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Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travel
Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modelling of an undergraduate student.
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Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas. All wildlife tended to avoid places that were recently visited by recreational users. And they avoided mountain bikers and motorized vehicles significantly more than they did hikers and h
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Remote neuropsychology tests for children shown effective, study finds
Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study indicates. The finding could help expand access to specialists and reduce barriers to care, particularly as the popularity of telemedicine grows during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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Secondary variant of Photorhabdus luminescens interacts with plant roots
One of the basic approaches in organic farming is to use organisms beneficial to the system to combat pests. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is one such beneficial organism. In the case of insect larvae infestation, the bacterium produces a variety of different toxins which quickly kill the larvae. Yet, it seems this is not the only ability of Photorhabdus that can be exploited for organic
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Finding the Achilles' heel of a killer parasite
Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes—parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis. The findings, published online today in Science, could change the course of this disease that kills up to 250,000 people a year.
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Newfound brain structure explains why some birds are so smart—and maybe even self-aware
Circuitry of the pallium mirrors the mammalian neocortex
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COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
During the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 created a rally effect around political leaders, according to a large-scale study published Sept. 24, 2020. The rise of COVID-19 cases was associated with a 15- to 20-point boost in approval for United States governors and an average 14-point gain for world leaders. It's unclear how long the effect lasts, but the health crisis might be a catalyst to
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During pandemic, racism puts additional stress on Asian Americans
People of Asian ancestry face yet another set of challenges posed by racism and xenophobia which has soared during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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New nemertean species found in Panama represents the first of its genus from the Caribbean
A novel ribbon worm species was discovered as part of the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute's Training in Tropical Taxonomy program in the Bocas del Toro archipelago in Panama
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Age restrictions for handguns make little difference in homicides
In the United States, individual state laws barring 18- to 20-year-olds from buying or possessing a handgun make little difference in the rate of homicides involving a gun by people in that age group, a new University of Washington study has found.
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A step toward helping patients breathe deeply
In a new study, researchers at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) report that a protein called TL1A drives fibrosis in several mouse models, triggering tissue remodeling, and making it harder for lungs and airways to function normally.
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New system detects faint communications signals using the principles of quantum physics
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised and demonstrated a system that could dramatically increase the performance of communications networks while enabling record-low error rates in detecting even the faintest of signals, potentially decreasing the total amount of energy required for state-of-the-art networks by a factor of 10 to 100.
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Finding the Achilles' heel of a killer parasite
Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes—parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis. The findings, published online today in Science, could change the course of this disease that kills up to 250,000 people a year.
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Neandertals have adopted male sex chromosome from modern humans
In 1997, the very first Neandertal DNA sequence—just a small part of the mitochondrial genome—was determined from an individual discovered in the Neander Valley, Germany, in 1856. Since then, improvements in molecular techniques have enabled scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology to determine high quality sequences of the autosomal genomes of several Neandertals, and
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Experts lead research into impact of climate change on rainforest elephants
Experts from the University of Stirling, working closely with the Government of Gabon, have led an international study into the impact of climate change on Central Africa's rainforests and the threat posed to elephant populations in the region.
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Mystery of giant proton pump solved
Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, generating energy that supports life. A giant molecular proton pump, called complex I, is crucial: It sets in motion a chain of reactions, creating a proton gradient that powers the generation of ATP, the cell's fuel. Despite complex I's central role, the mechanism by which it transports protons across the membrane has so far been unknown. Now, Leonid
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Nvidia RTX 3090 Review Roundup: Absolute Creative Power, Maximum Chonk
Reviews of the RTX 3090 make it clear this GPU is a lot of things. It's about the weight of a small roasted chicken (RTX 3090: 4.84 pounds; roasted chicken: 5-7 pounds). It's longer than the Xbox Series X is tall. It's a true triple-slot GPU and packs 24GB of VRAM. If you choose to wield an RTX 3090 as an offhand weapon, you will suffer a -4 / -8 to attacks due to its off-balance weight and heft.
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Experts lead research into impact of climate change on rainforest elephants
Experts from the University of Stirling, working closely with the Government of Gabon, have led an international study into the impact of climate change on Central Africa's rainforests and the threat posed to elephant populations in the region.
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Mystery of giant proton pump solved
Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, generating energy that supports life. A giant molecular proton pump, called complex I, is crucial: It sets in motion a chain of reactions, creating a proton gradient that powers the generation of ATP, the cell's fuel. Despite complex I's central role, the mechanism by which it transports protons across the membrane has so far been unknown. Now, Leonid
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Hundreds of Elephants Suddenly Dropped Dead Because of Neurotoxin, Experts Say
Earlier this year, conservationists in Botswana came across something gruesome: hundreds of elephants were dropping dead — and details are slowly emerging about the horrific scene. Two flights over the Okavango Panhandle, a lush river delta, confirmed that about 356 elephants had mysteriously died, as The New York Times reported at the time. They could rule out poachers, as all their tusks were s
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Unusual climate conditions influenced WWI mortality and subsequent Spanish flu pandemic
Scientists have spotted a once-in-a-century climate anomaly during World War I that likely increased mortality during the war and the influenza pandemic in the years that followed.
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A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech
Self-erasing chips developed at the University of Michigan could help stop counterfeit electronics or provide alerts if sensitive shipments are tampered with.
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Satellite finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Lowell
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Lowell that revealed the storm was dealing with wind shear.
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Cooked carrots can trigger allergic reactions
The consumption of raw carrots triggers allergic reactions in many people. Contrary to popular belief, cooked carrots can also have this effect. This was recently discovered by a research team at the University of Bayreuth.
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Leading water scientists warn of risks in shift to monoculture crops, tree plantations
Conversion of large swaths of land to uniform tree plantations and single-crop species may lead to unintended consequences for the water cycle, putting ecosystems at greater risk for fires, floods, droughts and even hurricanes, warns a think-tank group of almost 30 water scientists from 11 countries.
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New 'atlas' of human heart cells first step toward precision treatments for heart disease
Scientists have for the first time documented all of the different cell types and genes expressed in the healthy human heart, in research published in the journal Nature.Cardiologists from the Mazankowski Alberta Heart Institute at the University of Alberta joined teams from Cambridge, Boston and Berlin to use state-of-the-art analytical techniques to sequence the ribonucleic acids (RNA) in nine t
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Talking alone: Researchers use artificial intelligence tools to predict loneliness
A team led by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has used artificial intelligence technologies to analyze natural language patterns to discern degrees of loneliness in older adults.
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Hypercoagulability in patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
In this AJR article, 82 patients with COVID-19 who underwent abdominal ultrasound or CT were retrospectively compared with 82 patients without COVID-19 for thromboembolism and solid-organ infarction. Nine (11%) patients with COVID-19 had thromboembolic findings, with medium to large arterial thrombi in five. One patient without COVID-19 had known portal vein thrombus on CT. Thromboembolic findings
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Key genetic clue missing in fight against superbugs
For the first time, researchers have discovered how antibiotic resistance genes are spreading, at a continental scale, via bacterial plasmids in the hospital superbug, Klebsiella pneumoniae. The researchers say it is critical that plasmids are included when tracking antibiotic resistance in order to have the best chance of stopping superbugs.
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Study calls out the genes that make cancer cells so hard to kill
Developing immunotherapies for cancers is made more difficult by how different tumors are from each other. Some cancers are actually made worse by immunotherapy. A piece falls into place on the complicated puzzle of genetic interactions of cancer cells. There's a great diversity among cancer cells, though many of them share one unfortunate trait: They're often quite adept at resisting the body's
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Bird Brains Are Far More Humanlike Than Once Thought
The avian cortex had been hiding in plain sight all along. Humans were just too birdbrained to see it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How lockdown birds sang to a different tune
It's official, bird song did sound different during lockdown, according to a scientific study.
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Some severe COVID-19 cases linked to genetic mutations or antibodies that attack the body
Two new studies offer an explanation for why COVID-19 cases can be so variable. A subset of patients has mutations in key immunity genes; other patients have auto-antibodies that target the same components of the immune system. Both circumstances could contribute to severe forms of the disease.
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Mapping the human heart, cell by cell
Scientists have mapped and described the function of cells in six regions of the adult heart, providing a new foundation for studying heart disease.
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Uncovering a 'suPAR' culprit behind kidney injury in COVID-19
A new observational study finds patients in the hospital for COVID-19 have high levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR), an immune-derived pathogenic protein that is strongly predictive of kidney injury.
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Amazon Announces Security Drone That Flies Around Your Home
No Thanks Ring, the Amazon-owned security company known for its smart doorbells , just unveiled a tiny drone called the "Always Home Cam" that flies around and records inside your home. The $250 drone autonomously takes off, flies around on patrol, and lands in its charging dock, The Verge reports — like the nightmare panopticon version of a robot vacuum. While the new Ring drone is designed to r
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NASA nets Dolphin as an extratropical storm
NASA's Aqua satellite caught a visible image of Dolphin after it passed east central Japan on Sept. 24, 2020, where it became an extratropical storm in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Waste generation by hospital emergency departments is highlighted for first time
Emergency departments of hospitals generate significant amounts of environmentally harmful waste which could be reduced through basic changes to disposal policies and practices.
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Building a better stroke diagnosis
An interdisciplinary group of researchers at the Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing at Case Western Reserve University have uncovered a new suite of human blood biomarkers which could someday help emergency clinicians quickly recognize whether someone is experiencing a stroke with a simple blood test.
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Genetic study uncovers mutation associated with fibromuscular dysplasia
Researchers report first clinically actionable findings for a rare blood vessel disease in a study of four unrelated families, all with the same genetic variant.
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Bird Brains Are Far More Humanlike Than Once Thought
The avian cortex had been hiding in plain sight all along. Humans were just too birdbrained to see it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bird Brains Are Far More Humanlike Than Once Thought
The avian cortex had been hiding in plain sight all along. Humans were just too birdbrained to see it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bird Brains Are Far More Humanlike Than Once Thought
The avian cortex had been hiding in plain sight all along. Humans were just too birdbrained to see it — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Driven by climate, more frequent, severe wildfires in Cascade Range reshape forests
New research found that while the increased wildfire activity is causing widespread changes in the structure and composition of these mid-to-high elevation forests, the new landscapes are also likely more resilient to projected upward trends in future fire activity and climate conditions.
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Centuries-old conjecture about formation of the solar system verified
Using a limited set of mathematical equations, a mathematical sciences professor said he has confirmed a 224-year-old math conjecture about the origins of our solar system, providing insights about the process that leads to the formation of solar systems across the universe.
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New tool mimics human skin to allow detailed study of mosquito biting
Scientists have developed a tool for studying the biting behavior of common pathogen-carrying mosquitoes.
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Secondary variant of Photorhabdus luminescens interacts with plant roots
One of the basic approaches in organic farming is to use organisms beneficial to the system to combat pests. The bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens is one such beneficial organism. Yet, it seems this is not the only ability of Photorhabdus that can be exploited for organic plant cultivation. A German research team has discovered additional properties that could significantly extend its range of us
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Post-Tropical Storm Teddy in NASA Newfoundland nighttime view
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided an infrared image of Post-tropical cyclone Teddy over the province of Newfoundland, Canada in the early morning hours of Sept. 24, 2020.
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COVID-19 infected workers return to work faster using time and symptom-based protocols
Recently, investigators assessed the experience of using a test-based protocol in over 1000 infected health care workers.
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Reimagining everyday technologies in light of COVID-19
In his recent paper published in the Association of Computing Machinery's journal, Interactions, City, University of London's Dr Alex Taylor calls on the industries and practitioners who build technologies, and the scholars who study them, to imagine different futures which are responsive to and responsible for the full diversity of lives lived.
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A study could provide guideline for exercise training aimed at high blood pressure patient
Brazilian researchers' finding that exercising in the evening reduces blood pressure more than in the morning can help health professionals choose the time of day for aerobic training depending on the type of anti-hypertensive drug they take.
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Intersecting social inequities increase the likelihood of severe illness due to COVID-19
Black, South Asian and Aboriginal populations from disadvantaged socioeconomic backgrounds in Canada are nearly four times more likely to have three or more medical conditions that have been identified as risk factors for severe illness from COVID-19.
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Scientists achieve higher precision weak force measurement between protons, neutrons
Through a one-of-a-kind experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nuclear physicists have precisely measured the weak interaction between protons and neutrons. The result quantifies the weak force theory as predicted by the Standard Model of Particle Physics.
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Next-gen bioinformatics tool enables big data analysis without programming expertise
A new data analysis tool developed by MD Anderson researchers incorporates a user-friendly, natural-language interface to aid biomedical researchers without bioinformatics or programming expertise to conduct intuitive data.
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How to bounce back from stretched out stretchable sensors
Elastic can stretch too far and that could be problematic in wearable sensors. A team of researchers at Yokohama National University has proposed a fix to prevent too much stretching while improving the sensing ability of electronics. This could lead to advanced prosthetics or disaster recovery robotics. They published their results on July 29 in the Scientific Reports.
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Carriers of two genetic mutations at greater risk for illness and death from COVID-19
Tel Aviv University researchers suggest that carriers of the genetic mutations PiZ and PiS are at high risk for severe illness and even death from COVID-19. These mutations lead to deficiency in the alpha1-antitrypsin protein, which protects lung tissues from damage in case of severe infections. Other studies have already associated deficiency in this protein with inflammatory damage to lung funct
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Autopsies Show Varied Forms of Heart Damage in COVID-19 Patients
The multifarious nature of the damage means treatments for cardiac issues during infection will require tailored approaches.
