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Most infants are well even when moms are infected by COVID-19, researchers find
Infants born to women with COVID-19 showed few adverse outcomes, according to new research. The study suggests that babies born to mothers infected with the virus generally do well six to eight weeks after birth. However, there was a higher rate of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions reported if the mothers had COVID-19 up to two weeks prior to delivery.
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Wound therapy device might not lower infection risk in women with obesity after C-section
Indiana University School of Medicine researchers are learning more about ways to prevent infections in women with obesity who have cesarean delivery. The multi-site study revealed using prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for this high-risk group.
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Patients with COVID-19 may have higher risk of kidney injury
According to Jochen Reiser, MD, PhD, the Ralph C Brown MD professor and chairperson of Rush's Department of Internal Medicine, patients with COVID-19 experience elevated levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR), an immune-derived pathogenic protein that is strongly predictive of kidney injury.
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Remembrance of waves past: memory imprints motion on scattered waves
Now, it appears that between relativity and the classical (stationary) wave regime, there exists another regime of wave phenomena, where memory influences the scattering process.
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Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods
Millions of ibis and birds of prey mummies, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley. Such a quantity of mummified birds raises the question of their origin: Were they bred, like cats, or were they hunted? Scientists from the CNRS, the Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 and the C2RMF have carried out extensive geochemical analyse
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Too few social media 'likes' can amp up teen depression
Not getting enough "likes" on social media posts can increase depression and anxiety in young people, a new study shows. The findings suggest this lack of likes can especially affect the most vulnerable populations for whom these platforms may contribute to a cycle of rejection. "…not getting enough 'likes' actually causes adolescents to reduce their feelings of self-worth…" In a new paper in Chi
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Walmart Is Delivering COVID Tests Via Drone
Loot Drop During its latest drone delivery trial, retail giant Walmart has started delivering at-home COVID-19 tests. The company started making deliveries of test kits in Las Vegas today. A second trial in Cheektowaga, New York will start in early October. Customers will have to live at most one mile from a designated Walmart Supercenter in either location to have their testing kits delivered by
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New 3-D printing method could jump-start creation of tiny medical devices for the body
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3-D-printing gels and other soft materials. Published in a new paper, it has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision. Because many gels are compatible with living cells, the new method could jump-start the production of soft tiny medical devices such as drug del
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Warming temperatures are driving Arctic greening
As Arctic summers warm, Earth's northern landscapes are changing. Using satellite images to track global tundra ecosystems over decades, a new study found the region has become greener, as warmer air and soil temperatures lead to increased plant growth.
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Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
In addition to being the last horizon for adventurers and spiritual seekers, the Himalaya region is a prime location for understanding geological processes. It hosts world-class mineral deposits of copper, lead, zinc, gold and silver, as well as rarer elements like lithium, antimony and chrome, that are essential to modern technology. The uplift of the Tibetan plateau even affects global climate b
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Study proposes narrative writing exercise as way to reduce polarization in U.S. politics
Left or right. Among other uses, these terms can generally identify most Americans' political beliefs—liberal or conservative, Democrat or Republican. When these views are at the extreme ends of the political spectrum, they are known as political polarization. With the gap between these political ideologies in American politics growing wider, experts argue that the gap between both sides is threat
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Complications from diabetes linked to worse memory, IQ in children
A study led by UC Davis Health researchers uncovered that even one severe episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is linked to cognitive problems; and among children with a previous diagnosis, repeated DKA exposure predicted lower cognitive performance after accounting for glycemic control.
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Johns Hopkins researchers publish COVID-19 'prediction model'
Using a combination of demographic and clinical data gathered from seven weeks of COVID-19 patient care early in the coronavirus pandemic, Johns Hopkins researchers today published a 'prediction model' they say can help other hospitals care for COVID-19 patients — and make important decisions about planning and resource allocations.
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UV-C light is effective for killing COVID-19 on N95s, study demonstrates
Researchers have demonstrated that certain N95 respirators tainted with COVID-19 can be effectively and safely decontaminated for reuse using ultraviolet-C light (UV-C), a method commonly utilized for treating rare skin diseases.
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NASA's new Mars rover will use X-rays to hunt fossils
NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover has a challenging road ahead: After having to make it through the harrowing entry, descent, and landing phase of the mission on Feb. 18, 2021, it will begin searching for traces of microscopic life from billions of years back. That's why it's packing PIXL, a precision X-ray device powered by artificial intelligence (AI).
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Data sonification: Sounds from around the Milky Way
The center of our Milky Way galaxy is too distant for us to visit in person, but we can still explore it. Telescopes give us a chance to see what the Galactic Center looks like in different types of light. By translating the inherently digital data (in the form of ones and zeroes) captured by telescopes in space into images, astronomers create visual representations that would otherwise be invisib
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Facebook Threatens to Pull Out of Europe Entirely
Big in Europe Following a landmark European court ruling, Facebook is warning that it may pull out of the continent entirely, The Guardian reports . In a July ruling , European regulators found that the social media company didn't do enough to protect users from surveillance by US intelligence agencies. According to the ruling, social media companies like Facebook would need to stop sending data
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Parylene photonics enable future optical biointerfaces
Carnegie Mellon University's Maysam Chamanzar and his team have invented an optical platform that will likely become the new standard in optical biointerfaces. He's labeled this new field of optical technology "Parylene photonics," demonstrated in a recent paper in Nature Microsystems and Nanoengineering.
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Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?
Solar flares are violent explosions on the sun that fling out high-energy charged particles, sometimes toward Earth, where they disrupt communications and endanger satellites and astronauts.
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Space Probe Will Search Venus for Life in Fortuitous Flyby
It's a storybook meet-cute that transcends culture: She's a toxic hellstew with a surface temperature that could melt lead. He's a half-European, half-Japanese satellite on his way to somewhere else entirely. Despite the promises he's made, despite his previous feelings, that "somewhere else" suddenly feels very far away. Together, they fight crime could prove the existence of life — or at least
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Science News from around the World
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from all over, including one from Israel about what DNA reveals about the Dead Sea Scrolls' parchment. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Herd immunity an impractical strategy, study finds
Achieving herd immunity to COVID-19 is an impractical public health strategy, according to a new model developed by University of Georgia scientists. The study recently appeared in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Silk offers homemade solution for COVID-19 prevention
A University of Cincinnati biology study found that silk fabric performs similarly to surgical masks when used in conjunction with respirators but has the added advantages of being washable and repelling water, which would translate to helping to keep a person safer from the airborne virus.
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Parylene photonics enable future optical biointerfaces
Carnegie Mellon University's Maysam Chamanzar and his team have invented an optical platform that will likely become the new standard in optical biointerfaces. He's labeled this new field of optical technology 'Parylene photonics,' demonstrated in a recent paper in Nature Microsystems and Nanoengineering.
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China, in Pointed Message to U.S., Tightens Its Climate Targets
President Xi Jinping pledged, among other goals, to achieve "carbon neutrality by 2060." It was China's boldest promise yet on climate change.
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Science News from around the World
Here are some brief reports about science and technology from all over, including one from Israel about what DNA reveals about the Dead Sea Scrolls' parchment. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Animals in the News
Time again for a look at the animal kingdom and our interactions with the countless species that share our planet. Today's photos include a donkey-therapy program in Spain, animals affected by wildfires in the U.S., a rescued anteater in Brazil, COVID-sniffing dog training in Germany, rhinos near Nairobi, beach rescue-dog training in Italy, stranded pilot whales in Tasmania, migrating storks in T
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Förenklade beräkningar ger felaktiga slutsatser om coronavirus
Forskare inom analytisk kemi vid Karlstads universitet har granskat färska forskningsdata om hur coronaviruset fäster i människokroppen. Befintlig forskning på området har dragit felaktiga slutsatser på grund förenklade beräkningsmetoder, enligt forskarna. – Vi var intresserade av att använda vår nya avancerade beräkningsmetod av interaktioner på ytor, som Patrik Forssén, doktor i databehandling,
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Kortare lov gav klirr i kassan
Både lovskola och tioårig grundskola utreds nu av regeringen. Och i flera andra länder har undervisningstiden utökats för att fler elever ska klara skolan. Kan det också vara receptet för svensk skola? Sverige ligger under genomsnittet i OECD för antal timmar som eleverna tillbringar i skolan. I medeltal går eleverna 178 dagar under ett läsår jämfört med till exempel Danmark där eleverna går stra
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Når du sover, arbejder din hjerne – men dens job ændrer sig med alderen
Fra vi fylder cirka 2,5 år, sker der et skift i, hvad hjernen laver om natten.
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Profil Optiks hjemmeside er nede: Hackergruppe hævder at stå bag og kræver løsesum
Hackergruppe har før stået bag ransomwareangreb, hvor den forlangte løsesum for at genåbne it-systemer.
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Children's immune response more effective against COVID-19
Children and adults exhibit distinct immune system responses to infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, a finding that helps explain why COVID-19 outcomes tend to be much worse in adults, researchers report.
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Earth Appears to Be Capturing a Tiny New Moon
Cuffing Season There's a mysterious object in space heading our way — and while it poses no threat to the Earth, it will probably get trapped in our orbit and become a new minimoon. If it does, then the object — dubbed 2020 SO by researchers — would become just the third confirmed minimoon to spend time in Earth's orbit, ScienceAlert reports . Like the other two, 2020 SO is officially classified
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Fostering 'political' attitude adjustments
When political views are at the extreme ends of the spectrum, they are known as political polarization. Now, communication experts at the University of Missouri have developed a writing exercise as a way to reduce polarization in US politics.
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Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?
Scientists discovered in 1996 that sunquakes are linked to solar flares. Now, using helioseismic holography, scientists have analyzed a 2011 flare and shown that the impulsive source that generated the sunquake, and the refracted acoustic waves that later rippled the solar surface, was submerged 1,000 kilometers below the photosphere and flare. Further sunquake study could reveal if submerged sour
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Study: Do people trust governments less when 'fake news' proves real?
A recent study measured how the public's trust in government differs when exposed to rumors, government denials, and subsequent verification of the initial rumors. The study, conducted in China, also examined whether any changes in trust lasted over a three-week period. The results suggest that governments that deem negative information as "fake news" may persuade some people, but over the long t
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Massive Volcanic Eruptions Might Have Opened the Door for the Rise of Dinosaurs
Earth's history is littered with extinctions and we keep identifying even more periods were profound changes happened to life on Earth. The Late Triassic might be hiding an event that led to the rise of dinosaurs.
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Daily briefing: 42 — not the answer to everything, but still pretty cool
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02715-5 Fun mathematical facts about the most famous of the not-particularly-interesting numbers. Plus: a menagerie of unconventional stem-cell models and questions about harassers at the US National Academy of Sciences.
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Biden Is in Denial About the Republican Party
On Sunday, Joe Biden made a personal appeal to Republican senators considering whether to hold a vote on President Donald Trump's anticipated Supreme Court nominee, asking them to wait for the result of November's election before filling the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's spot. "Please, follow your conscience," Biden said. "Don't go there. Uphold your constitutional duty, your conscience; let
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Covid crackdown stirs anger as Johnson walks fine line
Critics fear new UK measures go too far, not far enough or are muddled
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Black and Hispanic people in US face increased risk of testing positive for coronavirus
Individuals from Black and Hispanic backgrounds in the United States are twice as likely to test positive for COVID-19 than their White counterparts, according to new research in PLOS Medicine.Led by researchers at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and Yale University, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the study found this disparity even after accounting for
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US cellphone data uncovers 'hotspots' where COVID-19 social distancing levels are low
US cellphone data analysis finds 'hotspots' where COVID-19 social distancing levels are low, as well as revealing how demographics and governmental restrictions interact. Rajesh Narayanan and colleagues at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on September 22, 2020.
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Nationwide study shows disparities in COVID-19 infection for Black and Hispanic people
A study of around 5.8 million people who receive care from the United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) found that Black and Hispanic people were substantially more likely than their White counterparts to test positive for COVID-19, although no differences in 30-day mortality were observed between these groups. Christopher Rentsch, Assistant Professor at the London School of Hygiene & Tro
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Is rheumatoid arthritis two different diseases?
While disease activity improves over time for most rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, long-term outcomes only improve in RA patients with autoantibodies, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Xanthe Matthijssen of Leiden University Medical Center, Netherlands, and colleagues. The findings add to a growing body of evidence that RA with and without autoantibodies are two
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Most people infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop symptoms
While some people who contract SARS-CoV-2 infections never experience any symptoms, there remains disagreement about what proportion of total infections these cases represent. A new study published in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Diana Buitrago-Garcia at the University of Bern, Switzerland and colleagues suggests that true asymptomatic cases of SARS-CoV-2 comprise a minority of infecti
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Healthier lifestyles may increase lifespan even in people with multiple chronic conditions
A very healthy lifestyle is associated with up to 6.3 years longer life for men and 7.6 years for women, regardless of the presence of multiple chronic conditions, according to a study published September 22 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Yogini Chudasama of the University of Leicester, and colleagues.
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Animals lose fear of predators rapidly after they start encountering humans
Most wild animals show a suite of predator avoidance behaviors such as vigilance, freezing, and fleeing. But these are quickly reduced after the animals come into contact with humans through captivity, domestication, or urbanization, according to a study led by Benjamin Geffroy from MARBEC (Institute of Marine Biodiversity, Exploitation and Conservation), publishing September 22nd in the open-acce
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Who's Tweeting about scientific research? And why?
Although Twitter is best known for its role in political and cultural discourse, it has also become an increasingly vital tool for scientific communication. The record of social media engagement by laypeople is decoded by a new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, where researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, show that Twitter users can be ch
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Small increase in risk of autism seen for pre- and post-term births
A study of more than 3.5 million Nordic children suggests that the risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may increase slightly for each week a child is born before or after 40 weeks of gestation. Martina Persson of the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine.
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Evaporation critical to coronavirus transmission as weather changes
As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures. Researchers studied the effects of relative humidity, environmental temperature, and wind speed on the respiratory cloud and virus viability. They found a
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Playing video games as a child can improve working memory years later, researchers find
New research reveals how cognitive changes can take place even years after people stop playing.
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US cellphone data uncovers 'hotspots' where COVID-19 social distancing levels are low
U.S. cellphone data analysis finds "hotspots" where COVID-19 social distancing levels are low, as well as revealing how demographics and governmental restrictions interact. Rajesh Narayanan and colleagues at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on September 22.
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Who's Tweeting about scientific research? And why?
Although Twitter is best known for its role in political and cultural discourse, it has also become an increasingly vital tool for scientific communication. The record of social media engagement by laypeople is decoded by a new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, where researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, show that Twitter users can be ch
15d
Animals lose fear of predators rapidly after they start encountering humans
Most wild animals show a suite of predator avoidance behaviors such as vigilance, freezing, and fleeing. But these are quickly reduced after the animals come into contact with humans through captivity, domestication, or urbanization, according to a study led by Benjamin Geffroy from MARBEC (Institute of Marine Biodiversity, Exploitation and Conservation), publishing September 22nd in the open-acce
15d
Animals lose fear of predators rapidly after they start encountering humans
Most wild animals show a suite of predator avoidance behaviors such as vigilance, freezing, and fleeing. But these are quickly reduced after the animals come into contact with humans through captivity, domestication, or urbanization, according to a study led by Benjamin Geffroy from MARBEC (Institute of Marine Biodiversity, Exploitation and Conservation), publishing September 22nd in the open-acce
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Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other.
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Did early humans cook with hot springs before fire?
Early humans may have used hot springs as a cooking resource, for instance to boil fresh kills, long before humans are thought to have used fire as a controlled source for cooking, according to a new study. Some of the oldest remains of early human ancestors have been unearthed in Olduvai Gorge, a rift valley setting in northern Tanzania where anthropologists have discovered fossils of hominids t
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Climate Disruption Is Now Locked In. The Next Moves Will Be Crucial.
The Times spoke to two dozen experts who said decisions made now would spell the difference between a difficult future and something far worse.
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Despite Claims, Trump Rarely Uses Wartime Law in Battle Against Covid
The president often criticized the Defense Production Act as anti-business. Now he's campaigning on having frequently used the law to ramp up production of medical gear.
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Warming temperatures are driving arctic greening
As Arctic summers warm, Earth's northern landscapes are changing. Using satellite images to track global tundra ecosystems over decades, a new study found the region has become greener, as warmer air and soil temperatures lead to increased plant growth.
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A City in Michigan Just Decriminalized Magic Mushrooms
The City Council of Ann Arbor, Michigan voted unanimously to decriminalize all psychedelic plants and fungi on Monday night. It's an expansive move that will allow banned substances including ayahuasca, peyote, mescaline, and psilocybin, better known as "magic mushrooms," in the area — and one that, like the decriminalization of cannabis in a growing number of areas, could potentially spark a sho
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YouTube Content Moderator Sues Over Psychological Trauma
Workplace Trauma YouTube is under fire: A new lawsuit claims that it failed to support the content moderators who watch and remove inappropriate or violent videos uploaded to the site. The lawsuit was filed Monday by a former content moderator who says she had to watch videos of beheadings, shootings, child abuse, and other disturbing content, according to NBC News . As a result — and because You
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'Mussel-bola' Could Be Spreading. Maybe Now You'll Pay Attention.
New findings suggest a previously unknown virus may play a role in the sudden death of many freshwater mussels in recent years.
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Is This Really the End of Abortion?
F riday was a perfect early-autumn evening in Washington, D.C., less than 50 days away from the election. Marjorie Dannenfelser, the head of the Susan B. Anthony List, arguably the most powerful anti-abortion group in Washington, had wrapped up her day on Capitol Hill. She and her kids packed cheese and crackers and headed to the lawn outside the Supreme Court building, a majestic spot for a picn
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NIST scientists get soft on 3D printing
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a new method of 3D-printing gels and other soft materials. Published in a new paper, it has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision.
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Blood vessel growth in muscle is reduced in women after menopause
A new study from the University of Copenhagen's Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports demonstrates that formation of small blood vessels is impaired in the muscle tissue of postmenopausal women. The study's findings highlight the importance of physical activity for women prior to and during menopause, as a means to prevent the development of disease later in life.
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Team ties chronic itch to sleep loss and potential heart disease
A new study links chronic itch to sleep loss and other medical conditions—and could signal an increased risk of heart disease, researchers say. Many people suffer from a skin disorder known as chronic pruritic dermatosis, commonly referred to as "chronic itch." Recent research has suggested that chronic itch may be at the root of other related medical conditions, including sleep disturbances. "…a
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Chelicerata sDscam isoforms combine homophilic specificities to define unique cell recognition [Biochemistry]
Thousands of Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam1) isoforms and ∼60 clustered protocadhrein (cPcdh) proteins are required for establishing neural circuits in insects and vertebrates, respectively. The strict homophilic specificity exhibited by these proteins has been extensively studied and is thought to be critical for their function in neuronal self-avoidance….
