor polymorphisms regulate T cells and T cell-dependent inflammatory diseases [Immunology and Inflammation]
It has proven difficult to identify the underlying genes in complex autoimmune diseases. Here, we use forward genetics to identify polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor gene (Vdr) promoter, controlling Vdr expression and T cell activation. We isolated these polymorphisms in a congenic mouse line, allowing us to study the…
38min
Rhizosphere activity in an old-growth forest reacts rapidly to changes in soil moisture and shapes whole-tree carbon allocation [Ecology]
Drought alters carbon (C) allocation within trees, thereby impairing tree growth. Recovery of root and leaf functioning and prioritized C supply to sink tissues after drought may compensate for drought-induced reduction of assimilation and growth. It remains unclear if C allocation to sink tissues during and following drought is controlled…
38min
Influenza A virus causes maternal and fetal pathology via innate and adaptive vascular inflammation in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]
Influenza A virus (IAV) infection during pregnancy causes severe maternal and perinatal complications, despite a lack of vertical transmission of IAV across the placenta. Here, we demonstrate a significant alteration in the maternal vascular landscape that underpins the maternal and downstream fetal pathology to IAV infection in mice. In IAV…
38min
A phenolic small molecule inhibitor of RNase L prevents cell death from ADAR1 deficiency [Biochemistry]
The oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)–RNase L system is an IFN-inducible antiviral pathway activated by viral infection. Viral double-stranded (ds) RNA activates OAS isoforms that synthesize the second messenger 2-5A, which binds and activates the pseudokinase-endoribonuclease RNase L. In cells, OAS activation is tamped down by ADAR1, an adenosine deaminase that destabilizes…
38min
Correction for Reitz et al., Genomic analysis of siderophore {beta}-hydroxylases reveals divergent stereocontrol and expands the condensation domain family [Corrections]
BIOCHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY Correction for "Genomic analysis of siderophore β-hydroxylases reveals divergent stereocontrol and expands the condensation domain family," by Zachary L. Reitz, Clifford D. Hardy, Jaewon Suk, Jean Bouvet, and Alison Butler, which was first published September 16, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1903161116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 19805–19814). The authors note…
38min
Decoding the mystery of American pain reveals a warning for the future [Social Sciences]
There is an expectation that, on average, pain will increase with age, through accumulated injury, physical wear and tear, and an increasing burden of disease. Consistent with that expectation, pain rises with age into old age in other wealthy countries. However, in America today, the elderly report less pain than…
38min
The 3.6-Ma aridity and westerlies history over midlatitude Asia linked with global climatic cooling [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Midlatitude Asia (MLA), strongly influenced by westerlies-controlled climate, is a key source of global atmospheric dust, and plays a significant role in Earth's climate system . However, it remains unclear how the westerlies, MLA aridity, and dust flux from this region evolved over time. Here, we report a unique high-resolution…
38min
Correction for Hirose et al., Acrosin is essential for sperm penetration through the zona pellucida in hamsters [Corrections]
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Acrosin is essential for sperm penetration through the zona pellucida in hamsters," by Michiko Hirose, Arata Honda, Helena Fulka, Miwa Tamura-Nakano, Shogo Matoba, Toshiko Tomishima, Keiji Mochida, Ayumi Hasegawa, Kiyoshi Nagashima, Kimiko Inoue, Masato Ohtsuka, Tadashi Baba, Ryuzo Yanagimachi, and Atsuo Ogura, which was first published…
38min
The 17-y spatiotemporal trend of PM2.5 and its mortality burden in China [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Investigations on the chronic health effects of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure in China are limited due to the lack of long-term exposure data. Using satellite-driven models to generate spatiotemporally resolved PM2.5 levels, we aimed to estimate high-resolution, long-term PM2.5 and associated mortality burden in China. The multiangle implementation of…
38min
Carbon nitride-based light-driven microswimmers with intrinsic photocharging ability [Engineering]
Controlling autonomous propulsion of microswimmers is essential for targeted drug delivery and applications of micro/nanomachines in environmental remediation and beyond. Herein, we report two-dimensional (2D) carbon nitride-based Janus particles as highly efficient, light-driven microswimmers in aqueous media. Due to the superior photocatalytic properties of poly(heptazine imide) (PHI), the micro
38min
Ultrasensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic for field-applicable detection of Plasmodium species in symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria [Medical Sciences]
Asymptomatic carriers of Plasmodium parasites hamper malaria control and eradication. Achieving malaria eradication requires ultrasensitive diagnostics for low parasite density infections (<100 parasites per microliter blood) that work in resource-limited settings (RLS). Sensitive point-of-care diagnostics are also lacking for nonfalciparum malaria, which is characterized by lower density infectio
38min
Correction for Ewe et al., Natural cryptic variation in epigenetic modulation of an embryonic gene regulatory network [Corrections]
GENETICS Correction for "Natural cryptic variation in epigenetic modulation of an embryonic gene regulatory network," by Chee Kiang Ewe, Yamila N. Torres Cleuren, Sagen E. Flowers, Geneva Alok, Russell G. Snell, and Joel H. Rothman, which was first published June 1, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1920343117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 13637–13646)….
38min
Correction for Duchemin and Josserand, Dimple drainage before the coalescence of a droplet deposited on a smooth substrate [Corrections]
APPLIED PHYSICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Dimple drainage before the coalescence of a droplet deposited on a smooth substrate," by Laurent Duchemin and Christophe Josserand, which was first published August 11, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2007857117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 20416–20422). The authors note that, due to a printer's error, the affiliation…
38min
Variants in FtsJ RNA 2'-O-Methyltransferase 3 and Growth Hormone 1 are associated with small body size and a dental anomaly in dogs [Genetics]
Domesticated dogs show unparalleled diversity in body size across breeds, but within breeds variation is limited by selective breeding. Many heritable diseases of dogs are found among breeds of similar sizes, suggesting that as in humans, alleles governing growth have pleiotropic effects. Here, we conducted independent genome-wide association studies in…
38min
Extraordinary flight performance of the smallest beetles [Engineering]
Size is a key to locomotion. In insects, miniaturization leads to fundamental changes in wing structure and kinematics, making the study of flight in the smallest species important for basic biology and physics, and, potentially, for applied disciplines. However, the flight efficiency of miniature insects has never been studied, and…
40min
Catch-quota matching allowances balance economic and ecological targets in a fishery managed by individual transferable quota [Environmental Sciences]
Fishers with individual catch quota, but limited control over the mix of species caught, depend on trade and catch–quota balancing allowances to fully utilize their quota without discarding. However, these allowances can theoretically lead to overfishing if total allowable catches (TACs) are consistently exceeded. This study investigates usage of balancing…
40min
Astroglial FMRP deficiency cell-autonomously up-regulates miR-128 and disrupts developmental astroglial mGluR5 signaling [Neuroscience]
The loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) causes fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited intellectual disability. How the loss of FMRP alters protein expression and astroglial functions remains essentially unknown. Here we showed that selective loss of astroglial FMRP in vivo up-regulates a brain-enriched miRNA, miR-128-3p,…
40min
Unraveling nucleation pathway in methane clathrate formation [Chemistry]
Methane clathrates are widespread on the ocean floor of the Earth. A better understanding of methane clathrate formation has important implications for natural-gas exploitation, storage, and transportation. A key step toward understanding clathrate formation is hydrate nucleation, which has been suggested to involve multiple evolution pathways. Herein, a unique nucleation/growth…
40min
Tree planting has the potential to increase carbon sequestration capacity of forests in the United States [Sustainability Science]
Several initiatives have been proposed to mitigate forest loss and climate change through tree planting as well as maintaining and restoring forest ecosystems. These initiatives have both inspired and been inspired by global assessments of tree and forest attributes and their contributions to offset carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Here we…
40min
Quality-control mechanisms targeting translationally stalled and C-terminally extended poly(GR) associated with ALS/FTD [Neuroscience]
Maintaining the fidelity of nascent peptide chain (NP) synthesis is essential for proteome integrity and cellular health. Ribosome-associated quality control (RQC) serves to resolve stalled translation, during which untemplated Ala/Thr residues are added C terminally to stalled peptide, as shown during C-terminal Ala and Thr addition (CAT-tailing) in yeast. The…
40min
Melatonin promotes sleep by activating the BK channel in C. elegans [Neuroscience]
Melatonin (Mel) promotes sleep through G protein-coupled receptors. However, the downstream molecular target(s) is unknown. We identified the Caenorhabditis elegans BK channel SLO-1 as a molecular target of the Mel receptor PCDR-1-. Knockout of pcdr-1, slo-1, or homt-1 (a gene required for Mel synthesis) causes substantially increased neurotransmitter release and…
40min
Ventromedial prefrontal area 14 provides opposing regulation of threat and reward-elicited responses in the common marmoset [Neuroscience]
The ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) is a key brain structure implicated in mood and anxiety disorders, based primarily on evidence from correlational neuroimaging studies. Composed of a number of brain regions with distinct architecture and connectivity, dissecting its functional heterogeneity will provide key insights into the symptomatology of these disorders….
40min
Studies of lincosamide formation complete the biosynthetic pathway for lincomycin A [Chemistry]
The structure of lincomycin A consists of the unusual eight-carbon thiosugar core methyllincosamide (MTL) decorated with a pendent N-methylprolinyl moiety. Previous studies on MTL biosynthesis have suggested GDP-ᴅ-erythro-α-ᴅ-gluco-octose and GDP-ᴅ-α-ᴅ-lincosamide as key intermediates in the pathway. However, the enzyme-catalyzed reactions resulting in the conversion of GDP-ᴅ-erythro-α-ᴅ-gluco-oct
40min
QnAs with Janet Currie [QnAs]
Many mental illnesses arise in adolescence, and a study of national insurance claims in the United States finds a large variance in how adolescent patients are treated even within the same zip code. The findings, reported in Janet Currie's Inaugural Article (IA) (1), reveal that 45% of adolescents receive first-line…
40min
Correction for Oliveira-dos-Santos et al., Regulation of T cell activation, anxiety, and male aggression by RGS2 [Corrections]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Regulation of T cell activation, anxiety, and male aggression by RGS2," by Antonio J. Oliveira-dos-Santos, Goichi Matsumoto, Bryan E. Snow, Donglin Bai, Frank P. Houston, Ian Q. Whishaw, Sanjeev Mariathasan, Takehiko Sasaki, Andrew Wakeham, Pamela S. Ohashi, John C. Roder, Carol A. Barnes, David P. Siderovski,…
40min
Accelerated reproduction is not an adaptive response to early-life adversity in wild baboons [Anthropology]
In humans and other long-lived species, harsh conditions in early life often lead to profound differences in adult life expectancy. In response, natural selection is expected to accelerate the timing and pace of reproduction in individuals who experience some forms of early-life adversity. However, the adaptive benefits of reproductive acceleration…
40min
CD8 T cells drive anorexia, dysbiosis, and blooms of a commensal with immunosuppressive potential after viral infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Infections elicit immune adaptations to enable pathogen resistance and/or tolerance and are associated with compositional shifts of the intestinal microbiome. However, a comprehensive understanding of how infections with pathogens that exhibit distinct capability to spread and/or persist differentially change the microbiome, the underlying mechanisms, and the relative contribution of individual…
40min
Enabling early detection of osteoarthritis from presymptomatic cartilage texture maps via transport-based learning [Medical Sciences]
Many diseases have no visual cues in the early stages, eluding image-based detection. Today, osteoarthritis (OA) is detected after bone damage has occurred, at an irreversible stage of the disease. Currently no reliable method exists for OA detection at a reversible stage. We present an approach that enables sensitive OA…
40min
Circulating testican-2 is a podocyte-derived marker of kidney health [Medical Sciences]
In addition to their fundamental role in clearance, the kidneys release select molecules into the circulation, but whether any of these anabolic functions provides insight on kidney health is unknown. Using aptamer-based proteomics, we characterized arterial (A)-to-renal venous (V) gradients for >1,300 proteins in 22 individuals who underwent invasive sampling….
40min
Treatment of mental illness in American adolescents varies widely within and across areas [Economic Sciences]
Many mental health disorders first manifest in adolescence, and early treatment may affect the course of the disease. Using a large national database of insurance claims, this study focuses on variations in the type of care that adolescent patients receive when they are treated for an initial episode of mental…
40min
Rapid onsets of warming events trigger mass mortality of coral reef fish [Ecology]
Our study reveals a hitherto overlooked ecological threat of climate change. Studies of warming events in the ocean have typically focused on the events' maximum temperature and duration as the cause of devastating disturbances in coral reefs, kelp forests, and rocky shores. In this study, however, we found that the…
40min
Correction for Xiang et al., Using synthetic biology to overcome barriers to stable expression of nitrogenase in eukaryotic organelles [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Using synthetic biology to overcome barriers to stable expression of nitrogenase in eukaryotic organelles," by Nan Xiang, Chenyue Guo, Jiwei Liu, Hao Xu, Ray Dixon, Jianguo Yang, and Yi-Ping Wang, which was first published June 29, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2002307117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 16537–16545). The authors…
40min
Australian funnel-web spiders evolved human-lethal {delta}-hexatoxins for defense against vertebrate predators [Evolution]
Australian funnel-web spiders are infamous for causing human fatalities, which are induced by venom peptides known as δ-hexatoxins (δ-HXTXs). Humans and other primates did not feature in the prey or predator spectrum during evolution of these spiders, and consequently the primate lethality of δ-HXTXs remains enigmatic. Funnel-web envenomations are mostly…
40min
Endoplasmic reticulum chaperones stabilize ligand-receptive MR1 molecules for efficient presentation of metabolite antigens [Immunology and Inflammation]
The antigen-presenting molecule MR1 (MHC class I-related protein 1) presents metabolite antigens derived from microbial vitamin B2 synthesis to activate mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells. Key aspects of this evolutionarily conserved pathway remain uncharacterized, including where MR1 acquires ligands and what accessory proteins assist ligand binding. We answer these questions…
40min
Vitamin A aldehyde-taurine adduct and the visual cycle [Cell Biology]
Visual pigment consists of opsin covalently linked to the vitamin A-derived chromophore, 11-cis-retinaldehyde. Photon absorption causes the chromophore to isomerize from the 11-cis- to all-trans-retinal configuration. Continued light sensitivity necessitates the regeneration of 11-cis-retinal via a series of enzyme-catalyzed steps within the visual cycle. During this process, vitamin A aldehyde…
40min
Researchers find diminished response by 'killer' T cells in elderly COVID-19 patients
Although people of any age can become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, elderly patients face a higher risk of severity and death than younger patients. New research comparing the immune response among age groups, published this week in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, may help explain why. Older patients with the disease have lower fre
48min
Artificial intelligence detects osteoarthritis years before it develops
Researchers have created a machine-learning algorithm that can pick up on subtle signs of osteoarthritis – too abstract to register in the eye of a trained radiologist – on an MRI scan taken years before symptom onset.
48min
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
How can we explain the fact that no single species predominates? A generally accepted hypothesis is that a trade-off exists between organisms able to acquire and consume more food than other when resources are scarce, and organisms which rapidly consume large quantities of food when they are in abundance. However, when scientists from the University of Geneva and the Technical University of Denmar
48min
CRISPR-based malaria testing on-the-fly
A multi-disciplinary research collaboration which was led by Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), created a field-applicable, ultrasensitive diagnostic assay that specifically detects DNA sequences from all Plasmodium species in symptomatic and asymptomatic malaria. The new malaria diagnostic method combines an optimize
48min
WHO unveils global plan to fairly distribute COVID-19 vaccine, but challenges await
Nations with two-thirds of world's population have joined, but not United States or China
49min
Dino teeth research prove giant predatory dinosaur lived in water
A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.
58min
Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins
In a new study, researchers describe a method for examining proteins in keen detail. To do this, his group makes clever use of a phenomenon known as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), incorporating it into an innovative type of microscope.
58min
Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Researchers want to make so-called zeolites more efficient. Today, these compounds are already indispensable additives in the chemical industry and have been used as catalysts in oil refineries since the 1960s. Now the researchers advocate paying more attention to the classic zeolites. These, they assert, would even have the potential to make a bioeconomy based on renewable resources possible.
58min
Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in 'ruling reptiles'
Scientists used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis — a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago — and inferred that it had a 'mosaic' of functions in locomotion.
58min
Do rats like to be tickled?
Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalizations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response. The study suggests that if this same relationship is observed for other situations, then it may be possible to use call patterns in rats to measure their emotional response and understand how best to improve their welfare.
58min
Trump's TikTok Farce Ignores the Lessons of the Red Scare
The president's claims that the app is a national security threat don't top the First Amendment.