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Researchers Invent $1 Hearing Aid
Custom hearing aids can be prohibitively expensive to the millions of people around the world who are experiencing hearing loss. But thanks to a new invention, custom hearing aids could be closing in on a massive price drop. An open-source hearing aid built using off-the-shelf parts could slash the price to under a single dollar. "The challenge we set for ourselves was to build a minimalist heari
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Report: Gene-Hacking Plants and Animals Could Fight Climate Change
Feed Me, Seymour When we think of geoengineering the environment to counteract global climate change, we typically conjure the image of massive projects like blocking out sunlight . But a new report suggests that a biological approach to geoengineering — gene hacking the DNA of plants and animals to curb carbon emissions — could be a far more useful approach, according to Axios . In other words,
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Migrating Tornadoes Bring Heightened Danger to the Southeast
Social vulnerabilities in the region, such as the prevalence of mobile homes, highlight the need for educating residents about storm risks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nanocrystals make volcanoes explode
Tiny crystals, ten thousand times thinner than a human hair, can cause explosive volcanic eruptions. This surprising connection has recently been discovered by a German-British research team led by Dr. Danilo Di Genova from the Bavarian Research Institute of Experimental Geochemistry & Geophysics (BGI) at the University of Bayreuth.
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Older the person, higher the self-esteem: age differences in self-esteem in Japan
Self-esteem, or the value one assigns oneself, changes through life. Studies from western countries report a decline in self-esteem post-60 years, but studies in Japan have not sufficiently explored this, owing to partial perspectives on self-esteem and not investigating people aged 70 and older. Now, a new study by Japanese researchers examines the relationship of self-esteem with age and present
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NASA estimating Beta's rains moving into the Tennessee valley
Using a NASA satellite rainfall product that incorporates data from satellites and observations, NASA estimated Post-tropical Cyclone Beta's rainfall rates as it moved over Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee. Beta continues a steady northeast track into Mississippi, bringing heavy rainfall across Mississippi into the Tennessee Valley.
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Alexa Now Has Its Own Questions for You
A new feature from Amazon allows the intelligent assistant to ask for clarification on your requests.
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A question of reality
Physicists have published a review that explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and its applications.
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Reliable window fans for keeping cool and breathing easy
Keep cool with one of these fans. (Amazon/) Opening a window to let in some fresh air is one of the best parts of transitional seasons. Adding a dedicated window fan into the mix can extend these benefits even further, stimulating air circulation and equalizing humidity and temperature levels. For any season or situation where indoor air quality is less than ideal, or for proper ventilation of du
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Study provides additional support for use of new class of diabetes drugs
A new study led by a cardiologist from Brigham and Women's Hospital has assessed the cardiovascular and renal outcomes for ertugliflozin, an SGLT2 inhibitor prescribed for patients with type 2 diabetes to help them control blood sugar levels.
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Researchers demonstrate how deep learning can advance study of neural degeneration
Researchers have demonstrated the utility of artificial intelligence (AI) in identifying and categorizing neural degeneration in the model organism C. elegans. The tool uses deep learning, a form of AI, and should facilitate and expedite research into neural degeneration.
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New system detects faint communications signals using the principles of quantum physics
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have devised and demonstrated a system that could dramatically increase the performance of communications networks while enabling record-low error rates in detecting even the faintest of signals.
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Twin studies suggest impaired type I interferon signaling may contribute to severe COVID-19 symptoms
Two new studies report specific mechanisms of impaired type I interferon (IFN) signaling in some hospitalized patients suffering from severe cases of COVID-19, suggesting that screens for these defects could help identify patients at the highest risk of life-threatening complications from SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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Scientists trace severe COVID-19 to faulty genes and an autoimmune condition
An international team led by Jean-Laurent Casanova has led to a breakthrough in understanding why only some people develop severe COVID-19: due to faulty genes or misguided antibodies, they lack type I interferons, proteins vital in protecting against viruses. The findings point to certain existing medical interventions as potentially beneficial treatments.
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Finding the Achilles' heel of a killer parasite
Two studies led by UT Southwestern researchers shed light on the biology and potential vulnerabilities of schistosomes — parasitic flatworms that cause the little-known tropical disease schistosomiasis. The findings, published online today in Science, could change the course of this disease that kills up to 250,000 people a year.
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Some severe COVID-19 cases linked to genetic mutations or antibodies that attack the body
Two new studies offer an explanation for why COVID-19 cases can be so variable. A subset of patients has mutations in key immunity genes; other patients have autoantibodies that target the same components of the immune system. Both circumstances could contribute to severe forms of the disease.
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Y chromosomes of Neandertals and Denisovans now sequenced
An international research team led by Martin Petr and Janet Kelso of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has determined Y chromosome sequences of three Neandertals and two Denisovans. These Y chromosomes provide new insights into the relationships and population histories of archaic and modern humans, including new evidence for ancient gene flow from early m
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Stirling experts lead research into impact of climate change on rainforest elephants
Experts from the University of Stirling, working closely with the Government of Gabon, have led an international study into the impact of climate change on Central Africa's rainforests and the threat posed to elephant populations in the region.
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Mystery of giant proton pump solved
Mitochondria are the powerhouses of our cells, generating energy that supports life. A giant molecular proton pump, called complex I, is crucial: It sets in motion a chain of reactions, creating a proton gradient that powers the generation of ATP, the cell's fuel. Leonid Sazanov and his group at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) have solved the mystery of how complex I
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Talc and petroleum jelly among the best lubricants for people wearing PPE
Talcum powder, a coconut oil-cocoa butter beeswax mixture, and petroleum jelly provide the best skin protection for long-term PPE use, say scientists.
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Loneliness levels high during COVID-19 lockdown
During the initial phase of COVID-19 lockdown, rates of loneliness among people in the UK were high and were associated with a number of social and health factors, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jenny Groarke of Queen's University Belfast, UK, and colleagues.
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Early admixture with humans led to Y chromosome replacement in late Neanderthals
In one of the first studies to comprehensively analyze Y chromosomes of humans' two closest relatives, Denisovans and Neanderthals, researchers report what prior studies have suggested: early gene flow events between archaic and modern humans led to the eventual replacement of archaic Neanderthal Y chromosomes by introgressed Homo sapiens Y chromosomes.
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Marine heatwaves like 2015's Pacific "blob" attributable to anthropogenic climate warming
Severe marine heatwaves, like 2015's Pacific "blob," are far more likely to occur now than before human-induced global warming began, according to a new study.
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Bird brains' cortex-like structure may be behind complex cognition, and even consciousness
Informing the century-long riddle of why some birds, despite having a radically different forebrain organization than mammals, demonstrate comparable cognitive abilities, two new studies report that a neuron-dense part of the avian brain, the pallium, may help birds achieve these cognitive feats, including conscious awareness.
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In San Francisco bay area, shutdown reduced anthropogenic noise, which changed birdsong quality
Reductions in humanmade noise resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic shutdown led birds in parts of California to adapt their songs to be higher quality, a new study reports.
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Metal wires of carbon complete toolbox for carbon-based computers
Carbon-based computers have the potential to be a lot faster and much more energy efficient than silicon-based computers, but 2D graphene and carbon nanotubes have proved challenging to turn into the elements needed to construct transistor circuits. Graphene nanoribbons can overcome these limitations, but to date scientists have been made only semiconductors and insulators, not the metallic wires
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Accuracy of commercial antibody kits for SARS-CoV-2 varies widely
There is wide variation in the performance of commercial kits for detecting antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), according to a study published September 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Jonathan Edgeworth and Blair Merrick of Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, Suzanne Pickering and Katie Doores of King's College London, and collea
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Genetic or immune defects may impair ability to fight Covid-19
Exclusive: significant proportion of severely ill people have inborn errors, study finds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A significant proportion of patients who develop life-threatening forms of Covid-19 have genetic or immunological defects that impair their ability to fight the virus, research has found. In papers published in the journal Science, the C ovid Human
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News at a glance
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Fighting to be counted
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Seeking a niche
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Logic at the cell surface
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A dynamic viral spike
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Making metallic ribbons
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The heat is on
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Consciousness shared
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Remediating malalignment
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An Olympic curling robot
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Dogs return to the show
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A bacterial battleground
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Identity by association
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Distinct conformational states of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein
Intervention strategies are urgently needed to control the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. The trimeric viral spike (S) protein catalyzes fusion between viral and target cell membranes to initiate infection. Here, we report two cryo–electron microscopy structures derived from a preparation of the full-length S protein, representing its prefusion (2.9-angstro
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Rotational resonances in the H2CO roaming reaction are revealed by detailed correlations
Since its discovery 16 years ago, roaming has become a ubiquitous mechanism in molecular photochemistry. Its general features are now understood, but little detail is known about how the potential energy surface (PES) determines reaction outcomes. We performed detailed experiments on formaldehyde (H 2 CO) photodissociation and determined fully correlated quantum state distributions of the molecul
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Inducing metallicity in graphene nanoribbons via zero-mode superlattices
The design and fabrication of robust metallic states in graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are challenging because lateral quantum confinement and many-electron interactions induce electronic band gaps when graphene is patterned at nanometer length scales. Recent developments in bottom-up synthesis have enabled the design and characterization of atomically precise GNRs, but strategies for realizing GNR
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Adaptation of SARS-CoV-2 in BALB/c mice for testing vaccine efficacy
The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has prioritized the development of small-animal models for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We adapted a clinical isolate of SARS-CoV-2 by serial passaging in the respiratory tract of aged BALB/c mice. The resulting mouse-adapted strain at passage 6 (called MASCp6) showed increased infectivity in mouse lung and
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The immunogenetics of sexual parasitism
Sexual parasitism has evolved as a distinctive mode of reproduction among deep-sea anglerfishes. The permanent attachment of males to host females observed in these species represents a form of anatomical joining, which is otherwise unknown in nature. Pronounced modifications to immune facilities are associated with this reproductive trait. The genomes of species with temporarily attaching males
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Stable perovskite solar cells with efficiency exceeding 24.8% and 0.3-V voltage loss
Further improvement and stabilization of perovskite solar cell (PSC) performance are essential to achieve the commercial viability of next-generation photovoltaics. Considering the benefits of fluorination to conjugated materials for energy levels, hydrophobicity, and noncovalent interactions, two fluorinated isomeric analogs of the well-known hole-transporting material (HTM) Spiro-OMeTAD are dev
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High-impact marine heatwaves attributable to human-induced global warming
Marine heatwaves (MHWs)—periods of extremely high ocean temperatures in specific regions—have occurred in all of Earth's ocean basins over the past two decades, with severe negative impacts on marine organisms and ecosystems. However, for most individual MHWs, it is unclear to what extent they have been altered by human-induced climate change. We show that the occurrence probabilities of the dura
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A neural correlate of sensory consciousness in a corvid bird
Subjective experiences that can be consciously accessed and reported are associated with the cerebral cortex. Whether sensory consciousness can also arise from differently organized brains that lack a layered cerebral cortex, such as the bird brain, remains unknown. We show that single-neuron responses in the pallial endbrain of crows performing a visual detection task correlate with the birds' p
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Photon-recoil imaging: Expanding the view of nonlinear x-ray physics
Addressing the ultrafast coherent evolution of electronic wave functions has long been a goal of nonlinear x-ray physics. A first step toward this goal is the investigation of stimulated x-ray Raman scattering (SXRS) using intense pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser. Earlier SXRS experiments relied on signal amplification during pulse propagation through dense resonant media. By contrast, ou
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Succination inactivates gasdermin D and blocks pyroptosis
Activated macrophages undergo a metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis, accumulating Krebs' cycle intermediates that alter transcription of immune response genes. We extended these observations by defining fumarate as an inhibitor of pyroptotic cell death. We found that dimethyl fumarate (DMF) delivered to cells or endogenous fumarate reacts with gasdermin D (GSDMD) at critical cysteine residues
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Designed protein logic to target cells with precise combinations of surface antigens
Precise cell targeting is challenging because most mammalian cell types lack a single surface marker that distinguishes them from other cells. A solution would be to target cells using specific combinations of proteins present on their surfaces. In this study, we design colocalization-dependent protein switches (Co-LOCKR) that perform AND, OR, and NOT Boolean logic operations. These switches acti
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A single-cell RNA-seq atlas of Schistosoma mansoni identifies a key regulator of blood feeding
Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that infects 240 million people. With no vaccines and only one drug available, new therapeutic targets are needed. The causative agents, schistosomes, are intravascular flatworm parasites that feed on blood and lay eggs, resulting in pathology. The function of the parasite's various tissues in successful parasitism are poorly understood, hindering i
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Large-scale RNAi screening uncovers therapeutic targets in the parasite Schistosoma mansoni
Schistosome parasites kill 250,000 people every year. Treatment of schistosomiasis relies on the drug praziquantel. Unfortunately, a scarcity of molecular tools has hindered the discovery of new drug targets. Here, we describe a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen in adult Schistosoma mansoni that examined the function of 2216 genes. We identified 261 genes with phenotypes affecting neurom
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The evolutionary history of Neanderthal and Denisovan Y chromosomes
Ancient DNA has provided new insights into many aspects of human history. However, we lack comprehensive studies of the Y chromosomes of Denisovans and Neanderthals because the majority of specimens that have been sequenced to sufficient coverage are female. Sequencing Y chromosomes from two Denisovans and three Neanderthals shows that the Y chromosomes of Denisovans split around 700 thousand yea
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Full disclosure
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Synthetic connectivity, emergence, and self-regeneration in the network of prebiotic chemistry
The challenge of prebiotic chemistry is to trace the syntheses of life's key building blocks from a handful of primordial substrates. Here we report a forward-synthesis algorithm that generates a full network of prebiotic chemical reactions accessible from these substrates under generally accepted conditions. This network contains both reported and previously unidentified routes to biotic targets
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The science and medicine of human immunology
Although the development of effective vaccines has saved countless lives from infectious diseases, the basic workings of the human immune system are complex and have required the development of animal models, such as inbred mice, to define mechanisms of immunity. More recently, new strategies and technologies have been developed to directly explore the human immune system with unprecedented preci
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A cortex-like canonical circuit in the avian forebrain
Although the avian pallium seems to lack an organization akin to that of the cerebral cortex, birds exhibit extraordinary cognitive skills that are comparable to those of mammals. We analyzed the fiber architecture of the avian pallium with three-dimensional polarized light imaging and subsequently reconstructed local and associative pallial circuits with tracing techniques. We discovered an iter
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The endoplasmic reticulum P5A-ATPase is a transmembrane helix dislocase
Organelle identity depends on protein composition. How mistargeted proteins are selectively recognized and removed from organelles is incompletely understood. Here, we found that the orphan P5A–adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) transporter ATP13A1 (Spf1 in yeast) directly interacted with the transmembrane segment (TM) of mitochondrial tail–anchored proteins. P5A-ATPase activity mediated the extra
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Pandemic Shutdown Altered Bay Area Birdsongs
As shelter-in-place orders quieted the city of San Francisco, its sparrow population developed softer, sexier songs.