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America's electorate is increasingly polarized along partisan lines about voting by mail during the COVID-19 crisis [Political Sciences]
Are voters as polarized as political leaders when it comes to their preferences about how to cast their ballots in November 2020 and their policy positions on how elections should be run in light of the COVID-19 outbreak? Prior research has shown little party divide on voting by mail, with…
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Assessing the ecological niche and invasion potential of the Asian giant hornet [Ecology]
The Asian giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia) was recently detected in western British Columbia, Canada and Washington State, United States. V. mandarinia are an invasion concern due to their ability to kill honey bees and affect humans. Here, we used habitat suitability models and dispersal simulations to assess potential invasive spread…
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Transmission dynamics reveal the impracticality of COVID-19 herd immunity strategies [Population Biology]
The rapid growth rate of COVID-19 continues to threaten to overwhelm healthcare systems in multiple countries. In response, severely affected countries have had to impose a range of public health strategies achieved via nonpharmaceutical interventions. Broadly, these strategies have fallen into two categories: 1) "mitigation," which aims to achieve herd…
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Structural determinants of protocadherin-15 mechanics and function in hearing and balance perception [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The vertebrate inner ear, responsible for hearing and balance, is able to sense minute mechanical stimuli originating from an extraordinarily broad range of sound frequencies and intensities or from head movements. Integral to these processes is the tip-link protein complex, which conveys force to open the inner-ear transduction channels that…
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An apoptosis-dependent checkpoint for autoimmunity in memory B and plasma cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
B lymphocytes acquire self-reactivity as an unavoidable byproduct of antibody gene diversification in the bone marrow and in germinal centers (GCs). Autoreactive B cells emerging from the bone marrow are silenced in a series of well-defined checkpoints, but less is known about how self-reactivity that develops by somatic mutation in…
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Human norovirus exhibits strain-specific sensitivity to host interferon pathways in human intestinal enteroids [Microbiology]
Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide; yet currently, no vaccines or FDA-approved antiviral drugs are available to counter these pathogens. To understand HuNoV biology and the epithelial response to infection, we performed transcriptomic analyses, RT-qPCR, CRISPR-Cas9 modification of human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures, and functional…
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The primary step of biotin synthesis in mycobacteria [Microbiology]
Biotin plays an essential role in growth of mycobacteria. Synthesis of the cofactor is essential for Mycobacterium tuberculosis to establish and maintain chronic infections in a murine model of tuberculosis. Although the late steps of mycobacterial biotin synthesis, assembly of the heterocyclic rings, are thought to follow the canonical pathway,…
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Helper bacteria halt and disarm mushroom pathogens by linearizing structurally diverse cyclolipopeptides [Microbiology]
The bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas tolaasii severely damages white button mushrooms by secretion of the pore-forming toxin tolaasin, the main virulence factor of brown blotch disease. Yet, fungus-associated helper bacteria of the genus Mycetocola (Mycetocola tolaasinivorans and Mycetocola lacteus) may protect their host by an unknown detoxification mechanism. By a combination…
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Dynamic PB2-E627K substitution of influenza H7N9 virus indicates the in vivo genetic tuning and rapid host adaptation [Microbiology]
Avian-origin influenza viruses overcome the bottleneck of the interspecies barrier and infect humans through the evolution of variants toward more efficient replication in mammals. The dynamic adaptation of the genetic substitutions and the correlation with the virulence of avian-origin influenza virus in patients remain largely elusive. Here, based on the…
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Highly infectious prions are not directly neurotoxic [Microbiology]
Prions are infectious agents which cause rapidly lethal neurodegenerative diseases in humans and animals following long, clinically silent incubation periods. They are composed of multichain assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein. While it has long been assumed that prions are themselves neurotoxic, recent development of methods to obtain exceptionally pure…
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Lifestyle adaptations of Rhizobium from rhizosphere to symbiosis [Microbiology]
By analyzing successive lifestyle stages of a model Rhizobium–legume symbiosis using mariner-based transposon insertion sequencing (INSeq), we have defined the genes required for rhizosphere growth, root colonization, bacterial infection, N2-fixing bacteroids, and release from legume (pea) nodules. While only 27 genes are annotated as nif and fix in Rhizobium leguminosarum,…
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Concanamycin A counteracts HIV-1 Nef to enhance immune clearance of infected primary cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes [Microbiology]
Nef is an HIV-encoded accessory protein that enhances pathogenicity by down-regulating major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) expression to evade killing by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A potent Nef inhibitor that restores MHC-I is needed to promote immune-mediated clearance of HIV-infected cells. We discovered that the plecomacrolide family of natural products…
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Coregulation of dimorphism and symbiosis by cyclic AMP signaling in the lichenized fungus Umbilicaria muhlenbergii [Microbiology]
Umbilicaria muhlenbergii is the only known dimorphic lichenized fungus that grows in the hyphal form in lichen thalli but as yeast cells in axenic cultures. However, the regulation of yeast-to-hypha transition and its relationship to the establishment of symbiosis are not clear. In this study, we show that nutrient limitation…
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The small GTPase MglA together with the TPR domain protein SgmX stimulates type IV pili formation in M. xanthus [Microbiology]
Bacteria can move across surfaces using type IV pili (T4P), which undergo cycles of extension, adhesion, and retraction. The T4P localization pattern varies between species; however, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. In the rod-shaped Myxococcus xanthus cells, T4P localize at the leading cell pole. As cells reverse their direction…
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Neural progenitor cell pyroptosis contributes to Zika virus-induced brain atrophy and represents a therapeutic target [Microbiology]
Mounting evidence has associated Zika virus (ZIKV) infection with congenital malformations, including microcephaly, which raises global alarm. Nonetheless, mechanisms by which ZIKV disrupts neurogenesis and causes microcephaly are far from being understood. In this study, we discovered direct effects of ZIKV on neural progenitor cell development by inducing caspase-1– and…
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A conserved subcomplex within the bacterial cytokinetic ring activates cell wall synthesis by the FtsW-FtsI synthase [Microbiology]
Cell division in bacteria is mediated by a multiprotein assembly called the divisome. A major function of this machinery is the synthesis of the peptidoglycan (PG) cell wall that caps the daughter poles and prevents osmotic lysis of the newborn cells. Recent studies have implicated a complex of FtsW and…
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Spatiotemporal dissociation of fMRI activity in the caudate nucleus underlies human de novo motor skill learning [Neuroscience]
Motor skill learning involves a complex process of generating novel movement patterns guided by evaluative feedback, such as a reward. Previous literature has suggested anteroposteriorly separated circuits in the striatum to be implicated in early goal-directed and later automatic stages of motor skill learning, respectively. However, the involvement of these…
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Rapid hippocampal plasticity supports motor sequence learning [Neuroscience]
Recent evidence suggests that gains in performance observed while humans learn a novel motor sequence occur during the quiet rest periods interleaved with practice (micro-offline gains, MOGs). This phenomenon is reminiscent of memory replay observed in the hippocampus during spatial learning in rodents. Whether the hippocampus is also involved in…
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The emergence of a functionally flexible brain during early infancy [Neuroscience]
Adult brains are functionally flexible, a unique characteristic that is thought to contribute to cognitive flexibility. While tools to assess cognitive flexibility during early infancy are lacking, we aimed to assess the spatiotemporal developmental features of "neural flexibility" during the first 2 y of life. Fifty-two typically developing children 0…
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Interplay between cell-adhesion molecules governs synaptic wiring of cone photoreceptors [Neuroscience]
Establishment of functional synaptic connections in a selective manner is essential for nervous system operation. In mammalian retinas, rod and cone photoreceptors form selective synaptic connections with different classes of bipolar cells (BCs) to propagate light signals. While there has been progress in elucidating rod wiring, molecular mechanisms used by…
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Medin aggregation causes cerebrovascular dysfunction in aging wild-type mice [Neuroscience]
Medin is the most common amyloid known in humans, as it can be found in blood vessels of the upper body in virtually everybody over 50 years of age. However, it remains unknown whether deposition of Medin plays a causal role in age-related vascular dysfunction. We now report that aggregates…
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Dynamic changes in DICER levels in adipose tissue control metabolic adaptations to exercise [Physiology]
DICER is a key enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. Here we show that aerobic exercise training up-regulates DICER in adipose tissue of mice and humans. This can be mimicked by infusion of serum from exercised mice into sedentary mice and depends on AMPK-mediated signaling in both muscle and adipocytes. Adipocyte…
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Targeting myostatin/activin A protects against skeletal muscle and bone loss during spaceflight [Physiology]
Among the physiological consequences of extended spaceflight are loss of skeletal muscle and bone mass. One signaling pathway that plays an important role in maintaining muscle and bone homeostasis is that regulated by the secreted signaling proteins, myostatin (MSTN) and activin A. Here, we used both genetic and pharmacological approaches…
15d
Sexually dimorphic effects of forkhead box a2 (FOXA2) and uterine glands on decidualization and fetoplacental development [Physiology]
Glands of the uterus are essential for pregnancy establishment. Forkhead box A2 (FOXA2) is expressed specifically in the glands of the uterus and a critical regulator of glandular epithelium (GE) differentiation, development, and function. Mice with a conditional deletion of FOXA2 in the adult uterus, created using the lactotransferrin iCre…
15d
Genome-wide variation and transcriptional changes in diverse developmental processes underlie the rapid evolution of seasonal adaptation [Physiology]
Many organisms enter a dormant state in their life cycle to deal with predictable changes in environments over the course of a year. The timing of dormancy is therefore a key seasonal adaptation, and it evolves rapidly with changing environments. We tested the hypothesis that differences in the timing of…
15d
Fruit setting rewires central metabolism via gibberellin cascades [Plant Biology]
Fruit set is the process whereby ovaries develop into fruits after pollination and fertilization. The process is induced by the phytohormone gibberellin (GA) in tomatoes, as determined by the constitutive GA response mutant procera. However, the role of GA on the metabolic behavior in fruit-setting ovaries remains largely unknown. This…
15d
MAC5, an RNA-binding protein, protects pri-miRNAs from SERRATE-dependent exoribonuclease activities [Plant Biology]
MAC5 is a component of the conserved MOS4-associated complex. It plays critical roles in development and immunity. Here we report that MAC5 is required for microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis. MAC5 interacts with Serrate (SE), which is a core component of the microprocessor that processes primary miRNA transcripts (pri-miRNAs) into miRNAs and…
15d
Stable unmethylated DNA demarcates expressed genes and their cis-regulatory space in plant genomes [Plant Biology]
The genomic sequences of crops continue to be produced at a frenetic pace. It remains challenging to develop complete annotations of functional genes and regulatory elements in these genomes. Chromatin accessibility assays enable discovery of functional elements; however, to uncover the full portfolio of cis-elements would require profiling of many…
15d
Correction for Rill et al., Alkyltransferase-like protein clusters scan DNA rapidly over long distances and recruit NER to alkyl-DNA lesions [Corrections]
BIOCHEMISTRY Correction for "Alkyltransferase-like protein clusters scan DNA rapidly over long distances and recruit NER to alkyl-DNA lesions," by Natascha Rill, Ann Mukhortava, Sonja Lorenz, and Ingrid Tessmer, which was first published April 9, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1916860117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 9318–9328). The authors note that Fig. 3 appeared…
15d
Correction for Chen et al., Selective translation by alternative bacterial ribosomes [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Selective translation by alternative bacterial ribosomes," by Yu-Xiang Chen, Zhi-yu Xu, Xueliang Ge, Suparna Sanyal, Zhi John Lu, and Babak Javid, which was first published July 28, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2009607117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 19487–19496). The authors note that Jia-Yao Hong should be added to the…
15d
Correction for Nishimura et al., Prevention and treatment of SHIVAD8 infection in rhesus macaques by a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Prevention and treatment of SHIVAD8 infection in rhesus macaques by a potent d-peptide HIV entry inhibitor," by Yoshiaki Nishimura, J. Nicholas Francis, Olivia K. Donau, Eric Jesteadt, Reza Sadjadpour, Amanda R. Smith, Michael S. Seaman, Brett D. Welch, Malcolm A. Martin, and Michael S. Kay, which was…
15d
Correction for Reyer et al., Channelrhodopsin-mediated optogenetics highlights a central role of depolarization-dependent plant proton pumps [Corrections]
PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for "Channelrhodopsin-mediated optogenetics highlights a central role of depolarization-dependent plant proton pumps," by Antonella Reyer, Melanie Häßler, Sönke Scherzer, Shouguang Huang, Jesper Torbøl Pedersen, Khaled A. S. Al-Rascheid, Ernst Bamberg, Michael Palmgren, Ingo Dreyer, Georg Nagel, Rainer Hedrich, and Dirk Becker, which was first published August 11,…
15d
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Analysis of cuttlebone microstructure A scanning electron micrograph of the highly porous microstructure of a cuttlebone, with chambered architecture consisting of mineralized vertical walls and horizontal septa. Cuttlefish are marine mollusks with an ultralightweight internal shell called a cuttlebone, which is mineralized and used for buoyancy. The cuttlebone is primarily…
15d
Low-carbon transition is improbable without carbon pricing [Physical Sciences]
Rosenbloom et al. (1) downplay the role of carbon pricing in climate policy. We counter their criticisms. The authors claim that framing climate change as a market failure fails to appreciate it is a "system problem." This overlooks that market failures, such as negative/positive externalities and public goods/bads, represent a…
15d
Reply to van den Bergh and Botzen: A clash of paradigms over the role of carbon pricing [Physical Sciences]
We welcome van den Bergh and Botzen's (1) comment on our paper (2) as it reflects foundational differences between mainstream economics and sociotechnical transitions perspectives on the role of carbon pricing (CP) in climate policy. Emerging from in-depth empirical studies of transitions in societal systems such as energy (3), the…
15d
Breathing, voice, and synchronized movement [Social Sciences]
When humans vocalize along with rhythmic arm movements, the recorded voice shows the same rhythmic pattern as these movements (1). When others listen to this voice, their rhythmic movements synchronize with those of the unseen vocalizer (1). Pouw et al.'s (1) outstanding multimodal research connects voice and gesture, and—we suggest—even…
15d
Reply to Ravignani and Kotz: Physical impulses from upper-limb movements impact the respiratory-vocal system [Social Sciences]
The commentary by Ravignani and Kotz (1) affords us an opportunity to clarify the interpretation of our recent findings (2). We showed that "although listeners could only hear and not see the vocalizer, they were able to completely synchronize their own rhythmic wrist or arm movement with the movement of…
15d
Robert May, 1936-2020: A man for all disciplines [Retrospectives]
Robert (Bob) May, Baron May of Oxford, a long-time International Member of the National Academy of Sciences, passed away on April 28, 2020, in Oxford, United Kingdom, from "frailties of old age, Alzheimer's disease, and pneumonia," at the age of 84. He is survived by his wife Judith, his daughter…
15d
Paranthropus through the looking glass [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Most research and public interest in human origins focuses on taxa that are likely to be our ancestors. There must have been genetic continuity between modern humans and the common ancestor we share with chimpanzees and bonobos, and we want to know what each link in this chain looked like…
15d
Insights into the future of soil erosion [Sustainability Science]
Integrating a long-established soil erosion model with Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) scenarios, Borrelli et al. (1) set out to meet the needs of policymakers and earth-system modelers to better understand the future of soil erosion this century. Policymakers need this insight because of the constraints erosion places on…
15d
Rethinking climate context dependencies in biological terms [Ecology]
To detect biodiversity changes, biologists can rely on time series of historical observations and resurveys (1–3). As global climate is warming, there is a staggering number of studies detecting population losses (i.e., local extinction or extirpation events), species range shifts (e.g., leading-edge expansion), and community reshuffling (e.g., biotic homogenization) (4–6)….
15d
The pervasive threat of lead (Pb) in drinking water: Unmasking and pursuing scientific factors that govern lead release [Chemistry]
The Flint water crisis raised questions about the factors resulting in unacceptable soluble lead concentrations in the city's drinking water. Although water treatment strategies, failure to follow regulations, and unethical behavior were all factors, knowledge deficits at the intersection of several scientific fields also contributed to the crisis. Pursuit of…
15d
Critical period regulation across multiple timescales [Biological Sciences]
Brain plasticity is dynamically regulated across the life span, peaking during windows of early life. Typically assessed in the physiological range of milliseconds (real time), these trajectories are also influenced on the longer timescales of developmental time (nurture) and evolutionary time (nature), which shape neural architectures that support plasticity. Properly…
15d
The role of the genome in experience-dependent plasticity: Extending the analogy of the genomic action potential [Biological Sciences]
Our past experiences shape our current and future behavior. These experiences must leave some enduring imprint on our brains, altering neural circuits that mediate behavior and contributing to our individual differences. As a framework for understanding how experiences might produce lasting changes in neural circuits, Clayton [D. F. Clayton, Neurobiol….
15d
Biological embedding of experience: A primer on epigenetics [Biological Sciences]
Biological embedding occurs when life experience alters biological processes to affect later life health and well-being. Although extensive correlative data exist supporting the notion that epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation underlie biological embedding, causal data are lacking. We describe specific epigenetic mechanisms and their potential roles in the biological…
15d
Behavior-related gene regulatory networks: A new level of organization in the brain [Biological Sciences]
Neuronal networks are the standard heuristic model today for describing brain activity associated with animal behavior. Recent studies have revealed an extensive role for a completely distinct layer of networked activities in the brain—the gene regulatory network (GRN)—that orchestrates expression levels of hundreds to thousands of genes in a behavior-related…
15d
Molecular regulation of ZmMs7 required for maize male fertility and development of a dominant male-sterility system in multiple species [Agricultural Sciences]
Understanding the molecular basis of male sterility and developing practical male-sterility systems are essential for heterosis utilization and commercial hybrid seed production in crops. Here, we report molecular regulation by genic male-sterility gene maize male sterility 7 (ZmMs7) and its application for developing a dominant male-sterility system in multiple species….
15d
Social history and exposure to pathogen signals modulate social status effects on gene regulation in rhesus macaques [Biological Sciences]
Social experience is an important predictor of disease susceptibility and survival in humans and other social mammals. Chronic social stress is thought to generate a proinflammatory state characterized by elevated antibacterial defenses and reduced investment in antiviral defense. Here we manipulated long-term social status in female rhesus macaques to show…
15d
Stacking models for nearly optimal link prediction in complex networks [Applied Biological Sciences]
Most real-world networks are incompletely observed. Algorithms that can accurately predict which links are missing can dramatically speed up network data collection and improve network model validation. Many algorithms now exist for predicting missing links, given a partially observed network, but it has remained unknown whether a single best predictor…
15d
Liquid harvesting and transport on multiscaled curvatures [Applied Biological Sciences]
Various creatures, such as spider silk and cacti, have harnessed their surface structures to collect fog for survival. These surfaces typically stay dry and have a large contact hysteresis enabling them to move a condensed water droplet, resulting in an intermittent transport state and a relatively reduced speed. In contrast…
15d
Ultra-sharp pinnacles sculpted by natural convective dissolution [Applied Physical Sciences]
The evolution of landscapes, landforms, and other natural structures involves highly interactive physical and chemical processes that often lead to intriguing shapes and recurring motifs. Particularly intricate and fine-scale features characterize the so-called karst morphologies formed by mineral dissolution into water. An archetypal form is the tall, slender, and sharply…
15d
The limitations of extending nature's color palette in correlated, disordered systems [Applied Physical Sciences]
Living organisms have developed a wide range of appearances from iridescent to matte textures. Interestingly, angular-independent structural colors, where isotropy in the scattering structure is present, only produce coloration in the blue wavelength region of the visible spectrum. One might, therefore, wonder if such observation is a limitation of the…
15d
Thermoelectric response from grain boundaries and lattice distortions in crystalline gold devices [Applied Physical Sciences]
The electronic Seebeck response in a conductor involves the energy-dependent mean free path of the charge carriers and is affected by crystal structure, scattering from boundaries and defects, and strain. Previous photothermoelectric (PTE) studies have suggested that the thermoelectric properties of polycrystalline metal nanowires are related to grain structure, although…
15d
Properties of protein unfolded states suggest broad selection for expanded conformational ensembles [Biochemistry]
Much attention is being paid to conformational biases in the ensembles of intrinsically disordered proteins. However, it is currently unknown whether or how conformational biases within the disordered ensembles of foldable proteins affect function in vivo. Recently, we demonstrated that water can be a good solvent for unfolded polypeptide chains,…
15d
Dynamic structural order of a low-complexity domain facilitates assembly of intermediate filaments [Biochemistry]
The coiled-coil domains of intermediate filament (IF) proteins are flanked by regions of low sequence complexity. Whereas IF coiled-coil domains assume dimeric and tetrameric conformations on their own, maturation of eight tetramers into cylindrical IFs is dependent on either "head" or "tail" domains of low sequence complexity. Here we confirm…
15d
Structure of the dimeric ATP synthase from bovine mitochondria [Biochemistry]
The structure of the dimeric ATP synthase from bovine mitochondria determined in three rotational states by electron cryo-microscopy provides evidence that the proton uptake from the mitochondrial matrix via the proton inlet half channel proceeds via a Grotthus mechanism, and a similar mechanism may operate in the exit half channel….