1h
1h
Israel fish deaths linked to rapid warming of seas
Bacterial infection alongside speed of temperature rise may have triggered mortality, suggests study High temperatures and the persistent warming of oceans have triggered profound changes in marine ecosystems, but a new study suggests that the rate of onset of warming – rather than the peak – could also play a key role in the damage fuelled by climate change. In early July 2017, researchers were
1h
The Richest One Percent Emits Twice as Much Carbon as Half the World
Tipped Scales Over the last 30 years, the wealthiest one percent of the global population emitted twice as much carbon into the atmosphere as the entire poorest half of the planet. Those 64 million people that make up the global one percent are responsible for about 15 percent of all carbon emissions between 1990 and 2015, according to new reserach by Oxfam . Meanwhile, the 3.1 billion people in
1h
Johnson turns to scientists to make case for Covid clampdown
Top advisers warn UK is on same path as France and Spain unless it takes action
1h
Toxic masculinity: Why male funnel web spiders are so dangerous
A team of University of Queensland researchers has revealed why male funnel web spiders develop much deadlier venom than their female counterparts.
1h
Tree planting has potential to increase carbon sequestration capacity
USDA Forest Service scientists have published an in-depth study on the value of tree planting as a means of offsetting carbon emissions in the United States. An analysis based on publicly available data from more than 130,000 forested plots in the Forest Service's Forest Inventory & Analysis Program found that fully stocking non-stocked and poorly stocked forests would result in an annual increase
1h
New research identifies genetic factors contributing to small body size in dogs
When a beautiful pup has a dental problem, it's time to call a veterinarian. But when it runs in the family, researchers take the case.
1h
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
Biologists have long considered the origins and continued coexistence of the immense diversity of species found in our environment. How can we explain the fact that no single species predominates? A generally accepted hypothesis is that there are trade-offs, which means that no organism can do best in all conditions. One trade-off that is commonly assumed is that between gleaner organisms —which a
1h
Strontium-iridium oxide used for customization as an electronic material
PSI scientists have gained a fundamental understanding of a highly promising material that could be suited to future data storage applications. Their experiments with strontium-iridium oxide, Sr2IrO4, investigated both the magnetic and electronic properties of the material as a thin film. They also analyzed how these properties can be systematically controlled by manipulating the films. This study
1h
Toxic masculinity: Why male funnel web spiders are so dangerous
A team of University of Queensland researchers has revealed why male funnel web spiders develop much deadlier venom than their female counterparts.
1h
New research identifies genetic factors contributing to small body size in dogs
When a beautiful pup has a dental problem, it's time to call a veterinarian. But when it runs in the family, researchers take the case.
1h
Biodiversity hypothesis called into question
Biologists have long considered the origins and continued coexistence of the immense diversity of species found in our environment. How can we explain the fact that no single species predominates? A generally accepted hypothesis is that there are trade-offs, which means that no organism can do best in all conditions. One trade-off that is commonly assumed is that between gleaner organisms —which a
1h
Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins
In a new study, researchers describe a method for examining proteins in keen detail. To do this, his group makes clever use of a phenomenon known as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), incorporating it into an innovative type of microscope.
1h
Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Researchers want to make so-called zeolites more efficient. Today, these compounds are already indispensable additives in the chemical industry and have been used as catalysts in oil refineries since the 1960s. Now the researchers advocate paying more attention to the classic zeolites. These, they assert, would even have the potential to make a bioeconomy based on renewable resources possible.
1h
Brain Circuitry for Fear and Anxiety Is the Same on fMRI
A study in people fails to detect differences in the brain's response to fear or anxiety, long thought to be controlled by different neural circuits.
1h
NASA finds Tropical Storm Dolphin going swimmingly
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of recently formed Tropical Depression 14W as it strengthened into a tropical storm. Terra satellite imagery showed the storm was organizing.
1h
Ikke den handel Trump havde forudset: Amerikanske virksomheder tæt på at købe sig ind i TikTok
TikTok vil fortsat være på kinesiske hænder, hvis handlen går igennem.
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Bakterie har slået hundredevis af elefanter ihjel: I Danmark går det oftest udover hunde
Herhjemme er de elefant-dræbende bakterier kendt som blågrønne alger, og de kan ødelægge leveren.
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Algorithm Spots COVID-19 Cases from Eye Images: Preprint
A small study shows artificial intelligence can pick out individuals with coronavirus infections, but ophthalmologists and AI experts say the approach is far from proven to be capable of distinguishing infections with SARS-CoV-2 from other ills.
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Can the UK avoid 50,000 Covid-19 cases a day?
Continued doubling of infection rate feared by top advisers is unlikely to happen, say some experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On one thing, everyone agrees: the UK is at a turning point. After a summer of crowded beaches and pubs reopening, followed by children returning to school and employees going back to the workplace, new cases of Covid-19 are definitely o
1h
Scientists uncover the structural mechanism of coronavirus receptor binding
The spike protein on the surface of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus can adopt at least ten distinct structural states, when in contact with the human virus receptor ACE2, according to new research.
1h
Markets fall on fears of second wave of Covid infections
Travel and leisure sector hard hit as operators brace for curbs stretching into northern winter
1h
Arctic summer sea ice second lowest on record: US researchers
Arctic summer sea ice melted in 2020 to the second smallest area since records began 42 years ago, US scientists announced Monday, offering further stark evidence of the impact of global warming.
1h
Colloidal dispersions of nanosheets for catalysis
Researchers from the ICN2 Nanostructured Functional Materials Group, in collaboration with other institutions, have used a liquid phase exfoliation process to obtain nanosheets with enhanced electrocatalytical properties. The work is published in Ultrasonics Sonochemistry.
1h
Mixed-species tree stands adapt better than pure stands
Firs and spruces dominate the tree population of the Black Forest with a share of 80 percent. However, such predominantly pure stands are particularly vulnerable to extreme events caused by climate change, such as storm damage, heat waves, and bark beetle infestations. In Baden-Württemberg, on average, every third tree is already sick. A conversion from pure to mixed stands could increase the resi
1h
Quantum dot photovoltaics make a lasting impression
A process developed at KAUST for depositing extremely thin and smooth films can make it easier to manufacture stable solar cells based on quantum dot technology.
1h
Nature conservation and tourism can coexist despite conflicts
The concept of sustainable nature tourism plays a key role in mediating conflicts between tourism and nature conservation, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
1h
Combining two tools would boost understanding of climate change
How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It's a deceptively complicated question, so a Rutgers-led group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help answer the crucial climate change-related question.
1h
New composite material revs up pursuit of advanced electric vehicles
Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory used new techniques to create a composite that increases the electrical current capacity of copper wires, providing a new material that can be scaled for use in ultra-efficient, power-dense electric vehicle traction motors.
1h
New technology is a 'science multiplier' for astronomy
Federal funding of new technology is crucial for astronomy, according to results of a study released Sept. 21 in the Journal of Astronomical Telescopes, Instruments and Systems.
1h
NASA analyzes soaking capabilities of hurricane Teddy on Bermuda approach
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Hurricane Teddy's rainfall rates as it approaches Bermuda on Sept. 21. Teddy is a large hurricane and growing. It is also churning up seas all the way to the U.S. and Canadian coastlines.
1h
Unexpected wildfire emission impacts air quality worldwide
In lab studies of wildfire, nitrous acid seems like a minor actor, often underrepresented in atmospheric models. But in the real-world atmosphere, during wildfires, the chemical plays a leading role—spiking to levels significantly higher than scientists expected, driving increased ozone pollution and harming air quality, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the Be
1h
Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage
While the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PVSCs)—a future of solar cells—has already greatly improved in the past decade, the problems of instability and potential environmental impact are yet to be overcome. Recently, scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) have developed a novel method which can simultaneously tackle the leakage of lead from PVSCs and the stab
1h
New resistance gene to devastating potato disease that caused Irish Famine
Late blight is the most important pathogen in potato and causes devastation worldwide. The disease, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, was the trigger of the Irish Famine and still one of the most serious threats to potato production that causes significant economic losses.
1h
NASA finds Tropical Storm Dolphin going swimmingly
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of recently formed Tropical Depression 14W as it strengthened into a tropical storm. Terra satellite imagery showed the storm was organizing.
1h
Regulatory T cells could lead to new immunotherapies aimed at treating multiple sclerosis
In a new University of California, Irvine-led study, researchers have discovered how regulatory T cells (Treg) are instrumental in limiting the damage caused to the spinal cord in diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS).
1h
Children with COVID-19 show different immune responses, but better outcomes than adults
A comparison of children and adults hospitalized with COVID-19 reveals pediatric patients, who had better outcomes and shorter hospital stays, displayed altered immune responses and more limited production of antibodies against infection.
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Evaluating impacts of COVID-19 lockdowns on children and young people
Children, who appear at a relatively lower risk from COVID-19, are disproportionally harmed by precautions involved with lockdowns, say Matthew Snape and Russell Viner in a Perspective.
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Modeling future COVID-19 cases under a variety of immune responses, and with or without vaccines
Researchers who adapted standard epidemiological models to explore how the COVID-19 pandemic trajectory might unfold in the next five years report diverse scenarios ranging from recurring severe epidemics to elimination.
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Long-term COVID-19 containment will be shaped by strength, duration of immunity
New research suggests that the impact of natural and vaccine-induced immunity will be key factors in shaping the future trajectory of the global coronavirus pandemic, known as COVID-19. In particular, a vaccine capable of eliciting a strong immune response could substantially reduce the future burden of infection, according to a study by Princeton researchers published in the journal Science Sept.
1h
Study finds that children's immune response protects against COVID-19
The first study comparing the immune responses of adults and children with COVID-19 has detected key differences that may contribute to understanding why children usually have milder disease than adults. The findings also have important implications for vaccines and drugs being developed to curb COVID-19. The study was published today in Science Translational Medicine and was conducted by scientis
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Discovery of druggable pocket in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein could stop virus in its tracks
A druggable pocket in the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein that could be used to stop the virus from infecting human cells has been discovered by an international team of scientists led by the University of Bristol. The researchers say their findings, published today [21 Sep] in the journal Science, are a potential 'game changer' in defeating the current pandemic and add that small molecule anti-viral dru
1h
What Is Inflammation, and Why Is It Sometimes 'Bad' for Your Health?
The buzzword health condition can help or harm, depending on the situation.
1h
New resistance gene to devastating potato disease that caused Irish Famine
Late blight is the most important pathogen in potato and causes devastation worldwide. The disease, caused by the oomycete Phytophthora infestans, was the trigger of the Irish Famine and still one of the most serious threats to potato production that causes significant economic losses.
1h
AI could expand healing with bioscaffolds
Artificial intelligence can speed the development of 3D-printed bioscaffolds that help injuries heal, according to researchers.
1h
How to get a handle on carbon dioxide uptake by plants
How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It's a deceptively complicated question, so a group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help answer the crucial climate change-related question.
1h
Bird beak revealed by laser imaging informs early beak function and development
Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago. It was one of the first birds to evolve a beak. Early beak evolution remains understudied. Using an imaging technique called Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence, researchers address this by revealing just how different the beak and jaw of Confuciusornis were compared to birds we see today.
1h
Vitamin E needed for proper nervous system development
In research with key ramifications for women of childbearing age, scientists show that embryos produced by vitamin E-deficient zebrafish have malformed brains and nervous systems.
1h
How the oil industry made us doubt climate change
Energy companies stand accused of trying to downplay their contribution to global warming.
2h
Astronomers Complain That Climate Change Is Making Telescopes Worse
Outlook Hazy Not only is climate change devastating our world, but it's also starting to prevent astronomers from studying others. Several of the world's most powerful telescopes are struggling to observe the cosmos as the climate around them changes, according to ScienceAlert , as rising temperatures and other changing environmental conditions are starting to muck up their instruments and block
2h
Farmer knowledge is key to finding more resilient crops in climate crisis
A new paper in Frontiers in Plant Science reviews the 'Seeds for Needs' approach that combines farmers' knowledge of resilient crops with 'elite' varieties identified by scientists.
2h
How NASA Marketed Its Space Program With Fantastical Depictions of the Future
When it came to exploring the stars, Americans had to see it to believe in it
2h
'Raised By Wolves' Questions Whether Humanity Can Be Saved
Ridley Scott's new HBO Max show struggles to determine if people and society are doomed.
2h
'Toe spring' shoes can lead to long-term pain
Wearing footwear with an upward curvature at the front of the shoe, known as a toe spring, requires less work from foot muscles. But researchers warn that might not be a good thing in the long run. A new study explains why toe springs are comfortable and popular, but suggest that these shoes may contribute to weakening of the foot muscles with long-term use. This may increase susceptibility to co
2h
Biomarker indicating neurodegeneration identified in the eye
A new study led by Boston Medical Center researchers indicates a well-known biomarker that serves as a marker for earlier diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases is now detectable in the eye. Neurofilament light chain, a protein previously detected in cerebrospinal fluid and blood that is being explored as a biomarker to detect neurodegeneration, has now been identified in the vitreous humor, or f
2h
How to get a handle on carbon dioxide uptake by plants
How much carbon dioxide, a pivotal greenhouse gas behind global warming, is absorbed by plants on land? It's a deceptively complicated question, so a Rutgers-led group of scientists recommends combining two cutting-edge tools to help answer the crucial climate change-related question.
2h
AI could expand healing with bioscaffolds
Artificial intelligence can speed the development of 3D-printed bioscaffolds that help injuries heal, according to researchers at Rice University.
2h
The impact of COVID-19 on access to Parkinson's disease medication
A global survey of health professionals has shown that during the COVID-19 pandemic, patients with Parkinson's disease in large parts of Asia, Africa, and Latin and South America experienced difficulty in accessing their medication, which is likely to have led to deterioration of symptom control.
2h
Funding climate action policies: Consumers weigh in
There is growing demand for countries to take aggressive action to combat climate change, but less consensus on how to fund it. In a new study published September 21 in Nature Climate Change, researchers asked more than 10,000 people from the US, UK, Germany and France to weigh in. The majority preferred a constant-cost plan – even if costs are high. The finding surprised researchers, but provides
2h
Warmth Pouring Out of Siberia Sends Arctic Sea Ice Plummeting to Second Lowest Extent on Record
Even the normally frozen North Pole had some open water when visited by an historic Arctic expedition toward summer's end.
2h
Unexpected wildfire emission impacts air quality worldwide
During wildfires, nitrous acid plays a leading role — spiking to levels significantly higher than scientists expected, driving increased ozone pollution and harming air quality, according to a new study.
2h
Tracking the working dogs of 9/11
A study of search and rescue dogs showed little difference in longevity or cause of death between dogs at the disaster site and dogs in a control group.
2h
Physical and cognitive function have improved meaningfully in 30 years
The functional ability of older people is nowadays better when it is compared to that of people at the same age three decades ago.
2h
Strong markets for cultured meat across meat-reducing Germany and France
New research shows substantial markets for cultured meat and movements towards meat reduced diets across Germany and France.
2h
Halting a second wave requires onerous trade-offs
Curbing the virus without new national lockdowns means limiting social mixing
2h
Global stocks sink on fears of new Covid lockdowns
Worries over tightening of pandemic restrictions make for gloomy start to week
2h
Southern hemisphere could see up to 30% less rain at end of the century
Analysis published in Scientific Reports is based on climate models for the mid-Pliocene period, which occurred 3 million years ago and shared characteristics with present-day warming.
2h
The overlap between fear and anxiety brain circuits
Fear and anxiety reflect overlapping brain circuits, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. The findings highlight a need to reevaluate the existing models guiding anxiety research.
2h
New discovery to have huge impact on development of future battery cathodes
A new article reveals how researchers fully identified the nature of oxidized oxygen in the important battery material – Li-rich NMC – using RIXS (Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering). This compound is being closely considered for implementation in next generation Li-ion batteries because it delivers higher energy density than current materials, and could translate to longer driving ranges for ele
2h
Astronomers Discover "Pi Earth" Planet That Orbits Every 3.14 Days
Pi Earth A team of scientists at MIT say they've discovered a "Pi Earth" — an Earth-sized planet that orbits its star every 3.14 Earth days. The team found the planet, dubbed K2-315b, by analyzing 2017 data from NASA's Kepler Space Telescope's K2 mission. The scientists then zoomed in on the system using SPECULOOS, an international network of telescopes, designed to hunt for ultracool dwarf stars
3h
Sex ed before 'first sex' may prevent teen pregnancy
Early, frank, and age-appropriate conversations about safe sex can result in fewer unintended pregnancies, research finds. The study affirms that educational intervention before "first sex" can protect the sexual health of Black males. The findings, published in the journal Culture, Health & Sexuality , are based on the analysis of self-reported sexual experiences of Black male teens and young ad
3h
Arctic sea-ice shrinks to near record low extent
Only in 2012 have satellites seen the summer floes in the polar north more withdrawn than in 2020.