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Y Chromosome from Early Modern Humans Replaced Neanderthal Y
A selective advantage may have led the modern human Y chromosome to sweep through the Neanderthal population after it was introduced via interbreeding more than 100,000 years ago.
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How Neanderthals lost their Y chromosome
Homo sapiens ' Y chromosome spread through Neanderthal populations after early mating
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Hidden immune weakness found in 14% of gravely ill COVID-19 patients
Damaged interferon response helps explain why men get sicker than women
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How the Pandemic Transformed This Songbird's Call
When the San Francisco Bay Area locked down, urban noise levels plummeted. In response, the white-crowned sparrow changed its tune.
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Metal wires of carbon complete toolbox for carbon-based computers
Transistors based on carbon rather than silicon could potentially boost computers' speed and cut their power consumption more than a thousandfold—think of a mobile phone that holds its charge for months—but the set of tools needed to build working carbon circuits has remained incomplete until now.
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Logic at the cell surface
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A dynamic viral spike
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Making metallic ribbons
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The heat is on
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Consciousness shared
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Remediating malalignment
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An Olympic curling robot
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Scientists Sequence Genome of Mold That Gave Us Penicillin, the First Antibiotic
Credit: CABI (Credit: CABI) The discovery of antibiotics by Scottish scientist Alexander Fleming is one of humanity's greatest achievements. Suddenly, diseases that plagued humanity for generations were treatable with a few injections. And it's all thanks to a strain of Penicillium fungus. Now, a team from Imperial College London and Oxford University has revived the mould to sequence its genome
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Fåglar kvittrar bättre under coronakrisen
Fåglar sjunger mycket bättre när staden är tyst. Det hävdar forskare i San Francisco som studerat hur mindre stadsbuller gjort stadens fågelsång bättre under vårens lockdown.
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Ny forskning: Därför är vissa fåglar lika smarta som däggdjur
Nu vet vi varför vissa fåglar är lika smarta som däggdjur. En del av fåglarnas hjärnor är nämligen väldigt lik människans och andra däggdjurs. Det visar ny forskning som gett sig på att förstå varför fåglar är så intelligenta. Spela klippet för att höra mer.
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Bird songs got sexier during the COVID-19 shutdown
A white-crowned sparrow sings to defend his territory and attract mates (JN Phillips/) Early in the pandemic in March and April (or what feels like 10 years ago), there were reports around the world of animals moving into previously busy cityscapes, and a rising chorus of bird calls . And while many people reported increased sightings of coyotes, mountain lions and other animals, the reason may s
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Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' originate over ocean
Researchers have identified a new type of 'landfalling drought' that originates over the ocean before traveling onto land, and which can cause larger, drier conditions than other droughts.
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Ocean Heat Waves Are Directly Linked to Climate Change
The "blob" of hotter ocean water that killed sea lions and other marine life in 2014 and 2015 may become permanent.
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Europe: Modelling the evolution of a second wave of COVID-19
Two scientists from IP2I (CNRS/Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1), in collaboration with a researcher from the University of Southern Denmark and the University of Naples Federico II, have developed a new mathematical model inspired by high energy physics to predict the next waves of the Covid-19 pandemic.
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Uncovering a 'suPAR' culprit behind kidney injury in COVID-19
A new observational study finds patients in the hospital for COVID-19 have high levels of soluble urokinase receptor (suPAR), an immune-derived pathogenic protein that is strongly predictive of kidney injury.
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NASA-NOAA satellite finds wind shear affecting Tropical Storm Lowell
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Eastern North Pacific Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Storm Lowell that revealed the storm was dealing with wind shear.
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Potential drug could 'jam' hand, foot, and mouth disease
Researchers have identified a potential new drug candidate against enterovirus 71, a common cause of hand, foot, and mouth disease in infants and young children. The compound of interest is a small molecule that binds to RNA , the virus's genetic material, and changes its 3D shape in a way that stops the virus from multiplying without harming its human host. There are currently no FDA-approved dr
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Why So Blue, Tarantula? A Mystery Gets a New Clue
The large arachnids have long been thought to be colorblind, but new evidence suggests they can perceive each others' brilliant coloring.
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Researchers explore how the human brain is so resilient
Future technology may be able to monitor and modify the brain to produce enhanced team performance, while increasing the efficiency and accuracy of decisions. The US Army may be able to use this information to enhance future operations.
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Unusual climate conditions influenced WWI mortality and subsequent Spanish flu pandemic
Scientists have spotted a once-in-a-century climate anomaly during World War I that likely increased mortality during the war and the influenza pandemic in the years that followed.
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New analytical model detects mutations in breast cancer
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a computational model which is effective in detecting and identifying genetic mutations in breast tumours. The study, the largest of its kind in the world, includes results from over 3 200 patients with breast cancer.
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A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech
Self-erasing chips developed at the University of Michigan could help stop counterfeit electronics or provide alerts if sensitive shipments are tampered with.
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Can you paint your migraine?
'Can you draw me a picture of your headache?' may sound like an unusual question – but drawings of headache pain provide plastic surgeons with valuable information on which patients are more or less likely to benefit from surgery to alleviate migraine headaches.
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Michael Alley (Penn State) 2: Assertion-Evidence Slides for a Research Talk
https://www.ibiology.org/professional-development/power-point-slide-design Michael Alley shares his expertise on how to design presentation slides and confidently deliver an effective scientific talk. Michael Alley has been teaching scientists and engineers how to design presentation slides and deliver effective scientific talks for over three decades. In this three-part lecture, you will learn (
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Michael Alley (Penn State) 1: Rethinking Scientific Presentations: The Assertion-Evidence Approach
https://www.ibiology.org/professional-development/power-point-slide-design Michael Alley shares his expertise on how to design presentation slides and confidently deliver an effective scientific talk. Michael Alley has been teaching scientists and engineers how to design presentation slides and deliver effective scientific talks for over three decades. In this three-part lecture, you will learn (
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Michael Alley (Penn State) 3: Attaining Confidence in Your Scientific Presentations
https://www.ibiology.org/professional-development/power-point-slide-design Michael Alley shares his expertise on how to design presentation slides and confidently deliver an effective scientific talk. Michael Alley has been teaching scientists and engineers how to design presentation slides and deliver effective scientific talks for over three decades. In this three-part lecture, you will learn (
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This Revolutionary Supplement Was Designed to Reduce the Side Effects of Adderall
Most people take some sort of stimulant every day to boost cognitive functions (concentration, focus, wakefulness, etc.). The most popular choice, of course, is caffeine. It's estimated that some 200 million Americans drink at least one cup of coffee every day. However, in recent years, more and more people are turning to prescription stimulants to get the job done. According to a 2018 survey con
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Neuroscience Has A Whiteness Problem. This Research Project Aims To Fix It
People of African ancestry have been excluded from many studies of brain disorders. In Baltimore, scientists, doctors and community leaders are working to make neuroscience research more diverse. (Image credit: janiecbros/Getty Images)
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Sunak's support plans pose tough choices for business
The chancellor's package was essential, but may yet prove insufficient
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Airports Are Rolling Out 30 Minute COVID Tests
COVID Air A number of airports in Europe are working to bring 30 minute COVID-19 tests to airports, Bloomberg reports . The aviation industry is hoping it could persuade more travelers to resume air travel. Rome's international airport was first to introduce rapid pre-flight screening earlier this month. Heathrow, the busiest airport in Europe, is also testing similar solutions. "We need the syst
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A robot triumphs in a curling match against elite humans
Nature, Published online: 23 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02723-5 Artificial intelligence helps to propel a machine to victory in an Olympic sport described as 'chess on ice'.
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Faint orbital debris that threatens satellites not being monitored closely enough, warn astronomers
University of Warwick astronomers are warning that orbital debris posing a threat to operational satellites is not being monitored closely enough, as they publish a new survey finding that over 75% of the orbital debris they detected could not be matched to known objects in public satellite catalogues.
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Highly detailed map of human heart could guide personalised heart treatments
Scientists have created the most detailed cellular and molecular map of the healthy human heart ever, to understand how the heart functions, and illuminate what goes wrong in cardiovascular disease. Part of the Human Cell Atlas initiative to map every human cell type, the atlas reveals the diversity of cells, and could guide more personalised heart treatments. Published in Nature, this could also
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Something old, something new combine for effective vaccine against parasitic skin disease
Scientists are planning for Phase 1 human trials of a vaccine they developed by using CRISPR gene-editing technology to mutate the parasite that causes leishmaniasis, a skin disease common in tropical regions of the world and gaining ground in the United States.
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LBG individuals use stimulants at higher rates than heterosexuals
Lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals report higher rates of medical, non-medical, and illegal stimulant use compared to heterosexuals, mirroring patterns seen in other substance use. The study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers provides the most detailed picture to date on stimulant use by LGB subgroups and gender. Findings are published in the American Journ
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All the new products Amazon announced at its Fall 2020 event
Dave Limp is delivering the announcements. (Amazon /) Heading into the holiday season, Amazon is getting ready to push literally millions of its own devices out the door and into homes. Last year, the company dumped an enormous pile of new devices onto the market at this event, and we're expecting a similarly massive haul this year. Amazon is doing a private virtual event to announce its new stuf
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Astrocytes, Not Just Neurons, Play a Role in Sleep
In mice, the brain's main glial cell type exhibits distinctive patterns of activity across the sleep-wake cycle and influences the response to sleep deprivation.
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Kan ulige tal være fuldkomne?
Gennem mere end 2.000 år har matematikere ment, at kun lige tal kan være fuldkomne. Ingen har kunnet bevise det, men de har ikke givet op endnu.
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Scientists Gene-Hacked a Pest Caterpillar's Eggs to Self-Destruct
Planned Obsolescence T o protect crops from the pesky fall armyworm, a caterpillar that plagues farmers around the world, a team of scientists altered its DNA so that any eggs it lays will self-destruct. Unfortunately, the end result isn't the dazzling explosion we'd hoped for. Rather, Wired reports , the caterpillar eggs are so overloaded with certain proteins that they're blocked from ever deve
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Air Force, SpaceX mum about sky-high rocket costs
Five years ago, Elon Musk, the multibillionaire CEO of the SpaceX rocket company, smashed his way into the business of launching U.S. military and intelligence satellites, a lucrative market that had been cornered for nearly a decade by United Launch Alliance.
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A minuscule spacecraft joins a pilot's epic journey to fly from pole to pole
On November 16, 2019, pilot and author Robert DeLaurentis took off on an ambitious adventure. Setting out from San Diego county's Gillespie Field, he banked toward Grand Prairie, Texas on the first leg of a pole to pole expedition. At each stop along the way he planned to talk about STEM education, aviation safety and technology, all with the intention of encouraging and inspiring the next generat
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Impurities enhance polymer LED efficiencies
New research published in EPJ B reveals that the higher-than-expected efficiency of PLEDs can be reached through interactions between triplet excitons, and impurities embedded in their polymer layers.
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New education 'hubs' for Deaf children needed to replace social spaces lost when specialist schools close
New dedicated hubs for Deaf children are needed around the country to provide new social spaces, education and support, an expert has said.
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Job security, finances strongly related to increased anxiety during pandemic
For people still employed during the COVID-19 pandemic, job insecurity and financial concern are associated with greater symptoms of depression and anxiety, according to findings from the UConn School of Nursing published recently in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, or JOEM.
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The psychosocial benefits of plastic surgery for young women with congenital breast asymmetry
Nearly all women have breasts that are slightly different from each other. However, some women have more marked differences in the size, shape, or position of the breasts even after development is complete — leading to negative effects on emotional well-being and self-image.
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These methods will make screen time more enriching for your kids
It's time to realize that screen time is not a bad thing. (OK Play/) Colleen Russo Johnson is the co-founder and chief scientist at The OK Company (makers of OK Play).This story originally featured on Working Mother . Screen time : a term that has sadly become loaded with guilt and shame. Working parents have enough pressure on themselves, and the last thing they need is added stress about their
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Researchers examine COVID-19 impact on manufacturing
Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have examined how manufacturers are—or aren't—pivoting successfully in response to major manufacturing disruptions as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.
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A question of quantum reality
Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, "Real or Not Real: that is the question," explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and its applications.