15d
Clathrin light chain diversity regulates membrane deformation in vitro and synaptic vesicle formation in vivo [Biochemistry]
Clathrin light chain (CLC) subunits in vertebrates are encoded by paralogous genes CLTA and CLTB, and both gene products are alternatively spliced in neurons. To understand how this CLC diversity influences neuronal clathrin function, we characterized the biophysical properties of clathrin comprising individual CLC variants for correlation with neuronal phenotypes…
15d
Records of RNA locations in living yeast revealed through covalent marks [Biochemistry]
RNA movements and localization pervade biology, from embryonic development to disease. To identify RNAs at specific locations, we developed a strategy in which a uridine-adding enzyme is anchored to subcellular sites, where it directly marks RNAs with 3′ terminal uridines. This localized RNA recording approach yields a record of RNA…
15d
The roles of SDHAF2 and dicarboxylate in covalent flavinylation of SDHA, the human complex II flavoprotein [Biochemistry]
Mitochondrial complex II, also known as succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), is an integral-membrane heterotetramer (SDHABCD) that links two essential energy-producing processes, the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. A significant amount of information is available on the structure and function of mature complex II from a range of organisms. However,…
15d
A kinetic rationale for functional redundancy in fatty acid biosynthesis [Biochemistry]
Cells build fatty acids with biocatalytic assembly lines in which a subset of enzymes often exhibit overlapping activities (e.g., two enzymes catalyze one or more identical reactions). Although the discrete enzymes that make up fatty acid pathways are well characterized, the importance of catalytic overlap between them is poorly understood….
15d
CydDC functions as a cytoplasmic cystine reductase to sensitize Escherichia coli to oxidative stress and aminoglycosides [Biochemistry]
l-cysteine is the source of all bacterial sulfurous biomolecules. However, the cytoplasmic level of l-cysteine must be tightly regulated due to its propensity to reduce iron and drive damaging Fenton chemistry. It has been proposed that in Escherichia coli the component of cytochrome bd-I terminal oxidase, the CydDC complex, shuttles…
15d
Structure of the human clamp loader reveals an autoinhibited conformation of a substrate-bound AAA+ switch [Biochemistry]
DNA replication requires the sliding clamp, a ring-shaped protein complex that encircles DNA, where it acts as an essential cofactor for DNA polymerases and other proteins. The sliding clamp needs to be opened and installed onto DNA by a clamp loader ATPase of the AAA+ family. The human clamp loader…
15d
Hemolymph protease-5 links the melanization and Toll immune pathways in the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta [Biochemistry]
Proteolytic activation of phenoloxidase (PO) and the cytokine Spätzle during immune responses of insects is mediated by a network of hemolymph serine proteases (HPs) and noncatalytic serine protease homologs (SPHs) and inhibited by serpins. However, integration and conservation of the system and its control mechanisms are not fully understood. Here…
15d
TRIM28 functions as the SUMO E3 ligase for PCNA in prevention of transcription induced DNA breaks [Biochemistry]
In human cells, the DNA replication factor proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) can be conjugated to either the small ubiquitinlike modifier SUMO1 or SUMO2, but only SUMO2-conjugated PCNA is induced by transcription to facilitate resolution of transcription–replication conflict (TRC). To date, the SUMO E3 ligase that provides substrate specificity for…
15d
HDAC3 deacetylates the DNA mismatch repair factor MutS{beta} to stimulate triplet repeat expansions [Biochemistry]
Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansions cause nearly 20 severe human neurological diseases which are currently untreatable. For some of these diseases, ongoing somatic expansions accelerate disease progression and may influence age of onset. This new knowledge emphasizes the importance of understanding the protein factors that drive expansions. Recent genetic evidence indicates…
15d
Scaling relationships for the elastic moduli and viscosity of mixed lipid membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The elastic and viscous properties of biological membranes play a vital role in controlling cell functions that require local reorganization of the membrane components as well as dramatic shape changes such as endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and cell division. These properties are widely acknowledged to depend on the unique composition of…
15d
Hidden dynamic signatures drive substrate selectivity in the disordered phosphoproteome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Phosphorylation sites are hyperabundant in the eukaryotic disordered proteome, suggesting that conformational fluctuations play a major role in determining to what extent a kinase interacts with a particular substrate. In biophysical terms, substrate selectivity may be determined not just by the structural–chemical complementarity between the kinase and its protein substrates…
15d
Decanoic acid inhibits mTORC1 activity independent of glucose and insulin signaling [Cell Biology]
Low-glucose and -insulin conditions, associated with ketogenic diets, can reduce the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway, potentially leading to a range of positive medical and health-related effects. Here, we determined whether mTORC1 signaling is also a target for decanoic acid, a key component…
15d
Direct functionalization of C-H bonds by electrophilic anions [Chemistry]
Alkanes and [B12X12]2− (X = Cl, Br) are both stable compounds which are difficult to functionalize. Here we demonstrate the formation of a boron−carbon bond between these substances in a two-step process. Fragmentation of [B12X12]2− in the gas phase generates highly reactive [B12X11]− ions which spontaneously react with alkanes. The…
15d
Ultranarrow plasmon resonances from annealed nanoparticle lattices [Chemistry]
This paper reports how the spectral linewidths of plasmon resonances can be narrowed down to a few nanometers by optimizing the morphology, surface roughness, and crystallinity of metal nanoparticles (NPs) in two-dimensional (2D) lattices. We developed thermal annealing procedures to achieve ultranarrow surface lattice resonances (SLRs) with full-width at half-maxima…
15d
Spatially dependent H-bond dynamics at interfaces of water/biomimetic self-assembled lattice materials [Chemistry]
Understanding hydrogen-bond interactions in self-assembled lattice materials is crucial for preparing such materials, but the role of hydrogen bonds (H bonds) remains unclear. To gain insight into H-bond interactions at the materials' intrinsic spatial scale, we investigated ultrafast H-bond dynamics between water and biomimetic self-assembled lattice materials (composed of sodium…
15d
CHD7 and Runx1 interaction provides a braking mechanism for hematopoietic differentiation [Developmental Biology]
Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) formation and lineage differentiation involve gene expression programs orchestrated by transcription factors and epigenetic regulators. Genetic disruption of the chromatin remodeler chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) expanded phenotypic HSPCs, erythroid, and myeloid lineages in zebrafish and mouse embryos. CHD7 acts to suppress hematopo
15d
Polar amplification of Pliocene climate by elevated trace gas radiative forcing [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Warm periods in Earth's history offer opportunities to understand the dynamics of the Earth system under conditions that are similar to those expected in the near future. The Middle Pliocene warm period (MPWP), from 3.3 to 3.0 My B.P, is the most recent time when atmospheric CO2 levels were as…
15d
Timing and structure of the Younger Dryas event and its underlying climate dynamics [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Younger Dryas (YD), arguably the most widely studied millennial-scale extreme climate event, was characterized by diverse hydroclimate shifts globally and severe cooling at high northern latitudes that abruptly punctuated the warming trend from the last glacial to the present interglacial. To date, a precise understanding of its trigger, propagation,…
15d
The Cl isotope composition and halogen contents of Apollo-return samples [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Lunar mare basalts are depleted in F and Cl by approximately an order of magnitude relative to mid-ocean ridge basalts and contain two Cl-bearing components with elevated isotopic compositions relative to the bulk-Earth value of ∼0‰. The first is a water-soluble chloride constituting 65 ± 10% of total Cl with…
15d
Chondrules reveal large-scale outward transport of inner Solar System materials in the protoplanetary disk [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Dynamic models of the protoplanetary disk indicate there should be large-scale material transport in and out of the inner Solar System, but direct evidence for such transport is scarce. Here we show that the ε50Ti-ε54Cr-Δ17O systematics of large individual chondrules, which typically formed 2 to 3 My after the formation…
15d
Strong spatial embedding of social networks generates nonstandard epidemic dynamics independent of degree distribution and clustering [Ecology]
Some directly transmitted human pathogens, such as influenza and measles, generate sustained exponential growth in incidence and have a high peak incidence consistent with the rapid depletion of susceptible individuals. Many do not. While a prolonged exponential phase typically arises in traditional disease-dynamic models, current quantitative descriptions of nonstandard epidemic…
15d
Most invasive species largely conserve their climatic niche [Ecology]
The ecological niche is a key concept for elucidating patterns of species distributions and developing strategies for conserving biodiversity. However, recent times are seeing a widespread debate whether species niches are conserved across space and time (niche conservatism hypothesis). Biological invasions represent a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis in…
15d
Direct characterization of solute transport in unsaturated porous media using fast X-ray synchrotron microtomography [Engineering]
Solute transport in unsaturated porous materials is a complex process, which exhibits some distinct features differentiating it from transport under saturated conditions. These features emerge mostly due to the different transport time scales at different regions of the flow network, which can be classified into flowing and stagnant regions, predominantly…
15d
Mechanical design of the highly porous cuttlebone: A bioceramic hard buoyancy tank for cuttlefish [Engineering]
Cuttlefish, a unique group of marine mollusks, produces an internal biomineralized shell, known as cuttlebone, which is an ultra-lightweight cellular structure (porosity, ∼93 vol%) used as the animal's hard buoyancy tank. Although cuttlebone is primarily composed of a brittle mineral, aragonite, the structure is highly damage tolerant and can withstand…
15d
A SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidate would likely match all currently circulating variants [Evolution]
The magnitude of the COVID-19 pandemic underscores the urgency for a safe and effective vaccine. Many vaccine candidates focus on the Spike protein, as it is targeted by neutralizing antibodies and plays a key role in viral entry. Here we investigate the diversity seen in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus…
15d
Genes and environments, development and time [Biological Sciences]
A now substantial body of science implicates a dynamic interplay between genetic and environmental variation in the development of individual differences in behavior and health. Such outcomes are affected by molecular, often epigenetic, processes involving gene–environment (G–E) interplay that can influence gene expression. Early environments with exposures to poverty, chronic…
15d
p53 drives a transcriptional program that elicits a non-cell-autonomous response and alters cell state in vivo [Genetics]
Cell stress and DNA damage activate the tumor suppressor p53, triggering transcriptional activation of a myriad of target genes. The molecular, morphological, and physiological consequences of this activation remain poorly understood in vivo. We activated a p53 transcriptional program in mice by deletion of Mdm2, a gene that encodes the…
15d
CSF1R inhibition by a small-molecule inhibitor is not microglia specific; affecting hematopoiesis and the function of macrophages [Immunology and Inflammation]
Colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R) inhibition has been proposed as a method for microglia depletion, with the assumption that it does not affect peripheral immune cells. Here, we show that CSF1R inhibition by PLX5622 indeed affects the myeloid and lymphoid compartments, causes long-term changes in bone marrow-derived macrophages by suppressing…
15d
Circulation of gut-preactivated naive CD8+ T cells enhances antitumor immunity in B cell-defective mice [Immunology and Inflammation]
The gut microbiome has garnered attention as an effective target to boost immunity and improve cancer immunotherapy. We found that B cell-defective (BCD) mice, such as µ-membrane targeted deletion (µMT) and activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) knockouts (KOs), have elevated antitumor immunity under specific pathogen-free but not germ-free conditions. Microbial dysbiosis…
15d
A bilateral tumor model identifies transcriptional programs associated with patient response to immune checkpoint blockade [Immunology and Inflammation]
Immune checkpoint blockade (ICB) is efficacious in many diverse cancer types, but not all patients respond. It is important to understand the mechanisms driving resistance to these treatments and to identify predictive biomarkers of response to provide best treatment options for all patients. Here we introduce a resection and response-assessment…
15d
LncRNA Malat1 inhibition of TDP43 cleavage suppresses IRF3-initiated antiviral innate immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in the regulation of antiviral innate immune responses need to be further identified. By functionally screening the lncRNAs in macrophages, here we identified lncRNA Malat1, abundant in the nucleus but significantly down-regulated after viral infection, as a negative regulator of antiviral type I IFN (IFN-I)…
15d
Ubiquitination of TLR3 by TRIM3 signals its ESCRT-mediated trafficking to the endolysosomes for innate antiviral response [Immunology and Inflammation]
Trafficking of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to endolysosomes and its subsequent proteolytic cleavage are required for it to sense viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and trigger antiviral response, yet the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. We show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM3 is mainly located in…
15d
Synaptic secretion from human natural killer cells is diverse and includes supramolecular attack particles [Immunology and Inflammation]
Natural killer (NK) cells form immune synapses to ascertain the state of health of cells they encounter. If a target cell triggers NK cell cytotoxicity, lytic granules containing proteins including perforin and granzyme B, are secreted into the synaptic cleft inducing target cell death. Secretion of these proteins also occurs…
15d
Radiation induces dynamic changes to the T cell repertoire in renal cell carcinoma patients [Immunology and Inflammation]
Clinical studies combining radiation and immunotherapy have shown promising response rates, strengthening efforts to sensitize tumors to immune-mediated attack. Thus, there is an ongoing surge in trials using preconditioning regimens with immunotherapy. Yet, due to the scarcity of resected tumors treated in situ with radiotherapy, there has been little investigation…
15d
Plasmacytoid dendritic cells cross-prime naive CD8 T cells by transferring antigen to conventional dendritic cells through exosomes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Although plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) have been shown to play a critical role in generating viral immunity and promoting tolerance to suppress antitumor immunity, whether and how pDCs cross-prime CD8 T cells in vivo remain controversial. Using a pDC-targeted vaccine model to deliver antigens specifically to pDCs, we have demonstrated…
15d
Ataxin-1 regulates B cell function and the severity of autoimmune experimental encephalomyelitis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Ataxin-1 (ATXN1) is a ubiquitous polyglutamine protein expressed primarily in the nucleus where it binds chromatin and functions as a transcriptional repressor. Mutant forms of ataxin-1 containing expanded glutamine stretches cause the movement disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism in the cerebellum. Conversely, ATXN1 loss-of-function…
15d
Perinatal androgens organize sex differences in mast cells and attenuate anaphylaxis severity into adulthood [Immunology and Inflammation]
Mast cell (MC)-associated diseases, including allergy/anaphylaxis and neuroinflammatory pain disorders, exhibit a sex bias, with females at increase risk. While much attention has been directed toward adult sex hormones as drivers of sex differences, that female sex bias in MC-associated diseases is evident in prepubertal children, suggesting early-life origins of…
15d
The mysterious story of square ice, piles of cubes, and bijections [Mathematics]
When combinatorialists discover two different types of objects that are counted by the same numbers, they usually want to prove this by constructing an explicit bijective correspondence. Such proofs frequently reveal many more details about the relation between the two types of objects than just equinumerosity. A famous set of…
15d
The PedBE clock accurately estimates DNA methylation age in pediatric buccal cells [Biological Sciences]
The development of biological markers of aging has primarily focused on adult samples. Epigenetic clocks are a promising tool for measuring biological age that show impressive accuracy across most tissues and age ranges. In adults, deviations from the DNA methylation (DNAm) age prediction are correlated with several age-related phenotypes, such…
15d
Molecular insights into the genome dynamics and interactions between core and acquired genomes of Vibrio cholerae [Microbiology]
Bacterial species are hosts to horizontally acquired mobile genetic elements (MGEs), which encode virulence, toxin, antimicrobial resistance, and other metabolic functions. The bipartite genome of Vibrio cholerae harbors sporadic and conserved MGEs that contribute in the disease development and survival of the pathogens. For a comprehensive understanding of dynamics of…
15d
Secondary structure of the mRNA encoding listeriolysin O is essential to establish the replicative niche of L. monocytogenes [Microbiology]
Intracellular pathogens are responsible for an enormous amount of worldwide morbidity and mortality, and each has evolved specialized strategies to establish and maintain their replicative niche. Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that secretes a pore-forming cytolysin called listeriolysin O (LLO), which disrupts the phagosomal membrane and, thereby, allows…
15d
Glucocorticoid exposure during hippocampal neurogenesis primes future stress response by inducing changes in DNA methylation [Biological Sciences]
Prenatal stress exposure is associated with risk for psychiatric disorders later in life. This may be mediated in part via enhanced exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs), which are known to impact neurogenesis. We aimed to identify molecular mediators of these effects, focusing on long-lasting epigenetic changes. In a human hippocampal progenitor…
15d
Drosophila melanogaster foraging regulates a nociceptive-like escape behavior through a developmentally plastic sensory circuit [Biological Sciences]
Painful or threatening experiences trigger escape responses that are guided by nociceptive neuronal circuitry. Although some components of this circuitry are known and conserved across animals, how this circuitry is regulated at the genetic and developmental levels is mostly unknown. To escape noxious stimuli, such as parasitoid wasp attacks, Drosophila…
15d
Idiosyncratic neural coding and neuromodulation of olfactory individuality in Drosophila [Biological Sciences]
Innate behavioral biases and preferences can vary significantly among individuals of the same genotype. Though individuality is a fundamental property of behavior, it is not currently understood how individual differences in brain structure and physiology produce idiosyncratic behaviors. Here we present evidence for idiosyncrasy in olfactory behavior and neural responses…
15d
Deep learning of spontaneous arousal fluctuations detects early cholinergic defects across neurodevelopmental mouse models and patients [Biological Sciences]
Neurodevelopmental spectrum disorders like autism (ASD) are diagnosed, on average, beyond age 4 y, after multiple critical periods of brain development close and behavioral intervention becomes less effective. This raises the urgent need for quantitative, noninvasive, and translational biomarkers for their early detection and tracking. We found that both idiopathic…
15d
Subregion-specific rules govern the distribution of neuronal immediate-early gene induction [Biological Sciences]
The induction of immediate-early gene (IEG) expression in brain nuclei in response to an experience is necessary for the formation of long-term memories. Additionally, the rapid dynamics of IEG induction and decay motivates the common use of IEG expression as markers for identification of neuronal assemblies ("ensembles") encoding recent experience….