3h
UK's hospitality sector warns new lockdown would be 'nail in coffin'
Share prices of pub groups and travel companies dive as industry fears fresh curbs
3h
October issue SLAS Technology now available
The October issue of SLAS Technology features the cover article, 'Role of Digital Microfl-uidics in Enabling Access to Laboratory Automation and Making Biology Programmable' by Varun B. Kothamachu, Ph.D., Sabrina Zaini and Federico Muffatto (Digi.Bio).
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October issue of SLAS Discovery now available
The October edition of SLAS Discovery features the cover article, 'A Critical and Concise Review of Mass Spectrometry Applied to Imaging in Drug Discovery' by Richard J. A. Goodwin Ph.D. (AstraZeneca), Zoltan Takats Ph.D. (Imperial College London), and Josephine Bunch, Ph.D. (National Physical Laboratory).
3h
NASA analyzes soaking capabilities of hurricane Teddy on Bermuda approach
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Hurricane Teddy's rainfall rates as it approaches Bermuda on Sept. 21. Teddy is a large hurricane and growing. It is also churning up seas all the way to the U.S. and Canadian coastlines.
3h
Nine goofy, award-winning animal photos to turn your day around
Indian elephants. Kaziranga, India. (Kunal Gupta/Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2020/) If this past year has proven anything, it's that animals are the best free internet therapy there is. From virtual zoo tours to TikTok challenges , animals have been an invaluable source of entertainment—and relief—during the pandemic . On that note, we wanted to share our favorites from the 2020 finalists
3h
New discovery to have huge impact on development of future battery cathodes
A new article reveals how researchers fully identified the nature of oxidized oxygen in the important battery material – Li-rich NMC – using RIXS (Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering). This compound is being closely considered for implementation in next generation Li-ion batteries because it delivers higher energy density than current materials, and could translate to longer driving ranges for ele
3h
2 of 5 parents faced depression as school came home
As schools nationwide suspended in-person education, many parents felt overwhelmed and stressed about teaching their child at home, according to a new report. The COVID-19 pandemic presented parents with new challenges on how best to prepare and support their children for a different school experience. In the early days of the pandemic, nearly 80% of parents were educating their child at home. "S
3h
NASA's IRIS spots nanojets: Shining light on heating the solar corona
Researchers report the first ever clear images of nanojets — bright thin lights that travel perpendicular to the magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere, called the corona — in a process that reveals the existence of one of the potential coronal heating candidates: nanoflares.
3h
Researcher analyzes the use of solar energy at US airports
By studying 488 public airports in the United States, researchers found that 20% of them have adopted solar photovoltaic (PV), commonly known as solar panels, over the last decade.
3h
A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
Scientists have developed an implantable technology that enabled the discovery of an interaction between sensory neurons and immune cells.
3h
Researchers discover new molecules for tracking Parkinson's disease
New research describes an innovative method for identifying molecules that can help track the progression of Parkinson's disease. This proof-of-concept study could change the paradigm for how researchers screen and test new molecules for studying a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases.
3h
'Front of package' nutrition labels improved nutrition quality
A new study analyzing 16 years of data on tens of thousands of products finds that the adoption of nutrition data on 'front of package' labels is associated with improved nutritional content of those foods and their competitors.
3h
Engineers imitate human hands to make better sensors
An international research team has developed 'electronic skin' sensors capable of mimicking the dynamic process of human motion. This work could help severely injured people, such as soldiers, regain the ability to control their movements, as well as contribute to the development of smart robotics, according to researchers.
3h
Early birds vs night owls: For diabetics, an early bedtime is best
Early to bed, early to rise … while the old saying promises health, wealth and wisdom, new research confirms part of the adage holds true, as a world first study shows that people who go to bed early are more likely to be in better health and more physically active compared to night owls.
3h
Giant spider provides promise of pain relief for irritable bowel syndrome
Molecules from the venom of one of the world's largest spiders could help researchers tailor pain blockers for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
3h
When is HIIT the best exercise fit?
Determining whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is an appropriate form of exercise for the average person has been hotly debated for years. But for one researcher, there's not much to debate — interval exercise, when used appropriately, can fit into people's menu of flexible exercise options.
3h
Nature conservation and tourism can coexist despite conflicts
The concept of sustainable nature tourism plays a key role in mediating conflicts between tourism and nature conservation, a new study shows.
3h
Online training helps preemies
An international team of researchers has now found that computerized training can support preterm children's academic success. In their randomized controlled study 'Fit for School', the researchers compared two learning apps.
3h
Neurobiology: To keep pain in check, count down
Diverse cognitive strategies affect our perception of pain. Studies have now linked the phenomenon to the coordinated activity of neural circuits located in different brain areas.
3h
New composite material revs up pursuit of advanced electric vehicles
Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory used new techniques to create a composite that increases the electrical current capacity of copper wires, providing a new material that can be scaled for use in ultra-efficient, power-dense electric vehicle traction motors.
3h
New technology is a 'science multiplier' for astronomy
A new study has tracked the long-term impact of early seed funding obtained from the National Science Foundation on many key advances in astronomy over the past three decades.
3h
Immunotherapy is beneficial in gastric and oesophageal cancers, studies show
New data presented at ESMO 2020 have shown that immunotherapy is beneficial for patients with gastric and oesophageal cancers who currently have poor survival.
3h
Glassdoor lists the highest-rated CEOs during COVID
The website Glassdoor has released their rankings of the top CEOs and companies to work for during the pandemic. The rankings were based on a study of reviews placed on their website by employees which mentioned COVID or CEO performance. The study isn't quite definitive, but offers an insight into what employees want during times of crisis. The last time humanity faced an airborne pandemic was du
3h
A New Space Habitat Design Simulates Gravity by Spinning
Moving Out Instead of trying to build settlements on the surface of the Moon or Mars, a team of engineers believes that we ought to expand humanity's reach into the cosmos by constructing orbital habitats from scratch. To that effect, the Texas A&M University aerospace engineers designed their own orbital habitat, which they say could host up to 8,000 people, according to Universe Today . Most im
3h
Ribeye-eating pigs demonstrate protein quality for humans
Nearly a decade ago, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) developed a new index to assess protein quality in foods. The goal, writ large, was to address food security for the world's most vulnerable populations, creating more accurate tools for food assistance programs seeking to provide balanced nutrition.
3h
Tracking the working dogs of 9/11
When veterinarian Cynthia Otto was in Manhattan in the wake of the 9/11 attacks helping support the search and rescue dogs, she heard rumors about the possible impact on the dogs' long-term health.
3h
Unlocking the secrets of plant genomes in high resolution
Resolving genomes, particularly plant genomes, is a very complex and error-prone task. This is because there are several copies of all of the chromosomes and they are very alike. A team of bioinformatics researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now developed a software tool that allows for precise assignment to the correct copies – a process known as 'phasing'. They present
3h
Spin Hall effect in Weyl semimetal for energy-efficient information technology
The discovery of topological Weyl semimetals in 2017 has revealed opportunities to realize several extraordinary physical phenomena in condensed matter physics. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have demonstrated the direct electrical detection of a large spin Hall effect in this topological quantum material. Weyl semimetal takes advantage of its strong spin-orbit coupling and
3h
Parker Solar Probe, Akatsuki and Earth-bound observers give rare top-to surface glimpse of Venus
Observations of Venus by NASA's Parker Solar Probe, JAXA's Akatsuki mission and astronomers around the world have given a rare cloud-top-to-surface glimpse of the Earth's neighboring planet. The results are being presented this week at the Europlanet Science Congress (EPSC) 2020, which is taking place as a virtual meeting from 21 September-9 October.
3h
Tracking the working dogs of 9/11
When veterinarian Cynthia Otto was in Manhattan in the wake of the 9/11 attacks helping support the search and rescue dogs, she heard rumors about the possible impact on the dogs' long-term health.
3h
Unlocking the secrets of plant genomes in high resolution
Resolving genomes, particularly plant genomes, is a very complex and error-prone task. This is because there are several copies of all of the chromosomes and they are very alike. A team of bioinformatics researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now developed a software tool that allows for precise assignment to the correct copies – a process known as 'phasing'. They present
3h
How to improve the surgery backlog during COVID-19
When the COVID-19 pandemic first began, many non-urgent surgeries were delayed. Now, a new paper explains how to address the backlog of surgeries, without compromising patient outcomes.
3h
Unexpected wildfire emission impacts air quality worldwide
During wildfires, nitrous acid plays a leading role–spiking to levels significantly higher than scientists expected, driving increased ozone pollution and harming air quality, according to a new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder and the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy.
3h
Tracking the working dogs of 9/11
A study of search and rescue dogs led by the School of Veterinary Medicine showed little difference in longevity or cause of death between dogs at the disaster site and dogs in a control group.
3h
'Awe walks' boost emotional well-being
A regular dose of awe is a simple way to boost healthy 'prosocial' emotions such as compassion and gratitude, according to a new study by researchers at the UC San Francisco Memory and Aging Center (MAC) and the Global Brain Health Institute (GBHI) — a partnership between UCSF and Trinity College Dublin to improve brain health worldwide.
3h
Comet discovered to have its own northern lights
Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has its own far-ultraviolet aurora, data reveal. It is the first time such electromagnetic emissions in the far-ultraviolet have been documented on a celestial object other than a planet or moon.
3h
Astronomers discover an Earth-sized 'pi planet' with a 3.14-day orbit
Scientists have discovered a 'pi Earth' — an Earth-sized planet that zips around its star every 3.14 days, in an orbit reminiscent of the universal mathematics constant.
3h
Ribeye-eating pigs demonstrate protein quality for humans
Nearly a decade ago, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) developed a new index to assess protein quality in foods. The goal, writ large, was to address food security for the world's most vulnerable populations, creating more accurate tools for food assistance programs seeking to provide balanced nutrition.
3h
Cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees, humans
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity.
3h
Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents
Two new studies investigate marine heatwaves and currents at the edge of the continental shelf, which impact regional ocean circulation and marine life.
3h
How Ginsburg's Death Threatens the Affordable Care Act and Reproductive Rights
As the Trump administration eyes a speedy replacement, the court will hear a case against the health care law a week after the election — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Did you solve it? Puzzlebombed!
The solutions to today's teasers Earlier today I set a logic problem and a word problem from Puzzlebomb , a monthly problem sheet. I'll start with the word problem. Continue reading…
4h
NASA sees Wilfred degenerate into a trough
Former Tropical Storm Wilfred weakened in the Central Atlantic Ocean and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image after the storm became a trough or elongated area of low pressure.
4h
NASA satellite found Post-Tropical Storm Alpha fizzle over Portugal and Spain
Former Subtropical Storm Alpha was a short-lived storm that formed and fizzled within 24 hours. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found the remnants of former Subtropical storm Alpha spreading over Portugal and northwestern Spain.
4h
The US National Academy of Sciences can now kick out harassers. So why hasn't it?
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02640-7 The NAS told Nature that no one has used the complaint system put in place last year, even though several academy members are known sexual harassers.
4h
At the Math Olympiad, Computers Prepare to Go for the Gold
The 61st International Mathematical Olympiad , or IMO, begins today. It may go down in history for at least two reasons: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic it's the first time the event has been held remotely, and it may also be the last time that artificial intelligence doesn't compete. Indeed, researchers view the IMO as the ideal proving ground for machines designed to think like humans. If an AI sy
4h
The Quantum Butterfly Noneffect
A familiar concept from chaos theory turns out to work differently in the quantum world — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Vaccination insights
While scientists race to develop and test a vaccine effective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, recent studies have indicated that countries with widespread BCG vaccination appear to be weathering the pandemic better than their counterparts. This has led many researchers to suspect that BCG vaccine, which immunizes against tuberculosis, might offer protection against COVID-19.
4h
Highly efficient perovskite solar cells with enhanced stability and minimised lead leakage
While the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells (PVSCs) has already greatly improved in the past decade, the problems of instability and potential environmental impact are yet to be overcome. Recently, scientists from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) have developed a novel method which can simultaneously tackle the leakage of lead from PVSCs and the stability issue without comp
4h
NASA's IRIS spots nanojets: Shining light on heating the solar corona
In a paper published today in Nature Astronomy, researchers report the first ever clear images of nanojets—bright thin lights that travel perpendicular to the magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere, called the corona—in a process that reveals the existence of one of the potential coronal heating candidates: nanoflares.
4h
Video: Why is the West Coast sky orange?
California wildfires are, unfortunately, nothing new—but that bright orange sky definitely is.
4h
Epigenetics linked to genetic differences between domesticated and wild chickens
Some of the genetic differences that have arisen between domesticated chickens and their wild ancestors, the red junglefowl, are linked to epigenetic changes, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Scientists at Linköping University in Sweden have discovered a small number of "hotspots" in the DNA that control epigenetic changes at hundreds of other locations throughout
4h
Epigenetics linked to genetic differences between domesticated and wild chickens
Some of the genetic differences that have arisen between domesticated chickens and their wild ancestors, the red junglefowl, are linked to epigenetic changes, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Scientists at Linköping University in Sweden have discovered a small number of "hotspots" in the DNA that control epigenetic changes at hundreds of other locations throughout
4h
Personality shifts might also change your politics
Changes in personality may also lead to changes in political ideologies, researchers report. "We found this interesting effect where people wanted to improve on things like being more emotionally connected to others—or, becoming more empathetic ," says William Chopik, assistant professor of psychology at Michigan State University. "But we found that this leads to changes in their political souls
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Astronomers discover an Earth-sized 'pi planet' with a 3.14-day orbit
In a delightful alignment of astronomy and mathematics, scientists at MIT and elsewhere have discovered a "pi Earth"—an Earth-sized planet that zips around its star every 3.14 days, in an orbit reminiscent of the universal mathematics constant.
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Extra stability for magnetic knots
Tiny magnetic whirls that can occur in materials – so-called skyrmions – hold high promises for novel electronic devices or magnetic memory in which they are used as bits to store information. A fundamental prerequisite for any application is its stability. A research team has now demonstrated that so far neglected magnetic interactions can play a key role for skyrmion stability and can drasticall
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New research highlights impact of COVID-19 on food security in Kenya and Uganda
CABI scientists have conducted new research highlighting the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on food security in Kenya and Uganda with more than two-thirds of those surveyed having experienced economic hardship due to the pandemic.
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A faster and more reliable method to categorize olive oil is validated
Classifying olive oils into the categories of extra virgin (EVOO), virgin (VOO) and lampante (LOO) is still quite a challenge to deal with since the official method includes physical-chemical and sensory analyses by means of a panel of tasters. These tasters need to be specialized, and on many occasions are not available, in addition to being expensive and slow. All of this has created the necessi
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Did volcanoes turn Venus into a 'hellish' planet?
Some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, have layering that seems consistent with volcanic activity, according to a new study. The finding could provide insights into the enigmatic planet's geological history. Tesserae are tectonically deformed regions on the surface of Venus that are often more elevated than the surrounding landscape. They comprise about 7% of the planet's surface
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NASA sees Wilfred degenerate into a trough
Former Tropical Storm Wilfred weakened in the Central Atlantic Ocean and NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided a visible image after the storm became a trough or elongated area of low pressure.
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Genomic adaptations to a rice-based diet mitigate the risk of obesity and diabetes
Populations of China, Korea, and Japan first adopted rice as their main source of nutrition more than 10,000 years ago. As a result, they have developed genomic adaptations that are protecting them from the risks entailed by the westernization of their diets.
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NASA satellite found Post-Tropical Storm Alpha fizzle over Portugal and Spain
Former Subtropical Storm Alpha was a short-lived storm that formed and fizzled within 24 hours. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite found the remnants of former Subtropical storm Alpha spreading over Portugal and northwestern Spain.
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Discovered: New resistance gene to devastating potato disease that caused Irish Famine
In a recent collaboration between the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences and the James Hutton institute, scientists identified a diploid wild potato with a high resistance to Phytophthora infestans. They discovered novel R genes in this potato using dRenSeq analysis, and further transcriptional analysis revealed the essential role of multiple signal transduction pathways and secondary metabo
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Older people have become younger
The functional ability of older people is nowadays better when it is compared to that of people at the same age three decades ago.