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Overpriced? Researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber
Apps such as Uber are an important mobility feature in many big cities. Driving others from A to B in their own car has become a job for many people. However, many drivers complain that their income is too low. In May 2019, the US television station ABC reported how Uber drivers at Washington airport artificially inflated the price of the service by all going offline at the same time. Within a few
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We won't beat Covid by channelling Churchill | Letters
Boris Johnson's Churchillian language does not impress Richard Teverson , while Katherine Arnott dismisses the prime minister's appeal to people's common sense. Plus letters from Patrick Cosgrove and David Boyd Haycock I, like so many others, am slack-jawed at the incompetence of this government's response to Covid. Our death rate is terrible and the continued mixed messages from "go to work as y
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Life May Have Hopped From Earth to Venus on Asteroid, Scientists Say
Hitching a Ride The discovery of phosphine gas , a potential biomarker, in the atmosphere of Venus made a big splash earlier this month, suggesting that life could survive in the Earth-like conditions inside Venus's clouds. In a recently uploaded preprint , head of Harvard astronomy department Avi Loeb and undergraduate student Amir Siraj argue that the discovery may be chalked up to massive aste
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It's a boy: Tahlequah's baby orca is frolicking, healthy
Tahlequah's new calf is a male, the Center for Whale Research has confirmed.
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Bridging the gap between the magnetic and electronic properties of topological insulators
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology shed light on the relationship between the magnetic properties of topological insulators and their electronic band structure. Their experimental results offer new insights into recent debates regarding the evolution of the band structure with temperature in these materials, which exhibit unusual quantum phenomena and are envisioned to be crucial in next-
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Research: Most Geosynchronous Space Junk Has Never Been Catalogued
Space Shrapnel Space debris poses a serious threat to any satellites — or astronauts — orbiting the Earth. And new research suggests that it's an even bigger problem than we thought. The U.S. Strategic Command manages a database of space objects, including orbital debris, but it can only monitor objects that are at least one meter across. Unfortunately, the majority of objects orbiting the planet
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It's a boy: Tahlequah's baby orca is frolicking, healthy
Tahlequah's new calf is a male, the Center for Whale Research has confirmed.
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Caribbean islands face loss of protection and biodiversity as seagrass loses terrain
Tropical islands have an important ally when it comes to battling storms and sea-level rise: seagrass. During hurricane Irma, an extremely powerful Category 5 storm that hit the North Caribbean in 2017, NIOZ scientist Rebecca James witnessed how native seagrass meadows along the coast of Sint Maarten held their ground, reduced coastal erosion and lowered the chances of flooding. In the years of re
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Air pollution leads to increase in electricity usage, study suggests
High levels of air pollution are forcing people inside to consume more electricity, subsequently causing even greater environmental problems by increasing greenhouse gas emissions.
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US parents delaying preschool and kindergarten amid pandemic
Claire Reagan was feeling overwhelmed as her oldest child's first day of kindergarten approached and with a baby on the way. The 5-year-old boy has autism, and she worried he would struggle with juggling in-person and virtual learning, and that she wouldn't have enough time to give him the help he needs.
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Jindal school researchers examine COVID-19 impact on manufacturing
Two Jindal School faculty members found that manufacturing response to COVID-19 has been largely reactive and uncoordinated, and many firms' crisis communication plans do not include managing an infectious-disease outbreak.
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Lockdown mental health problems amongst family carers up to 10 times higher
Family carers for children and adults with intellectual disabilities have reported rates of mental health problems under lockdown that are up to 10 times higher than parents without those responsibilities, a new study has found. They were five times more likely to report severe anxiety, and between four and ten times more likely to report major depression, compared to parents who did not have cari
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A question of reality
Physicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, 'Real or Not Real: that is the question', explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and its applications.
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Overpriced? TUD researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber
How exactly does the strategy of the artificial price increases in the taxi app Uber work and when is it used? This is what Dr. Malte Schröder and Professor Marc Timme from the Chair for Network Dynamics at the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden (cfaed) and the Institute for Theoretical Physics at TU Dresden have been investigating alongside PhD students David-Maximilian Storch and Philip Ma
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Oceans could rise more than a foot by 2100
If greenhouse gas emissions continue apace, Greenland and Antarctica's shrinking ice sheets could together contribute more than 15 inches (38 centimeters) of global sea level rise by 2100, a new study warns. That's beyond the amount Earth's warming climate has already set in motion. The findings are in line with projections in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) 2019 Special Re
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Indoor potting mixes for a thriving houseplant jungle
Best potting mixes for indoor plants. (Andre Guerra via Unsplash/) Caring for houseplants is rewarding but something a bit finicky—they each have their own water and light preferences, and grow to need repotting at different times. But the soil you choose should not be a stressor. The best potting mixes are infused with nutrients that help you avoid fiddling with fertilizer for a few months. The
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COVID-19 data on Native Americans is 'a national disgrace.' This scientist is fighting to be counted
Abigail Echo-Hawk is working around the clock to close discriminatory data gaps
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Ecotourism gem reduced to ashes as Brazil wetlands burn
Domingas Ribeiro remembers how powerless she felt as the flames devastating the Pantanal wetlands burned through the ecotourism hotel she had spent the past year developing in central Brazil.
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Facebook wants to make AI better by asking people to break it
The explosive successes of AI in the last decade or so are typically chalked up to lots of data and lots of computing power. But benchmarks also play a crucial role in driving progress—tests that researchers can pit their AI against to see how advanced it is. For example, ImageNet, a public data set of 14 million images, sets a target for image recognition. MNIST did the same for handwriting reco
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The CDC thinks 90 percent of the US could still catch COVID-19
CDC Director Robert Redfield (left) and National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Director Anthony Fauci (far right) both testified to a Senate committee this week about the status of the pandemic. (National Institutes of Health/) Follow all of PopSci 's COVID-19 coverage here , including the latest on how flu season will affect the pandemic , ways to tell if your symptoms are just al
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The return of the spin echo
The spin of particles can be manipulated by a magnetic field. This principle is the basic idea behind magnetic resonance imaging as used in hospitals. A surprising effect has now been discovered in the spins of phosphorus atoms coupled to microwaves: If the atoms are excited, they can emit a series of echoes. This opens up new ways of information processing in quantum systems.
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Reasons for football injuries
If professional footballers are out of action due to injuries, this can have serious consequences for the club. However, in order to avoid injuries, it is important to know how exactly and in which situations these injuries typically occur. A research team from the Faculty of Sport Science at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and the German statutory accident insurance VBG (Department for Sports Injur
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UK can be 'Saudi Arabia of wind power' – PM
The UK prime minister says the UK holds extraordinary potential for wind power.
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Go Ahead, Try to Sneak Bad Words Past AI Filters—for Research
A new Facebook project pits humans against algorithms, to expose the systems' weaknesses and help make them better.
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IgNobelpris till forskning om alligator på helium
Kognitionsforskaren Stephan Reber är en av forskarna som tilldelas årets IgNobelpris för sin forskning om alligatorers ljud. I en studie från 2015 undersökte man vad som händer om en alligator får andas in helium. Syftet är att ta reda på om krokodildjur har så kallade resonansljud i sin röst, något en del andra djur använder för att visa hur stora de är. – Jag är extremt glad och tacksam för det
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Inside the Twitter Hack—and What Happened Next
On July 15, a massive Twitter hack rocked the inside and out. On Election Day, that's not an option.
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Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilized egg divide and specialize
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. The finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy.
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Research helps people, lunar rovers, get there on time
A graduate student relied on the bus system to get to class. He wanted to understand why, despite arriving at the bus stop on time, he was sometimes late to class. He developed a tool that considers transportation variables weighed against how great a margin of error bus riders are willing to accept, which can also apply to getting a lunar rover to its destination, and with a high degree of reliab
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Amazonia racing toward tipping point, fueled by unregulated fires
Amazonia is closer to a catastrophic ecological tipping point than any time in the last 100,000 years, and human activity is the cause.
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New model — Antarctic ice loss expected to affect future climate change
In a new climate modeling study that looked at the impacts of accelerated ice melt from the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) on future climate, a team of climate scientists reports that future ice-sheet melt is expected to have significant effects on global climate.
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Loving-kindness meditation will make you happier
Researchers from HSE University compared the effect of two meditation practices – loving-kindness meditation (LKM) and compassion meditation (CM). Loving-kindness meditation turned out to be more effective when it comes to increasing happiness, but, in contrast with previous studies, compassion meditation also did not result in a growth of negative emotions. The paper was published in Mindfulness
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New issue of Daedalus features essays from sixteen climate change witnesses
A new Issue of Daedalus — the journal of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences — brings together essays by sixteen prominent climate change witnesses, representing multiple fields, backgrounds, and generations.
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Something to sneeze at: Hunger-induced sneezing?
If you're anything like me and crave the look of a pantry or office supplies organized by color in clear bins, you've probably, also like me, already binged Netflix's Get Organized with the Home Edit, in which organizational gurus Clea and Joanna of The Home Edit Instagram fame edit and contain disorganized kitchens, closets, offices, […]
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Coronavirus continuing to mutate, study finds, as US cases rise
Experts believe virus is probably becoming more contagious but US study did not find mutations made it more lethal The Covid-19 virus is continuing to mutate throughout the course of the pandemic, with experts believing it is probably becoming more contagious, as coronavirus cases in the US have started to rise once again, according to new research. The new US study analyzed 5,000 genetic sequenc
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Costa Rica is producing a new corps of skilled tropical biologists. But many can't find jobs at home
Small nation faces obstacles as it promotes scientific excellence
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Why we must confront the painful parts of US history | Hasan Kwame Jeffries
To move forward in the United States, we must look back and confront the difficult history that has shaped widespread injustice. Revisiting a significant yet overlooked piece of the past, Hasan Kwame Jeffries emphasizes the need to weave historical context, no matter how painful, into our understanding of modern society — so we can disrupt the continuum of inequality massively affecting marginali
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Placenta is initiated first, as cells of a fertilised egg divide and specialise
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. The finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy.
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Bridging the gap between the magnetic and electronic properties of topological insulators
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology shed light on the relationship between the magnetic properties of topological insulators and their electronic band structure. Their experimental results shed new insights into recent debates regarding the evolution of the band structure with temperature in these materials, which exhibit unusual quantum phenomena and are envisioned to be crucial in next-g
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Putting virtual rehab for stroke patients to the test
Researchers have created a new gaming platform which uses low cost videogame technology to improve the lives of stroke patients suffering from complex neurological syndromes caused by their stroke.It is hoped that the new technology, which can be used in patients' own homes, could prove particularly beneficial for rehabilitation during periods of lockdown, social distancing and shielding – caused
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Scientists shine light on tiny crystals behind unexpected violent eruptions
In a new study of volcanic processes, scientists have demonstrated the role nanolites play in the creation of violent eruptions at otherwise 'calm' and predictable volcanoes. The study describes how nano-sized crystals (nanolites), 10,000 times smaller than the width of a human hair, can have a significant impact of the viscosity of erupting magma, resulting in previously unexplained and explosive
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Tesla's new battery tech promises a road to a cheap self-driving electric car
The tabless battery design is striking to look at. (Tesla/) Elon Musk makes a lot of promises —some of which actually come to fruition. This week, Musk took the stage at the most recent Tesla shareholder meeting to talk about the company and drop some information about its upcoming battery innovations. Musk dubbed the event "Battery Day" and, in typical Tesla fashion, he delved fairly deeply into
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Will food prices keep rising during the pandemic?
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to affect the people who buy and sell food, including constraining supplies, spiking prices, and hurting restaurants. "The food economy has been incredibly resilient so far, but now that we're more than half a year into this pandemic, the cracks are really starting to show," says Trey Malone , an assistant professor of agriculture, food, and resource economics in t
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Man dies from eating more than a bag of liquorice a day
The 54-year-old construction worker ate a bag-and-a-half of black liquorice every day, doctors say.
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Integration of innate immune signaling by caspase-8 cleavage of N4BP1
Nature, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2796-5
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Cells of the adult human heart
Nature, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2797-4
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Well-known molecule not found in cancer cells after all
A new research result from Aarhus University shows that a so-called circular RNA molecule, which has been designated as carcinogenic, is actually not found in the cancer cells. The results have just been published in Nature Communications.
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Penicillium camemberti: a history of domestication on cheese
The white, fluffy layer that covers Camembert is made of a mould resulting from human selection, similar to the way dogs were domesticated from wolves. A collaboration involving French scientists from the CNRS has shown that the mould Penicillium camemberti is the result of a domestication process.
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Highly detailed map of the human heart could guide personalized heart treatments
Scientists have created a detailed cellular and molecular map of the healthy human heart to understand how this vital organ functions and to shed light on what goes awry in cardiovascular disease.
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Mapping the human heart, cell by cell
Scientists have mapped and described the function of cells in six regions of the adult heart, providing a new foundation for studying heart disease.
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CU researcher: Outdated corneal donation policies prevent sight-restoring surgery
U.S. and Canadian restrictions on corneal donations prevented as many as 3,217 corneal donations from gay and bisexual men in 2018, despite a worldwide need for corneas for vision-restoring surgery and a lack of scientific evidence of harm caused by corneas from these men, according to a new study published in the September 24 issue of the journal JAMA Ophthalmology.
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Handheld device could provide fast method to diagnose concussions in youth athletes
Building upon years of research, a new study has demonstrated how a specific assessment of the eye could someday help properly diagnosis and monitor concussions.
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Assessment of disparities in COVID-19 testing, infection across language groups in Seattle
Researchers evaluated the proportion of patients who completed COVID-19 testing and the proportion of positive cases using language as a surrogate for immigrant status.
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Diagnosing sports-related concussion in teens
Researchers investigated the effectiveness of using measurements of how pupils react to light as physiologic biomarker to help diagnose sports-related concussion in adolescents.