15d
Acute social isolation alters neurogenomic state in songbird forebrain [Biological Sciences]
Prolonged social isolation has negative effects on brain and behavior in humans and other social organisms, but neural mechanisms leading to these effects are not understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that even brief periods of social isolation can alter gene expression and DNA methylation in higher cognitive centers of…
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The neural basis of language development: Changes in lateralization over age [Neuroscience]
We have long known that language is lateralized to the left hemisphere (LH) in most neurologically healthy adults. In contrast, findings on lateralization of function during development are more complex. As in adults, anatomical, electrophysiological, and neuroimaging studies in infants and children indicate LH lateralization for language. However, in very…
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Global potential, topology, and pattern selection in a noisy stabilized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation [Physics]
We formulate a general method to extend the decomposition of stochastic dynamics developed by Ao et al. [J. Phys. Math. Gen. 37, L25–L30 (2004)] to nonlinear partial differential equations which are nonvariational in nature and construct the global potential or Lyapunov functional for a noisy stabilized Kuramoto–Sivashinsky equation. For values…
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Evolution of the Kondo lattice electronic structure above the transport coherence temperature [Physics]
The temperature-dependent evolution of the Kondo lattice is a long-standing topic of theoretical and experimental investigation and yet it lacks a truly microscopic description of the relation of the basic f-c hybridization processes to the fundamental temperature scales of Kondo screening and Fermi-liquid lattice coherence. Here, the temperature dependence of…
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Adolescents' perceptions of family social status correlate with health and life chances: A twin difference longitudinal cohort study [Social Sciences]
Children from lower-income households are at increased risk for poor health, educational failure, and behavioral problems. This social gradient is one of the most reproduced findings in health and social science. How people view their position in social hierarchies also signals poor health. However, when adolescents' views of their social…
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Local exposure to school shootings and youth antidepressant use [Social Sciences]
While over 240,000 American students experienced a school shooting in the last two decades, little is known about the impacts of these events on the mental health of surviving youth. Using large-scale prescription data from 2006 to 2015, we examine the effects of 44 school shootings on youth antidepressant use….
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Improving data access democratizes and diversifies science [Social Sciences]
The foundation of the scientific method rests on access to data, and yet such access is often restricted or costly. We investigate how improved data access shifts the quantity, quality, and diversity of scientific research. We examine the impact of reductions in cost and sharing restrictions for satellite imagery data…
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Can Democrats Stop the Nomination?
Anyone confidently predicting one way or another whether Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell can seat a new justice on the Supreme Court is blustering. Here is the only thing that's certain: The coming fight will not be resolved by principle—no matter how senators talk or what principles they profess. It will be resolved by legislative gamesmanship, voting strength, and power politics. Four ma
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A Failure of Empathy Led to 200,000 Deaths. It Has Deep Roots.
S ometime this week , alone on a hospital bed, an American died. The coronavirus had invaded her lungs, soaking them in fluid and blocking the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide that makes up our every breath. Her immune system's struggle to fight back might have sparked an overreaction called a cytokine storm , which shreds even healthy tissue. The doctors tried everything, but they couldn't
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The Failure of Mulan Is More Bad News for Hollywood
Data gathered this weekend appeared to hold seismic news for Hollywood—specifically Disney. A report from Yahoo suggested that a shocking 9 million Disney+ users had streamed the studio's Mulan remake in its first 12 days of release, translating into a gross of $261 million. That's a staggering number for an on-demand rental and for an industry that's been struggling through pandemic-related cine
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NOAA is changing the way it talks about hurricanes
Understanding risks is a crucial part of hurricane preparation (PxHere/) A day before Hurricane Laura made landfall, the National Hurricane Center issued a warning of "unsurvivable storm surge" in parts of Texas and Louisiana. It's a phrase that quickly captured widespread attention. Many journalists, including at Wired , NPR , BBC , Mother Jones , Vox , and here at Popular Science , ran headline
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Study shows keeping gratitude journal reduces gossip, incivility in workplace
Gratitude interventions in the workplace can help employee well-being and managers can use these efforts to foster more respectful behavior in their teams.
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Most infants are well even when moms are infected by COVID-19
Infants born to women with COVID-19 showed few adverse outcomes, according to the first report in the country of infant outcomes through eight weeks of age. The study, led by researchers at UC San Francisco, suggests that babies born to mothers infected with the virus generally do well six to eight weeks after birth, however there was a higher rate of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions
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These birds communicate by fluttering their feathers—and they have different accents
Birds tweet, squawk, chirp, hoot, cluck, and screech to communicate with each other. Some birds have found another way to talk, though: they make sounds by fluttering their feathers or smacking their wings together really fast. Scientists just discovered another species that makes sounds with its feathers, a bird from the American tropics called the Fork-tailed Flycatcher. And by analyzing recordi
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'Cheater mitochondria' may profit from cellular stress coping mechanisms
Cheating mitochondria may take advantage of cellular mechanisms for coping with food scarcity in a simple worm to persist, even though this can reduce the worm's wellbeing.
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179 Arrested in Massive Global Dark Web Takedown
Operation Disruptor is an unprecedented international law enforcement effort, stemming from last year's seizure of a popular underground bazaar called Wall Street Market.
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Lower energy light can create polymer gel objects
Researchers have demonstrated a way to use low-energy, visible light to produce polymer gel objects from pure monomer solutions. The work, published in Chem , not only poses a potential solution to current challenges in producing these materials, but also sheds further light on how low energy photons can combine to produce high energy excited states. Polymer products—primarily plastics—show up in
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These birds communicate by fluttering their feathers—and they have different accents
Birds tweet, squawk, chirp, hoot, cluck, and screech to communicate with each other. Some birds have found another way to talk, though: they make sounds by fluttering their feathers or smacking their wings together really fast. Scientists just discovered another species that makes sounds with its feathers, a bird from the American tropics called the Fork-tailed Flycatcher. And by analyzing recordi
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'Cheater mitochondria' may profit from cellular stress coping mechanisms
Cheating mitochondria may take advantage of cellular mechanisms for coping with food scarcity in a simple worm to persist, even though this can reduce the worm's wellbeing.
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Arctic sea ice hits second-lowest level on record
Nature, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02705-7 Heat waves, winds and thin ice contribute to a 'new normal' in the north's climate.
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China's researchers have valuable experiences that the world needs to hear about
Nature, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02697-4 As China prepares to take on a crucial role in the governance of global biodiversity, its researchers must be at the table.
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NASA catches Tropical Storm Dolphin swimming north
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Dolphin as it continued moving north though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on a track toward east central Japan.
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Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
Interactions between individuals of the same species shape many aspects of their biology, including their social behavior. Social genetic effects occur when the phenotype of an individual, defined as a set of their observable characteristics, is affected by the genetic features of others from the same species. These effects are common and imply consequences for the evolutionary history or health s
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Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
Interactions between individuals of the same species shape many aspects of their biology, including their social behavior. Social genetic effects occur when the phenotype of an individual, defined as a set of their observable characteristics, is affected by the genetic features of others from the same species. These effects are common and imply consequences for the evolutionary history or health s
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Scientists identify new species of crystal-encrusted truffle, thanks to bonobos
Mushroom-munching bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have introduced scientists to a new species of truffle.
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Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming.
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Scientists identify new species of crystal-encrusted truffle, thanks to bonobos
Mushroom-munching bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have introduced scientists to a new species of truffle.
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Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming.
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NASA sees rebirth of Tropical Storm Paulette
Tropical Storm Paulette just reformed in the central North Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 22. Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Paulette's rainfall rates.
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Mining molecular data with cryo-EM unveils hidden biological secrets
The field of structural biology has made enormous strides, peering into the activities of nature at the tiniest scale. Such investigations are critical for charting the behavior of important macromolecules and understanding their essential role in living organisms.
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NASA analyzes Tropical Storm Lowell's very cold cloud tops
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Lowell using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm. Infrared imagery revealed that the strongest storms were around Lowell's center and in its southern quadrant because of northerly wind shear.
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Revisions to drinking water standard tighten lead leaching allowance for plumbing products
Newly published changes to NSF/ANSI/CAN 61, the drinking water product standard required in the United States and Canada, further restrict the amount of lead that can leach from plumbing products, NSF International announced today.
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NASA sees Hurricane Teddy threaten Eastern Canada
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy as it nears eastern Canada. Teddy has triggered multiple warnings and watches.
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NASA imagery reveals strongest areas of Tropical Storm Beta
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Beta in infrared imagery to determine where the strongest parts of the storm were located. Beta is expected to stall inland over Texas today, Sept. 21, and heavy rains will continue over portions of the middle and upper Texas coast.
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New theory predicts movement of different animals using sensing to search
All animals great and small live every day in an uncertain world. Whether you are a human being or an insect, you rely on your senses to help you navigate and survive in your world. But what drives this essential sensing?
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Mining molecular data with cryo-EM unveils hidden biological secrets
The field of structural biology has made enormous strides, peering into the activities of nature at the tiniest scale. Such investigations are critical for charting the behavior of important macromolecules and understanding their essential role in living organisms.
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New theory predicts movement of different animals using sensing to search
All animals great and small live every day in an uncertain world. Whether you are a human being or an insect, you rely on your senses to help you navigate and survive in your world. But what drives this essential sensing?
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Boots stops taking flu jab bookings for under-65s as stocks run low
Company has had 'more people than ever' seeking vaccination after government campaign Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boots has stopped taking bookings from under-65s who want the flu jab after stocks ran low following a record number of requests. The company said more people than ever had been booking early to get their flu vaccinations, after a government campaign
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Understanding the role of underground connections in hydrology
Topographically sketched catchment areas are a spatial unit based on the shapes of the earth's surface. They show how human activities and climate change influence the available quantities of water. Knowledge of these units is fundamental to sustainable water management. However, due to underground connections, some catchment areas accumulate water from areas beyond their topographic boundaries, w
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A multisensory graphene-based skin can sense in extreme environments where other sensors cannot be used
Harsh environments that are inhospitable to existing technologies could now be monitored using sensors based on graphene. An intriguing form of carbon, graphene comprises layers of interconnected hexagonal rings of carbon atoms, a structure that yields unique electronic and physical properties with possibilities for many applications.
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Compounding impact of severe weather events fuels marine heatwave in the coastal ocean
Several coastal communities are picking up the pieces after being ravaged by hurricanes in the past month. Hurricane Laura, a category 4, and Hurricane Sally, a category 2, seemed to meander their way across the Gulf of Mexico constantly shifting forecasts and keeping meteorologists on their toes. In the hours before these storms struck land, they seemed to explode in intensity.
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How Justice Ginsburg's Death Could Affect Future Climate Rulings
Legal experts say a sixth conservative Supreme Court judge could imperil current and future emissions regulations — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NASA catches Tropical Storm Dolphin swimming north
NASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Tropical Storm Dolphin as it continued moving north though the Northwestern Pacific Ocean on a track toward east central Japan.
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MTU engineers build three new open-source tools for COVID-19
A 3D printer that can take the heat, breathing tech to keep firefighters safe and a ventilator design printed for less than $170. Large groups of makers, engineers, and medical professionals collaborate to make open-source solutions that can be reproduced and assembled locally worldwide.
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Genetics or social environment: Who wins in the influence of behaviors?
The study published in eLife analyzed behaviors associated with oxytocin, one of the known "happy hormones", and showed that these can be reverted in the individual, with or without oxytocin, depending on the social group it interacts with.
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Compounding impact of severe weather events fuels marine heatwave in the coastal ocean
Researchers at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab with support from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory can offer insight into why these storms intensified quickly as they moved across the continental shelf.
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Scientists call for clarity on AstraZeneca's Covid vaccine trial
Experts fear damage to public trust as tests remain on hold in US but restart elsewhere
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Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with challenges. Cellulose and woody lignocellulose are especially hard for bacteria to digest but pretreatment can make it easier. Researchers are testing plasma formation in biomass and finding a promising method: A plasma-liquid interaction forms re
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ADHD study reveals unique genetic differences in African American patients
Researchers have shown there may be key genetic differences in the causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between African Americans and people of European ancestry, which may play an important part in how patients of different ethnic backgrounds respond to treatments for this condition.
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Entomologists discover a rare species of tropical Heteroptera with long antennae
An international team of scientists, including researchers from St Petersburg University, has discovered a new genus and species of bug from the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. It was named Tatupa grafei and classified as belonging to plant bugs (Miridae).
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'Front of package' food labels boost nutrition
There's an association between putting nutrition data on "front of package" food product labels and improved nutritional content in those foods, according to a new study. Researchers analyzed 16 years of data on tens of thousands of products and their competitors, evaluating nutritional data on 44 categories of food products from 1996 through 2011. Altogether, they looked at data on 21,096 produc
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Entomologists discover a rare species of tropical Heteroptera with long antennae
An international team of scientists, including researchers from St Petersburg University, has discovered a new genus and species of bug from the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. It was named Tatupa grafei and classified as belonging to plant bugs (Miridae).
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Deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes based on a doublet-emission cerium(III) complex
In this work, the authors have demonstrated a high external quantum efficiency (EQE) in deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on a new cerium(III) complex Ce-1 as the emitter, which can achieve 100% exciton utilization efficiency (EUE). Coupled with its short excited-state lifetime, adjustable emission spectrum, and low cost, cerium(III) complex has the potential to develop deep-bl
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Spacecraft DAPPER will study 'Dark Ages' of the universe in radio waves
The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) has joined a new NASA space mission to the far side of the Moon to investigate when the first stars began to form in the early universe.
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Starspots: Revving up the variability of solar-like stars
In cosmic comparison, the Sun is a bore. While the brightness of some other stars with similar characteristics fluctuates strongly, the Sun's variations are much more moderate. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany, from the Turkish-German University and Boğaziçi University in Turkey, and from Kyung Hee University in South Korea, have now investigated
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JPL meets unique challenge, delivers radar hardware for Jupiter mission
Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory met a significant milestone recently by delivering key elements of an ice-penetrating radar instrument for an ESA (European Space Agency) mission to explore Jupiter and its three large icy moons.
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Ultra-wide computer monitors to enhance your setup
See more while you work. (Caspar Camille Rubin via Unsplash/) If you're still using the standard-issue monitor that came with your PC you are missing out. Ultra-wide high-definition monitors can totally change your experience—transforming the sad apartment office to a digital command center out of some William Gibson cyberpunk thriller. Like just about everything else in the tech world, specs mat
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Henry Ford study demonstrates UV-C light is effective for killing COVID-19 on N95s
Dermatology researchers at Henry Ford Health System, in collaboration with a team at the University of Michigan, have demonstrated that certain N95 respirators tainted with COVID-19 can be effectively and safely decontaminated for reuse using ultraviolet-C light (UV-C), a method commonly utilized for treating rare skin diseases.
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COVID-19 mortality rates higher among men than women
A new review article from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shows people who are biologically male are dying from COVID-19 at a higher rate than people who are biologically female.
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When painting reveals increases in social trust
Scientists from the CNRS, ENS-PSL, Inserm, and Sciences Po revealed an increase in facial displays of trustworthiness in European painting between the fourteenth and twenty-first centuries. The findings, published in Nature Communications on 22 September 2020, were obtained by applying face-processing software to two groups of portraits, suggesting an increase in trustworthiness in society that cl
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Exercise hormone may modulate genes associated with replication of novel coronavirus
Brazilian researchers observed that in uninfected adipocytes, the hormone irisin altered the expression of genes that regulate ACE-2, which encodes a protein to which the virus binds in order to invade human cells.
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Test, isolate, communicate: Keys to controlling a COVID-19 outbreak in a long-term care facility
A new study led by Carl Shrader, a physician and researcher in the Department of Family Medicine in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, revealed the role that communication played in quashing a COVID-19 outbreak at Sundale, a long-term care facility.
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These birds communicate by fluttering their feathers — and they have different accents
Fork-tailed Flycatchers, scientists just discovered, communicate with the sounds made when they flutter their feathers. And by analyzing recordings of the birds in flight, the researchers found that subspecies with different migration patterns have different "dialects" to their feather sounds, possibly helping contribute to them splitting into separate species.
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TB vaccines for babies don't protect against COVID
BCG vaccination during infancy does not protect against coronavirus infection, according to new research. While scientists race to develop and test a vaccine effective against SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, recent studies have indicated that countries with widespread BCG vaccination appear to be weathering the pandemic better than their counterparts. This has led many researchers to
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Younger women 'bearing brunt' of second wave of Covid in UK
Exclusive: Figures show big rise in number of women aged 20 to 40 admitted to hospital Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Younger women are "bearing the brunt" of the UK's second wave of coronavirus infections, according to a fresh analysis of hospital admissions prepared by government science advisers. Hospital records reveal a substantial rise in the number of women a
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'New' lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products.
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Mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow
Researchers discover a mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow.
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Physicists develop printable organic transistors
Scientists have come a step closer to the vision of a broad application of flexible, printable electronics. The team has succeeded in developing powerful vertical organic transistors with two independent control electrodes.
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Forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought
A warming climate and more frequent wildfires do not necessarily mean the western United States will see the forest loss that many scientists expect. Dry forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought if managed appropriately, according to researchers.
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Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods
Millions of mummified ibis and birds of prey, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley. Such a quantity of mummified birds raises the question of their origin: were they bred, like cats, or were they hunted? According to a team of scientists that carried out extensive geochemical analyses on mummies, they were wild birds.
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Living in an anoxic world: Microbes using arsenic are a link to early life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead.
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Chemists make cellular forces visible at the molecular scale
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level.
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Global analysis of how effective and topographic catchment areas differ
Topographically sketched catchment areas are a spatial unit based on the shapes of the earth's surface. They show how human activities and climate change influence the available quantities of water. Knowledge of these units is fundamental to sustainable water management. However, due to underground connections, some catchment areas accumulate water from areas beyond their topographic boundaries, w
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This Long-Tailed Bird Makes Sounds With Its Feathers in Different Accents
Separate subspecies of the fork-tailed flycatcher make different trill sounds with their wing feathers. Flycatcher_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Kevin Wells Photography/Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, September 22, 2020 – 12:00 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science) — The fork-tailed flycatcher whistles with its wings in two different accents, potentially more evidence this bird is splitt
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Covid-19 Support Groups Are a Potential Research Gold Mine
Social media groups are rife with peril, but for people coping with the virus—and those trying to treat it—they're a valuable resource.
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Would binaural beats not work if you're deaf in an ear?
The way binaural beats work is that 2 different frequencies are played through each headphone at a time which forces your brain to register a uniform sound. But I am completely deaf in an ear so I wouldn't be able to hear one of the other frequencies. Would binaural beats not work then? Would it not work on a speaker? submitted by /u/HabitOfThoughts [link] [comments]
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"Are the Gödel incompleteness theorems limitative results for the neurosciences?"
This article is about https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791808/ what you all need to know is Gödel's Incompleteness Theorems ends in meaninglessness Magister colin leslie dean shows Godels 1st and 2nd theorems shown to end in meaninglessness http://gamahucherpress.yellowgum.com/wp-content/uploads/GODEL5.pdf Godels 1st theorem "Any effectively generated theory capable of expressing el
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The Brain's Autopilot Mechanism Steers Consciousness
submitted by /u/Truetree9999 [link] [comments]
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Concordia researchers delve into the Montreal Casino's "Vegas Nights" experience
Three researchers from Concordia University's Centre for Sensory Studies recently completed a study that looks at how all the specific techniques the local casino uses to create a "sensuous" gambling experience affect the client. The authors argue that their ethnographic study is among the first to explore how these sensory design techniques work together to shape the atmosphere of the casino.
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Mayo study identifies barriers to physician adoption of federal Right to Try law
A new study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute is the first to examine the opinions and experiences of clinical oncologists working at a major medical center on the Federal Right to Try (RTT) law.
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How night vision is maintained during retinal degenerative disease
New insight on how people with retinal degenerative disease can maintain their night vision for a relatively long period of time has been published today in the open-access eLife journal.