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Advancing the accurate tracking of energy poverty
IIASA researchers have developed a novel measurement framework to track energy poverty that better aligns with the services people lack rather than capturing the mere absence of physical connections to a source of electricity. This alternative framework can aid better tracking of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7 by virtue of its simplicity and sensitivity to the diversity in service conditions
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Despite coronavirus: Social contacts increase again
Arrange a get-together with friends, enjoy life out in the fresh air: Despite the corona pandemic, everyday life is returning to normal. This is indicated by the current survey results of the BfR-Corona-Monitor. According to them, only 60 percent of the respondents say that they meet up with friends less often. Only 51% state that they leave their home less often to protect themselves from an infe
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NASA's IRIS spots nanojets: Shining light on heating the solar corona
In a paper published today in Nature Astronomy, researchers report the first ever clear images of nanojets — bright thin lights that travel perpendicular to the magnetic structures in the solar atmosphere, called the corona — in a process that reveals the existence of one of the potential coronal heating candidates: nanoflares.
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CU Denver researcher analyzes the use of solar energy at US airports
By studying 488 public airports in the United States, University of Colorado Denver School of Public Affairs researcher Serena Kim, PhD, found that 20% of them have adopted solar photovoltaic (PV), commonly known as solar panels, over the last decade.
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VCU study shows the experimental drug AR-12 could be a promising COVID-19 treatment
A team of scientists led by Paul Dent, Ph.D., at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center has discovered that an experimental cancer drug called AR-12 inhibits the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic, from infecting cells and replicating. Their findings were published online today in the journal Biochemical Pharmacology, and steps are now being taken to develop a clin
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Cleveland Clinic study finds no link between influenza vaccine and COVID-19 risk
Using patient data from Cleveland Clinic's COVID-19 registry, Dr. Joe Zein found that receiving the flu vaccine does not increase risk for COVID-19 or worsen associated disease outcomes, suggesting it is safe and advisable to receive the influenza vaccine this flu season.
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Scientists reveal details about the first cat infected with SARS-CoV-2 in Spain
The IRTA-CReSA coronavirus research team, alongside researchers from IrsiCaixa, the Barcelona Supercomputing Center (BSC) and veterinarians from a veterinary hospital near Barcelona publish in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) the results of postoperative analyzes of COVID-19 positive cat necropsy. The study confirms that cats can become infected with SARS-CoV-2 without it aff
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Researchers discover new molecules for tracking Parkinson's disease
New research describes an innovative method for identifying molecules that can help track the progression of Parkinson's disease. This proof-of-concept study could change the paradigm for how researchers screen and test new molecules for studying a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases.
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Penn researchers discover potential cause of immunotherapy-related neurotoxicity
New research has uncovered the previously unknown presence of CD19 — a B cell molecule targeted by chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell immunotherapy to treat leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma — in brain cells that protect the blood brain barrier (BBB). This discovery may potentially be the cause for neurotoxicity in patients undergoing CD19 directed CAR T cell immunotherapy, according
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Extra stability for magnetic knots
Tiny magnetic whirls that can occur in materials – so-called skyrmions – hold high promises for novel electronic devices or magnetic memory in which they are used as bits to store information. A fundamental prerequisite for any application is its stability. A research team has now demonstrated that so far neglected magnetic interactions can play a key role for skyrmion stability and can drasticall
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Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages.
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Falls may signal Alzheimer's before symptoms appear
Older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall may have undetected neurodegeneration in their brains that puts them at high risk of developing Alzheimer's dementia, according to a study. The researchers found that, in older people without cognitive problems who experience a fall, the process of neurodegeneration that leads to Alzheimer's dementia already may have begun. The finding
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CIA's new tech recruiting pitch: More patents, more profits
America's most famous spy agency has a major competitor it can't quite seem to beat: Silicon Valley. The CIA has long been a place cutting-edge technology is researched, developed, and realized—and it wants to lead in fields like artificial intelligence and biotechnology. However, recruiting and retaining the talent capable of building these tools is a challenge on many levels, especially since a
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Bio-based inhibition of gas hydrate formation
Copper stearate was used as the basis for this catalyst test and showed efficiency for in-situ oil combustion.
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A link between sensory neurons activation and the immune system
Scientists at EPFL, ETHZ and Harvard Medical School/Boston Children's Hospital have developed an implantable technology that enabled the discovery of an interaction between sensory neurons and immune cells.
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Ribeye-eating pigs demonstrate protein quality for humans
Nearly a decade ago, the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) developed a new index to assess protein quality in foods. The goal, writ large, was to address food security for the world's most vulnerable populations, creating more accurate tools for food assistance programs seeking to provide balanced nutrition. Hans H. Stein at the University of Illinois knew he could help.
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Engineers imitate human hands to make better sensors
An international research team has developed "electronic skin" sensors capable of mimicking the dynamic process of human motion. This work could help severely injured people, such as soldiers, regain the ability to control their movements, as well as contribute to the development of smart robotics, according to Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Early Career Professor in the Penn State Departme
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Awareness of COVID-19 in severe dementia patients
Tokyo, September 21, 2020- The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has substantially affected patients with dementia and their caregivers.
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Mirror-like photovoltaics get more electricity out of heat
New heat-harnessing 'solar' cells that reflect 99% of the energy they can't convert to electricity could help bring down the price of storing renewable energy as heat, as well as harvesting waste heat from exhaust pipes and chimneys.
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New discovery to have huge impact on development of future battery cathodes
New paper in Nature Energy, reveals how researchers fully identified the nature of oxidised oxygen in the important battery material – Li-rich NMC – using RIXS (Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering) at Diamond Light Source. This compound is being closely considered for implementation in next generation Li-ion batteries because it delivers higher energy density than current materials, and could tran
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Epigenetics linked to genetic differences between domesticated and wild chickens
Some of the genetic differences that have arisen between domesticated chickens and their wild ancestors, the red junglefowl, are linked to epigenetic changes, according to a new study published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Scientists at Linköping University, Sweden, have discovered a small number of "hotspots" in the DNA that control epigenetic changes at hundreds of other locations throughout t
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Comet Chury's ultraviolet aurora
On Earth, auroras, also called northern lights, have always fascinated people. An international consortium involving the University of Bern has now discovered such auroras in the ultraviolet wavelength range at comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, Chury for short. This phenomenon was detected thanks to the analysis of data from the European Space Agency ESA's Rosetta mission.
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Do rats like to be tickled?
Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalisations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response, according to new research by the University of Bristol. The study, published today [21 September] in Current Biology, suggests that if this same relationship is observed for other situations, then it may be possible to use call patterns in rats to m
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SwRI instruments aboard Rosetta help detect unexpected ultraviolet aurora at a comet
Data from Southwest Research Institute-led instruments aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft have helped reveal auroral emissions in the far ultraviolet around a comet for the first time.
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'Bandage' developed to rebuild broken bone
Researchers at King's College London have developed a material that allows transplantation of bone-forming stem cells into severe bone fractures and speeds up the healing process.
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Having a ball: Crystallization in a sphere
Researchers at The University of Tokyo and Fudan University furthered our understanding of the crystallization process in confined spaces by visualizing the ordering of colloidal particles in a droplet. The team conducted real-time microscopic observations of the assembly of colloidal particles in droplets to clarify the crystallization process. They found that the kinetically controlled interacti
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Ryugu's rocky past
Researchers find evidence that asteroid Ryugu was born out of the possible destruction of a larger parent asteroid millions of years ago. Thanks to the Hayabusa2 spacecraft, the international team was able to study certain surface features in detail. Variations in the kinds of boulders scattered on Ryugu tell researchers about the processes involved in its creation. The study of asteroids includin
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New insights into how the drug pomalidomide fights cancer
Scientists from the Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo Medical University, and Saitama Medical University have published findings that offer insights into how the drug pomalidomide benefits some patients with a cancer called multiple myeloma. Clinicians use pomalidomide to treat cases of multiple myeloma resistant to the more established drug lenalidomide, and the research team found that pomali
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Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and from ETH Zurich want to make so-called zeolites more efficient. Today, these compounds are already indispensable additives in the chemical industry and have been used as catalysts in oil refineries since the 1960s. Now, in the journal Nature Materials, the researchers advocate paying more attention to the classic zeolites. These, they assert, woul
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Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins
In a new study, Shaopeng Wang and his colleagues describe a method for examining proteins in keen detail. To do this, his group makes clever use of a phenomenon known as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), incorporating it into an innovative type of microscope.
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Examining association between sleep duration, cognitive decline
Researchers in this observational study investigated the association between the amount of sleep at night and cognitive decline among participants in two large studies on aging.
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Comparing effectiveness of smartphone apps for quitting smoking
This randomized clinical trial compared the effectiveness of two smartphone apps that use different approaches to help smokers quit.
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Changes in hospitalizations for alcohol use disorder in US
Changes over nearly two decades in the rate of hospitalizations and in-hospital deaths from alcohol use disorder in the US were examined in this study.
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COVID-19 and human trafficking
The amplified impact of COVID-19 on vulnerable populations has important implications for individuals at risk of or exploited in human trafficking.
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Fred Hutch-led clinical trial shows new smartphone app helps smokers quit
Scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center believe they've found a better of use of mobile technology to help adult cigarette smokers quit.
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Airbus Unveils Three Designs for Hydrogen-Powered Planes
ZEROe European aerospace corporation Airbus has come up with three airplane designs that rely on hydrogen power — rather than polluting aviation-grade kerosene. The concepts, collectively known as "ZEROe," are part of the company's efforts to bring the first zero-carbon commercial jet into service by 2035, Bloomberg reports . Hydrogen Forward One design is designed to carry up to 200 passengers w
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Scientists Speculate About How Life on Venus Could Have Began
Speculative SETI A week after scientists found evidence of chemicals in Venus' atmosphere which, they say, could point to life in the planet's atmosphere, their colleagues have some guesses as to where those theoretical extraterrestrials could have come from. In an essay published in The Conversation , two University of New South Wales Sydney researchers suggest that any aliens would have origina
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Home team advantage explained in three charts
Popular Science 's Play issue is now available to everyone. Read it now, no app or credit card required. Athletes tend to do better on their own turf. But the factors that create the mythical home-field advantage are still somewhat mysterious. Referee bias, lack of travel-related fatigue, and the morale boost of fan attendance may contribute, yet experts still debate the particulars. In fact, the
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The Vaccine Protocols
We now have the official clinical trial designs for the three biggest and most advanced coronavirus vaccine trials: Moderna , Pfizer/BioNTech and Oxford/AstraZeneca . Now, as for you, J&J, Novavax, Merck, and all the others that are pushing into efficacy trials as fast as possible – don't think for a moment that you won't be expected to do the same. But this is a good start. So how do these trial
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Why I fight for climate justice | Xiye Bastida
In a deeply moving letter to her grandmother, Xiye Bastida reflects on what led her to become a leading voice for global climate activism — from mobilizing school climate strikes to speaking at the United Nations Climate Summit alongside Greta Thunberg — and traces her resolve, resilience and profound love of the earth to the values passed down to her. "Thank you for inviting me to love the worl
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Researchers find cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees, humans
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity.
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Cosmic X-rays reveal a distinct signature of black holes
An international team of astrophysicists has found distinctive signatures of black hole event horizons, unmistakably separating them from neutron stars, which are objects comparable to black holes in mass and size but confined within a hard surface. This is by far the strongest steady signature of stellar-mass black holes to date. The team consisting of Mr. Srimanta Banerjee and Professor Sudip Bh
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Scientists propose multifunctional liquid metal nanocapsules
Liquid metals (LMs) are promising for applications in flexible electronics and biomimetic functional composites. Nanometerization and surface modification of LMs are usually used to improve their substrate affinity and processing properties. In most cases, LM nanodroplets are encapsulated into ultrathin and fragile shells of oxides or amphiphile monolayers. However, they may be hindered from being
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Technique permits convenient, precise optical imaging of individual proteins
Often considered the workhorses of the body, proteins are among the most important biomolecules critical to life processes. They provide structural foundation for cells and tissues and perform a dizzying array of tasks, from metabolizing energy and helping cells communicate with one another to defending the body from pathogens and guiding cell division and growth.
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Rosetta spacecraft detects unexpected ultraviolet aurora at a comet
Data from Southwest Research Institute-led instruments aboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft have helped reveal auroral emissions in the far ultraviolet around a comet for the first time.
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Rock types on Ryugu provide clues to the asteroid's turbulent history
The asteroid Ryugu may look like a solid piece of rock, but it's more accurate to liken it to an orbiting pile of rubble. Given the relative fragility of this collection of loosely bound boulders, researchers believe that Ryugu and similar asteroids probably don't last very long due to disruptions and collisions from other asteroids. Ryugu is estimated to have adopted its current form around 10 mi
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Do rats like to be tickled?
Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalizations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response, according to new research by the University of Bristol. The study, published today in Current Biology, suggests that if this same relationship is observed for other situations, then it may be possible to use call patterns in rats to measure their em
5h
Better catalysts for a sustainable bioeconomy
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and from ETH Zurich want to make so-called zeolites more efficient. Today, these compounds are already indispensable additives in the chemical industry and have been used as catalysts in oil refineries since the 1960s. Now, in the journal Nature Materials, the researchers advocate paying more attention to the classic zeolites. These, they assert, woul
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Having a ball: Crystallization in a sphere
Crystallization is the assembly of atoms or molecules into highly ordered solid crystals, which occurs in natural, biological, and artificial systems. However, crystallization in confined spaces, such as the formation of the protein shell of a virus, is poorly understood. Researchers are trying to control the structure of the final crystal formed in a confined space to obtain crystals with desired
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Workers and soldiers: sizing up diversity in ant species
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02683-w An evolutionary developmental biologist is intrigued by how wing buds affect the growth of these insects' heads and bodies.
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Astronomers discover an Earth-sized "pi planet" with a 3.14-day orbit
Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have discovered a "pi Earth" — an Earth-sized planet that zips around its star every 3.14 days, in an orbit reminiscent of the universal mathematics constant.
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Dino teeth research prove giant predatory dinosaur lived in water
A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth, by a team of researchers from the University of Portsmouth, proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.
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Climate: risks and future strategies in Italy
It could be worth up to 8% of GDP per capita, exacerbate the differences between north and south, between society's rich and poor, as well as affect a number of Italy's strategic sectors: climate change is a risk accelerator for many aspects of both the economy and society. The report, "Risk Analysis. Climate Change in Italy" has been published. Realized by the CMCC Foundation, Euro-Mediterranean
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Educational intervention before 'first sex' can protect sexual health of black males
A new Johns Hopkins Medicine study adds to evidence that the earlier parents, educators and health care workers have age-appropriate and frank discussions about safe sex, the better will be their — and their partners' — long-term sexual health and developmen
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Falling Medicare reimbursement rates for orthopaedic trauma
The amount Medicare reimburses for orthopaedic trauma surgery has fallen by nearly one-third over the past two decades, reports a study in the Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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Richmond emergency room experienced a surge in opioid overdoses during pandemic
In a paper published Friday by the Journal of the American Medical Association, Virginia Commonwealth University researchers released data showing an alarming surge in opioid-related overdoses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Nonfatal opioid overdose visits to the VCU Medical Center emergency department in Richmond increased from 102 between March and June 2019 to 227 between March and June 2020. Tha
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Researchers find cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees, humans
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity.
5h
Do rats like to be tickled?
Not all rats like to be tickled but by listening to their vocalizations it is possible to understand in real-time their individual emotional response, according to new research by the University of Bristol. The study, published today in Current Biology, suggests that if this same relationship is observed for other situations, then it may be possible to use call patterns in rats to measure their em
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Strong markets for cultured meat across meat-reducing Germany and France
For the first time ever the majority of Germans are limiting their consumption of meat, and many are open to the concept of eating cultured meat, according to a new study.
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Bird beak revealed by laser imaging informs early beak function and development
Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago. It was one of the first birds to evolve a beak. Early beak evolution remains understudied. Using an imaging technique called Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence (LSF), researchers at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) address this by revealing just how different the beak and jaw of Confuciusornis were compared
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Spørg Fagfolket: Kan coronavirus overleve kulden fra fryseren?
Flere læsere vil gerne vide, om virus kan overleve en tur i fryseren, og om fluer kan smitte. Det svarer professor fra Københavns Universitet på.