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Antibodies protect against wide range of influenza B virus strains
Researchers have identified two antibodies that protect mice against lethal infections of influenza B virus, report scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Together with an antibody that targets the other major kind of influenza viruses that infect people — influenza A — these antibodies potentially could form the basis of
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High-intensity resistance training in post-acute care produced better outcomes and patient experience
Today, researchers from the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus released a new study evaluating the effectiveness and safety of high-intensity rehabilitation for older adults in skilled nursing facilities. "Our study identified an impactful opportunity to improve the way we care for patients in skilled nursing facilities." said lead author Allison Gustavson, PT, DPT, PhD, at the CU Ansc
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Searching together: A lesson from rats
Concentrate on your own task but also pay attention to others–this is the key rule for success, at least for rats when exploring as a groupThe rat in a maze might be one of the most classic paradigms in the study of behaviour, but an international team of scientists has put a twist on this experimental motif to push the leading edge of technology and research into search strategies of collectives
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Twinkling, star-shaped brain cells may hold the key to why, how we sleep
A new study published today in the journal Current Biology suggests that star-shaped brain cells known as astrocytes could be as important to the regulation of sleep as neurons. The study builds new momentum toward ultimately solving the mystery of why we sleep and how sleep works in the brain. The discovery may also set the stage for potential future treatment strategies for sleep disorders and n
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How close is AI to decoding our emotions?
Researchers have spent years trying to crack the mystery of how we express our feelings. Pioneers in the field of emotion detection will tell you the problem is far from solved. But that hasn't stopped a growing number of companies from claiming their algorithms have cracked the puzzle. In part one of a two-part series on emotion AI, Jennifer Strong and the team at MIT Technology Review explore w
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Why people might never use autonomous cars
Automated driving is advancing all the time, but there's still a critical missing ingredient: trust. Host Jennifer Strong meets engineers building a new language of communication between automated vehicles and their human occupants, a crucial missing piece in the push toward a driverless future. We meet: Dr. Richard Corey and Dr. Nicholas Giudice, founders of the VEMI Lab at the University of Mai
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Regeringen vil reducere vejtransportens CO2-udledning med 9 procent
Nyt transportudspil indeholder planer om et nyt CO2-fortrængningskrav, vejafgift for lastbiler og 500.000 elbiler på vejene.
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Scientists Claim to Find First-Ever Planet in Another Galaxy
Outer Reaches A team of scientists says it's spotted what might be the first-known exoplanet in an entirely different galaxy. There could be billions of exoplanets within our own galaxy, but finding new worlds in even the next galaxies over is vastly more difficult. Now, with evidence that a planet-sized object is orbiting a binary system in the Whirlpool galaxy, New Scientist reports that a team
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Myndigheder erkender fejl i Smittestop-app
De allernærmeste kontakter har ikke i alle tilfælde fået besked om smittefare. Uvist, om fejlen har været der fra starten af.
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Mysterious beaked whale smashes mammal diving record
A Cuvier's beaked whale stays under water for almost four hours, leaving scientists puzzled.
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Optimizing of VCSEL photon lifetime for minimum energy consumption at varying bit rates
The explosive growth of internet use leads to an explosion of the energy consumption of data centers. Vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSELs) are key enabling devices meeting the requirements of optical interconnects in such data centers up to a few hundred meters of single or multimode fiber due to their simplicity, low cost, and large data transmission rates. Achieving higher bit rates
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Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change
Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature. Species that rely most on finding a suitably shady location to keep cool are at the greatest risk of population decline. The results predict how climate change might impact butterfly communities, and will inform conservation strategies to protect them.
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Driven by climate, more frequent, severe wildfires in Cascade Range reshape forests
In recent years—and 2020 is no exception—parts of the Pacific Northwest that are typically too wet to burn are experiencing more frequent, severe and larger wildfires due to changes in climate. New research from Portland State University found that while the increased wildfire activity is causing widespread changes in the structure and composition of these mid-to-high elevation forests, the new la
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Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' originate over ocean
Meteorologists track hurricanes over the oceans, forecasting where and when landfall might occur so residents can prepare for disaster before it strikes. What if they could do the same thing for droughts?
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Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greens
Why are some tarantulas so vividly colored? Scientists have puzzled over why these large, hairy spiders, active primarily during the evening and at night-time, would sport such vibrant blue and green colouration—especially as they were long thought to be unable to differentiate between colors, let alone possess true color vision.
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Penicillium camemberti: a history of domestication on cheese
The white, fluffy layer that covers Camembert is made of a mold resulting from human selection, similar to the way dogs were domesticated from wolves. A collaboration involving French scientists from the CNRS has shown, through genomic analyses and laboratory experiments, that the mold Penicillium camemberti is the result of a domestication process that took place in several stages.
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Searching together: A lesson from rats
The rat in a maze might be one of the most classic paradigms in the study of behavior, but an international team of scientists has put a twist on this experimental motif to push the leading edge of technology and research into search strategies of collectives.
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Gravity causes homogeneity of the universe
Gravity can accelerate the homogenization of space-time as the universe evolves. This insight is based on theoretical studies of the physicist David Fajman of the University of Vienna. The results have been published in the journal 'Physical Review Letters'.
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Air pollution leads to increase in electricity usage, study suggests
High levels of air pollution are forcing people inside to consume more electricity, subsequently causing even greater environmental problems by increasing greenhouse gas emissions.
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COVID-19: Berlin scientists lay basis for a passive vaccination
Researchers at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) and Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin have identified highly effective antibodies against the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 and are now pursuing the development of a passive vaccination. In this process, they have also discovered that some SARS-CoV-2 antibodies bind to tissue samples from various organs, which could potentially tr
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Driven by climate, more frequent, severe wildfires in Cascade Range reshape forests
In recent years—and 2020 is no exception—parts of the Pacific Northwest that are typically too wet to burn are experiencing more frequent, severe and larger wildfires due to changes in climate. New research from Portland State University found that while the increased wildfire activity is causing widespread changes in the structure and composition of these mid-to-high elevation forests, the new la
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Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greens
Why are some tarantulas so vividly colored? Scientists have puzzled over why these large, hairy spiders, active primarily during the evening and at night-time, would sport such vibrant blue and green colouration—especially as they were long thought to be unable to differentiate between colors, let alone possess true color vision.
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Penicillium camemberti: a history of domestication on cheese
The white, fluffy layer that covers Camembert is made of a mold resulting from human selection, similar to the way dogs were domesticated from wolves. A collaboration involving French scientists from the CNRS has shown, through genomic analyses and laboratory experiments, that the mold Penicillium camemberti is the result of a domestication process that took place in several stages.
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Searching together: A lesson from rats
The rat in a maze might be one of the most classic paradigms in the study of behavior, but an international team of scientists has put a twist on this experimental motif to push the leading edge of technology and research into search strategies of collectives.
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Trouble at the FDA and CDC
That title is the only way that I can describe the events of the last few days. Like so many other things this year, what we're seeing now at the top of the drug regulatory structure is unprecedented, and not in a good way at all. Let's recap. A few days ago, HHS Secretary Alex Azar sent out what has to be considered a very unusual memo. Its key point (as written) is: The authority to sign and is
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First Evidence of a Planet in Another Galaxy
The Milky Way is filled with planets. Now astronomers have found the first candidate planet in another galaxy.
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The Space Station Toilet Apparently Smells Horrible
Smelly Problem NASA engineers working on the Orion capsule meant to carry astronauts to the Moon as soon as 2023 have a smelly problem on their hands, Business Insider reports : how to design a space toilet with less of a stench. Orion capsule engineering lead Jason Hutt described the smell in an instantly iconic tweet. "If you want to recreate that used spacecraft smell, take a couple dirty diap
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Democrats' SCOTUS Message Could Really Work in Swing States
The struggle over Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court could help propel Democrats to the brink of a Senate majority in November's election. But whether it lifts them over that threshold could turn on the terms of the confirmation fight. Given the nature of the states that will decide Senate control, the Democrats' path to a majority may be much easier if they can keep the debat
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Commercialising quantum computers
Today's small, limited and finicky machines may yet have business uses
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Why funnel-web spiders are so dangerous to people
They have not had the chance to evolve not to be
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A burrowing dinosaur
Chinese researchers have found a fossorial fossil
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Reasons Revealed for the Brain's Elastic Sense of Time
Our sense of time may be the scaffolding for all of our experience and behavior, but it is an unsteady and subjective one, expanding and contracting like an accordion. Emotions, music, events in our surroundings and shifts in our attention all have the power to speed time up for us or slow it down. When presented with images on a screen, we perceive angry faces as lasting longer than neutral ones
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One of the world's driest deserts is the focus of a new study on our changing climate
Carbon, one of the main building blocks for all life on Earth, cycles among living organisms and the environment. This cycle, and how it works in one of the driest places on Earth, is the subject of a new study recently published in the journal Plant and Soil with lead author and Arizona State University (ASU) scientist, Heather Throop.
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Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas.
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Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas.
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Ministers 'seek alternatives' for UK sat-nav
The government says it is after all ideas for a sovereign satellite-navigation system post-Brexit.
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Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travel
Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modeling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student.
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New international research has found 25% of carnivorous plant species may be at risk of extinction
New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development.
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Island-building in Southeast Asia created Earth's northern ice sheets
The Greenland ice sheet owes its existence to the growth of an arc of islands in Southeast Asia—stretching from Sumatra to New Guinea—over the last 15 million years, a new study claims.
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New international research has found 25% of carnivorous plant species may be at risk of extinction
New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development.
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'Close to 100% accuracy': Helsinki airport uses sniffer dogs to detect Covid
Researchers running Helsinki pilot scheme say dogs can identify virus in seconds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Four Covid-19 sniffer dogs have begun work at Helsinki airport in a state-funded pilot scheme that Finnish researchers hope will provide a cheap, fast and effective alternative method of testing people for the virus. A dog is capable of detecting the prese
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Parental touch reduces pain responses in babies' brains
Being held by a parent with skin-to-skin contact reduces how strongly a newborn baby's brain responds to a painful medical jab, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and York University, Canada.
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Born to be wild: Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamine
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found a fungal-bacterial relationship that allows bacteria to travel along fungal highways and supply the fungus with thiamine (vitamin B1), which is essential to most organisms. Thiamine provided by the bacteria helped the fungal filaments to grow, and the highways let the bacteria travel farther than otherwise possible. Research in this area could
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Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' originate over ocean
Researchers have identified a new type of 'landfalling drought' that originates over the ocean before traveling onto land, and which can cause larger, drier conditions than other droughts.
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Topology-optimized thermal cloak-concentrator
Cloaking a concentrator in thermal conduction via topology optimization. A simultaneous cloaking and concentrating of heat flux is achieved through topology optimization, a computational structural design methodology.
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Optimizing of VCSEL photon lifetime for minimum energy consumption at varying bit rates
Prof. Bimberg's group at Bimberg Chinese-German Center for Green Photonics Changchun at Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics, and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences has developed VCSELs emitting at 850 nm, 880 nm, 910 nm, 940 nm, which were optimized to achieve 50+ Gb/s, enabling 200+ Gb/s data transmission across a multimode fiber. This was based on the PAM2-modulation scheme without any kind of
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Harvard Study: We Shouldn't Rule Out Underground Life on the Moon and Mars
A team of scientists claim they've determined a way to figure out if there's life living underground on faraway places, including the Moon and Mars — and that it would be worth having a look by drilling down into the surface. The team, from the Center for Astrophysics at Harvard and the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT), believe that simply analyzing if there's water on the surface isn't enou
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Team builds colloidal diamonds, 'Holy Grail' of photonics
Researchers have devised a new process for the reliable self-assembly of colloids in a diamond formation. The long-awaited photonic technique could change the way scientists develop and use optical technologies over the next decade. The colloidal diamond has been a dream of researchers since the 1990s. These structures—stable, self-assembled formations of miniscule materials—have the potential to
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If You Care About Your Immune System, Support It With Cutting Edge Science
When it comes to your health and wellness, the importance of your immune system is almost impossible to overstate. Unfortunately, while cutting-edge nutritional science has created comprehensive formulas for all sorts of other wellness needs—building muscles, optimizing metabolism, sharpening cognitive performance—nutritional formulas designed to support the immune system have been at a standstil
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Genetic variation unlikely to influence COVID-19 morbidity and mortality
A comprehensive search of genetic variation databases has revealed no significant differences across populations and ethnic groups in seven genes associated with viral entry of SARS-CoV-2.
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Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greens
Researchers from Yale-NUS College and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) find support for new hypotheses: that tarantulas' vibrant blue colours may be used to communicate between potential mates, while green colouration confers the ability to conceal among foliage. Their research also suggests that tarantulas are not as colour-blind as previously believed, and that these arachnids may be able to per
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Opening an autophagy window as the apoptosis door starts to close
Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) researchers have successfully attached the cancer cell-targeting antibody Trastuzumab to a previously reported supermolecule that induces autophagic cell death. The antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) selectively targeted HER2-overexpressing cancer calls and reduced cell viability at lower concentrations than free supermolecule drug. It is hoped that the ADC wi
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Bioelectronic device achieves unprecedented control of cell membrane voltage
Every living cell maintains a voltage across the cell membrane that results from differences in the concentrations of charged ions inside and outside the cell. In an impressive proof-of-concept demonstration, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has developed a bioelectronic system driven by a machine learning algorithm that can shift the membrane voltage in living cells and maintain it at a se
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Donor-conceived adults have higher incidence of immunology diseases
Adults conceived through sperm donation reported higher frequencies of allergies, type 1 diabetes and other autoimmune conditions. Donor sperm conceived adults had seven times more type 1 diabetes diagnoses; double the incidence of thyroid disease, acute bronchitis and sleep apnoea; and 10% more reported allergies. The study looked at 272 donor-conceived adult participants compared to 877 conceive
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One of the world's driest deserts is the focus of a new study on our changing climate
Carbon, one of the main building blocks for all life on Earth, cycles among living organisms and the environment. This cycle, and how it works in one of the driest places on Earth, is the subject of a new study recently published in the journal Plant and Soil with lead author and Arizona State University (ASU) scientist, Heather Throop.