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Scientists identify new species of crystal-encrusted truffle, thanks to bonobos
Mushroom-munching bonobos in the Democratic Republic of the Congo have introduced scientists to a new species of truffle.
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Ecological factors driving microbial community assembly in response to warming
Researchers from the OU Institute for Environmental Genomics and Department of Microbiology and Plant Biology lead a study that aims to better understand ecological community assembly mechanisms in response to climate warming.
15d
NASA analyzes Tropical Storm Lowell's very cold cloud tops
NASA analyzed the cloud top temperatures in Tropical Storm Lowell using infrared light to determine the strength of the storm. Infrared imagery revealed that the strongest storms were around Lowell's center and in its southern quadrant because of northerly wind shear.
15d
'Cheater mitochondria' may profit from cellular stress coping mechanisms
Cheating mitochondria may take advantage of cellular mechanisms for coping with food scarcity in a simple worm to persist, even though this can reduce the worm's wellbeing.
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The Next Administration Must Get Science and Technology Policy Right
This was evident even before the pandemic descended; it's even more crucial now — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Chemists make cellular forces visible at the molecular scale
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level.
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Smart cells: Chemists develop tool with potential to treat illness at the cellular level
New research by an international team of chemists describes a new type of artificial cell that can communicate with other cells within the body–with potential applications in the field of smart pharmaceuticals.
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NASA sees Hurricane Teddy threaten Eastern Canada
NASA's Aqua satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Hurricane Teddy as it nears eastern Canada. Teddy has triggered multiple warnings and watches.
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Mining molecular data with cryo-EM unveils hidden biological secrets
In the new study, Abhishek Singharoy and his colleagues demonstrate that cryo-EM can be pushed to even greater extremes of clarity, by extracting precious information previously buried in the reams of cryo-EM data.
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NASA imagery reveals strongest areas of Tropical Storm Beta
NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Tropical Storm Beta in infrared imagery to determine where the strongest parts of the storm were located. Beta is expected to stall inland over Texas today, Sept. 21, and heavy rains will continue over portions of the middle and upper Texas coast.
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When bots do the negotiating, humans more likely to engage in deceptive techniques
Researchers found that whether humans would embrace a range of deceptive and sneaky negotiating techniques was dependent both on the humans' prior negotiating experience in negotiating as well as whether virtual agents where employed to negotiate on their behalf. The findings stand in contrast to prior studies and show that when humans use intermediaries in the form of virtual agents, they feel mo
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NIH study details self-reported experiences with post-exertional malaise in ME/CFS
One of the major symptoms of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) is post-exertional malaise (PEM), the worsening of symptoms after physical or mental activities. Using their own words and experiences, people with ME/CFS described how debilitating PEM can be in a study in Frontiers in Neurology. This is the first publication to come out of the National Institutes of Health's
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Study examines women's attitudes toward long-acting injectable therapy to prevent HIV
A new study among women at high risk for HIV explored their hesitancy to use pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) overall, as well as their interest in and willingness to use long-acting injectable (LAI) PrEP. While one-third of the women interviewed would not consider PrEP regardless of its formulation, when asked to choose, the majority (55%) would prefer LAI PrEP over oral PrEP.
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The Simple Math Problem We Still Can't Solve
This column comes with a warning: Do not try to solve this math problem. You will be tempted. This problem is simply stated, easily understood, and all too inviting. Just pick a number, any number: If the number is even, cut it in half; if it's odd, triple it and add 1. Take that new number and repeat the process, again and again. If you keep this up, you'll eventually get stuck in a loop. At lea
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New theory predicts movement of different animals using sensing to search
A research team has developed a new theory that can predict the movement of an animal's sensory organs — such as eyes, ears and nose — while searching for something vital to its life.
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NASA Unveils Flabbergasting Budget For Moon Missions
$28 Billion NASA is in the throes of yet another budget crunch in its efforts to realize the Trump administration's ambitious plans to return astronauts to the Moon by 2024. Unsurprisingly, that project will be extremely expensive. The agency just revealed a $28 billion price tag for its Artemis program, Agence France-Presse reports , covering NASA's needs for the next five years. NASA administra
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U.S. National Academy of Sciences Can Kick Out Harassers–So Why Hasn't It?
The NAS says that no one has used the complaint system put in place last year, even though several academy members are known sexual harassers — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Can Scientists Stop the Plague of the Spotted Lanternfly?
The voracious, shape-shifting insect native to Asia is attacking crops, vineyards and trees
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Engineers pre-train AI computers to make them even more powerful
Engineers at CSEM have developed a new machine-learning method that paves the way for artificial intelligence to be used in applications that until now have been deemed too sensitive. The method, which has been tested by running simulations on a climate-control system for a 100-room building, is poised to deliver energy savings of around 20%.
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NASA sees rebirth of Tropical Storm Paulette
Tropical Storm Paulette just reformed in the central North Atlantic Ocean today, Sept. 22. Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Paulette's rainfall rates.
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ADHD study reveals unique genetic differences in African American patients
Researchers have shown there may be key genetic differences in the causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) between African Americans and people of European ancestry, which may play an important part in how patients of different ethnic backgrounds respond to treatments for this condition.
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New theory predicts movement of different animals using sensing to search
A Northwestern University research team has developed a new theory that can predict the movement of an animal's sensory organs — such as eyes, ears and nose — while searching for something vital to its life.
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Underground connection
Researchers present first global analysis of how effective and topographic catchment areas differ.
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'Firefly' imaging method zooms in on 'the forces within us'
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level.
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Living in an anoxic world: Microbes using arsenic are a link to early life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead. These findings are detailed in research published today in Communications Earth and Environment.
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Why some cancers may respond poorly to key drugs discovered
Scientists have identified a driver of drug resistance in breast, ovarian and prostate cancers that may help doctors predict which patients will become resistant to a class of drugs frequently used to treat BRCA 1/2-deficient tumors.
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Bundled payment model reduces health disparities for Black patients
A new nationwide model of care for hip and knee joint replacements appears to reduce disparities in health outcomes for Black patients, according to new research led by Oregon Health & Science University.
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When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Using data from all 50 US states plus the District of Columbia, two mathematicians have developed a new method to analyse COVD-19 rates to help policymakers identify demonstrable turning points in infection surges.
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Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with challenges. Cellulose and woody lignocellulose are especially hard for bacteria to digest but pretreatment can make it easier. Researchers are testing plasma formation in biomass and finding a promising method: A plasma-liquid interaction forms re
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COVID-19: Second wave for some; others remain in first wave
As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, some locations have experienced decreasing numbers of cases followed by an increase. In the journal Chaos, mathematicians report a method to analyze these numbers for evidence of a first or second wave. The authors studied data from all 50 U.S. states plus D.C. for the seven-month period from Jan. 21 to July 31. They found 31 states and D.C. were experiencing a
15d
Negative pressure wound therapy does not cut infection risk in obese women after cesarean
Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) does not appear to lower the risk of infection for obese women after cesarean delivery, suggests a study funded by the National Institutes of Health. The treatment involves placing a low-pressure pump over a closed surgical wound to create negative air pressure.
15d
Evaporation critical to coronavirus transmission as weather changes
As COVID-19 cases continue to rise, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures. In Physics of Fluids, researchers studied the effects of relative humidity, environmental temperature, and wind speed on the respiratory cloud and virus v
15d
The US Military Used Emergency Coronavirus Money to Buy Weapons
Uno Reverse Back in March, Congress allocated a $1 billion emergency fund to the Pentagon, directing it to stockpile medical supplies and equipment for the country. But instead of using the money to battle the coronavirus pandemic, The Washington Post reports , the military funneled hundreds of millions of dollars to contractors to buy satellite parts, weapons, drones, and other military gear. It
15d
The Rise of the 3-Parent Family
David Jay is the oldest of 12 cousins on one side of his family and the third-oldest of 24 cousins on the other. As a kid, family to Jay meant having a lot of people around, a feeling of community, and crucially, a sense of permanence, that these people would always be in his life. Later, as an adult living in collective housing, he could access the feeling of family with those around him, but th
15d
The impact of human mobility on disease spread
Due to continual improvements in transportation technology, people travel more extensively than ever before. Although this strengthened connection between faraway countries comes with many benefits, it also poses a serious threat to disease control and prevention. When infected humans travel to regions that are free of their particular contagions, they might inadvertently transmit their infections
15d
Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
The disruptive inventions that make people go "Wow!" tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests.
15d
Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
Researchers found that nuanced interactions between teachers and campers at a coding camp for middle school girls as well as among the girls themselves impacted how girls viewed themselves as coders.
15d
Ecologists confirm Alan Turing's theory for Australian fairy circles
Fairy circles are one of nature's greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena. Researchers have now collected detailed data to show that Alan Turing's model explains the striking vegetation patterns of the Australian fairy circles. In addition, the researchers showed that the grasses that make up these patterns act as "eco-engineers" to modify their hostile and arid environment, keepin
15d
Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. In a comprehensive experiment scientists have uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this chemical, thus preventing many known plant fungi from invading the host plant.
15d
Sodium-ion batteries are a valid alternative to Lithium-ion batteries
A team of scientists combined their knowledge and expertise to assess the current status of the Na-ion technology from materials to cell development, offering a realistic comparison of the key performance indicators for NBs and LIBs.
15d
Targeting the treatment of autoimmune diseases
Researchers have successfully treated two patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Using daratumumab, a monoclonal antibody which targets specific immune cells known as plasma cells, the researchers were able to modulate the abnormal immunological memory processes found in these patients. Treatment induced sustainable clinical responses and resulted in a reduction in syst
15d
Regular doses of awe can do wonders for emotional health
Nature walks can trigger feelings of awe, but you can achieve the feeling inside, too. (Pixabay/) Awe, the emotional response and feelings of wonder people experience when seeing things that they can't fully comprehend, has long been associated with better mental and physical health. Taking a simple weekly "awe walk" might help older adults engage more deeply with this positive emotion, new resea
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Better conservation planning can improve human life too
Conservation planning can be greatly improved to benefit human communities, while still protecting biodiversity, according to University of Queensland research.
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Vikingerne var højere, mere mørkhårede og havde oftere skizofreni
Nye danske genanalyser af DNA fra hundredvis af vikingeskeletter dokumenterer, at vikingerne var højere, mere mørkhårede og oftere udviklede skizofreni end os. Vikingestudiet, som er det største studie af historisk DNA nogensinde, indikerer, at datidens vikingesamfund var langt mindre sammentømrede end hidtil troet.
15d
Better conservation planning can improve human life too
Conservation planning can be greatly improved to benefit human communities, while still protecting biodiversity, according to University of Queensland research.
15d
Stockholm Nobel ceremony replaced with televised event: Foundation
The traditional Nobel Prize ceremony in Stockholm has been cancelled for the first time since 1944 in favour of a televised event due to the coronavirus pandemic, organisers announced Tuesday.
15d
Warming ocean, old-forest loss put a squeeze on an elusive seabird
Squeezed by changing ocean conditions that limit their food options and the long-term loss of old forest needed for nesting, marbled murrelets would benefit most from conservation efforts that take both ocean and forest into account, new research by Oregon State University shows.
15d
When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Mathematicians have developed a framework to determine when regions enter and exit COVID-19 infection surge periods, providing a useful tool for public health policymakers to help manage the coronavirus pandemic.
15d
Inducing plasma in biomass could make biogas easier to produce
Producing biogas from the bacterial breakdown of biomass presents options for a greener energy future, but the complex composition of biomass comes with a long list of challenges.
15d
Evaporation critical to coronavirus transmission as weather changes
As COVID-19 cases continue to rise worldwide, it is increasingly urgent to understand how climate impacts the continued spread of the coronavirus, particularly as winter virus infections are more common and countries in the northern hemisphere will soon see cooler temperatures.
15d
Just add water: Biodiversity resurgence in effluent-fed desert riverbeds
Throughout the late 19th century, rivers across the southwestern United States were parceled out, and flows were diverted through irrigation canals and trapped behind dams. Growing populations put new demands on groundwater sources. Coupled with changing climate conditions, water tables sank and perennial streams began to run dry.
15d
Astrophysicists prove that dust particles in space are mixed with ice
The matter between the stars in a galaxy—called the interstellar medium—consists not only of gas, but also of a great deal of dust. At some point in time, stars and planets originated in such an environment, because the dust particles can clump together and merge into celestial bodies. Important chemical processes also take place on these particles, from which complex organic—possibly even prebiot
15d
For black girls, attitudes about being black affect risk of depression
A new study suggests that the messages Black girls hear at home about being Black, and about being Black women in particular, can affect their risk of exhibiting the symptoms of depression.
15d
"New" lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products.
15d
County and ZIP code-level data show 'stark social inequities' in COVID-19
A geocoding approach – linking routinely collected public health data to neighborhood socioeconomic factors – shows consistently higher rates of COVID-19 illness and death among people living in more-disadvantaged communities, reports a study in the November/December Journal of Public Health Management and Practice. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
15d
Entomologists from SPbU discover a rare species of tropical Heteroptera with long antennae
An international team of scientists, including researchers from St Petersburg University, has discovered a new genus and species of bug from the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. It was named Tatupa grafei and classified as belonging to plant bugs (Miridae).
15d
Wild birds as offerings to the Egyptian gods
Millions of mummified ibis and birds of prey, sacrificed to the Egyptian gods Horus, Ra or Thoth, have been discovered in the necropolises of the Nile Valley. Such a quantity of mummified birds raises the question of their origin: were they bred, like cats, or were they hunted? According to a team of scientists that carried out extensive geochemical analyses on mummies, they were wild birds.
15d
Forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought
A warming climate and more frequent wildfires do not necessarily mean the western United States will see the forest loss that many scientists expect. Dry forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought if managed appropriately, according to Penn State researchers.
15d
Warming ocean, old-forest loss put a squeeze on an elusive seabird
Squeezed by changing ocean conditions that limit their food options and the long-term loss of old forest needed for nesting, marbled murrelets would benefit most from conservation efforts that take both ocean and forest into account, new research by Oregon State University shows.
15d
Just add water: Biodiversity resurgence in effluent-fed desert riverbeds
Throughout the late 19th century, rivers across the southwestern United States were parceled out, and flows were diverted through irrigation canals and trapped behind dams. Growing populations put new demands on groundwater sources. Coupled with changing climate conditions, water tables sank and perennial streams began to run dry.
15d
Cells: Divide and enlarge
By far the most important process in cell development is how cells divide and then enlarge in order to multiply.
15d
The Lancet Alters Editorial Practices After Surgisphere Scandal
The changes, which affect the declarations authors have to sign and the peer-review process, have received a mixed response from the scientific community.
15d
Cells: Divide and enlarge
By far the most important process in cell development is how cells divide and then enlarge in order to multiply.
15d
Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behavior or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in th
15d
Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. This discovery was made by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of the State of Paraná in Brazil. In a comprehensive experiment the team has uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this ch
15d
Ecologists confirm Alan Turing's theory for Australian fairy circles
Fairy circles are one of nature's greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now, for the first time, collected detailed data to show that Alan Turing's model explains the striking vegetation patterns of the Australian fairy circles. In addition, the researchers showed that the grasses that make up these patterns act
15d
Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. This discovery was made by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of the State of Paraná in Brazil. In a comprehensive experiment the team has uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this ch
15d
Ecologists confirm Alan Turing's theory for Australian fairy circles
Fairy circles are one of nature's greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena. An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has now, for the first time, collected detailed data to show that Alan Turing's model explains the striking vegetation patterns of the Australian fairy circles. In addition, the researchers showed that the grasses that make up these patterns act
15d
Wels catfish genome assembled
An international research team led by scientists from Estonian University of Life Sciences has for the first time sequenced and assembled the genome of the wels catfish (Silurus glanis). The maximum reported size of the wels catfish is 5 m and up to 300 kg, which makes it one of the largest freshwater fish species in the whole world. By deciphering the genetic code of the barbelled giant, scientis
15d
Who is the weakest link? A better understanding of global supply chains
From toilet paper to industrial chemicals, there's no doubt the COVID-19 pandemic has been disruptive to global supply chains.
15d
Wels catfish genome assembled
An international research team led by scientists from Estonian University of Life Sciences has for the first time sequenced and assembled the genome of the wels catfish (Silurus glanis). The maximum reported size of the wels catfish is 5 m and up to 300 kg, which makes it one of the largest freshwater fish species in the whole world. By deciphering the genetic code of the barbelled giant, scientis
15d
The psychological traits that shape your political beliefs | Dannagal G. Young
Social psychologist Dannagal G. Young breaks down the link between our psychology and politics, showing how personality types largely fall into people who prioritize openness and flexibility (liberals) and those who prefer order and certainty (conservatives). Hear why both sets of traits are crucial to any society — and how our differences are being dangerously exploited to divide us. What if thi
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'I Had Heart Surgery in the Middle of a Coronavirus Hot Spot'
Anxiety and uncertainty about the pandemic are leading some patients to delay surgery. But how safe is that when you have an aneurysm in your heart?
15d
Reading in company boosts creativity
Language has evolved as a consequence of social interaction; however, most research is conducted with participants in isolation. What happens in our brain when we read in the company of others? Is it the same as reading alone? Researchers at the Complutense University of Madrid and the Carlos III Health Institute have found that company is conducive to a more creative and integrated understanding
15d
Water trapped in star dust
Dust particles in space are mixed with ice, as a research team from Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy has now proven in lab experiments. Furthermore, they observed "trapped water", which should thus also exist in space.
15d
Dresden physicists develop printable organic transistors
Scientists at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Dresden have come a step closer to the vision of a broad application of flexible, printable electronics. The team around Dr Hans Kleemann has succeeded for the first time in developing powerful vertical organic transistors with two independent control electrodes. The results have recently been published in the renowned online journal "Nature Com
15d
Divide and enlarge
Researchers discover a mechanism that causes cell nuclei to grow.
15d
Playing video games as a child can improve working memory years later
UOC research reveals cognitive changes can be found even years after people stop playing
15d
Better conservation planning can improve human life too
Conservation planning can be greatly improved to benefit human communities, while still protecting biodiversity, according to University of Queensland research.PhD candidate Jaramar Villarreal-Rosas, from UQ's School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, said the benefits people receive from ecosystems – known as ecosystem services – are under increasing threat globally due to the negative impacts
15d
Minskande utsläpp redan innan pandemin
Bruttonationalprodukten, BNP, under årets första kvartal låg på nästan exakt samma nivå som under första kvartalet i fjol. Men därefter gick det utför. Under andra kvartalet 2020 dalade BNP med 7,3 procent. Det är en effekt av coronaepandemin som slår hårt mot handel, produktion och resande.
15d
Water on exoplanet cloud tops could be found with hi-tech instrumentation
Astronomers have shown that water vapor can potentially be detected in the atmospheres of exoplanets by peering literally over the tops of their impenetrable clouds.
15d
A new science-driven app aims to help kids and parents play together
The drawing activities are fun, even if you're older than the recommended age range. (OK Play /) As a parent, managing a child's screen time is tricky during normal circumstances. During the COVID-19 pandemic, however, it has been even more difficult. Electronics can provide a much-needed distraction for little ones and parents alike, but it's worryingly simple for them to develop bad habits that
15d
Elon Musk: Tesla's Next Gen Battery Tech Still Two Years Away
Battery Day Tonight, Tesla is holding a splashy investor event called "Battery Day" — where, CEO Elon Musk has publicly hinted, it will show off its latest battery tech. All eyes will be on Tesla at what CNN is calling a "big event for investors." To anticipate the massive amounts of hype surrounding the event — and to likely manage expectations — Musk took to Twitter early this morning to clarif
15d
Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in t
15d
Water on exoplanet cloud tops could be found with hi-tech instrumentation
University of Warwick astronomers have shown that water vapour can potentially be detected in the atmospheres of exoplanets by peering literally over the tops of their impenetrable clouds.