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The Core Lesson of the COVID-19 Heart Debate
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Last Monday, when I called the cardiologist Amy Kontorovich in the late morning, she apologized for sounding tired. "I've been in my lab infecting heart cells with SARS-CoV-2 since 6 a.m. this morning," she said. That might seem like an odd experiment for a virus that sprea
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German Space Agency Shows Off Outrageous Modular Vehicle Prototype
U-Shift While it wasn't busy commanding a mole to dig through the Martian topsoil, German Aerospace Center (DLR) has come with a futuristic vehicle concept unlike anything we've seen before. Its U-shift vehicle concept is designed to transform itself into anything from a cargo pod, an on-call bus, or even a mobile sales vehicle. It does so by switching out capsule-like structures attached to the
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Researchers find cardiovascular health similarities between chimpanzees, humans
Doctors like to remind patients not to monkey around with their health, suggesting that a good diet and regular exercise improve longevity.
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Computational study of famous fossil reveals evolution of locomotion in 'ruling reptiles'
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis-a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago-and inferred that it had a "mosaic" of functions in locomotion.
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Cosmic X-rays reveal an indubitable signature of black holes
A black hole is an exotic cosmic object, from within which nothing, not even light, can escape. Definitive proof of the existence of such objects is a holy grail of physics and astronomy. An international team of astrophysicists, consisting of Mr. Srimanta Banerjee, Professor Marat Gilfanov, Professor Sudip Bhattacharyya and Professor Rashid Sunyaev, has found by far the strongest steady signature
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Extra stability for magnetic knots
Tiny magnetic whirls that can occur in materials – so-called skyrmions – hold high promises for novel electronic devices or magnetic memory in which they are used as bits to store information. A fundamental prerequisite for any application is its stability. A research team of Kiel University has now demonstrated that so far neglected magnetic interactions can play a key role for skyrmion stability
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Unlocking the secrets of plant genomes in high resolution
Resolving genomes, particularly plant genomes, is a very complex and error-prone task. This is because there are several copies of all of the chromosomes and they are very alike. A team of bioinformatics researchers from Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf (HHU) has now developed a software tool that allows for precise assignment to the correct copies – a process known as 'phasing'. They present
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Belief in conspiracy theories is a barrier to controlling spread of COVID-19
Belief in conspiracy theories about the coronavirus pandemic was inversely related to the perceived threat of the pandemic; taking of preventive actions, including wearing a face mask; and the intention to be vaccinated when there is a COVID-19 vaccine. The research is based on two-wave panel study in March and July of 840 U.S. adults.
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'Front of package' nutrition labels improved nutrition quality
A new study analyzing 16 years of data on tens of thousands of products finds that the adoption of nutrition data on "front of package" labels is associated with improved nutritional content of those foods and their competitors.
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BU researchers discover how COVID-19 may trigger fatal levels of lung inflammation
Responding to the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, requires models that can duplicate disease development in humans, identify potential targets and enable drug testing. Specifically, access to primary human lung in vitro model systems is a priority since a variety of respiratory epithelial cells are the proposed targets of viral entry.
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Scientists propose multifunctional liquid metal nanocapsules
Prof. LI Chaoxu and his coworkers from the Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have proposed multifunctional liquid metal nanocapsules.
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Aktivister: Sundhedsvæsenet bør gå sammen for at stoppe sexisme blandt læger
For knap tre år siden var det græsrodsbevægelsen Uden Tavshedspligt, der bragte #MeToo til det danske sundhedsvæsen. Nu håber talskvinde på en fælles sundhedspolitisk løsning. I løbet af blot 3 dage har 335 skrevet under på bevægelsens erklæring 'Stop sexisme blandt læger'.
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Strong markets for cultured meat across meat-reducing Germany and France
New research shows substantial markets for cultured meat and movements towards meat reduced diets across Germany and France.
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CHOP researchers find MIS-C associated with myocardial injury
Using sensitive parameters to assess cardiac function, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that cardiac involvement in multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) differs from Kawasaki disease (KD) and is associated with myocardial injury. The findings were published recently in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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Researchers discover cyber vulnerabilities affecting bluetooth based medical devices
The Greyhound framework, named after the breed of dogs known for their hunting abilities, was designed and implemented by an SUTD-led research team to systematically sniff out security lapses in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth enabled devices.
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CNIO identifies genetic factors associated to hand-foot syndrome in chemotherapy with capecitabine
* The researchers studied more than 600,000 genetic variants in the genome of 166 patients treated with the chemotherapy drug capecitabine* Before undergoing treatment, the patients carrying the risk alleles for the hand-foot syndrome had low levels of two proteins that are key to the effective functioning of the skin barrier* The finding may help classify patients according to their genetic risk
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Corona-induced CO2 emission reductions are not yet detectable in the atmosphere
The impact of the corona pandemic will reduce worldwide carbon dioxide emissions by up to eight percent in 2020. Cumulative reductions of about this magnitude would be required every year to reach the goals of the Paris Agreement by 2030. Measurements by researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) now revealed that concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has not yet changed du
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Bird beak revealed by HKU-codeveloped laser imaging informs early beak function and development
Confuciusornis was a crow-like fossil bird that lived in the Cretaceous ~120 million years ago. It was one of the first birds to evolve a beak (Fig. 1). Early beak evolution remains understudied. Using an imaging technique called Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence, researchers at the University of Hong Kong (HKU) address this by revealing just how different the beak and jaw of Confuciusornis were compa
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Soft robots, origami combine for potential way to deliver medical treatments
Researchers have found a way to send tiny, soft robots into humans, potentially opening the door for less invasive surgeries and ways to deliver treatments for conditions ranging from colon polyps to stomach cancer to aortic artery blockages.
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A computer predicts your thoughts, creating images based on them
Researchers have developed a technique in which a computer models visual perception by monitoring human brain signals. In a way, it is as if the computer tries to imagine what a human is thinking about. As a result of this imagining, the computer is able to produce entirely new information, such as fictional images that were never before seen. The technique is based on a novel brain-computer inter
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Scientists don't share their findings for fun – they want their research to make a difference
Scientists don't take time away from their research to share their expertise with journalists, policymakers and everyone else just to let us know about neat scientific facts.
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Functional wall clocks that also look good
You don't need to get lost to the world of app notifications every time you check the time. (Samantha Gades via Unsplash/) Even in an age of a prolific number of screens, a clock can be a functional and stylish piece to add to your home. Whether you prefer analog—with the hands and tick-tocking—or a digital version, the clock can keep you grounded in time and space. With so many lifestyles leavin
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'The seasons are against us': what we learned from UK's top Covid scientists
Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty's briefing predicted an autumn of rising deaths and difficult lockdown choices Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK government's most senior scientists, England's chief medical officer, Chris Whitty, and the chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, have given a televised briefing about the recent increases in coronavirus cas
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Många elitidrottare mår dåligt under pandemin
En stor del av våra elitidrottare mår sämre under den pågående covid-19-pandemin och fler kvinnor än män har upplevt att de mår dåligt. Det visar en studie som genomförts i expressfart av forskare vid Lunds universitet.
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Nvidia's Arm Acquisition Brings the Two Key Technologies of This Century Under One Roof
Artificial intelligence and mobile computing have been two of the most disruptive technologies of this century. The unification of the two companies that made them possible could have wide-ranging consequences for the future of computing . California-based Nvidia's graphics processing units (GPUs) have powered the deep learning revolution ever since Google researchers discovered in 2011 that they
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A New Tool Detects Counterfeit Whiskey—Without Wasting a Drop
Bogus booze has been infiltrating the market, so physicists found a way to test for authenticity while keeping the precious bottles sealed.
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To Have Known Her
The loss of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is absolutely devastating. It is, quite obviously, devastating for the country. But for those of us who knew her, it is also personally devastating. I consider it one of the single greatest privileges and honors of my life to have served as Justice Ginsburg's law clerk. (Each justice has three to four law clerks who help them screen the Court's petitions an
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Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports.
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Nature conservation and tourism can coexist despite conflicts
The concept of sustainable nature tourism plays a key role in mediating conflicts between tourism and nature conservation, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows.
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Online training helps preemies
An international team of researchers has now found that computerised training can support preterm children's academic success. In their randomised controlled study "Fit for School", the researchers compared two learning apps. The project at the University Hospital Essen and at Ruhr-Universität Bochum was funded by Mercator Research Center Ruhr (Mercur) with approximately 300,000 Euros for four yea
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Study on the effect of rosemary and ginger essential oils against Klebsiella pneumoniae
This study aims at investigating the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effect of rosemary and ginger essential oil-based nano-sized formulations on colistin resistant K. pneumonia clinical isolates.
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Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents
Two new studies from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) investigate marine heatwaves and currents at the edge of the continental shelf, which impact regional ocean circulation and marine life.
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Soil bogging caused by climate change adds to the greenhouse effect, says a RUDN University soil sci
A soil scientist from RUDN University studied soil samples collected at the Tibetan Plateau and discovered that high soil moisture content (caused by the melting of permafrost and glaciers) leads to further temperature increase. Therefore, the rate of soil bogging should be held back in order to slow down global warming.
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Immunotherapy combination improves outcomes in advanced kidney cancer
An immunotherapy agent combined with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor drug significantly improved progression-free survival and reduced the risk of death compared to a single agent treatment in advanced kidney cancer patients, according to first results of a phase 3 clinical trial. The pivotal study could lead to a new treatment option for patients with metastatic kidney cancer.
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Cannabinoids decrease the metabolism of glucose in the brain
What happens when THC acts on the glial cells named astrocytes ? This research concludes that the activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors in tmice astrocytes hampers the metabolism of glucose and the production of lactate in the brain; this alters neuronal function and leads to a deterioration in social interaction behaviours.
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Easy-to-use tire pressure checkers for cars and bikes
No pressure, but check your pressure. (Frank Albrecht via Unsplash/) When tires are used below their recommended air pressures, all sorts of problems can crop up: resistance against the road increases, fuel economy goes down, and uneven heating and flexing can occur, all of which can contribute to increased chances of having a dangerous blowout. This can all be easily prevented by having a dedica
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Stylish composting bins that improve your impact on the planet
Composting that complements your kitchen. (Amazon/) It's remarkable that the art of composting has advanced so significantly; there are so many attractive bins and food recyclers on the market, it can be tough to choose. Even if you're limited in space, lots of machines are small enough to fit inside cabinets, under sinks, or on top of countertops—yes, even in your condo or apartment. Getting int
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Homicides near schools affect students' educational outcomes, says new study
Homicides near schools negatively impact on the educational attainment of children, a new study in the Journal of Labor Economics reports.
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Modelling of ancient fossil movement reveals step in the evolution of posture in dinosaur and crocodile ancestors
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) used three-dimensional computer modelling to investigate the hindlimb of Euparkeria capensis–a small reptile that lived in the Triassic Period 245 million years ago–and inferred that it had a "mosaic" of functions in locomotion.
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Plans underway for new polar ice and snow topography mission
Monitoring the cryosphere is essential to fully assess, predict and adapt to climate variability and change. Given the importance of this fragile component of the Earth system, today ESA, along with Airbus Defence and Space and Thales Alenia Space, have signed a contract to develop the Copernicus Polar Ice and Snow Topography Altimeter mission, known as CRISTAL.
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Crop diversity is key to increased profits for Brazilian farmers
The old adage "variety is the spice of life" can also be true on the farm. Planting the same crop over and over, year after year, can quickly deplete the soil of valuable nutrients. The crops eventually won't produce as much, and the farmer will lose profits.
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In a Desert's Burning Sands, Shrimp
When it rains in Iran's Dasht-e Lut desert, the ground comes alive with tiny, upside-down crustaceans.
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Crop diversity is key to increased profits for Brazilian farmers
The old adage "variety is the spice of life" can also be true on the farm. Planting the same crop over and over, year after year, can quickly deplete the soil of valuable nutrients. The crops eventually won't produce as much, and the farmer will lose profits.
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330 elephants in Botswana may have died from toxic algae
The sudden deaths of some 330 elephants in northwestern Botswana earlier this year may have occurred because they drank water contaminated by toxic blue-green algae, the government announced Monday.
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DSAM: Cannabisordning har ladt patienter og læger i stikken
Den aktuelle kritik af den tre år gamle forsøgsordning med medicinsk cannabis er både forventelig og uundgåelig, lyder det fra Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin. Skal forsøgsordningen genstartes, bør der lyttes til lægerne denne gang.
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Britain needs to live with coronavirus, not in fear of it | Simon Jenkins
Vallance and Whitty spoke reasonably and sincerely in their press conference. But their data was selective, and they seem determined to cause alarm Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Thank goodness for scientists talking about coronavirus rather than politicians. They speak English and sound sincere. Today's presentation by Whitehall's Sir Patrick Vallance and Chris Whi
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Succession creator Jesse Armstrong criticises Trump and Johnson at Emmys
Writer lays into president and PM for their 'crummy' response to coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Succession creator, Jesse Armstrong, used his Emmy acceptance speech to attack Boris Johnson and Donald Trump for their "crummy" response to coronavirus, and also the media moguls who do so much to keep them in power. Armstrong's HBO show , telling the sto
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330 elephants in Botswana may have died from toxic algae
The sudden deaths of some 330 elephants in northwestern Botswana earlier this year may have occurred because they drank water contaminated by toxic blue-green algae, the government announced Monday.
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Scientists find a new mechanism for the stabilization of skyrmions
Tiny magnetic whirls that can occur in materials—so-called skyrmions—hold high promises for novel electronic devices or magnetic memory in which they are used as bits to store information. A fundamental prerequisite for any application is the stability of these magnetic whirls. A research team of the Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics of Kiel University has now demonstrated that so
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Images of the U.S. west coast on fire
Over the past month, dozens of wildfires have burned vast swathes of land in California, Oregon and Washington State, killing more than 30 people and smothering the majority of the western United States in smoke. While photographs have circulated online showing the apocalyptic orange skies, satellites in orbit around Earth carry different instruments that can provide not only images, but a wealth
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New insights into changes in ecosystem structure and function
A research team led by the Pablo de Olavide University investigated the changes in the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems during millions of years of development. The study, published by Nature Communications, advances the knowledge of the natural history of terrestrial ecosystems, and resolves one of the major unsettled questions in ecology: What are the major drivers of ecosystem s
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Neurobiology – To keep pain in check, count down
Diverse cognitive strategies affect our perception of pain. Studies by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich neuroscientist Enrico Schulz and colleagues have linked the phenomenon to the coordinated activity of neural circuits located in different brain areas.
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New research highlights impact of COVID-19 on food security in Kenya and Uganda
CABI scientists have conducted new research highlighting the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on food security in Kenya and Uganda with more than two-thirds of those surveyed having experienced economic hardship due to the pandemic.Dr Monica Kansiime led a team of researchers who discovered, from a random sample of 442 respondents, that the proportion of food insecure people increased by 38% and 44% in
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A faster and more reliable method to categorize olive oil is validated
Classifying olive oils into the categories of extra virgin (EVOO), virgin (VOO) and lampante (LOO) is still quite a challenge to deal with since the official method includes physical-chemical and sensory analyses by means of a panel of tasters. These tasters need to be specialized, and on many occasions are not available, in addition to being expensive and slow. All of this has created the necessi
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Promising phase 1 trial results: Use of sotorasib (AMG 510) in patients with solid tumors
A phase 1 clinical trial of sotorasib (AMG 510) in patients with heavily pretreated advanced solid tumors shows encouraging anti-cancer activity, especially in lung and colorectal cancers, reports a new study led by City of Hope and other renowned comprehensive cancer centers. 'KRAS mutations have been linked with worse treatment outcomes in a variety of cancers,' Dr. Marwan Fakih said. 'This stud
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KRAS inhibitor sotorasib appears safe, achieves durable clinical benefit in early trial
For patients with advanced solid cancers and KRAS G12C mutations, the targeted therapy sotorasib, a KRAS G12C inhibitor, resulted in manageable toxicities and durable clinical benefits, particularly in lung and colorectal cancer, in Phase I study.
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Revealed: Large discrepancies in accounting for the funding sources of some UK patient organisations
New analysis published in BMJ Open raises transparency concerns over funding to patient groups from big drug companies.
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New insights into changes in ecosystem structure and function
A research team led by the Pablo de Olavide University investigated the changes in the structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems during millions of years of development. The study, published by Nature Communications, advances the knowledge of the natural history of terrestrial ecosystems, and resolves one of the major unsettled questions in ecology: What are the major drivers of ecosystem s
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New insights into the role of the eisosomes as membrane building blocks in fungi
The red mold Neurospora crassa belongs to the group of sac fungi and serves researchers as a common model organism that allows a comparatively simple analysis of genetic information and the functions associated with it. The fungus has been the subject of scientific research for decades and its genetic information contained in around 10,000 genes has been completely decoded since the beginning of t
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Scientists advance understanding of blood-brain barrier health
In a study with potential impacts on a variety of neurological diseases, researchers have provided the first experimental evidence from a living organism to show that an abundant, star-shaped brain cell known as an astrocyte is essential for blood-brain barrier health.