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How helping my international students succeed helped everyone
Nature, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02730-6 By fixing a systematic problem in my exams, I helped all of my students — not just those for whom English is a second language.
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Famous Black Hole Shows Its Wobbly Past in New Movie
The M87 supermassive black hole imaged earlier this year. The release of the first-ever image of a real black hole in 2019 was a watershed moment for science, but there's still more work to do. The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) team is still planning future observations, but it's also looking at old data to strengthen our understanding of how black holes work. The fruit of that labor is a short m
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A Trump-Biden Debate Without Climate Change Is Inexcusable
The West is on fire, the Gulf Coast is under water, and voters want candidates to talk about the environment.
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Sweden: Bones of dog found at Stone Age burial site
Archaeologists on Thursday reported finding the remains of a dog from more than 8,400 years ago at a human burial site in southern Sweden.
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Genome duplications as evolutionary adaptation strategy
Genome duplications play a major role in the development of forms and structures of plant organisms and their changes across long periods of evolution. Biologists made this discovery in their research of the Brassicaceae family. To determine the scope of the different variations over 30 million years, they analyzed all 4,000 species of this plant family and investigated at the genus level their mo
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Scientists predict potential spread, habitat of invasive Asian giant hornet
Researchers have predicted how and where the Asian giant hornet, an invasive newcomer to the Pacific Northwest, popularly dubbed the 'murder hornet,' could spread and find ideal habitat, both in the United States and globally.
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The Four Most Promising Worlds for Alien Life in the Solar System
The Earth's biosphere contains all the known ingredients necessary for life as we know it. Broadly speaking these are: liquid water, at least one source of energy, and an inventory of biologically useful elements and molecules. But the recent discovery of possibly biogenic phosphine in the clouds of Venus reminds us that at least some of these ingredients exist elsewhere in the solar system too.
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Being cut off from other humans changes your brain. Here's the science on how.
Over the past few months, the phrase "social distancing" has entered our lexicon. Many of us have found ourselves separated from family and friends—or at least from our normal social lives. As humans grapple with pandemic-induced isolation, science is starting to offer insight into what may be happening in our brains when our social contact with others is dramatically reduced. That insight happen
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Lawmakers Demand Scrutiny of Racial Bias in Health Algorithms
Four congressmembers say formulas that include race as a factor can hurt Black Americans' access to care.
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Microaggressions aren't just innocent blunders, and new research links them with racial bias
A white man shares publicly that a group of Black Harvard graduates "look like gang members to me" and claims he would have said the same of white people dressed similarly. A white physician mistakes a Black physician for a janitor and says it was an honest mistake. A white woman asks to touch a Black classmate's hair, is scolded for doing so and sulks, "I was just curious."
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Photopyroelectric microfluidics developed by researchers
Precisely manipulating various liquids is essential in many fields and unlike solid objects, fluids are intrinsically divisible. Fluids are also sticky with appropriate functions for lossless manipulation to prevent loss and contamination. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Wei Li and colleagues in mechanical engineering and research and innovation in China presented photopyroelect
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Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travel
Paradox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modelling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student.
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Solving the strange storms on Jupiter
Geometric storm patterns on Jupiter's south pole have been a mystery to scientists, but Caltech researchers may have uncovered how they form.
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Rate prediction for homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrate
Methane hydrates are the single biggest source of fossil fuel on planet earth and play a role in climate change. The molecular process of their formation is not known and heavily debated. In a paper in the Journal of Physical Chemistry B, researchers at the Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (HIMS) now provide insight in methane hydrate formation. They performed atomistic scale molecular
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76 Days Is Unwatchable Yet Utterly Compelling
The first minutes of 76 Days are an intrusion into a moment so private, it practically begs the viewer to look away: A medical worker in a hazmat suit is dragged through the halls of a hospital in China, crying out for one last chance to say goodbye to her dead father, an early victim of COVID-19. Her co-workers, also in head-to-toe protective gear, are a terrifying sight. But they speak to her k
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The return of the spin echo
A research team from Garching and Vienna discovered a remarkable echo effect that offers exciting new possibilities for working with quantum information.
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Research concludes that remote learning might not be a bad thing
Remote and blended approaches to teacher education can be as effective as face-to-face approaches concludes a new study from the University of Birmingham.
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Climate pledges 'like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing'
Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.
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New mechanism of action against SARS-CoV-2 by antiviral drug remdesivir
Researchers have discovered a novel, second mechanism of action by the antiviral drug remdesivir against SARS-CoV-2. The research team previously demonstrated how remdesivir inhibits the COVID-19 virus's polymerase or replication machinery in a test tube.
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Inside the secret lives of synchronous fireflies
Ever wonder why some fireflies flash in harmony? New research sheds light on this beautiful phenomenon and strives to understand how relatively simple insects manage to coordinate such feats of synchronization.
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Compounding impact of severe weather events fuels marine heatwave in the coastal ocean
Researchers can offer insight into why these storms intensified quickly as they moved across the continental shelf.
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Keeping Coronavirus Vaccines at Subzero Temperatures During Distribution Will Be Hard, But Likely Key to Ending Pandemic
Trucks, planes and storage facilities all need to be able to keep a vaccine cold.
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Remote neuropsychology tests for children shown effective
Administering neuropsychology evaluations to children online in the comfort of their own homes is feasible and delivers results comparable to tests traditionally performed in a clinic, a new study led by UT Southwestern researchers and Children's Health indicates. The finding, published online this month in the Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, could help expand access to specialists and reduc
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Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlife
The COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests. Now a new UBC study highlights the need to be mindful of how these activities may affect wildlife living in protected areas. All wildlife tended to avoid places that were recently visited by recreational users. And they avoided mountain bikers and motorized vehicles significantly more than they did hikers a
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World first study links obesity with reduced brain plasticity
A world-first study has found that severely overweight people are less likely to be able to re-wire their brains and find new neural pathways, a discovery that has significant implications for people recovering from a stroke or brain injury.
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'Save me Seymour!'
New international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development.
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Novel cell membrane model could be key to uncovering new protein properties
Researchers have recently shed light on how cell membrane proteins could be influenced by the lipids around them. By developing a novel type of membrane model, they were able to show that the shape and behavior of a protein can be altered by exposure to different lipid compositions. The research team confirmed the artificial membrane's structure through neutron and x-ray scattering at the Departme
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Island-building in Southeast Asia created Earth's northern ice sheets
Tectonic processes are thought to have triggered past ice ages, but how? A new analysis of mountain building in the maritime tropics of Southeast Asia attributes the last ice age, which reached a maximum 15,000 years ago, to increasing rock weathering in the rising island arc from Sumatra to New Guinea over the past 15 million years, with the first ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere appearing a
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Gravity causes homogeneity of the universe
Gravity can accelerate the homogenization of space-time as the universe evolves. This insight is based on theoretical studies of the physicist David Fajman of the University of Vienna. The mathematical methods developed within the research project allow to investigate fundamental open questions of cosmology such as why the universe today appears so homogeneous. The results have been published in t
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Expert compares 'involuntary consent' of essential workers to exploitation of women in the adult film industry
Some essential workers might agree to work a certain job for money. Some might do so out of a sense of duty. Others might be pressured to say "yes" to their work.
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Frequency of combined droughts and heatwaves has substantially increased in western U.S. over past 50 years
A team of researchers from Canada, Iran and the U.S. has found that the frequency of combined droughts and heatwaves has increased substantially in the western U.S. over the past half-century. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their analysis of weather data going back to 1896 and what they learned from it.
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Researchers develop a 'stretching rack' for cells
The behavior of cells is controlled by their environment. Besides biological factors or chemical substances, physical forces such as pressure or tension are also involved. Researchers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and Heidelberg University developed a method that enables them to analyze the influence of external forces on individual cells. Using a 3-D printing process, they produced
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Faint orbital debris that threatens satellites not being monitored closely enough, warn astronomers
University of Warwick astronomers are warning that orbital debris posing a threat to operational satellites is not being monitored closely enough, as they publish a new survey finding that over 75% of the orbital debris they detected could not be matched to known objects in public satellite catalogs.
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Impurities enhance polymer LED efficiencies
Molecular dynamics simulations have shown that the mysteriously high efficiency of polymer LEDs arises from interactions between triplet excitons in their polymer chains, and unpaired electrons in their molecular impurities.
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Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breeding
An international team of scientists studying shorebirds, led by the University of Bath, has found that successful plover parents are more likely to divorce after nesting than those that did not successfully breed, in contrast to most other bird species which tend to split up after nest failure.
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Key genetic clue missing in fight against superbugs
For the first time, researchers have discovered how antibiotic resistance genes are spreading, at a continental scale, via bacterial plasmids in the hospital superbug, Klebsiella pneumoniae.
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'If you call 000 … I will send you back to your country': How COVID-19 has trapped temporary visa holders
At the first sign of lockdown due to COVID-19 in Australia and across the globe, there were concerns domestic and family violence would increase in prevalence and intensity. It was also feared that, at the same time, conditions would prevent women from coming forward.
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Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breeding
An international team of scientists studying shorebirds, led by the University of Bath, has found that successful plover parents are more likely to divorce after nesting than those that did not successfully breed, in contrast to most other bird species which tend to split up after nest failure.
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Key genetic clue missing in fight against superbugs
For the first time, researchers have discovered how antibiotic resistance genes are spreading, at a continental scale, via bacterial plasmids in the hospital superbug, Klebsiella pneumoniae.
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It's a man's (pandemic) world: How policies compound the pain for women in the age of COVID-19
COVID-19 times have brought sober realizations about deep shifts in Australian society. Encroaching steadily over the past half-century, these have been largely submerged from daily view, until now.
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Reminders of inequality for poor people prod them to be more likely to want to tax the rich
A pair of political science researchers at the University of California, has found that showing people a symbol of inequality can push them to demand that rich people be taxed more. In their paper published in the journal Nature, Melissa Sands and Daniel de Kadt outline an experiment they conducted with poor people living in South Africa and an expensive car. Colin Tredoux and John Dixon with the
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Driven by climate, more frequent, severe wildfires in Cascade Range reshape forests
New research from Portland State University found that while the increased wildfire activity is causing widespread changes in the structure and composition of these mid-to-high elevation forests, the new landscapes are also likely more resilient to projected upward trends in future fire activity and climate conditions.
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New chronology of the Saturn system
A new chronology for the moons of Saturn has been developed by Planetary Science Institute Associate Research Scientist Samuel W. Bell.
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Landmark release sees bilbies return to Sturt National Park in NSW
Bilbies are once again bounding in Sturt National Park more than a century after they were declared extinct in NSW.
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How universities can manage student anxiety about coronavirus on campus
Students have returned to UK universities, and the timing couldn't be worse. Some in the medical community have argued that the key to safe reopening is to do so at a time when community transmission is minimal. With coronavirus infections currently doubling every week and the government introducing new measures to bring those rates down, having up to one million students back on campus is enormou
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Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamine
Tiny organisms head out on the highway, looking for adventure like they've ridden straight out of the 1960s rock hit, "Born to Be Wild." Researchers from Japan have discovered that while perhaps not as thrill-seeking, bacteria do indeed travel on fungal highways and pay a toll in return.
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Histone degradation after DNA damage enhances repair
DNA damage can occur anywhere in the genome, but most DNA is wrapped around nucleosomes making it inaccessible to the repair machinery. Researchers from the Gasser group now show that DNA damage induces histone depletion, which increases the accessibility and flexibility of the DNA fiber and enhances the rate of homology search during repair by homologous recombination.
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Landmark release sees bilbies return to Sturt National Park in NSW
Bilbies are once again bounding in Sturt National Park more than a century after they were declared extinct in NSW.
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Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamine
Tiny organisms head out on the highway, looking for adventure like they've ridden straight out of the 1960s rock hit, "Born to Be Wild." Researchers from Japan have discovered that while perhaps not as thrill-seeking, bacteria do indeed travel on fungal highways and pay a toll in return.
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Histone degradation after DNA damage enhances repair
DNA damage can occur anywhere in the genome, but most DNA is wrapped around nucleosomes making it inaccessible to the repair machinery. Researchers from the Gasser group now show that DNA damage induces histone depletion, which increases the accessibility and flexibility of the DNA fiber and enhances the rate of homology search during repair by homologous recombination.
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Improving Asian buffalo breeds with genomics
Selective breeding of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle with the help of genomics could help increase livestock productivity, thereby improving food security, nutrition and incomes for millions of smallholder farmers in Asia, says a new study.
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New brain cell-like nanodevices work together to identify mutations in viruses
Scientists have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell. Furthermore, they have shown that these synthetic brain cells can be joined together to form intricate networks that can then solve problems in a brain-like manner.
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Seismic data explains continental collision beneath Tibet
New imagery reveals the causes of seismic activity deep beneath the Himalaya region, contributing to an ongoing debate over the continental collision process when two tectonic plates crash into each other.
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Can ripples on the sun help predict solar flares?