15d
Targeting the treatment of autoimmune diseases
A team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Deutsches Rheuma-Forschungszentrum (DRFZ) Berlin, a Leibniz Institute, have successfully treated two patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus. Using daratumumab, a monoclonal antibody which targets specific immune cells known as plasma cells, the researchers were able to modulate the abnormal immunolog
15d
New research says Sodium-ion batteries are a valid alternative to Lithium-ion batteries
A team of scientists including WMG at the University of Warwick combined their knowledge and expertise to assess the current status of the Na-ion technology from materials to cell development, offering a realistic comparison of the key performance indicators for NBs and LIBs.
15d
The impact of human mobility on disease spread
In a paper publishing on Tuesday in the SIAM Journal of Applied Mathematics , Daozhou Gao of Shanghai Normal University investigated the way in which human dispersal affects disease control and total extent of an infection's spread.
15d
Did the aurora borealis play a role in sinking the Titanic?
Independent weather researcher Mila Zinkova is raising the question of whether the aurora borealis played a role in the events that led to the sinking of the Titanic. In her paper published in the journal Weather, Zinkova suggests it is possible that the aurora borealis interfered with navigational systems, making it difficult for the crew of the Titanic to avoid crashing into an iceberg, which le
15d
In Arkansas, Backlash Against Pesticide Regulation Gets Personal
A state official in Arkansas who's led a national effort to limit damage from a controversial herbicide has recently found his tractors damaged and hay bales burned. (Image credit: Terry Fuller)
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Climate science critic to be chief scientist at key U.S. climate research agency
Ryan Maue, who has decried "climate alarmists," to join NOAA
15d
Wildfires, logging affect fungi pine forests depend on for survival, studies show
Disturbances can hit Alberta's lodgepole pine forests hard—including life under the soil, new University of Alberta research shows.
15d
Want to Decode the Human Brain? There's a New System for That, and It's Pretty Wild
Even for high-tech California, the man strolling around UCLA was a curious sight. His motion capture suit, sensor-embedded gloves, and virtual reality eyewear were already enough to turn heads. But what stopped people in their tracks and made them stare was a bizarre headgear, tightly strapped to his head through a swimming cap-like device embedded with circular electrode connectors. Several spri
15d
The co-occurrence of cancer driver genes, key to precision medicine
Researchers from the Structural Bioinformatics and Network Biology Laboratory at IRB Barcelona develop a system to predict tumour response to different treatments.Called Targeted Cancer Therapy for You (TCT4U), this system has allowed them to identify a set of complex biomarkers that are available to the medical-scientific community.The work has been published in the journal Genome Medicine.
15d
Researchers find new way to protect plants from fungal infection
Widespread fungal disease in plants can be controlled with a commercially available chemical that has been primarily used in medicine until now. This discovery was made by scientists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the University of the State of Paraná in Brazil. In a comprehensive experiment the team has uncovered a new metabolic pathway that can be disrupted with this ch
15d
A fresh sense of possibility
A multisensory graphene-based skin can sense in extreme environments where other sensors cannot be used.
15d
Ecologists confirm Alan Turing's theory for Australian fairy circles
Fairy circles are one of nature's greatest enigmas and most visually stunning phenomena. Researchers led by Göttingen University have now collected detailed data to show that Alan Turing's model explains the striking vegetation patterns of the Australian fairy circles. In addition, the researchers showed that the grasses that make up these patterns act as "eco-engineers" to modify their hostile an
15d
Platonska kroppar i vår omgivning
Fortfarande minns jag hur förvånad och fascinerad jag blev, när jag under min skoltid fick i läxa att kunna bevisa att det inte finns mer än fem slag av regelbundna polyedrar, s.k. platonska kroppar. Tänk att man kan bevisa något sådant! Kanske var det den aha-upplevelsen av matematikens möjligheter som fick mig att så småningom läsa lite matematik också på universitetet.
15d
Supersygehus eller servicestation for primærsektoren?
Sygehuse er en parentes i de flestes liv, og deres opgave er derfor at gøre sundhedsansatte uden for sygehuset dygtige, mener tidligere lægelig hospitalsdirektør Mads Koch Hansen. Det vil være fantastisk, hvis hospitalsvæsnet bliver en servicefunktion i danskernes liv, lyder det fra sygeplejechef i Aalborg.
15d
'New' lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products.
15d
We Live in a Potemkin Autocracy Now
The Trump administration named New York City, Seattle, and Portland, Oregon, "anarchist jurisdictions" on Sunday, threatening to slash federal funding due to protests against police brutality and property damage. The announcement built on an earlier order that accused several cities of "permitting anarchy, violence, and destruction"—but the three that made the final cut aren't among the nation's
15d
'New' lactic acid bacteria can make African camel milk safe
A research project headed by the Technical University of Denmark, DTU, has come up with the formula for a freeze-dried starter culture that African camel milk farmers can use to make safe, fermented milk products.
15d
Spørg Fagfolket: Hvordan kan virus mutere, hvis den ikke er levende?
En læser undrer sig over, hvordan virus kan mutere, når den ikke er levende. Det svarer professor på Københavns Universitet på.
15d
Wels catfish genome assembled
By deciphering the genetic code of the barbelled giant, scientists expect to better understand the secrets of the wels catfish's exceptionally rapid growth, enormous appetite and longevity.
15d
Deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes based on a doublet-emission cerium(III) complex
In this work, the authors have demonstrated a high external quantum efficiency (EQE) in deep-blue organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on a new cerium(III) complex Ce-1 as the emitter, which can achieve 100% exciton utilization efficiency (EUE). Coupled with its short excited-state lifetime, adjustable emission spectrum, and low cost, cerium(III) complex has the potential to develop deep-bl
15d
Insight-HXMT discovers closest high-speed jet to black hole
Insight-HXMT, China's first space X-ray astronomical satellite, has discovered a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) above 200 kiloelectron volts (keV) in a black hole binary, making it the highest energy low-frequency QPO ever found. The scientists also found that the QPO originated from the precession of a relativistic jet near the event horizon of the black hole.
15d
Very sensitive optical receivers for space communication
Researchers in Sweden recently demonstrated a novel concept for laser-beam-based communication links using a near 'noiseless' optical pre-amplifier in the receiver. They demonstrated an unprecedented receiver sensitivity of only one photon-per-information bit at a bit rate of 10.5 Gbit/s. This approach will provide a path for increasing the reach and information rates in future high-speed links fo
15d
Who is the weakest link? A better understanding of global supply chains
The COVID-19 pandemic has caused "kinks" in the movement of goods and services around the globe, but how important a role do multinational companies play in local economies and supply chains?
15d
Researchers claim long-term exposure to air pollution in China killed 30.8 million people between 2000 and 2016
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in the U.S. has found evidence that suggests as many as 30.8 million people suffered premature deaths in China over the years 2000 to 2016 due to breathing polluted air. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of air pollution levels in China and prematur
15d
Cheap plastic is flooding developing countries, so we're making new biodegradable materials to help
Squeezed by lower fuel demand during the pandemic and the rise of renewable energy, the oil industry is staking out a new future for itself in plastics. Instead of powering vehicles or generating electricity, oil companies are increasingly looking to use their product to manufacture cheap plastic packaging, which they can sell in lower to middle income countries.
15d
Water on exoplanet cloud tops could be found with hi-tech instrumentation
University of Warwick astronomers have shown that water vapor can potentially be detected in the atmospheres of exoplanets by peering literally over the tops of their impenetrable clouds.
15d
GMO Crops and Yield
The issue of genetically modified organisms is interesting from a science communication perspective because it is the one controversy that apparently most follows the old knowledge deficit paradigm. The question is – why do people reject science and accept pseudoscience. The knowledge deficit paradigm states that they reject science in proportion to their lack of knowledge about science, which sh
15d
Parkinson's disease is not one, but two diseases
Researchers around the world have been puzzled by the different symptoms and varied disease pathways of Parkinson's patients. A major study has now identified that there are actually two types of the disease.
15d
New drug candidate found for hand, foot and mouth disease
Researchers have identified a potential drug candidate against enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. The compound of interest is a small molecule that binds to RNA, the virus's genetic material, and changes its 3-D shape in a way that stops the virus from multiplying without harming its human host. It's an antiviral strategy that could be use
15d
Mental illness treatment varies widely among American adolescents within and across zip codes
After a mental illness episode, less than half of children received any therapy within three months, and 22.5% of children received only drug therapy, according to a new study.
15d
New study reveals why flu can be devastating for pregnant women
New research overturns current scientific thinking on flu infection in pregnancy. The study helps explain why influenza can lead to life-threatening complications during pregnancy. The research also has implications for our understanding of how COVID-19 may be affecting the vascular system.
15d
Toxic masculinity: Why male funnel web spiders are so dangerous
A team of researchers has revealed why male funnel web spiders develop much deadlier venom than their female counterparts. The team has spent 20 years investigating delta-hexatoxins, the venom peptides that make funnel web spider venom so dangerous.
15d
Tree planting has potential to increase carbon sequestration capacity on Nation's forests
In the United States, fully stocking non-stocked and poorly stocked forests would result in an annual increase of 20 percent in the amount of carbon sequestered by forests.
15d
The best gear to upgrade your gaming atmosphere
Upgrade your atmosphere. (Bantersnaps via Unsplash/) With video games becoming more immersive and detailed than ever before, it's essential to optimize your room and surroundings if you truly want to get the most out of your gaming experience. There are plenty of normal lighting fixtures and computer peripherals that are great for everyday use, but they just won't cut it in a scenario where ambia
15d
Researchers examine 'race unknown' enrollment data in higher education
When a college student self-identifies as "race unknown," what does that mean in the context of higher education research? According to researchers at Penn State and Michigan State University, the "race unknown" category does not represent random "noise" in data collection but rather can be attributed to some combination of student responses and data collection practices. Additionally, they discov
15d
A new strategy to implement a high-fidelity mixed-species entangling gate
In recent years, research teams worldwide have been trying to create trapped ion quantum computers, which have so far proved to be among the most promising systems for practical quantum computing implementations. In these computers, trapped ions serve as quantum bits that are entangled in order to perform advanced computations.
15d
PFAS-forbindelser fra brandøvelser har kurs mod vandmiljøet
PLUS. En grundvandsfane fra Flyvestation Karup med PFAS strømmer i retning mod Karup Å. Men er mængderne skadelige? Og hvor meget stammer fra Forsvaret?
15d
Antarctic krill take refuge from climate change
New research shows that Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), a key link in the Southern Ocean food web, have refuges from the rapid climatic warming and ice loss that has degraded part of its habitat. The study is published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography this week (22 September).
15d
Without oxygen, Earth's early microbes relied on arsenic to sustain life
Much of life on planet Earth today relies on oxygen to exist, but before oxygen was present on our blue planet, lifeforms likely used arsenic instead. These findings are detailed in research published today in Communications Earth and Environment.
15d
Antarctic krill take refuge from climate change
New research shows that Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba), a key link in the Southern Ocean food web, have refuges from the rapid climatic warming and ice loss that has degraded part of its habitat. The study is published in the journal Limnology and Oceanography this week (22 September).
15d
Researchers analyse how 3-D printed metals fracture
3-D-printed metals have been used since the 1980s to produce a wide range of parts for various industries. These materials often have tiny pores inside them (around dozens of micrometers in size), which can get bigger when a load is applied to them, due to their manufacturing process. The team of researchers has analyzed what happens to these "micro voids" when applying a load to them in order to
15d
Physicists develop printable organic transistors
Scientists at the Institute of Applied Physics at TU Dresden have come a step closer to the vision of a broad application of flexible, printable electronics. The team around Dr. Hans Kleemann has succeeded for the first time in developing powerful vertical organic transistors with two independent control electrodes. The results have recently been published in the renowned online journal Nature Com
15d
Cultural appropriation in the Peruvian Andes sparks discussion around Indigenous identity
Every year, more than 100,000 people travel to the Quyllurit'i glacier shrine from many communities and towns throughout the Cusco region and beyond, all participating in the largest pilgrimage in the Peruvian Andes. In 2014, a regional political party appropriated one of the central figures of the pilgrimage, the pablito or ukuku—a move that the pilgrimage's organizing body opposed. A recent stud
15d
How ribosomes are like Russian dolls
Maturation of the ribosome is a complex operation. Work by an LMU team now shows that the 90S precursor of the small 40S subunit undergoes a "molting" process, during which it progressively discards its outermost components.
15d
Warming ocean, old-forest loss put a squeeze on an elusive seabird
Squeezed by changing ocean conditions that limit their food options and the long-term loss of old forest needed for nesting, marbled murrelets would benefit most from conservation efforts that take both ocean and forest into account, new research shows.
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Just add water: Biodiversity resurgence in effluent-fed desert riverbeds
Innovative new projects using effluent to restore flow in rivers, like the Santa Cruz River Heritage Project, are showing almost immediate positive biodiversity effects, and the return of species (such as dragonflies, mayflies and caddisflies) to these rivers after very long dry spells can be incredibly fast.
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Scientists identify solid electrolyte materials that boost lithium-ion battery performance
The discovery could help battery researchers design the first solid electrolytes that are safe, cheap and efficient.
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Parkinson's disease is not one, but two diseases
Researchers around the world have been puzzled by the different symptoms and varied disease pathways of Parkinson's patients. A major study from Aarhus University, Denmark, has now identified that there are actually two types of the disease.
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Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
Researchers found that nuanced interactions between teachers and campers at a coding camp for middle school girls as well as among the girls themselves impacted how girls viewed themselves as coders.
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Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
The disruptive inventions that make people go 'Wow!' tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests. Researchers found that, within metro areas, the majority of patents come from innovations created in suburbs. But the unconventional, disruptive innovations — the ones that combine research from different technological fields — are more likely to be
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Chemists make cellular forces visible at the molecular scale
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. Nature Methods published the work, led by chemists at Emory University, who demonstrated their technique on human blood platelets in laboratory experiments.
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How ribosomes are like Russian dolls
Maturation of the ribosome is a complex operation. Work by an LMU team now shows that the 90S precursor of the small 40S subunit undergoes a "molting" process, during which it progressively discards its outermost components.
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NASA's OSIRIS-REx to asteroid Bennu: 'You've got a little Vesta on you'
In an interplanetary faux pas, it appears some pieces of asteroid Vesta ended up on asteroid Bennu, according to observations from NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft. The new result sheds light on the intricate orbital dance of asteroids and on the violent origin of Bennu, which is a "rubble pile" asteroid that coalesced from the fragments of a massive collision.
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Study suggests abrupt ocean warming could lead to mass fish deaths
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Israel and one in Greece has found evidence that suggests sudden ocean warming can lead to mass fish deaths. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of mass fish death events and what they learned about them.
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Q&A: New paper explores organoid growth and development, illustrates new route for control
Max Yavitt, a graduate student in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, is the first author on a new paper in Advanced Materials focusing on organoid development. We asked Yavitt about the research problems the work explores, his time with the Anseth Lab and why this is such an important and growing area of research–particularly for the field of medicine.
15d
Chemists make cellular forces visible at the molecular scale
Scientists have developed a new technique using tools made of luminescent DNA, lit up like fireflies, to visualize the mechanical forces of cells at the molecular level. Nature Methods published the work, led by chemists at Emory University, who demonstrated their technique on human blood platelets in laboratory experiments.
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Barns perspektiv på adhd
Hur barn och ungdomar med adhd förstår och hanterar sina symptom studeras i en ny avhandling. – Om vi är medvetna om hur barn uppfattar sitt beteende så kan vi också förstå varför situationer uppstår, säger Noam Ringer, psykolog och forskare vid Stockholms universitet. I en studie byggd på djupintervjuer kartlägger Noam Ringer hur barn och ungdomar med den neuropsykiatriska funktionsnedsättningen
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Study suggests abrupt ocean warming could lead to mass fish deaths
A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Israel and one in Greece has found evidence that suggests sudden ocean warming can lead to mass fish deaths. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of mass fish death events and what they learned about them.
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Q&A: New paper explores organoid growth and development, illustrates new route for control
Max Yavitt, a graduate student in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, is the first author on a new paper in Advanced Materials focusing on organoid development. We asked Yavitt about the research problems the work explores, his time with the Anseth Lab and why this is such an important and growing area of research–particularly for the field of medicine.
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Number of new weekly coronavirus cases at record high, says WHO
Announcement comes as Covid deaths increased by 27% in Europe week on week Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The weekly number of new recorded coronavirus infections worldwide was last week at its highest level to date, the World Health Organization has announced, as deaths from Covid-19 in Europe increased by more than a quarter week on week. Almost 1 million people h
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The first ultra-hot Neptune, LTT 9779b, is one of nature's improbable planets
An international team of astronomers, including a group from the University of Warwick, have discovered the first Ultra Hot Neptune planet orbiting the nearby star LTT 9779.
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Pembrolizumab giver patienter med spiserørskræft bedre overlevelse
Kombinationen af pembrolizumab og kemoterapi som førstelinjebehandling til patienter med spiserørskræft giver patienterne bedre overlevelse og bedre progressionsfri overlevelse end behandling med kemoterapi alene.
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ESMO-resultater lover godt for behandling af kræft i livmoderen og æggestokkene
Der har ikke været de helt store nyheder på dettes års ESMO-kongres, men overlæge Mansoor Raza Mirza fra Rigshospitalet har alligevel fundet mange meget interessante resultater, som tegner godt for kvinder med kræft i livmoderen og æggestokkene.
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To Clean Up Comments, Let AI Tell Users Their Words Are Trash
It won't solve everything, but a new study suggests real-time automated feedback could help make the internet a less toxic place.
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White Americans still vastly overestimate racial progress, study finds
The discrepancy in perception among white Americans shows a far more optimistic view of the racial progress that has been made since the 1960s, according to a new study by Ivy Onyeador, a professor at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.
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Q&A: Impact of effort to reduce Amazon deforestation overestimated, study finds
Projects designed to protect the Amazon rainforest in Brazil and reduce greenhouse gas emissions overestimated their contributions to reducing deforestation, a team of international researchers reported in a new study.
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Forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought
A warming climate and more frequent wildfires do not necessarily mean the western United States will see the forest loss that many scientists expect. Dry forest margins may be more resilient to climate change than previously thought if managed appropriately, according to Penn State researchers.