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Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread 4000 years ago
New bioarchaeology research has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.
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For many immigrant students, remote learning during COVID-19 comes with more hurdles
Schools across the U.S. responded to the COVID-19 pandemic last spring with an unprecedented shift to remote learning – a trend that has continued into the new school year for many districts.
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New insights into the role of the eisosomes as membrane building blocks in fungi
The red mold Neurospora crassa belongs to the group of sac fungi and serves researchers as a common model organism that allows a comparatively simple analysis of genetic information and the functions associated with it. The fungus has been the subject of scientific research for decades and its genetic information contained in around 10,000 genes has been completely decoded since the beginning of t
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Studies investigate marine heatwaves, shifting ocean currents
North America experienced a series of dangerous heatwaves during the summer of 2020, breaking records from coast to coast. In the ocean, extreme warming conditions are also becoming more frequent and intense. Two new studies from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) investigate marine heatwaves and currents at the edge of the continental shelf, which impact regional ocean circulation an
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Nuclear plants in Arabian Sea face tsunami risk
A major tsunami in the northern Arabian Sea could severely impact the coastlines of India and Pakistan, which are studded with sensitive installations including several nuclear plants, says the author of a new study.
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Dino teeth research prove giant predatory dinosaur lived in water
A discovery of more than a thousand dinosaur teeth, by a team of researchers from the University of Portsmouth, proves beyond reasonable doubt that Spinosaurus, the giant predator made famous by the movie Jurassic Park III as well as the BBC documentary Planet Dinosaur was an enormous river-monster.
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Troubles in Tuva: Raids and bloody rituals among ancient steppe nomads
Ancient historiographers described steppe nomads as violent people dedicated to warfare and plundering. However, little archeological and anthropological data are available regarding violence in these communities during the early centuries CE. In a new study in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology, an international team led by researchers from the University of Bern and the Russian Academ
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Founder of Tesla Competitor Nikola Steps Down Amid Fraud Scandal
Ouch Nikola Motors founder and executive chairman Trevor Milton is stepping down from the company's board of directors following fraud allegations, The Verge reports . His company, Nikola, made a major splash in 2018 with a zero-emissions semi truck powered by both electric and hydrogen fuel cells — though Milton himself has risen to prominence in part by butting heads with Tesla CEO Elon Musk .
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Filling Africa's largest dam risks political tension if engineering realities are ignored
A hydro dam currently under construction in Ethiopa is set to be the largest hydropower plant in Africa, but could be heading towards controversy for international agreements on water sharing.
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Americans confident in future despite believing country is on wrong track, new survey finds
Most American voters have confidence in the future of the United States, even though a large majority believes the country is heading down the wrong track, according to a new survey from the George Washington University Society of Presidential Pollsters.
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Heavy rainfall drives a third of nitrogen runoff, according to new study
Heavy rain events that occur only a few days a year can account for up to a third of the annual nitrogen runoff from farmland in the Mississippi River basin, according to a new study from Iowa State University scientists.
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High-sensitivity nanoscale chemical imaging with hard x-ray nano-XANES
X-rays with excellent penetration power and high chemical sensitivity are suited to understand heterogeneous materials. In a new report on Science Advances, A. Pattammattel, and a team of scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source in New York, U.S., described nanoscale chemical speciation by combining scanning nanoprobe and fluorescence-yield X-ray absorption near-edge structure—known as
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Difference in microbiota between organic and conventional dairy farms
Bacteria and fungi on organic dairy farms are significantly different from those on conventional farms. That was discovered by postdoc researcher Sofia Gomes and her supervisors Nadia Soudzilovskaia and Peter van Bodegom in collaboration with the Louis Bolk Institute and Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Greater insight into microbial life on farms contributes to better production.
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Difference in microbiota between organic and conventional dairy farms
Bacteria and fungi on organic dairy farms are significantly different from those on conventional farms. That was discovered by postdoc researcher Sofia Gomes and her supervisors Nadia Soudzilovskaia and Peter van Bodegom in collaboration with the Louis Bolk Institute and Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Greater insight into microbial life on farms contributes to better production.
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How to make a replication origin in multicellular eukaryotes
Loading of replicative helicases onto DNA is a key event during the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. It takes place at specific chromosomal regions termed origins and is facilitated by the ORC protein complex. By resolving the cryo-EM structures of DNA-bound ORC, researchers from the Bleichert group (now at Yale) broaden our understanding of how DNA replication is initiated in animals.
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Botswana: Mystery elephant deaths caused by cyanobacteria
Toxins made by algae in water holes caused 330 elephant deaths in Botswana earlier this year.
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Censored: Australian scientists say suppression of environment research is getting worse
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02669-8 Survey finds that many researchers are banned from speaking about their work or have had their research altered to downplay risks.
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Sexual minority men who smoke report worse mental health
Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in gender and sexual minority populations, according to a new study. Researchers examined tobacco use by sexual minority men and transgender women to better understand the relationships between smoking, substance use, and mental, psychosocial, and general health. For the study in the journal Annals
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How to make a replication origin in multicellular eukaryotes
Loading of replicative helicases onto DNA is a key event during the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. It takes place at specific chromosomal regions termed origins and is facilitated by the ORC protein complex. By resolving the cryo-EM structures of DNA-bound ORC, researchers from the Bleichert group (now at Yale) broaden our understanding of how DNA replication is initiated in animals.
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Why Covid-19 Patients Are Suffering From Distorted and Phantom Smells
An increasing number of patients are reporting awful scents that aren't present
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It's getting harder for tech companies to bridge the US-China divide
Corporations have never been able to cleanly separate their activities from geopolitics. Now, technology firms are finding it increasingly difficult to work across the US-China divide. Try as they might to cross-pollinate through research and investments, the climate between China and the United States continues to deteriorate into political one-upmanship, leaving users to pay the steepest costs.
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Government programs 'don't have to be demeaning'
Government-funded after school programs for poor families can empower politically motivated parents, says researcher Carolyn Barnes. Barnes grew up in poverty. Her family survived on church pantries , clothing closets, food stamps , and her disabled father's social security check. When Barnes was a teenager her father died, and without his insurance—which went toward rent —their family ended up h
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Study: Black women with breast cancer experience delayed, longer treatment than whites
One in seven black women with breast cancer had delays in starting treatment, and black women also had extended duration of treatment, according to a study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers.
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Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread – 4000 years ago
New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago PhD candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.
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Early birds vs night owls: for diabetics, an early bedtime is best
Early to bed, early to rise…while the old saying promises health, wealth and wisdom, new research confirms part of the adage holds true, as a world first study shows that people who go to bed early are more likely to be in better health and more physically active compared to night owls.
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Giant spider provides promise of pain relief for irritable bowel syndrome
Molecules from the venom of one of the world's largest spiders could help University of Queensland-led researchers tailor pain blockers for people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).
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When is HIIT the best exercise fit?
Determining whether high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is an appropriate form of exercise for the average person has been hotly debated for years. But for one UBC Okanagan researcher, there's not much to debate–interval exercise, when used appropriately, can fit into people's menu of flexible exercise options.
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Scientists invent faster, cheaper strategy for designing infrared-emitting materials
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new low-cost, relatively simple strategy for designing materials used in live cell imaging, photodynamic therapy for cancer and night-vision technologies.
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Can COVID-19 inspire a new way of planning African cities?
Health crises are not new in Africa. The continent has grappled with infectious diseases on all levels, from local (such as malaria) to regional (Ebola) to global (COVID-19). The region has often carried a disproportionately high burden of global infectious outbreaks.
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If there is life on Venus, how could it have got there? Origin of life experts explain
The recent discovery of phosphine in the atmosphere of Venus is exciting, as it may serve as a potential sign of life (among other possible explanations).
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Researchers hone computer models to identify animals in photos
University of Wyoming researchers once again have advanced artificial intelligence technology to identify images of wild animals from camera-trap photographs in North America.
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Researchers hone computer models to identify animals in photos
University of Wyoming researchers once again have advanced artificial intelligence technology to identify images of wild animals from camera-trap photographs in North America.
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Archaeology uncovers infectious disease spread 4,000 years ago
New bioarchaeology research from a University of Otago Ph.D. candidate has shown how infectious diseases may have spread 4000 years ago, while highlighting the dangers of letting such diseases run rife.
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Why do birds crash into solar panels?
Billions of birds die annually from collisions with windows, communication towers, wind turbines, and other human-made objects. One reason is that birds see a reflection of the sky in the object and think they're flying into an unobstructed path.
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The Fight Against Words That Sound Like, but Are Not, Slurs
When the news began circulating on social media, many couldn't believe it was true––that the Marshall School of Business at the University of Southern California would remove a longtime professor from a class because a Mandarin word he used correctly in a lesson sounded sort of like a racial slur. One skeptic warned that the "ridiculous sounding story" seemed like a "fabricated Reddit meme." Anot
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Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 80s, some even reach 100. But chimpanzees rarely make it past 50, despite sharing 99% of our genetic code. While modern medicine has added years to human lifespans, a study points to a more ancient explanation why humans are the long-lived primate. Part of the secret to human longevity may lie in chemical changes to our DNA that slowed the rate of aging after human an
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Why there is no speed limit in the superfluid universe
Physicists have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit; exotic particles that stick to all surfaces in the superfluid. The discovery may guide applications in quantum technology, even quantum computing, where multiple research groups already aim to make use of these unusual particles.
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Researchers discover new molecules for tracking Parkinson's disease
For many of the 200,000 patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in the United States every year, the diagnosis often occurs only after the appearance of severe symptoms such as tremors or speech difficulties. With the goal of recognizing and treating neurological diseases earlier, researchers are looking for new ways to image biological molecules that indicate disease progression before sympto
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Why do birds crash into solar panels?
Billions of birds die annually from collisions with windows, communication towers, wind turbines, and other human-made objects. One reason is that birds see a reflection of the sky in the object and think they're flying into an unobstructed path.
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Carbon nanotubes developed for super efficient desalination
Membrane separations have become critical to human existence, with no better example than water purification. As water scarcity becomes more common and communities start running out of cheap available water, they need to supplement their supplies with desalinated water from seawater and brackish water sources.
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New facility tests future neutrino detector systems with 'beautiful' results
The international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, or DUNE, hosted by Fermilab, will be huge. In fact, with more than 1,000 collaborators from over 30 countries and five continents, it's the largest international science project ever hosted in the U.S.
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Design for a space habitat with artificial gravity that could be enlarged over time to fit more people
There are two main approaches that humanity can take to living in space. The one more commonly portrayed is colonizing other celestial bodies such as the moon and Mars. That approach comes with some major disadvantages, including dealing with toxic soils, clingy dust and gravity wells.
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Chemists develop 'smart cells' with potential to treat illness at cellular level
New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body—with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals.
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Researchers discover new molecules for tracking Parkinson's disease
For many of the 200,000 patients diagnosed with Parkinson's disease in the United States every year, the diagnosis often occurs only after the appearance of severe symptoms such as tremors or speech difficulties. With the goal of recognizing and treating neurological diseases earlier, researchers are looking for new ways to image biological molecules that indicate disease progression before sympto
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Chemists develop 'smart cells' with potential to treat illness at cellular level
New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body—with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals.
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1More ColorBuds Review: The Comfiest Earbuds Around
The successor to WIRED's favorite earbuds, these comfortable, affordable wireless headphones are our new top pick.
7h
The Fight Over the Fight Over California's Privacy Future
Prop. 24 is designed to make the California Consumer Privacy Act stronger. Why do so many privacy advocates oppose it?
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Portland's Face-Recognition Ban Is a New Twist on 'Smart Cities'
The first big US city to prohibit private businesses from using the technology reflects rising skepticism of new tools and concerns about fairness.
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Research demonstrates early field-experiences for student teachers is a plus—even online
When the coronavirus (COVID-19) prompted the closure of schools, impacting the field experience of University of Delaware students enrolled in teacher preparation programs, researchers Michelle Cirillo and Raymond LaRochelle jumped into action. They made sure a group of secondary math education students learning to teach in a 100-level University math class continued to polish their skills, despit
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Researchers find genetic signature of ancient MacDougall bloodline
Genetic markers for the Clan MacDougall have been discovered by Genealogy researchers at the University of Strathclyde.
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Almost a dozen new variable stars detected in the open cluster NGC 1912 and its surroundings
Chinese astronomers have conducted a study of variable stars in the galactic open cluster NGC 1912 and its surrounding field, detecting 11 new variables in this cluster, including binary systems. The study was detailed in a research paper published September 11 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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A computer predicts your thoughts, creating images based on them
Researchers at the University of Helsinki have developed a technique in which a computer models visual perception by monitoring human brain signals. In a way, it is as if the computer tries to imagine what a human is thinking about. As a result of this imagining, the computer is able to produce entirely new information, such as fictional images that were never before seen. The technique is based o
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Ways to improve petroleum coke combustibility studied with presence of metal catalysts
The fixed fluidized bed technology is already widely used overseas, but is relatively new for the Russian oil industry. To improve it, the KFU scientists mixed coke particles with quartz sand. This created a sort of a "freeze" in the porous layer and simplified the study of the kinetics of petroleum coke combustion in the presence of catalysts.
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Evolutionary paths: Scientists find new patterns in protein evolution
A group of scientists from Russia studied the trends in the evolution of amino acid sequences of proteins in vertebrates and insects and traced the factors influencing the process of evolution. The research results are published in the Nature Communications.
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Botswana says it has solved mystery of mass elephant die-off
Elephants may have ingested toxins produced by bacteria found in waterholes Hundreds of elephants died in Botswana earlier this year from ingesting toxins produced by cyanobacteria, according to government officials who say they will be testing waterholes for algal blooms next rainy season to reduce the risk of another mass die-off. The mysterious death of 350 elephants in the Okavango delta betw
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Evolutionary paths: Scientists find new patterns in protein evolution
A group of scientists from Russia studied the trends in the evolution of amino acid sequences of proteins in vertebrates and insects and traced the factors influencing the process of evolution. The research results are published in the Nature Communications.
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Facebooks næste store AI-udfordring: Kan du spotte hadefulde memes?
PLUS. Hvordan lærer en AI-model, at kombination af et harmløst billede og tekst kan udgøre hadefuldt indhold?
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Tandläkare tror ofta att de är bättre på rotbehandling än de är
Det finns en risk att allmäntandläkare överskattar sina kunskaper när det gäller rotbehandlingar. Det finns därför ett stort behov av vidareutbildning. Det visar en enkätundersökning som besvarats av 819 allmäntandläkare i Sverige och Norge. – Det behövs återkoppling. Utan återkoppling på sina behandlingar så är det svårt att bedöma sig själv ordentligt, och kan man inte se sina egna kunskapsluck
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NASA Will Test Autonomous Landing System on New Shepard Rocket
The margin for error in space exploration is tiny. Even an unassuming rock or a bit of sloped terrain can topple a robotic explorer, and what if there's no one within millions of miles to flip it right-side-up again? NASA is developing a new precision landing system called Safe and Precise Landing – Integrated Capabilities Evolution (SPLICE), and it's getting ready to test several of its core tec
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Vallance: Covid vaccine doses may be available for some by end of year
UK chief scientific adviser says breakthrough far more likely in first half of 2021 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A few doses of an effective Covid vaccine may be available for use before the end of the year, Sir Patrick Vallance, the UK government's chief scientific adviser has said – but it is far more likely that any such breakthrough will happen during the firs
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App bans won't make US security risks disappear
Will the US government ban TikTok and WeChat, or won't it—and why? With the Trump administration issuing vaguely phrased executive orders and policies about the apps, even as legal challenges against potential bans move through the courts and the president gives his "blessing" to a deal to keep TikTok in US app stores, it's hard to make out a coherent story. The Trump administration's actions aga
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The TikTok and WeChat ban that wasn't: here's whats happening now
What's going on? The US Commerce Department issued an order banning Americans from downloading Chinese-owned apps TikTok and WeChat at the end of last week . A lot has changed since then. First, TikTok: Back in August, President Donald Trump said TikTok had to either be bought by a US entity by September 15 or face a ban. On Friday, the company, which doesn't operate in China but is owned by Chin
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The Holocaust and Losing History
In the movie Interstellar, which takes place in a dystopian future where the Earth is challenged by progressive crop failures, children are taught in school that the US never went to the Moon, that it was all a hoax. This is a great thought experiment – could a myth, even a conspiracy theory, rise to the level of accepted knowledge? In the context of religion the answer is, absolutely. We have se
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AmazonBasics: A guide to the good, the bad, and the spontaneously combustible
You can add "it won't set itself on fire" to your shopping parameters. (Andrea Piacquadio / Pexels/) If you regularly buy online from Amazon, you've surely come across the brand AmazonBasics hawking all sorts of products across a wide array of categories. There are AmazonBasics charging cables , dumbbells , grills , and curtain rails . It's a lot to take in. What makes it even more confusing thou
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Promising computer simulations for stellarator plasmas
The turbulence model called Gyrokinetic Electromagnetic Numerical Experiment (GENE), developed at Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics (IPP) at Garching, Germany, has proven to be very useful for the theoretical description of turbulence in the plasma of tokamak-type fusion devices. Extended for the more complex geometry of stellarator-type devices, computer simulations with GENE now indicate a
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Researchers develop simple method to 3-D print milk products
Researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) have developed a method to perform direct ink writing (DIW) 3-D printing of milk-based products at room temperature while maintaining its temperature-sensitive nutrients.