Scientists discovered in 1996 that sunquakes are linked to solar flares. Now, using helioseismic holography, scientists have analyzed a 2011 flare and shown that the impulsive source that generated the sunquake, and the refracted acoustic waves that later rippled the solar surface, was submerged 1,000 kilometers below the photosphere and flare. Further sunquake study could reveal if submerged sour
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Scientists get soft on 3D printing
Researchers have developed a new method of 3D-printing gels and other soft materials. It has the potential to create complex structures with nanometer-scale precision.
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The strange storms on Jupiter
At the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight—even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth. Down near the south pole of the planet, mostly hidden from the prying eyes of humans, is a collection of swirling storms arranged in an unusually geometric pattern.
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Improving Asian buffalo breeds with genomics
Selective breeding of water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) and cattle with the help of genomics could help increase livestock productivity, thereby improving food security, nutrition and incomes for millions of smallholder farmers in Asia, says a new study.
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Company outlines steps to reduce ammonia emissions
A new marginal abatement cost curve (MACC) for ammonia emissions has been published by Teagasc. The publication is titled "An Analysis of the Cost of the Abatement of Ammonia Emissions in Irish Agriculture to 2030," and outlines the steps that can be taken to reduce ammonia emissions from Irish agriculture and the costs of achieving this. The document was prepared by the Teagasc Gaseous Emission W
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Researchers depict the formation of galaxies
An international team of astronomers, with researchers at Leiden Observatory playing a leading role, has mapped the fuel for galaxy formation in the iconic Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The results of the research have been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal.
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Despite frog-killing disease, researchers discover new frog species
Scientists have discovered a new species of rare frog that is rapidly disappearing. At the same time, they've also discovered hope.
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Despite frog-killing disease, researchers discover new frog species
Scientists have discovered a new species of rare frog that is rapidly disappearing. At the same time, they've also discovered hope.
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New Zealand companies lag behind others in their reporting on climate change, and that's a risk to their reputation
New Zealand's top 30 corporations do a poor job reporting on climate change compared with similar Australian and Fortune Global 500 companies, according to our research.
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New study models impact of rising fossil fuel prices on employment
A recent study published in Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy reveals new findings on the impact of fossil fuel prices on employment.
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Udskammet nordjysk tarmkirurg: Tarmcancer­screeningsagens gode, onde og grusomme omstændigheder
Koncerndirektør Anne Bukh og resten af ledelsen i Region Nordjylland afviste at lytte til mig, den ansatte, og derfor gik det så grueligt galt for patientsikkerheden og én klinikers retssikkerhed, skriver Axel Tilma, tidligere kirurgisk overlæge på Regionshospital Nordjylland, der først blev suspenderet og siden 'frikendt' for mistanke.
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A Tip From a Kid Helped Uncover a Slew of Scam Apps
After a girl reported a suspicious TikTok profile, researchers detected aggressive adware in apps that had been downloaded 2.4 million times.
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Marine bacteria shift between lifestyles to get the best resources
To stay, or not to stay? When it comes to nutrient resource patches, researchers from Japan and Switzerland have discovered that marine bacteria have a knack for exploiting them efficiently, timing movements between patches to get the best resources.
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New brain cell-like nanodevices work together to identify mutations in viruses
Scientists have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell. Furthermore, they have shown that these synthetic brain cells can be joined together to form intricate networks that can then solve problems in a brain-like manner.
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Ledige dimittender risikerer at hænge fast i arbejdsløshed
PLUS. Antallet af ledige, der blev uddannet i sommeren 2019, er langt højere et år efter deres dimission end normalt. IDA er bekymret for, at de bliver overhalet indenom af nyuddannede fra i år.
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Marine bacteria shift between lifestyles to get the best resources
To stay, or not to stay? When it comes to nutrient resource patches, researchers from Japan and Switzerland have discovered that marine bacteria have a knack for exploiting them efficiently, timing movements between patches to get the best resources.
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Study finds tepid home prices may reflect waning interest in New York City
Is living in the New York metropolitan area losing its appeal? It's entirely possible, say researchers at Florida Atlantic and Florida International universities who have studied more than 40 years of repeat home sales transactions.
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Targets bring more women on boards, but they still don't reach the top
An academic from Queen Mary University of London has contributed to a major new report published by Cranfield University that shows there are only five female CEOs in the FTSE 100.
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Færre nye robotter automatiserer industrien – bortset fra i én branche
PLUS. I 2019 blev der installeret 768 industrirobotter i Danmark, hvilket er det næsthøjeste nogensinde. Fremgangen er dog koncentreret på en enkelt branche, metalindustrien, mens der blev installeret færre nye robotter i fødevare-, plast- og procesindustrien.
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Framgångsrikt biotechsamarbete tar genterapiprojekt till kliniken.
Johan Richters forskning har resulterat i att man framgångsrikt utvecklat en genterapi för den ärftliga barnsjukdomen malign osteopetros. Forskargruppen har sedan några år tillbaka etablerat ett samarbete med ett amerikanskt biotechföretag och nu är alla tillstånd äntligen klara för att påbörja de kliniska prövningarna.
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Glass molecules can act like sand when jammed, study finds
UO researchers have discovered that molecules in glass materials behave just like particles in sand and rocks as they jam together, a mechanism that could boost explorations of condensed matter and complex systems.
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Active learning accelerates redox-flow battery discovery
By using active learning, scientists are more quickly finding suitable candidates for redox-flow batteries.
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White graphene exhibits high defect tolerance and elasticity
Because of their unique physical, chemical, electrical and optical properties, two-dimensional (2-D) materials have attracted tremendous attention in the past decades. After revealing the realistic strength and stretchability of graphene, nicknamed "black gold," researchers from City University of Hong Kong (CityU) have carried forward the success by unveiling the high defect tolerance and elastic
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Sir David Attenborough joins Instagram to warn 'the world is in trouble'
The broadcaster gained more than 200,000 followers within an hour of posting his first video.
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Can a Genetically Modified Bug Combat a Global Farm Plague?
Biotech company Oxitec has created a caterpillar with self-destructing eggs in an attempt to curb agricultural damage. But will other pests simply move in?
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Motorola One 5G Review: It Has Battery for Days
Forget plugging in every night. This phone lasts more than 48 hours on a charge.
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Fire and logging reduce homes for threatened mammals
Fire and logging are substantially reducing the number of hollow-bearing trees that threatened and critically endangered Australian mammals can use as homes, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) warns.
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Fire and logging reduce homes for threatened mammals
Fire and logging are substantially reducing the number of hollow-bearing trees that threatened and critically endangered Australian mammals can use as homes, a new study from The Australian National University (ANU) warns.
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Android security settings you should check right now
Android has a lot of tools to keep your data safe—use them. (Daniel Romero/Unsplash/) Most of your life is on your phone, so you might as well protect it as much as possible. The good news is that Android can help. With security features that apply to your device or your Google account on all devices, keeping your data safer is only a tap away. Find out which apps are doing what (and how to stop
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What Research in Antarctica Tells Us about the Science of Isolation
Over the past few months, the phrase "social distancing" has entered our lexicon. Many of us have found ourselves separated from family and friends—or at least from our normal… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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What Research in Antarctica Tells Us about the Science of Isolation
Over the past few months, the phrase "social distancing" has entered our lexicon. Many of us have found ourselves separated from family and friends—or at least from our normal… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Study Finds More Adulterated Supplements
Drugs are regulated in most countries for a reason. They can have powerful effects on the body, can be particularly risky or are incompatible with certain diseases, and can interact with other drugs. Dosages also need to be determined and monitored. So most countries have concluded that prescriptions of powerful drugs should be monitored by physicians who have expertise in their effects and inter
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Studying gene function in animal models
Researchers from the group of Jeroen Bakkers have described a thorough way to study the function of genes in model animals such as the zebrafish. In their study, published in Nature on September 23rd, they give an example of such a comprehensive study into gene function and provide a guideline to fellow researchers.
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Placental development takes place days before the embryo forms, study finds
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. This new finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy.
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Cuvier's beaked whale breaks record with 3 hour 42 minute dive
The blue whale might be one of the most enigmatic creatures on the planet, but the true megastars of the diving world are Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). They are capable of reaching depths of almost 3000 m, and calculations suggest that these relatively diminutive whales should only remain submerged for about 33 minutes before their oxygen is depleted and they resort to anaerobic re
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Broad beans versus soybeans as feed for dual-purpose chickens
Current practices of the poultry industry have raised ethical and ecological concerns. Ethical concerns include the culling of day-old male chicks of egg-laying breeds; ecological concerns include the import of large quantities of soybeans for feed. Now, a research team at the University of Göttingen has investigated alternatives such as using a regional protein crop like broad beans (also known a
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Planning greener, healthier cities from the data up
A new study by the University of South Australia indicates important gaps in urban planning data need to be addressed to ensure key development decisions are evidence-based.
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Studying gene function in animal models
Researchers from the group of Jeroen Bakkers have described a thorough way to study the function of genes in model animals such as the zebrafish. In their study, published in Nature on September 23rd, they give an example of such a comprehensive study into gene function and provide a guideline to fellow researchers.
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Placental development takes place days before the embryo forms, study finds
The first stages of placental development take place days before the embryo starts to form in human pregnancies. This new finding highlights the importance of healthy placental development in pregnancy, and could lead to future improvements in fertility treatments such as IVF, and a better understanding of placental-related diseases in pregnancy.
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Scientists take a 'spin' onto magnetoresistive RAM
Magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) is the top candidate for next-generation digital technology. However, manipulating MRAM efficiently and effectively is challenging. An interdisciplinary research team based at National Tsing Hua University (NTHU) in Taiwan, led by Prof. Chih-Huang Lai, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Prof. Hsiu-Hau Lin, Department of Physics has now
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Portrait by Renaissance master expected to soar past $80M
An enigmatic painting from Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli will go on auction next year and art watchers will be seeing if it fetches more than its eye-watering $80 million estimate, despite the pandemic.
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New research shows the limitations of coordination in chemistry
A common assumption in chemistry is that the coordination number of a catalyst's surface determines the reactivity of the reaction it catalyzes. Strikingly, chemists from Leiden University have now proven that this is not true for nature's most simple chemical reaction: the dissociation of hydrogen. The researchers managed to measure the so-called absolute reactivities of this reaction, a first in
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Study highlights climate mitigation potential of encouraging Earth's forests to regenerate naturally
Allowing forests to grow back naturally should be regarded alongside other measures like large-scale tree-planting as a critical nature-based approach to mitigating climate change, according to a major new study that maps potential above-ground carbon accumulation rates for forest regrowth across the globe.
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Cuvier's beaked whale breaks record with 3 hour 42 minute dive
The blue whale might be one of the most enigmatic creatures on the planet, but the true megastars of the diving world are Cuvier's beaked whales (Ziphius cavirostris). They are capable of reaching depths of almost 3000 m, and calculations suggest that these relatively diminutive whales should only remain submerged for about 33 minutes before their oxygen is depleted and they resort to anaerobic re
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Broad beans versus soybeans as feed for dual-purpose chickens
Current practices of the poultry industry have raised ethical and ecological concerns. Ethical concerns include the culling of day-old male chicks of egg-laying breeds; ecological concerns include the import of large quantities of soybeans for feed. Now, a research team at the University of Göttingen has investigated alternatives such as using a regional protein crop like broad beans (also known a
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A new strategy of cell entry for some types of parvoviruses
Researchers at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with American scientists, have discovered a new parvovirus strategy for reaching the cell nucleus, where they reproduce. The results were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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UK Covid-19 vaccine trial set to infect healthy volunteers with virus
Researchers hope to begin world's first human challenge trials at east London quarantine facility in January Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Healthy volunteers in the UK could soon be deliberately infected with coronavirus in the world's first human challenge trial to find out which Covid vaccines work. Government-funded studies, which it is believed will be announce
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The top shoe organizers for a tidier hallway or closet
A place for all your shoes. (Martin Adams via Unsplash/) Whether you're in a dorm, an apartment, or a multi-child household you've probably found out what happens when your shoes aren't organized. Yes, you lose pairs, can't find your work shoes when you're running out the door, can't find your boots when it's raining, etc. But worse than that, you are constantly tripping over shoes. There's no ex
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5 Ways the Health-Care System Can Stop Amplifying Racism
The coronavirus pandemic didn't create the health disparities among Americans, but it has exposed once again how stark the problem is. Black and Latino patients are two to three times as likely as white patients to be diagnosed with COVID-19, and more than four times as likely to be hospitalized for it. Black patients are more than twice as likely to die from the virus. They also die from it at y
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Kombinationer af blodsukkersænkende lægemidler til diabetespatienter kan have vidt forskellige risikoprofiler
Ny forskning indikerer, at når patienter med type 2-diabetes tager to eller tre lægemidler for at regulere blodsukkeret, ændrer det deres risiko for at få et alvorligt hjertekartilfælde, udvikle alvorlig hypoglykæmi eller dø.
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A new strategy of cell entry for some types of parvoviruses
Researchers at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with American scientists, have discovered a new parvovirus strategy for reaching the cell nucleus, where they reproduce. The results were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Poverty, joblessness drives wildlife poaching in S.Africa: study
Most people convicted for wildlife poaching and trafficking in South Africa commit the crimes due to poverty and joblessness, a study by an international wildlife conservation group has shown.
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Poverty, joblessness drives wildlife poaching in S.Africa: study
Most people convicted for wildlife poaching and trafficking in South Africa commit the crimes due to poverty and joblessness, a study by an international wildlife conservation group has shown.
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Hjertekar-helbred har stor betydning for risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes
Ny forskning peger på, hvor vigtigt det er at have et godt hjertekar-helbred, hvis man vil reducere risikoen for at udvikle type 2-diabetes.