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People in Cape Verde evolved better malaria resistance in 550 years
A gene variant that protects against malaria has spread rapidly among people living on the island of Santiago off West Africa
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Air pollution in China may have caused millions of deaths since 2000
Air pollution is estimated to have caused 30.8 million premature deaths in China and Taiwan since 2000, according to an algorithm that was trained on satellite data
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Covid-19 news: New restrictions in the UK as alert level raised to 4
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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UK coronavirus epidemic is doubling every seven days warn scientists
The UK faces a "very difficult problem" of rising covid-19 deaths and cases if it does not change course, chief medical officer for England Chris Whitty has warned
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We must not become immune to the pandemic's heavy death toll
The world is on track to soon exceed a million deaths from covid-19. It is a number we shouldn't become blasé about
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How gross 'chastity belts' shape butterfly evolution
New research digs into the role sexual conflict between male and female plays in butterfly evolution. Some male butterflies go to extreme lengths to ensure their paternity—sealing their mate's genitalia with a waxy "chastity belt" to prevent future liaisons. But female butterflies can fight back by evolving larger or more complex organs that are tougher to plug. "Butterflies and moths continue to
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Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
The disruptive inventions that make people go 'Wow!' tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests. Researchers found that, within metro areas, the majority of patents come from innovations created in suburbs. But the unconventional, disruptive innovations — the ones that combine research from different technological fields — are more likely to be
15d
It is time to embrace cannabis for medicinal use, say experts
Attitudes towards cannabis products for medicinal use need to change with much greater appropriate use of such products to help alleviate patients' pain, suggests new research.
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Topforsker ser gerne flere semi-online kongresser i fremtiden
Der har været fordele og ulemper ved at afholde årets ESMO online, fortæller professor og overlæge Inge Marie Svane.
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Nivolumab plus kemoterapi forlænger overlevelsen ved mavekræft
Nivolumab plus kemoterapi som førstelinjebehandling til patienter med mavekræft, gastro-esophageal overgangskræft eller esophageal adenokarcinom forbedrer overlevelsen sammenlignet med kemoterapi alene.
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Test and trace is failing UK schools
Teachers have been told repeatedly that the country is grateful, but words are starting to ring hollow
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Study investigates the nature of X-ray binary IGR J18214-1318
Using various space observatories, Italian astronomers have investigated an X-ray binary source known as IGR J18214-1318. Results of the study, detailed in a paper published September 14 on the arXiv pre-print server, provide important information about the properties of this system, shedding more light into its nature.
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Q&A: Demographers take a closer look at Virginia's crime and policing statistics
When historians look back on 2020, the coronavirus pandemic figures to be the highlighted global event.
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Children's immune response more effective against COVID-19
Children and adults exhibit distinct immune system responses to infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, a finding that helps explain why COVID-19 outcomes tend to be much worse in adults, researchers from Yale and Albert Einstein College of Medicine report Sept. 18 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.
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Fantastiska fakta om svampar
Svampar är mästare på samarbete. De gör enorm nytta som jordens renhållningsarbetare. Men de kan också vara fruktade fiender, förvandla insekter till zombier och lysa upp mörker. De finns på stora delar av våra kroppar och jordens största varelse är just en svamp.
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Powerful New Observatory Will Taste Neutrinos' Flavors
The Chinese JUNO experiment will aim to answer a mystery about the particles' mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Flere nye behandlinger kan være på vej til stor gruppe patienter med modermærkekræft
På årets ESMO har der ifølge professor og overlæge Inge Marie Svane været flere interessante forskningsnyheder, som lover godt for fremtiden for patienter med modermærkekræft uden gode behandlingsmuligheder.
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Color-Changing Ink Turns Clothes into Giant Chemical Sensors
A silk-based substance could lead to new wearables — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Powerful New Observatory Will Taste Neutrinos' Flavors
The Chinese JUNO experiment will aim to answer a mystery about the particles' mass — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Realizing the tremendous potential of biological collections will require strategy, action and investment
A new report on biological collections from The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine points to the need for sustainability, digitization, recruitment of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades to meet the challenges now facing science and society. The report, "Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century," says these collection
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The Pandemic Has Remade Friendship
M y friend Adam Nemett and I became close friends in college, when I basically lived in the house he shared with my then-boyfriend. We saw each other constantly—at home, on campus, over dinner. We got drunk together; took the train to New York City to go clubbing together; emailed during our summer vacations. The last night of college, the three of us wrapped our arms around one another, feeling
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Realizing the tremendous potential of biological collections will require strategy, action and investment
A new report on biological collections from The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine points to the need for sustainability, digitization, recruitment of a diverse workforce, and infrastructure upgrades to meet the challenges now facing science and society. The report, "Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century," says these collection
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COVID-19 stress could boost alcohol abuse risk
The COVID-19 pandemic has likely caused increases in the risk of alcohol and drug abuse while also making treatment harder to access, Denis M. McCarthy argues. Less social interaction, increased isolation, and more daily life stressors are just some of the challenges people face while going about their daily lives during the COVID-19 pandemic. For people who are also dealing with addictions to al
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Workers and companies face new legal and financial threats as pandemic continues
Workers are worried. Supply chain breaks have left shelves bare, and bank balances are hitting zero. The COVID-19 shutdown is forcing anyone trying to stay afloat to prepare for the worst.
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Penguin poo helps solve puzzles
Blue cod has been identified as making up a large proportion of the yellow-eyed penguin (hoiho) diet using a novel approach published by University of Otago researchers.
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How employers can soften the blow of furloughs and layoffs
Furloughs and layoffs are traumatic—especially during a pandemic—but new research from Rice University offers ways employers can ease the emotional impact when they deliver the bad news to their workers.
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Over 200,000 People Have Died in the US: Live Covid-19 Updates
The staggering toll comes as the pandemic spreads to places that had been spared early on.
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Penguin poo helps solve puzzles
Blue cod has been identified as making up a large proportion of the yellow-eyed penguin (hoiho) diet using a novel approach published by University of Otago researchers.
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Rainy days can send nitrogen runoff to rivers
Heavy rain events that occur only a few days a year can account for up to a third of the annual nitrogen fertilizer runoff from farmland in the Mississippi River basin, according to a new study. The research, published in the journal Communications Earth & Environment , uses computer modeling techniques to quantify nitrogen runoff from land ecosystems into rivers and streams. Nitrogen fertilizers
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Intensive monoculture is putting water systems in peril
The global spread of vast forest plantations and agricultural monocultures are turning once diverse landscapes into areas of land supporting single plant species, with profound implications for our terrestrial water cycle, according to new research.
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Physicists create turnstile for photons
Physicists from Germany, Denmark, and Austria have succeeded in creating a kind of turnstile for light in glass fibers that allows the light particles to only pass through one at a time
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Personal interactions are important drivers of STEM identity in girls
As head of the educational outreach arm of the Florida State University-headquartered National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Roxanne Hughes has overseen dozens of science camps over the years, including numerous sessions of the successful SciGirls Summer Camp she co-organizes with WFSU .
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Expert says west coast wildfires will likely mean smoky-tasting wine for years to come
Professor of Supply Chain Management and wine industry expert Burak Kazaz says along with exacting a heavy human toll, West Coast wildfires will also affect the flavor of your favorite California wine.
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We must do better at managing the wilderness that remains
It is really true that books have a life of their own. I was reminded of this recently while reading Stephen Meyer's "The End of the Wild," published in 2006. I found the book (or it found me) by chance while I was cleaning in my library. It contains a little gem where the author states, in no uncertain terms, that the Earth (already in 2005) had passed a critical point where evolution is no longe
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Exactly How Far Should You Distance From Others to Avoid Covid-19?
The CDC recommends 6 feet or more, the WHO about half that distance, but experts say the science is far from settled
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We must do better at managing the wilderness that remains
It is really true that books have a life of their own. I was reminded of this recently while reading Stephen Meyer's "The End of the Wild," published in 2006. I found the book (or it found me) by chance while I was cleaning in my library. It contains a little gem where the author states, in no uncertain terms, that the Earth (already in 2005) had passed a critical point where evolution is no longe
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Eksperter: EU-milliardsatsning på supercomputere er en forældet strategi
PLUS. EU-Kommissionen vil finde 60 milliarder kroner til udvikling af nye supercomputere i exaskala. Men snævert fokus på ydeevne er en teknologisk forældet strategi, lyder kritikken fra flere danskere supercomputer-eksperter.
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Cities beat suburbs at inspiring cutting-edge innovations
The disruptive inventions that make people go "Wow!" tend to come from research in the heart of cities and not in the suburbs, a new study suggests.Researchers found that, within metro areas, the majority of patents come from innovations created in suburbs. But the unconventional, disruptive innovations – the ones that combine research from different technological fields – are more likely to be pr
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The global scale of the coronavirus disaster demands a global response | Tom Kibasi
Just as world leaders came together after the second world war at Bretton Woods, now we need to create a new framework for health security The scale of the coronavirus crisis is hard to fully comprehend: globally, more than 30 million people have contracted the virus and nearly 1 million have died. The UN estimates that the pandemic will mean $8.5 tn in lost output for the world this year and nex
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10 awe-inspiring walks around the UK
Scientists found weekly 'awe walks' led to more positive emotions among study participants – here are some of the nation's most wondrous locations Share your awe-inspiring walks with us The Romantics first drew our attention to "awe" in the natural world and now scientists have confirmed its value. Older adults who took weekly "awe walks" reported increased positive emotions and less distress in
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RBG's Greatest Insight
Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's time on the Court was often characterized as a pitched battle between the principles of equality and individual liberty. Conservative majorities have tended to elevate individual autonomy rights over equal treatment and equal opportunity in our politics, our workplaces, and our schools. The liberal bloc, by contrast, has tended to oppose this subversion of equality t
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To Make Fairer AI, Physicists Peer Inside Its Black Box
After repurposing facial recognition and deepfake tech to study galaxies and the Higgs boson, physicists think they can help shape the responsible use of AI.
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How to Preorder the Xbox Series X and Series S: Pricing, Release Date, and More
Preorders for Microsoft's next-gen consoles go live today. We've compiled the best places you can snag one—and if you should.
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Covid-19 Vaccines Could End Up With Bias Built Right In
Some of the leading candidates might work better for the richest people in the world, simply on account of how they're made.
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From Katrina to COVID-19: Black communities in New Orleans were disproportionately impacted
Hurricane Katrina took a devastating toll on New Orleans, LA, when it made landfall in August 2005.
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If we realised the true cost of homelessness, we'd fix it overnight
Australia's six-month moratorium on evictions is due to end soon. Some states have extended the moratorium, but when it ends that's likely to force even more Australians into housing insecurity and outright homelessness. The moral and health arguments for housing people are clear, but many people are unaware of the financial cost we all bear for not fixing homelessness.
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Eight ways you can use cotton in an emergency
Cotton isn't the best material for outdoor clothing, but when it's used alone or with some other basic products, it can be a real asset when you're in a pinch. (Tim MacWelch/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . Diehard outdoor enthusiasts often have a love/hate relationship with cotton. This ancient fiber dates back to the reign of Egyptian pharaohs, and while it has many uses,
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Ny model kan forudsige risiko for nyresvigt hos patienter med type 1-diabetes
Risikoen for nyresvigt er høj hos patienter med type 1-diabetes, men en ny danskudviklet model kan forudsige, hvem der er i højest risiko, så de kan behandles mere intensivt.
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The Masks We Wear to Survive
A gay, African-American physician relied on personas to endure his medical training — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Masks We Wear to Survive
A gay, African-American physician relied on personas to endure his medical training — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Study unveils both pretty and ugly faces win at social selling
The COVID-19 pandemic has boosted e-commerce around the globe, including the consumer to consumer (C2C) markets on platforms such as social media. Interestingly, scholars from Lingnan University (LU) in Hong Kong have found that not only do attractive faces get better results, unattractive faces also achieve better results than plain-looking faces in online selling, particularly in expertise-relev
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Monitoring river health using a robotic water sampler
Researchers from MBARI and the US Geological Survey (USGS) recently published a paper showing several ways that MBARI's Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs) can be used to monitor the health of rivers. The ESPs, which are essentially robotic laboratories, were used to collect and preserve samples of water from the Yellowstone and Snake Rivers. By analyzing "environmental DNA" in the river water,
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Leddegigt forøger risiko for at udvikle type 2-diabetes med 23 procent
Leddegigt og type 2- diabetes er formentlig koblet sammen gennem inflammation i kroppe, siger forskere bag et studie, der viser at leddegigt øger risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes markant.
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Glukagoninfusion kan stimulere hjertet ved overdosis med betablokkere
Ny dansk forskning viser, at glukagon kan stimulere hjertet ved overdosis med betablokkere, og at behandlingen ikke kommer med nævneværdige bivirkninger. Lange infusioner forlænger effekten.
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Astronomers Find 'Pi Planet' With 3.14-Day Orbit
The longer we study the universe, the more exoplanets we find. Many of these discoveries are notable because of how Earth-like they are or because of the number of planets crammed into a single solar system. The rocky planet K2-315b, on the other hand, is notable because of its orbital period. It takes 3.14 Earth days to complete an orbit of its star. Astronomers have therefore dubbed it "pi plan
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Monitoring river health using a robotic water sampler
Researchers from MBARI and the US Geological Survey (USGS) recently published a paper showing several ways that MBARI's Environmental Sample Processors (ESPs) can be used to monitor the health of rivers. The ESPs, which are essentially robotic laboratories, were used to collect and preserve samples of water from the Yellowstone and Snake Rivers. By analyzing "environmental DNA" in the river water,
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80% of Hong Kong workers want to work from home at least 1 day per week after epidemic
In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, many organizations have adopted work from home (WFH) practice for months. A recent survey conducted by Lingnan University (LU) in Hong Kong reveals that over 80 percent of respondents prefer WFH for at least one day per week even after the pandemic. More than 70 percent of respondents said WFH allowed them to have more time to rest while 64 percent said the pr
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Study finds international students' learning activities seriously disturbed by COVID-19
In a recent survey conducted by the School of Graduate Studies of Lingnan University (LU) in Hong Kong on international/non-local higher education students' physical and psychological wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic, nearly 90 percent of respondents said the outbreak had caused "moderate to extreme" disruption to learning activities. Over 70 percent expressed concern about the outbreak, whi
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Color-coded biosensor illuminates in real time how viruses attack hosts
Infectious viruses come in many shapes and sizes and use slightly different attack mechanisms to make humans and animals sick. But all viruses share something in common: They can only do damage by replicating inside the cells of another organism—their host.
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Color-coded biosensor illuminates in real time how viruses attack hosts
Infectious viruses come in many shapes and sizes and use slightly different attack mechanisms to make humans and animals sick. But all viruses share something in common: They can only do damage by replicating inside the cells of another organism—their host.
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Invasive plants adapt to environments through trade-offs between secondary chemical responses
In response to shifting environments, plants may change their traits through evolutionary or ecological strategies, which enables plants to adapt to varying abiotic and biotic environments at a biogeographic scale and a range of latitudes by producing distinct types and amounts of secondary chemicals. However, it remains unclear whether and how invasive plant chemical responses to herbivory are as
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Insight-HXMT discovers closest high-speed jet to black hole
Insight-HXMT, China's first space X-ray astronomical satellite, has discovered a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) above 200 kiloelectron volts (keV) in a black hole binary, making it the highest energy low-frequency QPO ever found. The scientists also found that the QPO originated from the precession of a relativistic jet (high-speed outward-moving plasma stream) near the event horiz
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Invasive plants adapt to environments through trade-offs between secondary chemical responses
In response to shifting environments, plants may change their traits through evolutionary or ecological strategies, which enables plants to adapt to varying abiotic and biotic environments at a biogeographic scale and a range of latitudes by producing distinct types and amounts of secondary chemicals. However, it remains unclear whether and how invasive plant chemical responses to herbivory are as
15d
NASA technology enables precision landing without a pilot
Some of the most interesting places to study in our solar system are found in the most inhospitable environments—but landing on any planetary body is already a risky proposition. With NASA planning robotic and crewed missions to new locations on the Moon and Mars, avoiding landing on the steep slope of a crater or in a boulder field is critical to helping ensure a safe touch down for surface explo
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Hyperbolic metamaterials exhibit physics with two spatial and two temporal dimensions
Metamaterials—nanoengineered structures designed for precise control and manipulation of electromagnetic waves—have enabled such innovations as invisibility cloaks and super-resolution microscopes. Using transformation optics, these novel devices operate by manipulating light propagation in "optical spacetime," which may be different from the actual physical spacetime.
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The ultimate clothing steamers for getting rid of wrinkles
Keep your clothing wrinkle-free. (Andreea Pop via Unsplash/) Do you currently have a large pile of clothing sitting in the corner of your room? The time might have come to invest in a well-designed clothing steamer, that will tackle even the most difficult wrinkles with advanced technology. Here's some of the best steamers out there, complete with helpful perks like odor reduction and sanitizing
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Personer med type 1- og type 2-diabetes dør henholdsvis otte og to år før alle andre
Det er forbundet med et kortere liv at leve med type 1- eller type 2-diabetes. Ved hjælp af data fra praktiserende læger i Storbritannien, sætter forskere nu tal på, hvor mange år det koster.
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Metformin øger laktatniveauerne i portvenen
Mystikken om, hvordan metformin præcist virker og sænker blodsukkeret har stået på i årtier, men ny dansk forskning tyder på, at metformin i hvert fald har en særlig funktion i tarmen.
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Par synkroniserer sund livsstil
Dansk forskning præsenteret på EASD viser, at hvis den ene part i et parforhold er god til at leve på en måde, som modvirker risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes, er den anden part det ofte også.
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Dansk forskning kortlægger medicinforbrug blandt ældre med type 2- diabetes
Nyt dansk forskningsprojekt sætter fokus på balancen i medicinforbruget blandt ældre personer med type 2-diabetes i de sidste 10 år af deres liv.
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A menagerie of stem-cell models
Nature, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02682-x When conventional laboratory models fail, stem cells from squirrels, seals and other species can come to researchers' aid.
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The United States Has Become a Disaster Area
If you are reading this in the United States, you are experiencing a disaster—maybe more than one. Hurricane Sally hammered Alabama and the Florida panhandle last week, submerging homes and leaving tens of thousands without power. The West Coast is still wreathed in smoke from its worst fire season ever by acres burned, during which entire towns have been incinerated. Coronavirus cases are spikin
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Instagram's Founders Explain Their Covid-Charting Obsession
In their first post-Facebook project, Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger built rt.live, which state officials can use to plan their reopening.
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Does a Millipede Have a Penis? Well … Define 'Penis'
From gonopods to pedipalps, nature has a lot of ways to get gametes where they need to go.
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Loose Ends: A Literary Supercut of Sci-Fi Last Sentences
Miles grinned sleepily, puddled down in his uniform. "Welcome to the beginning."
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What Teaching Online Classes Taught Me About Remote Learning
After teaching for 25 years, yes, moving my classes online has been weird. But then I found moments of gratitude.
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Screening af UK Biobank viser tusinder af uidentificerede tilfælde af type 2-diabetes
200.000 blodprøver fra UK Biobank viser, at mere end 2.000 englændere går rundt med ikke-erkendt type 2-diabetes.
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Australian rescuers save 25 of 270 stranded whales so far
Around one third of an estimated 270 pilot whales that became stranded on Australia's island state of Tasmania have died, with rescuers managing to return 25 to the sea in an ongoing operation, officials said Tuesday.
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Daily briefing: Toxic bacteria caused the mysterious deaths of hundreds of African elephants
Nature, Published online: 21 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02703-9 Cyanobacteria-infected water killed at least 330 elephants in Botswana, and many questions remain. Plus: what the Israel–Arab peace accord means for scientific collaboration, and lessons from three centuries of vaccine opposition.
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Australian rescuers save 25 of 270 stranded whales so far
Around one third of an estimated 270 pilot whales that became stranded on Australia's island state of Tasmania have died, with rescuers managing to return 25 to the sea in an ongoing operation, officials said Tuesday.