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The Madness of Susanna Clarke, Fairy Princess
After more than a decade away, the author is back with 'Piranesi,' a way to communicate the incommunicable.
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How Work Became an Inescapable Hellhole
Instead of optimizing work, technology has created a nonstop barrage of notifications and interactions. Six months into a pandemic, it's worse than ever.
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Could a Century-Old TB Shot Protect Against Other Respiratory Diseases?
A trial in Greece shows a long-used tuberculosis vaccine may cut respiratory infections, raising hopes for similar protection against Covid-19.
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The 6 Best Kids Face Masks: Masks They May Actually Wear
Whether your kids are going to school or playing outside, you'll need comfortable face coverings. These are the ones my little monsters will tolerate.
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Scientists predict economically important traits of crops
Researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have developed a new mathematical model to predict economic performance of crops. It can assist breeders to produce the plants with the highest possible quality. The research results were presented at the fifth Plant Genetics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Biotechnology (PlantGen2019) conference, and published in BMC Ge
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Researchers discover a novel family of toxins used in bacterial competition
Researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil have characterized a novel family of anti-bacterial toxins present in bacteria, including Salmonella enterica. This species uses toxic proteins to kill other bacteria in gut microbiota and facilitate colonization of the infected host's gut.
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Scientists predict economically important traits of crops
Researchers from Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have developed a new mathematical model to predict economic performance of crops. It can assist breeders to produce the plants with the highest possible quality. The research results were presented at the fifth Plant Genetics, Genomics, Bioinformatics, and Biotechnology (PlantGen2019) conference, and published in BMC Ge
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Self-induced ultrafast demagnetization limits amount of light diffracted from magnetic samples at soft x-ray energies
Free electron X-ray lasers deliver intense, ultrashort pulses of X-rays, which can be used to image nanometer-scale objects in a single shot. When the X-ray wavelength is tuned to an electronic resonance, magnetization patterns can be made visible. When using increasingly intense pulses, however, the magnetization image fades away. The mechanism responsible for this loss in resonant magnetic scatt
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Researchers discover a novel family of toxins used in bacterial competition
Researchers at the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil have characterized a novel family of anti-bacterial toxins present in bacteria, including Salmonella enterica. This species uses toxic proteins to kill other bacteria in gut microbiota and facilitate colonization of the infected host's gut.
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Defying a 150-year-old rule for phase behavior
Frozen water can take on up to three forms at the same time when it melts: liquid, ice and gas. This principle, which states that many substances can occur in up to three phases simultaneously, was explained 150 years ago by the Gibbs phase rule. Today, researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University Paris-Saclay are defying this classical theory, with proof of a five-phase equi
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What is a 'persistent cough' and what should I do if I have it?
Continuous cough is one of three main Covid-19 symptoms people are told to look out for Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With the onset of autumn , one phrase is on many people's lips: persistent cough . But how many of us really know what it means, or what differentiates it from the barks and tickles caused by less dangerous autumnal illnesses? A new and continuous c
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Breathtaking Images Suggest There's Fresh Ice on One of Saturn's Moon
Enceladus just keeps getting more interesting.
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India and Pakistan ramp up remdesivir production under Gilead deal
Both countries have large supplies of generic Covid-19 treatment but distribution to other places has been slow
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Dear Therapist: I'm Having an Affair and I've Never Been Happier. Should I Confess?
Editor's Note: Every Monday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com . Dear Therapist, I was married for 25 years, had three children, and went through a very messy, traumatic divorce 10 years ago. My ex had become an abusive alcoholic and was very mean, especially to our middle child, a girl wi
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A Dangerous Moment for the Court
The Supreme Court seems strangely immune to the bitterness that plagues our politics. Even now, when Americans can no longer agree on basic facts , the Court's relative popularity has endured. Following Donald Trump's 2016 election, the Court has what may be its most conservative majority in decades. And yet this August, the Supreme Court recorded its highest approval rating since 2009 . But ther
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Think Twice Before Using Facebook, Google, or Apple to Sign In Everywhere
So-called single sign-on options offer a lot of convenience. But they have downsides that a good old fashioned password manager doesn't.
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Colds Nearly Vanished Under Lockdown. Now They're Coming Back
The return of non-Covid respiratory illnesses is putting a new strain on testing supplies around the world—and is a preview of what's in store for the US.
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Get WIRED: Director Nia DaCosta on Horror and Black Trauma
On this week's podcast, the director of the upcoming 'Candyman' talks to WIRED writer Jason Parham about genre, social justice, and the future of going to the movies.
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Mining Rare-Earth Elements from Fossilized Fish
Strange as it might seem, a 2,500-square-kilometer zone south of one tiny Pacific island could supply four substances that are crucial to modern electronics for centuries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Virksomheder går museer i bedene
PLUS. Grundfos tilslutter sig en tendens, hvor især familie- og fondsejede virksom­heder åbner eget museum. Det bliver vi alle klogere af – men husk, at det ikke er den objektive fortælling, påpeger industrihistoriker.
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Scientists Say Jellyfish Should Become The Next Popular Seafood
Your fish and chips may contain endangered species.
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For Math Fans: A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Number 42
Here is how a perfectly ordinary number captured the interest of sci-fi enthusiasts, geeks and mathematicians — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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For Math Fans: A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Number 42
Here is how a perfectly ordinary number captured the interest of sci-fi enthusiasts, geeks and mathematicians — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Sportshal var i sammenstyrtningsfare i mindst et årti inden lukning
PLUS. Et eftersyn førte til, at Hundested Hallen i Halsnæs Kommune blev lukket. Ifølge ingeniører fra rådgivningsfirmaet Moe er taget nemlig så tungt, at hallen risikerer at styrte sammen.
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Anisotropic plasmons in quasi-metallic 2-D materials
National University of Singapore physicists have discovered new mid-infrared anisotropic collective charge excitations in quasi-metallic phase two-dimensional (2-D) transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs).
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Aberrant electronic and structural alterations in pressure-tuned perovskite
The perovskite NaOsO3 has a complicated but interesting temperature-dependent metal-insulator transition (MIT). A team led by Drs. Raimundas Sereika and Yang Ding from the Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR) showed that the insulating ground state in NaOsO3 can be preserved up to at least 35 GPa with a sluggish MIT reduction from 410 K to a near room temperat
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Kemostråleterapi kan blive ny standard til behandling af endetarmskræft
Hidtil har operation været standardbehandling ved endetarmskræft, men dansk forskning peger på, at kemostråleterapi kan være kurativt for langt de fleste patienter.
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Johnson to announce 10pm pub closing time across England
Move comes after advisers warn daily case number could rise to 50,000 by middle of next month
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Hundreds of whales stranded in southern Australia
At least twenty-five whales have died and scientists are trying to rescue 250 more that are stranded in a remote bay on the Australian island of Tasmania, officials said Monday.
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Første nye behandling til højrisiko-brystkræftpatienter i årevis
For første gang i 20 år sker der fremskridt i den adjuvante behandling til patienter med højrisiko tidlig HR-positiv HER2-negativ brystkræft.
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Ingen fordel ved post-operativ stråleterapi til patienter med ikke-småcellet lungekræft
Post-operativ stråleterapi efter adjuvant kemoterapi giver ingen statistisk signifikant forbedring i overlevelse blandt patienter med ikke-småcellet lungekræft.
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Hundreds of whales stranded in southern Australia
At least twenty-five whales have died and scientists are trying to rescue 250 more that are stranded in a remote bay on the Australian island of Tasmania, officials said Monday.
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The right formula for scaling production of promising material to decontaminate water
An international team of researchers have found a way to refine and reliably produce an unpredictable and hard-to-control material that could impact environmental conservation, energy and consumer electronics.
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The right formula for scaling production of promising material to decontaminate water
An international team of researchers have found a way to refine and reliably produce an unpredictable and hard-to-control material that could impact environmental conservation, energy and consumer electronics. The material, Molybdenum Disulfide (MoS2), holds tremendous potential for numerous applications in energy storage, water treatment, gas, chemical and light sensing.
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Minorities suffer most from COVID-19 in nursing homes, assisted living communities
Older racial and ethnic minority residents and their caregivers bear the severest brunt from COVID-19 across the entire spectrum of US nursing homes and assisted living communities, University of Rochester Medical Center researchers report in two groundbreaking studies in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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Scientists advance understanding of blood-brain barrier health
in a study with potential impacts on a variety of neurological diseases, Virginia Tech researchers have provided the first experimental evidence from a living organism to show that an abundant, star-shaped brain cell known as an astrocyte is essential for blood-brain barrier health.
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Blodprøve kan hjælpe tarmkræftpatienter med risiko for tilbagefald
Efter en operation for tarmkræft får 30 pct. af patienterne i dag tilbagefald. Dansk forskning præsenteret på årets ESMO peger på, at det er muligt at identificere højrisikopatienter ved hjælp af en simpel blodprøve.
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Kræftlæger lider under COVID-19
Det er ikke kun patienter, som lider under dårligere forhold på grund af COVID-19. Det gør kræftlæger også, og mange af dem føler sig udbrændte og ude af stand til at tage ordentlig hånd om patienterne.
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Exclusive: University of Arizona says former researcher committed misconduct by plagiarizing figure
A former researcher in the University of Arizona's optics school engaged in "a serious case of research misconduct," Retraction Watch has learned. Palash Gangopadhyay, who until 2019 was a research scientist at Arizona, used a figure from a 2003 paper by other authors when he co-authored a 2018 paper in Optics Letters titled "High sensitivity … Continue reading
10h
The Cheating Scandal That Ripped the Poker World Apart
Mike Postle was on an epic winning streak at a California casino. Veronica Brill thought he had to be playing dirty. Let the chips fall where they may.
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Techtopia #163: Gem dine digitale fotos i potteplanten
Designprojektet 'Grow Your Own Cloud' vil omdanne digitale data til biologisk information og gemme dem i planter.
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Outdoor heaters, video chat, and other hacks for surviving winter with COVID-19
Cold weather might make COVID-19 worse, but sticking with strict social distancing rules can help lighten the load. (Pexels /) Back in March when the pandemic began, there was some hope that as the summer months approached, the spikes in coronavirus cases would ease up. However, the past few months have raged on with COVID-19 cases rising in spots around the country and the world, despite toasty
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Covid-19 News: Live Updates
Amid spiking cases, Europe is scrambling to contain the virus. Close to 1 million people have died of the virus around the world, a staggering toll.
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13.000 skoleelever kunne søge hinandens CPR-numre frem
Eleverne på seks ungdomsuddannelser har kunnet finde frem til hinandens CPR-numre i studiesystemet Ludus, som bliver leveret af DXC. Leverandøren har beklaget, og fejlen er rettet.
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Sorting Through the Science on Breast Milk and Covid-19
Breast milk researchers have set out to answer a slew of pressing questions: Can the virus be transmitted through breast milk? Does milk from recovering mothers protect babies from Covid? And can breast milk components be used to develop new treatments? These research efforts are starting to yield answers.
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Matematisk metode giver ny viden om atomare strukturer i glas
PLUS. Anvendt algebraisk topologi kan blandt andet bruges inden for materialekemi til at udvikle mere brudsikkert glas, men kan bruges på mange andre fagfelter, spår forskerne.
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Follow Covid rules or see UK deaths return to spring levels, minister warns
Grant Shapps says 'we can't afford to wait until deaths are rising before taking action' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK could return to the levels of mass coronavirus deaths seen in the spring unless people abide by social distancing rules, Grant Shapps has warned ahead of an appeal to the public by the government's most senior scientists. Shapps, the transpo
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Thyroxine binding to type III iodothyronine deiodinase
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72243-9
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Abrogation of atypical neurogenesis and vascular-derived EphA4 prevents repeated mild TBI-induced learning and memory impairments
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72380-1
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ANFIS grid partition framework with difference between two sigmoidal membership functions structure for validation of nanofluid flow
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72182-5
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Tryptophan-like and humic-like fluorophores are extracellular in groundwater: implications as real-time faecal indicators
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72258-2
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Ruthenium (II) complex cis-[RuII(ŋ2-O2CC7H7O2)(dppm)2]PF6-hmxbato induces ROS-mediated apoptosis in lung tumor cells producing selective cytotoxicity
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72420-w Ruthenium (II) complex cis -[Ru II (ŋ 2 -O 2 CC 7 H 7 O 2 )(dppm) 2 ]PF 6 -hmxbato induces ROS-mediated apoptosis in lung tumor cells producing selective cytotoxicity
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Strong and robust polarization anisotropy of site- and size-controlled single InGaN/GaN quantum wires
Scientific Reports, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71590-x
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Recurrent heart attacks on the decline, yet risk remains high
After surviving a heart attack, the proportion of patients experiencing a repeat attack within a year fell between 2008 and 2017, with the greatest decline in women. Despite the improvement, the rate of recurrent heart attacks, or artery-opening procedures, heart failure hospitalizations and deaths within a year remain high in heart attack survivors. Steps should be taken to ensure that men and wo
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Key discovery in psoriatic arthritis points way for developing targeted treatments
The strongest evidence yet of a single cause for psoriatic arthritis has been discovered by researchers. The disease may be activated by the same trigger in different patients which, if identified, could move towards creating therapies that would prevent psoriatic arthritis, and potentially providing a cure.
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Why there is no speed limit in the superfluid universe
Physicists from Lancaster University have established why objects moving through superfluid helium-3 lack a speed limit; exotic particles that stick to all surfaces in the superfluid.The discovery may guide applications in quantum technology, even quantum computing, where multiple research groups already aim to make use of these unusual particles.
10h
Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate. University of Queensland researchers found 92 endangered and 11 critically endangered species of seafood were caught in oceans around the world after analysing global industrial fishing records.
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Study shows vitamin E needed for proper nervous system development
– In research with key ramifications for women of childbearing age, scientists show that embryos produced by vitamin E-deficient zebrafish have malformed brains and nervous systems.
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Mapping cellular-scale internal mechanics in 3D tissues with thermally responsive hydrogel probes
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18469-7 Local mechanical properties are important to cellular function; but conventional measurement techniques are limited in intact, living, 3D tissues. Here, the authors report on swellable hydrogel microparticles to monitor mechanical properties in situ via a temperature change.
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Straightforward preparation of supramolecular Janus nanorods by hydrogen bonding of end-functionalized polymers
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18587-2 Janus cylinders are useful as building blocks for advanced functional materials but challenging to prepare. Here, the authors describe a robust strategy to form micrometer long Janus nanorods by self-assembly in water of end-functionalized polymers.
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Dissipation of electron-beam-driven plasma wakes
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18490-w Plasma wakefield accelerators promise compact, affordable future particle accelerators, but require deposition of enormous energy into a small volume. Here, the authors measure and simulate how this energy transfers from the wake into surrounding plasma, a process that ultimately governs the accelerator's r
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Optical imaging of single-protein size, charge, mobility, and binding
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18547-w Protein identification at the single-molecule level is the ultimate goal for biological research and disease diagnosis. Here, the authors identify the size, charge, mobility, and binding of individual protein molecules by measuring the optical and electrical responses of each protein molecule tethered to a
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Rational programming of history-dependent logic in cellular populations
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18455-z Automated frameworks to systematically implement robust history-dependent genetic programs in cellular populations.
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Elucidation of the aberrant 3′ splice site selection by cancer-associated mutations on the U2AF1
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18559-6 U2AF1 binds to the 3' splice site of introns and its mutation lead to abnormal splicing. Here the authors solve the crystal structures of wild type and pathogenic mutant U2AF1 bound to target RNA, showing that different target sequence is preferred by pathogenic mutant.