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Science fiction i verkligheten
Science fiction – från Frankenstein till klimatfiktion Föregångarna
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We Must Confront Anti-Asian Racism in Science
It existed before the pandemic, but COVID-19 has made it worse — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Hundreds of Whales Stranded Off Tasmania
More than 450 pilot whales became stranded on the west coast of the island state in Australia. Rescuers estimate that over half of them have already died.
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3-D Printing inside the Body Could Patch Stomach Ulcers
In vivo bioprinting might also help repair hernias and treat infertility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3-D Printing inside the Body Could Patch Stomach Ulcers
In vivo bioprinting might also help repair hernias and treat infertility — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Great Liberal Reckoning Has Begun
The death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ends an incredible legal career, one that advanced gender equality and inspired millions. RBG, as she became popularly known, was, like Thurgood Marshall before her, one of the handful of justices who, through their work as lawyers fighting for justice, can truly be said to have earned their spot on the judicial throne. But the outpouring of grief that has
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Thin and ultra-fast photodetector sees the full spectrum
Researchers have developed the world's first photodetector that can see all shades of light, in a prototype device that radically shrinks one of the most fundamental elements of modern technology.
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Build Your Own Raspberry Pi Home Network Content Filter
Boost both your digital security and your web browsing speed with an inexpensive, DIY packet inspector.
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Six-Word Sci-Fi: A Story Set in a World Without Paper
Each month we publish a six-word story—and it could be written by you.
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QAnon Is Like a Game—a Most Dangerous Game
The conspiracy theory has the best attributes of a multiplatform game, except that it can cause harm in the real world.
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How to Thwart Facial Recognition and Other Surveillance
Whether you're protesting or just stepping out for a boba, you deserve some algorithm-free alone time.
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Get Lost With a Signal-Blocking Smartphone Pouch
It's not hard for bad actors to track or hack your phone. But put it inside a Faraday pouch and you can drop off the digital map.
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A YouTube Radio Archivist Blasts the Past Into the Present
I went looking for the broadcasts of my coming-of-age in the early '90s. What I discovered instead was Jean-Gabriel Prats' trove of audio ephemera.
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Angry Nerd: If You're Dating Online in a Pandemic, Ghost or Be Ghosted
Don't want to see me again? Please, spare me the proper breakup. It's more suitable to our contactless existence.
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The Power and Paradox of Bad Software
The software industry makes amazing tools for itself, while doctors and scientists are stuck with old code. Tech needs to quit hacking and start listening.
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The Fantasy of Pokémon Go Is More Important Than Ever
Players of the alternate-reality game are still at it. They also seem, in these crazy days, to exhibit well-being.
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Term Limits Won't Fix the Court
The death of Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Friday has prompted, once again, a wave of discussion about the idea of limiting the terms of Supreme Court justices. If only Ginsburg had been forced to retire years ago, the theory goes, the country would not be facing down the uncertainty of a confirmation fight in the midst of an already tumultuous election season. The hope, which first gained traction in m
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Norrsken upptäckt vid komet
Norrsken är tidigare känt inte bara från jorden utan också från andra planeter, till exempel Jupiter och Mars, och även några månar i solsystemet. Men nya mätningar visar att det går att skåda norrsken även från en komet. Upptäckten av norrsken vid en komet bygger på mätningar från flera instrument på den europeiska rymdorganisationen ESA:s rymdsond Rosetta, bland dem ett från Institutet för rymd
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AI planners in Minecraft could help machines design better cities
A dozen or so steep-roofed buildings cling to the edges of an open-pit mine. High above them, on top of an enormous rock arch, sits an inaccessible house. Elsewhere, a railway on stilts circles a group of multicolored tower blocks. Ornate pagodas decorate a large paved plaza. And a lone windmill turns on an island, surrounded by square pigs. This is Minecraft city-building, AI style. Minecraft ha
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Digitale tvillinger: »I gamle dage kiggede vi i kalenderen – i dag kigger vi i data«
PLUS. I gamle dage kiggede man i kalenderen for at se, hvornår konstruktionen skulle inspiceres. I dag har vi kontinuerlige data. Og offshore er bare begyndelsen.
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Live News Updates on Covid-19
Clinical trials have not included children, so vaccines for them may not arrive until the next school year, while adults may get theirs by summer.
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Democratic Donors Push Biden for a Cabinet Free of Fossil Fuel Connections
A group of more than 60 donors is urging Joe Biden to renounce advisers with ties to the fossil fuel industry.
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Observation of the polaronic character of excitons in a two-dimensional semiconducting magnet CrI3
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18627-x Exciton dynamics can be strongly affected by lattice vibrations through electron-phonon (e-ph) coupling. Here, the authors show the presence of strong e-ph coupling in bilayer CrI3 and observe a Raman feature with periodic broad modes up to the 8th order, attributed to the polaronic character of excitons.
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IRES-targeting small molecule inhibits enterovirus 71 replication via allosteric stabilization of a ternary complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18594-3 Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that promotes translation of viral RNA. Here the authors show that an antiviral small molecule DMA-135 binds to the EV71 IRES RNA, inducing conformational change and stabilizing a ternary complex to repress translation.
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A theoretical model of Polycomb/Trithorax action unites stable epigenetic memory and dynamic regulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18507-4 Polycomb (PcG) and Trithorax (TrxG) group regulate several hundred target genes with important roles in development and disease. Here the authors combine experiment and theory to provide evidence that the Polycomb/Trithorax system has the potential for a rich repertoire of regulatory modes beyond simple epi
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A Cu(II)–ATP complex efficiently catalyses enantioselective Diels–Alder reactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18554-x ATP acts as a co-substrate in enzyme catalysed reactions, but can also specifically bind metal ions. Here, the authors show that ATP interacts with copper ions and forms a Cu(II)-ATP complex that efficiently catalyses Diels-Alder reactions, and determine ATP residues that are essential for this activity.
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Summer warming explains widespread but not uniform greening in the Arctic tundra biome
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18479-5 Satellites provide clear evidence of greening trends in the Arctic, but high-resolution pan-Arctic quantification of these trends is lacking. Here the authors analyse high-resolution Landsat data to show widespread greening in the Arctic, and find that greening trends are linked to summer warming overall bu
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A cell-type deconvolution meta-analysis of whole blood EWAS reveals lineage-specific smoking-associated DNA methylation changes
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18618-y Smoking-associated DNA methylation changes in whole blood have been reported by many EWAS. Here, the authors use a cell-type deconvolution algorithm to identify cell-type specific DNA methylation signals in seven EWAS, identifying lineage-specific smoking-associated DNA methylation changes.
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Bimetallic nickel-molybdenum/tungsten nanoalloys for high-efficiency hydrogen oxidation catalysis in alkaline electrolytes
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18585-4 The lack of efficient and cost-effective catalysts for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) hampers the application of hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells. Here, authors reported bimetallic MoNi4 and WNi4 nanoalloys with marked HOR activity in alkali, among which MoNi4 outperforms the Pt/C catalyst.
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VAV2 signaling promotes regenerative proliferation in both cutaneous and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18524-3 The Rho signalling pathway is frequently activated in squamous carcinomas. Here, the authors find that the Rho GEF VAV2 is over expressed in both cutaneous and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and that at the molecular level VAV2 promotes a pro-tumorigenic stem cell-like signalling programme.
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Ep. 48: Capturing the Songs of a Changing Climate
This month: Acoustic ecologists are racing to record Earth's shifting soundscapes before they disappear. Some researchers are using their recordings to answer questions about how the environment and its inhabitants are changing, while others are sounding the alarm on pressing conservation issues.
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Mitogenomic architecture of the multivalent endemic black clam (Villorita cyprinoides) and its phylogenetic implications
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72194-1 Mitogenomic architecture of the multivalent endemic black clam ( Villorita cyprinoides ) and its phylogenetic implications
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Prediction of age-related macular degeneration disease using a sequential deep learning approach on longitudinal SD-OCT imaging biomarkers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72359-y
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Digestive activity and organic compounds of Nezara viridula watery saliva induce defensive soybean seed responses
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72540-3
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Screening participation after a false positive result in organized cervical cancer screening: a nationwide register-based cohort study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72279-x
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The distinctive geographic patterns of common pigmentation variants at the OCA2 gene
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72262-6
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Assessing magnetic and inductive thermal properties of various surfactants functionalised Fe3O4 nanoparticles for hyperthermia
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71703-6 Assessing magnetic and inductive thermal properties of various surfactants functionalised Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles for hyperthermia
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Alternative splicing of MR1 regulates antigen presentation to MAIT cells
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72394-9
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Regulation of degenerative spheroids after injury
Scientific Reports, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71906-x
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How to jupyter notebook into dark theme
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Ann Arbor OKs move to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms, plants
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The Supply of Disinformation Will Soon Be Infinite
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The End of Hunger: Vertical Farming
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Soaring wealth during pandemic highlights rising inequality
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Gig Economy Company Launches Uber, But for Evicting People
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Paralysed man moves in mind-reading exoskeleton
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Nanoparticle eats plaques responsible for heart attacks.
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Cincinnati Children's scientists identify hormone that might help treat malabsorption
Scientists at Cincinnati Children's used human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells to discover how our bodies control the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat. They further found that one hormone might be able to reverse a congenital disorder in babies who cannot adequately absorb nutrients and need intravenous feeding to survive.
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Web resources bring new insight into COVID-19
Two new web resources put at researchers' fingertips information about cellular genes whose expression is affected by coronavirus infection and place these data points in the context of the complex network of host molecular signaling pathways.
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New freshwater database tells water quality story for 12K lakes globally
Although less than one per cent of all water in the world is freshwater, it is what we drink and use for agriculture. In other words, it's vital to human survival. York University researchers have just created a publicly available water quality database for close to 12,000 freshwater lakes globally – almost half of the world's freshwater supply – that will help scientists monitor and manage the he
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New drug candidate found for hand, foot and mouth disease
Duke researchers have identified a potential drug candidate against enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot and mouth disease in infants and young children. The compound of interest is a small molecule that binds to RNA, the virus's genetic material, and changes its 3-D shape in a way that stops the virus from multiplying without harming its human host. It's an antiviral strategy that could b
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Sprogmodel kan oversætte tungt jurasprog til hverdagstale
PLUS. NLP skal gøre kancellisprog simpelt. Men det kræver de rette træningsdata.
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Nasa outlines plan for first woman on Moon by 2024
The US space agency (Nasa) formally outlines its $28bn plan to return astronauts to the Moon by 2024.
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The Debates Could Seal Biden's Fate
Last weekend, Philippe Reines walked over to Ron Klain 's house in Washington, D.C., to hand off his Donald Trump outfit: the suit, the shoes with the lifts, the shirt, the long red tie, the cufflinks. Just in case. When the former Hillary Clinton aide stored the outfit in a bag after playing Trump in debate prep four years ago, a part of him thought it might one day be in her presidential librar
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New freshwater database tells water quality story for 12K lakes globally
Although less than one per cent of all water in the world is freshwater, it is what we drink and use for agriculture. In other words, it's vital to human survival. York University researchers have just created a publicly available water quality database for close to 12,000 freshwater lakes globally—almost half of the world's freshwater supply—that will help scientists monitor and manage the health
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Think international to end climate change, the wonder of flies, and the fourth wave of globalization: Books in brief
Nature, Published online: 22 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02670-1 Andrew Robinson reviews five of the week's best science picks.
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Europe unveils targets for hyped research 'missions'
Horizon Europe missions would focus funding on goals such as reducing cancer deaths
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Coronavirus bruger heparansulfat til at trænge ind i cellerne
Ny forskning fra Københavns Universitet redefinerer den kendte mekanisme til infektion, som COVID-19…
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Det Digitale Motorregister lider af lappeløsninger
Systemet er så presset, at der risikerer at give forkerte beregninger i registreringsafgiften.
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Slut med at prøve sig frem: Kvantesimulator skal finde medicin der virker
I dag er det i høj grad 'trial and error', når der udvikles ny medicin. Men med…
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Cowi efter fusk med bundpladebeton: Højhus bør tjekkes helt til tops
PLUS. I ny rapport anbefaler Cowi at få undersøgt flere dele af skandalebyggeri på Amager. Rapporten fik fredag Københavns Kommune til at kræve et byggestop.
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Coronavirus: work from home if you can, Gove says in government U-turn
Minister announces 'shift in emphasis' in England as coronavirus infections soar Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The public in England will once again be asked to work from home if they can, Michael Gove has said, signalling a U-turn in government advice to combat the spread of coronavirus that he said could help "avert the need for more serious action in the future"
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Panorama med platt lins i kameran
Normalt sett används böjda linser vid vidvinkelfotografering. Men nu har forskare vid bland annat amerikanska Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, utvecklat en vidvinkellins,"fish eye", som är helt platt och bara två millimeter tjock. Den nya linsen kan fånga skarpa bilder med en vinkel på närmare 180 grader, rapporterar forskarna i tidskriften Nano letters.
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NASA plans for return to Moon to cost $28 billion
NASA on Monday revealed its latest plan to return astronauts to the Moon in 2024, and estimated the cost of meeting that deadline at $28 billion, $16 billion of which would be spent on the lunar landing module.
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Rescuers race to save 180 stranded whales in Australia
Rescuers faced a race against time to save nearly 200 whales stuck in a remote Australian harbour on Tuesday, hoping to prevent the toll of 90 dead from rising further after managing to free "a small number" of the stranded mammals.
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Rescuers race to save 180 stranded whales in Australia
Rescuers faced a race against time to save nearly 200 whales stuck in a remote Australian harbour on Tuesday, hoping to prevent the toll of 90 dead from rising further after managing to free "a small number" of the stranded mammals.
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Johnson unveils Covid-19 restrictions expected to last 6 months
UK prime minister urges people to work from home as he introduces measures to control rise in coronavirus infections
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Bringing the Ocean's Midnight Zone Into the Light
The Monterey Bay Aquarium has learned how to raise the deepest sea life to the surface and keep it alive for display.
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Edzard Ernst Tackles Chiropractic
Edzard Ernst's new book is a handy, comprehensive reference for all things chiropractic. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Premier Inn owner Whitbread plans to cut up to 6,000 jobs
UK group says sales of food and hotel rooms remain depressed by 40% compared with 2019
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Face shields ineffective at trapping aerosols, says Japanese supercomputer
Simulation using world's fastest supercomputer casts doubt on effectiveness in preventing spread of coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Plastic face shields are almost totally ineffective at trapping respiratory aerosols, according to modelling in Japan , casting doubt on their effectiveness in preventing the spread of coronavirus . A simulation using Fugaku,
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Återkoppling "Fantastiska fakta om svampar"
Vi läste med förväntan ovan nämnda artikel, men blev bekymrade över flera felaktiga påståenden. "Hoppet står till vetenskapen" säger Viveka Ljungström i ledaren i samma nummer av F&F. Tidningen beskriver på sin hemsida att "Vi undviker lösa spekulationer och pseudovetenskap – det finns så mycket i den riktiga vetenskapen som är tillräckligt spännande och överraskande". Vi läsare föreställer oss at
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At the Math Olympiad, Computers Prepare to Go for the Gold – Facts So Romantic
Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine 's Abstractions blog . Computer scientists are trying to build an AI system that can win a gold medal at the world's premier math competition. Photograph by Valerie Kuypers / AFP / Getty Images The 61st International Mathematical Olympiad , or IMO, began yesterday. It may go down in history for at least two reasons: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic it's
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FN's verdensmål fylder år: Klimaet lider, og fremskridtene går for langsomt
Verden har nu ti år til at nå FN's 17 verdensmål – Og der er lang vej endnu, siger eksperter.
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There are now at least 10 tribes of Covid. Which one are you? | Suzanne Moore
Our responses to coronavirus are not us-and-them, like Brexit. We have fractured into many different groups. From the graph fetishists to the snoops, which one are you? It's easy to say that Covid has divided us. But this is not a simple us-and-them split like Brexit, however much that percolates through our collective unconscious. We are now all members of ever-shifting tribes. Here are some tha
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Covid UK: scientists at loggerheads over approach to new restrictions
Two groups of prominent scientists write open letters with conflicting advice on how to tackle virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Rival groups of scientists are at loggerheads over how government should handle the Covid pandemic, with one advising that only over-65s and the vulnerable should be shielded, while the other backs nationwide measures. The conflicting a
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Ren Zhiqiang – who called Chinese president a 'clown' – jailed for 18 years
Former real estate mogul was investigated after criticising Xi Jinping over his handling of the coronavirus pandemic China has sentenced an influential former property executive and critic of President Xi Jinping to 18 years in prison for corruption. Ren Zhiqiang, the former chairman of Huayuan, a state-owned real estate group, was also fined 4.2m yuan, Beijing No. 2 Intermediate Court said on it
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Country diary: the killer role of pollen in the hawkweed's life cycle
Ketton Quarry, Rutland: Pliny the Elder believed that hawks sprinkled sap from hawkweeds into their eyes. But the plant's true hawkish behaviour was only recently discovered Old limestone quarries are fantastic places for nature, and here at Ketton the Wildlife Trust reserve fills the space left by stone extracted in the 1930s. Next door there is light industry, on what would have been the quarry
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Childhood sexual abuse: Mental and physical after-effects closely linked
A new study has uncovered a correlation between psychological distress and genital and urinary health problems in female survivors of childhood sexual abuse.
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Diabetes dramatically reduces the kidney's ability clean itself
The kidneys often become bulky and dysfunctional in diabetes, and now scientists have found that one path to this damage dramatically reduces the kidney's ability to clean up after itself.
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Nearly 20 percent of americans don't have enough to eat
More than 18 percent of US adults do not know whether they will have enough to eat from day to day, and the numbers are worse for Hispanics, Blacks, people with obesity, and women, a new report shows.
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Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought
Radio-resistance in bacteria first evolves through the adaptation of DNA repair mechanisms, however as evolution continues more mutations accumulate, and more cellular metabolic processes are affected. It is not yet clear which panel of mutations provides high-level resistance. The study shows that acquisition of radio-resistance via evolution is possible independent of other mechanisms like extre
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What does it mean to be alive? Paul Nurse on defining 'life'
Is it possible to define the biological, chemical and physical functions that separate cells, plants and even humans from inanimate objects? In his new book, Paul Nurse, Nobel prize winner and director of the Francis Crick Institute, addresses a question that has long plagued both philosophers and scientists – what does it really mean to be alive? Speaking to Madeleine Finlay, Paul delves into wh
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Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought
The toughest organisms on Earth, called extremophiles, can survive extreme conditions like extreme dryness (desiccation), extreme cold, space vacuum, acid, or even high-level radiation. So far, the toughest of all seems to be the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans—able to survive doses of radiation a thousand times greater than those fatal to humans. But to this date, scientists remained puzzled by
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Evolution of radio-resistance is more complicated than previously thought
The toughest organisms on Earth, called extremophiles, can survive extreme conditions like extreme dryness (desiccation), extreme cold, space vacuum, acid, or even high-level radiation. So far, the toughest of all seems to be the bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans—able to survive doses of radiation a thousand times greater than those fatal to humans. But to this date, scientists remained puzzled by
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What does it mean to be alive? Paul Nurse on defining 'life'
Is it possible to define the biological, chemical and physical functions that separate cells, plants and even humans from inanimate objects? In his new book, Paul Nurse, Nobel prize winner and director of the Francis Crick Institute, addresses a question that has long plagued both philosophers and scientists – what does it really mean to be alive? Speaking to Madeleine Finlay, Paul delves into why
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The Lancet changes editorial policy after hydroxychloroquine Covid study retraction
New policy comes after serious quality control questions were raised about the data relied