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The scaling laws of edge vs. bulk interlayer conduction in mesoscale twisted graphitic interfaces
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18597-0 Edge conductance plays a central role in the electronic transport properties of graphitic interfaces. Here, the authors present a method to distinguish edge from bulk transport in twisted graphitic junctions and show that their relative contribution depends on the stacking configuration and the potential dr
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The shared frameshift mutation landscape of microsatellite-unstable cancers suggests immunoediting during tumor evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18514-5 DNA mismatch repair (MMR)-deficient cancers with microsatellite-instability are characterized by a high load of frameshift mutation-derived neoantigens. Here, by mapping the frameshift mutation landscape and predicting the immunogenicity of the resulting peptides, the authors show evidence of immunoediting
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Vaccines — lessons from three centuries of protest
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02671-0 Immunization has always been a proxy for wider fears about social control, a history reminds us. By Julie Leask
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Coronavirus symptoms: how to tell if you have a common cold, flu or Covid
Fever, runny nose, headache? Lost your sense of taste or smell? Your guide to differentiating between the three illnesses Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With winter approaching, the UK is entering the traditional seasons for colds and flu, with the additional complication this year that symptoms of those two illnesses can be broadly similar to those experienced by p
11h
Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate.
11h
Jellyfish with your chips?
Jellyfish could replace fish and chips on a new sustainable takeaway menu to help keep threatened species off the plate.
11h
Så här lagar du framtidens pad thai
Forskarna tycker att vi ska äta mer hållbar mat från havet. Varför inte testa en pad thai med sockertång istället för nudlar? Receptet gjorde succé hos testpanelen i Vetenskapens värld program om Framtidens mat.
11h
Välkomna på föreläsningar
15 OKTOBER – GRAND TOURPå 1600-talet avslutade många adelsmän sin utbildning med en bildningsresa – en Grand Tour. Ola Winberg, doktor i historia vid Uppsala universitet, hämtar exempel från resor i Frankrike och Italien, där resenärerna skulle studera renässansens och barockens främsta mästerverk.
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Danmark overskrider 5G-deadline: Nye frekvenser forsinkes til næste år
PLUS. Energistyrelsen udskyder længe ventet auktion over fem forskellige frekvensbånd til marts næste år, blandt andet de to centrale frekvensbånd til 5G – 3,5 GHz og 26 GHz.
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UK coronavirus live news: Whitty and Vallance to present data showing 'trend in UK heading in wrong direction'
Rolling coverage of the latest UK coronavirus developments, including the briefing from Chris Whitty and Patrick Vallance Global coronavirus blog 10.16am BST We are definitely getting a Commons statement from Matt Hancock, the health secretary, at 3.30pm. One oral ministerial statement today at 330pm: Covid-19 update – @MattHancock / @JonAshworth No UQs today 9.46am BST Most of the questions dire
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Western Australia space tracking station to cut ties with China
Decision will impact the expansion of Beijing's space exploration and navigational programs China will lose access to a strategic space tracking station in Western Australia when its contract expires, the facility's owners said, a decision that cuts into Beijing's expanding space exploration and navigational capabilities in the Pacific region. The Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) has had a contrac
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Men and Women Have Different Circadian Rhythms
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Smartphone Data Can Predict Depression and Anxiety
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Israel–Arab peace accord fuels hope for surge in scientific collaboration
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02688-5 Space, water, food security and archaeology present opportunities for joint research as United Arab Emirates and Bahrain end boycott of Israel.
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Richest 1%'s emissions twice that of poorest 50%: analysis
The richest one percent of people are responsible for more than twice as much carbon pollution as the poorest half of the world's population—3.1 billion people—new research showed Monday.
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Egypt discovers 14 ancient sarcophagi at Saqqara
Egypt's antiquities ministry announced Sunday the discovery of 14 sarcophagi in the Saqqara necropolis south of Cairo that had lain buried for 2,500 years.
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Taj Mahal reopens as coronavirus cases continue to rise in India
Monument in northern city of Agra opens to visitors after being closed for six months Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Taj Mahal, India's "monument to love", has reopened after a six-month hiatus with special rules introduced – including no touching the white marble walls of the mausoleum built for a Mughal emperor's favourite wife. Only 5,000 visitors are allowed
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Whale swims free of crocodile-filled Australian river
A humpback whale has found its way back to sea weeks after it got lost in a murky, crocodile-infested river in northern Australia.
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Whale swims free of crocodile-filled Australian river
A humpback whale has found its way back to sea weeks after it got lost in a murky, crocodile-infested river in northern Australia.
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Male baboons with female friends live longer
Close bonds with the opposite sex can have non-romantic benefits. And not just for people, but for our primate cousins, too.
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Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 70s and 80s, some even reach 100 years old. But life is much shorter for our closest animal relatives. Chimpanzees, for example, rarely make it past age 50, despite sharing almost 99% of our genetic code.
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Male baboons with female friends live longer
Close bonds with the opposite sex can have non-romantic benefits. And not just for people, but for our primate cousins, too.
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Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 70s and 80s, some even reach 100 years old. But life is much shorter for our closest animal relatives. Chimpanzees, for example, rarely make it past age 50, despite sharing almost 99% of our genetic code.
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Joe Mercola: Falsely demonizing the flu vaccine by claiming it increases your risk of COVID-19
September is the time of the year when the CDC, state public health authorities, and doctors urge everyone to be vaccinated against the flu. In the year of the COVID-19 pandemic, that means antivaxxers like Joe Mercola have a new angle to demonize the flu vaccine: Falsely claiming it increases your risk of catching COVID-19.
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Phages: the tiny viruses that could help beat superbugs
Bacteriophages were superseded by modern antibiotics, but scientists believe they could be key to conquering antimicrobial resistance It is, say enthusiasts, the cure that the world forgot. An old therapy that could take on the new superbugs. Discovered in 1917 by French Canadian biologist Félix d'Hérelle, phages – or bacteriophages – are tiny viruses that are natural predators of bacteria . In m
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Covering the race for a Covid vaccine: 'The speed of progress is astonishing'
The Guardian's health editor surveys the remarkable global efforts to develop effective protection against coronavirus Incredibly fast. Faster than any vaccine has ever been developed before, but we will have to wait a while longer yet. Continue reading…
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Can you solve it? Puzzlebombed!
Bamboozling bars and brain busting bees UPDATE: The solutions can be read by clicking here. Today's problems are from Puzzlebomb , a monthly sheet of word, logic and number puzzles whose first issue came out earlier this month. The first teaser – a meta-puzzle about bar graphs inspired by this xkcd cartoon – may well explode your head. Continue reading…
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Ju starkare rosa, desto kaxigare flamingo
Flamingor föds gråa men blir rosa som vuxna. Det beror på att de får i sig stora mängder färgpigment, karotenoider, från de skaldjur och alger de äter.
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Why UK Covid testing must be more than just a numbers game
Focus should not be on how many tests are done, but how they are used and where, say experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage How many coronavirus tests does the UK really need? The official aim is 500,000 a day by the end of October, more than double the current total. But, amid concern over a series of missed targets , scientists have tried to quantify the projected
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Jan van Deursen's senolytics: from bench to failed clinical trial
Jan van Deursen had to resign from Mayo Clinic over bullying charges. With his company Unity Biotech's phase 2 clinical trial failed, stock devalued and staff laid-off, van Deursen sued me in German court about the reproducibility of his senolytics research.
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Cottingley Fairies
Cottingley-älvorna År 1917 och senare även 1920 togs totalt fem fotografier som visade två unga flickor omgivna av vad som sades vara verkliga och levande älvor. Historien har fått namn efter byn Cottingley utanför Bradford i England och bilderna togs av kusinerna Elsie Wright och Frances Griffiths som också är med på bilderna. Bild 1: […] The post appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Children's allergic reactions to nuts spike at Halloween and Easter
Severe peanut allergies in children jump 85 per cent on Halloween and 60 per cent on Easter, and other nut allergies follow the same trend, possibly due to social gatherings where sweets are shared
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Smokers urged to join 'Stoptober' as quitting rate in England rises
Coronavirus pandemic has changed public attitudes to health, experts say Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The proportion of people who have successfully quit smoking this year is at its highest in more than a decade, new figures show. Data from the UCL Smoking Toolkit Study shows that in England in 2020 there has been an increase of almost two-thirds in the quitting s
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College students with disabilities at greater risk for substance abuse
College students with physical and cognitive disabilities use illicit drugs more, and have a higher prevalence of drug use disorder, than their non-disabled peers, according to a Rutgers study.
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European survey shows alarmingly low awareness of erectile dysfunction
Awareness of erectile dysfunction (ED) is alarmingly low in men and women aged 20 to 70, a new survey commissioned by the European Association of Urology (EAU) has revealed. A majority of the respondents do not know what ED exactly entails, and one in four has never heard of any of the seven most common treatments for ED.
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Black women may be less likely to receive timely treatment for breast cancer
New research suggests that Black women experience longer waits for treatment initiation than white women after a breast cancer diagnosis, and their duration of treatment is prolonged. The findings are published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).
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COVID-19 and the decolonization of Indigenous public health
Indigenous self-determination, leadership and knowledge have helped protect Indigenous communities in Canada during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and these principles should be incorporated into public health in future, argue the authors of a commentary in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200852.
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Spike in new nut anaphylaxis in children at Halloween and Easter
A new study looking at the link between peanut and tree-nut anaphylaxis in children and holidays found spikes at Halloween and Easter. The study, published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found that most were previously unknown allergies, calling for increased awareness http://www.cmaj.ca/lookup/doi/10.1503/cmaj.200034.
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The Inside Story of the Mueller Probe's Mistakes
A ndrew Weissmann was one of Robert Mueller's top deputies in the special counsel's investigation of the 2016 election, and he's about to publish the first insider account, called Where Law Ends: Inside the Mueller Investigation . The title comes from an adapted quote by the philosopher John Locke that's inscribed on the façade of the Justice Department building in Washington, D.C.: "Wherever law
16h
The Next Great Migration, by Sonia Shah
An original work that plays down the economic motives of modern migrants
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Majas kretslopp i garaget – självförsörjande på fisk och grönt
En fisk håvas upp ur tanken och barnen plockar salladen. Familjen De Bernardo hämtar allt de behöver till kvällens middag i kretsloppsodlingen i garaget. – Basilikan frodas, det växer som ogräs, säger Maja De Bernardo.
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Så kan papaya och bananer frodas i Sverige
Allt fler svenskar närodlar fiskar och växter i växthus med så kallad akvaponik, en odlingsmetod som går ut på att gödsla växter med fiskavföring. Fiskarna får sin näring av alger och bakterier genom ett slutet kretslopp där växter renar och återanvänder vatten.
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Forsvundet i 400 år: Kæmpe indianerby opdaget i USA
Der boede mere end 20.000 i byen, da spanierne kom.
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China's pork reserves running out as prices soar, analysts say
Beijing sells down frozen meat after African swine fever causes supply shortfall
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Supercapacitor Markets, Technology Roadmap, Opportunities 2021-2041
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This drug makes mice live longer and healthier lives
submitted by /u/thorium43 [link] [comments]
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Can Mushrooms Provide a Vegan, Green Alternative to Animal Leather?
submitted by /u/altbekannt [link] [comments]
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Impossible Burger Sales Replace 72% Of Traditional
submitted by /u/altmorty [link] [comments]
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Is there still research going on concerning Cryogenic Suspension/Suspended Animation?
It has always been a staple of sci-fi that "stasis chambers", "cold storage", "cryogenic sleep" can suspend the vital functions of a person for an undetermined timespan. As I was preparing some food today, I got some frozen food in my refrigerator and something made me look at the expiration date (it was still valid, of course). But then it dawned on me: wouldn't a similar concern have to exist w
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A patient has died after ransomware hackers hit a German hospital
submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]
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Study: Inequality Robs $2.5 Trillion From U.S. Workers Each Year
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Airlines pine for roar of jet engines over the Atlantic
Big carriers face growing threat on what was one of the busiest and most lucrative routes
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Averages of the Möbius function on shifted primes
It is a folklore conjecture that the M\"obius function exhibits cancellation on shifted primes; that is, $\sum_{p\le X}\mu(p+h) \ = \ o(\pi(X))$ as $X\to\infty$ for any fixed shift $h>0$. We prove the conjecture on average for shifts $h\le H$, provided $\log H/\log\log X\to\infty$. We also obtain results for shifts of prime $k$-tuples, and for higher correlations of M\"obius with von Mangoldt and
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This Tuesday Is The 'Fall Equinox'. Here's What That Means
Don't forget to check out your shadow.
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Leverandør tog strømmen til Sundhed.dk, mens tusinder ventede på corona-svar
I starten af måneden var Sundhed.dk nede i mere end et døgn, og de tusindvis af danskere, der ventede svar på corona-test, kunne ikke tilgå dem på siden. Nu viser en aktindsigt, at driftsleverandøren selv kom til at tage strømmen ved en fejl.
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Hård kritik af ny oksekødsrapport: Forskernes resultater er ikke retvisende
PLUS. Ny rapport, som forskere fra Aarhus Universitet og DTU har udarbejdet, nedtoner klimaeffekten af mindre oksekød i kosten og undlader helt at sammenligne med en rent vegetarisk kost.
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Your cells look young for their age, compared to a chimp's
Many humans live to see their 80s, some even reach 100. But chimpanzees rarely make it past 50, despite sharing 99% of our genetic code. While modern medicine has added years to human lifespans, a study points to a more ancient explanation why humans are the long-lived primate. Part of the secret to human longevity may lie in chemical changes to our DNA that slowed the rate of aging after human an
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Male baboons with female friends live longer
Opposite-sex friendships can have non-romantic benefits. And not just for people, but for our primate cousins, too. A 35-year study of 542 baboons finds that males that have close female friends have higher rates of survival. Previous studies have assumed that males befriend females to protect their offspring, or to boost their chances of mating later on. But the new study points to an additional
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Satellite achieves sharp-eyed view of methane
A Canadian company debuts a powerful new capability to monitor the potent greenhouse gas.
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China's export machine comes roaring back to life
Big economies may be struggling but their appetite for Chinese electronics is growing
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Climate Week: World split on urgency of tackling rising temperatures, poll suggests
Concern about climate change is growing, but there are big differences about the need for rapid action.
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Coronavirus live news: UK at 'critical point' in pandemic as US nears 200,000 deaths
England's chief medical officer to warn of a 'very challenging winter'; more than one in five Covid-19 deaths globally is in US; Lebanon sees record case rise. Follow the latest updates Trump health official says 'biology independent of politics' as US nears 200,000 deaths UK at 'critical point' over Covid-19, top scientists to tell public Mutant virus: should we be worried that Sars-CoV-2 is cha
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Study links higher level of exercise to 25% to 32% lower risk of all-cause mortality in people with type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows that having a greater exercise capacity is associated with a significantly decreased all-cause mortality risk of between 25-33% in people with type 2 diabetes (T2D).
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Screening UK Biobank blood samples identifies thousands of undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes
A study of approximately 200,000 blood samples from the UK Biobank has identified more than 2,000 undiagnosed cases of type 2 diabetes. The study is presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD).
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Couples can show linked behaviour in terms of risk factors to prevent type 2 diabetes
New research being presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows that when one half of a couple shows high levels of certain behaviours that prevent type 2 diabetes, such as good diet or exercise, that behaviour also tends to be high in the other half of the couple.
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Study shows that rheumatoid arthritis is associated with a 23% increased risk of developing diabetes
A new study presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows that rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is associated with a 23% increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and may indicate that both diseases are linked to the body's inflammatory response.
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Study shows the major impact of diabetes on the risk of falls
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year (21-25 September), shows that having type 1 diabetes (T1D) is associated with a 33% increase in the risk of falls compared with the general population, while having type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with a 19% increased risk of falls.
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Sunak to extend business support loans as Covid-19 spread worsens
Government weighs whether more aggressive measures needed to control virus in UK
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Climate Week: Prince Charles calls for 'swift' action on climate change
Covid-19 provides an opportunity to "reset" the economy for a more sustainable future, he says.
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U.S. Health Officials Tiptoe Around Trump's Vaccine Timetable
The administration's experts tried to find a way to support both the president and the reality of scientific and medical constraints he doesn't always recognize.
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UK at 'critical point' over Covid-19, top scientists to tell public
Patrick Vallance and Chris Whitty to make TV appeal ahead of 'challenging winter' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain's most senior government scientists will make a direct appeal to the public on Monday, warning that the coronavirus trend is "heading in the wrong direction" and "a critical point has been reached". As Downing Street considers imposing nationwide
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Health Officials Tiptoe Around Trump's Coronavirus Vaccine Timeline
New Zealand says it will ease its virus measures. Lockdowns return as Europe faces a second wave.
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