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Personer med diabetes falder oftere og brækker også oftere knogler
Gennemgang af blandt andet Patientregisteret viser, at lider man af enten type 1- eller type 2-diabetes, så er risikoen større, for at man på et tidspunkt kommer i kontakt med hospitalsvæsenet på grund af et fald eller en brækket knogle.
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Years later, researcher at center of highly publicized case has another paper retracted
A neuroscientist who was stripped of her PhD by Danish officials as part of a case going back a decade has notched her ninth retraction — but it took a while. In 2010, following questions about her work, Milena Penkowa received a three month suspended sentence for embezzlement, document forgery, and "fabrication of evidence." A … Continue reading
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Var sitter hältan? Bättre diagnostik ökar hästars välfärd
Hur upptäcker man en låggradig hälta hos hästar? Och på vilket ben är hästen egentligen halt? Emma Persson Sjödin, veterinär och doktorand vid SLU vill öka kunskapen om hur man tolkar asymmetrier i hästens rörelsemönster – i olika situationer. Ortopediska skador är mycket vanliga inom hästsporten och innebär ett stort djurvälfärdsproblem. Hälta är det vanligaste symptomet på ortopedisk smärta och
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The Fanatic
O ver the past 19 months, we have all heard a lot about Bill Barr's misuse of the office of attorney general and the resources of the Justice Department to do the personal bidding of President Donald Trump, to undermine the evenhanded rule of law, and to work in countless other ways to put the president in a position of nearly autocratic power. What first came to our attention as surprising accou
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Does 'Brain Training' Actually Work?
An online citizen science project is recruiting 30,000 volunteers to assess whether exercises to improve memory and attention are valid—and if so, for whom — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Färre plastfibrer i havet än befarat
Den nya studien är utförd av ett internationellt forskarteam och är baserad på drygt 900 vattenprov från sex olika havsbassänger. Forskarna hittade över 20 000 mikrofibrer i proverna. Drygt 8 procent av fibrerna bestod av plast, resten kom från växt- och djurriket. Det dominerande materialet var cellulosa, framför allt i form av bomull.
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We Need to Talk About Talking About QAnon
Describing and debunking the phenomenon is not enough. We need to explain why and how it came to be.
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De fleste med type 1-diabetes ønsker at fortsætte med telemedicin
COVID-19-pandemien har tvunget mange patienter med type 1-diabetes til kun at være i kontakt med deres læge over en telefon eller en videoforbindelse. Det vil mange dog gerne fortsætte med, selv efter pandemien er overstået, viser nyt globalt studie.
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Empagliflozin sænker blodsukkeret hos patienter uden bugspytkirtel
SGLT-2-hæmmeren empagliflozin kan reducere de høje måltidsrelaterede blodsukkerudsving hos patienter, som mangler bugspytkirtlen efter operation for eksempelvis kræft. Det viser dansk forskning præsenteret på årets EASD.
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Does 'Brain Training' Actually Work?
An online citizen science project is recruiting 30,000 volunteers to assess whether exercises to improve memory and attention are valid—and if so, for whom — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Højintensitetstræning forbedrer helbredet markant hos svært overvægtige med type 2-diabetes
Dansk forskning viser, at højintensitetstræning med roning og cykling kan forbedre både insulinfølsomheden, kropsbygningen og det kardiorespiratoriske helbred blandt svært overvægtige med type 2-diabetes.
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Frem med cyklen – det reducerer risikoen for at dø hos personer med diabetes
Ny dansk forskning baseret på data fra hele EU viser, at diabetespatienter, som springer på cyklen et par gange om ugen, kan reducere risikoen for at dø for tidligt signifikant.
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Virus Hunters: Searching for Therapeutic Phages in a Drug Resistant World
Typically, viral infections are not desirable; however, bacterial viruses, or bacteriophages, are promising therapeutic agents against multi-drug resistant microbes. Many phages have a narrow host range, infecting only one bacterial species or strain. Researchers hope to transform these viruses into targeted therapies for devastating bacterial infections. In this webinar from The Scientist, bacter
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When and Why You Should Get a Flu Shot
Experts explain why getting vaccinated is important every year—and especially during a pandemic — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Danmark er to år bagud: Private 5G-net buldrer frem i Tyskland
PLUS. Mens danske virksomheder holder igen med investeringer i 5G på grund af manglende frekvenstilladelser, så står tyske virksomheder i kø for at etablere private 5G-netværk. Danmark er allerede to år bagefter vores nabolande lyder det fra teleanalytiker.
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EFSA skærper grænsen for giftige fluorstoffer
PLUS. De sundhedsskadelige fluorstoffer, der findes i alverdens imprægnering til sko og tøj, har igen været under luppen.
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The Blob Meets the Heartland
For most of my three and a half decades as an American diplomat, the foreign-policy establishment (known unaffectionately in some quarters as "the blob") took for granted that expansive U.S. leadership abroad would deliver peace and prosperity at home. That assumption was lazy, and often flawed. Riding the waves of globalization and American geopolitical dominance, we overreached. We deluded ours
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5G wireless may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts
Upcoming 5G wireless networks that will provide faster cell phone service may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts, according to a Rutgers study on a controversial issue that has created anxiety among meteorologists.
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Personer med type 1-diabetes fik bedre blodsukkerniveauer under corona-lockdown
Personer med type 1-diabetes, som blev bedt om at arbejde hjemmefra under corona-lockdown, oplevede, at deres blodsukker blev forbedret på trods af færre muligheder for at træne og højere psykisk pres.
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Google Maps now shows you where covid-19 cases are spiking
The news: Google Maps has added a new feature that lets people see the number of covid-19 cases per 100,000 people for any given area, with a label indicating if cases are trending up or down. In a blog post, Google said the functionality will start rolling out worldwide on both Android and iOS this week. In the US the information goes down to the state and county level, but in Europe just the na
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This restaurant duo want a zero-carbon food system. Can it happen?
When Karen Leibowitz and Anthony Myint opened The Perennial, the most ambitious and expensive restaurant of their careers, it was essentially on a self-dare. The married duo had found enormous success with their previous restaurant in San Francisco, Mission Chinese Food, but realized something was missing. "Basically zero chefs were working on climate change," Myint told me recently. The food sys
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5G wireless may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts
Upcoming 5G wireless networks that will provide faster cell phone service may lead to inaccurate weather forecasts, according to a Rutgers study on a controversial issue that has created anxiety among meteorologists.
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Nordjyske barer vil kun lukke borgere ind, hvis de har hentet Smittestop-appen
Fremover skal borgere downloade Smittestop-appen til deres telefon, før de kan få lov til at komme ind på visse barer i Aalborgs festgade Jomfru Ane Gade.
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Illustration: get your research the attention it deserves
Nature, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02660-3 Three scientific artists explain how to create impact with attractive visuals.
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Telling the Truth About Slavery Is Not 'Indoctrination'
Last week, at the White House Conference on American History, President Donald Trump denounced the way "the left has warped, distorted, and defiled the American story with deceptions, falsehoods, and lies," attacking Howard Zinn, critical race theory, and The New York Times' 1619 Project (to which I was a contributor). The president emphasized the need for "patriotic education" in our schools, an
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What to Do When the Future Feels Hopeless
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. You live in the future. So do I. We all do. It's human nature. However, there are times—such as during a pandemic—when this nature makes us suffer. We are "prospective" creatures, according to the psychologists and philosophers Martin Seligman, Peter Railton, Roy Baumeister, and Chandra Sri
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Covid-19: is it possible to predict how sick someone could get? – podcast
Nine months in, and with over 30 million people having been infected with Covid-19, we now know some of the main factors that put people at higher risk of a severe case of the disease, such as age and having other health problems. But there is still a lot to learn about why some people, and not others, become very ill from catching Sars-CoV-2. Nicola Davis takes a look at the researchers attempti
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A volcanic eruption may have helped the dinosaurs take over the world
A volcanic eruption may have helped the dinosaurs take over (Pixabay/) In the past half billion years of Earth's history, there have been five widely-accepted major mass extinctions, but new findings published recently in Science Advances suggest that there may have been another—one that created conditions that allowed dinosaurs to take over the world. The newly proposed mass extinction, which oc
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Covid-19: is it possible to predict how sick someone could get?
Nine months in, and with over 30 million people having been infected with Covid-19, we now know some of the main factors that put people at higher risk of a severe case of the disease, such as age and having other health problems. But there is still a lot to learn about why some people, and not others, become very ill from catching Sars-CoV-2. Nicola Davis takes a look at the researchers attemptin
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Sådant är ditt cykellyse – bra att veta inför mörkerkörningen
Höstmörkret kommer allt närmare och det är hög tid för dig som cyklar att se över ditt cykellyse. Men hur ska du veta att belysningen uppfyller gällande krav och att den hjälper dig att både se och synas? VTI har genomfört tester för att jämföra egenskaper hos olika cykellysen. Spannet av cykellysen på marknaden är brett och det finns idag inget system för märkning eller godkännande av att de pro
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Russia's Sputnik Vaccine Stunt Could Cast a Long Shadow
In August, the Russian government unveiled, with pomp and flair, what was billed as the world's first registered Covid-19 vaccine. Since the vaccine has yet to prove its safety and efficacy, however, for now it is more fitting to discuss it for what it already is: a public relations exercise.
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Den første exoplanet fundet i en anden galakse
Baseret på måling af røntgenstråling mener astronomer at have fundet den første planet uden for Mælkevejen i en galakse 28 mio. lysår borte.
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Pringles and Cadbury 'failing on recycled packaging'
KitKats and Babybel are among other big brands that did badly in the Which? recycling test.
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Spinosaurus dinosaur was 'enormous river-monster', researchers say
The findings come after the discovery of 1,200 dinosaur teeth in an ancient river bed in Morocco.
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Covid-19 News: Cuomo Says New York Will Vet Federally Authorized Vaccines
Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York said the state will conduct its own review of vaccines authorized by the federal government over concern that the approval process has become too politicized.
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Novel cell membrane model could be key to uncovering new protein properties
The cell membrane, the wall-like boundary between the cell interior and its outside environment, is primarily made up of two kinds of biomolecules: lipids and proteins. Different lipid species closely pack together to form a double layer, or "bilayer," the membrane's fundamental structure, while proteins are embedded within or attached to the bilayer.
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Publisher Correction: Reconciling qualitative, abstract, and scalable modeling of biological networks
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18766-1
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Combinatorial entropy behaviour leads to range selective binding in ligand-receptor interactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18603-5 Multivalent ligand-receptor interactions enhance binding selectivity in biological systems, and may be exploited to design synthetic systems. Here the authors demonstrate a multivalent behavior where the ability to bind the target occurs when the receptor density is within a specific range.
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Cross-regulation of viral kinases with cyclin A secures shutoff of host DNA synthesis
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18542-1 Herpesviruses code for conserved protein kinases (CHPKs) that exert several regulatory functions by interacting with cellular factors. Here, the authors use affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP–MS) to identify differential interaction partners of CHPKs from seven different human herpesviruses, findin
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PD-L1 on dendritic cells attenuates T cell activation and regulates response to immune checkpoint blockade
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18570-x The role of PD-L1 expression on tumor-infiltrating immune cells in promoting tumor immune escape is not fully understood. Here, the authors show that PD-L1 expression by dendritic cells plays a crucial role in hindering anti-tumor T cell responses and is essential for the therapeutic efficacy of PD-L1 block
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Persistent and reversible solid iodine electrodeposition in nanoporous carbons
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18610-6 Iodide based energy storage is a potential candidate to improve performance of hybrid supercapacitors and batteries. Here, the authors revisit the previous understanding and show that electrochemical oxidation of iodide results in solid iodine deposits stabilized by the confinement of nanoporous carbons.
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Thermal transport of helium-3 in a strongly confining channel
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18662-8 Superfluid 3He under confinement can be used as a model system for topological quantum matter, but few related measurements are reported. Here, the authors report on the thermal conduction of helium-3 in a micro-fabricated channel with unanticipated effects in both the normal and superfluid states.
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Anomalous supply shortages from dynamic pricing in on-demand mobility
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18370-3 Dynamic pricing schemes are increasingly employed in on-demand mobility. Here the authors show that ride-hailing services across the globe exhibit anomalous price surges induced by collective action of drivers, uncovered from price time-series at 137 locations, and explain under which conditions they emerge
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Rapid vessel segmentation and reconstruction of head and neck angiograms using 3D convolutional neural network
Nature Communications, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18606-2 Manual postprocessing of computed tomography angiography (CTA) images is extremely labor intensive and error prone. Here, the authors propose an artificial intelligence reconstruction system that can automatically achieve CTA reconstruction in healthcare services.
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Novel cell membrane model could be key to uncovering new protein properties
The cell membrane, the wall-like boundary between the cell interior and its outside environment, is primarily made up of two kinds of biomolecules: lipids and proteins. Different lipid species closely pack together to form a double layer, or "bilayer," the membrane's fundamental structure, while proteins are embedded within or attached to the bilayer.
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Stroke alarm clock may streamline and accelerate time-sensitive acute stroke care
An interactive, digital alarm clock may speed emergency stroke care, starting at hospital arrival and through each step of the time-sensitive treatment process.The alarm clock is a low-cost strategy for streamlining stroke care and could translate to fewer deaths and less disability from stroke.
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Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions.
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The Democrats' Supreme Court Hail Mary
It was only a matter of time, really. Ever since Senate Republicans refused to hold a vote on Merrick Garland four years ago, progressives have argued that Democrats need to wrest back control of the Supreme Court by packing it full of liberal justices. By the Democratic primary last year, the idea had gone relatively mainstream, and half of the presidential candidates expressed openness to it. N
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Quantification of regional murine ozone-induced lung inflammation using [18F]F-FDG microPET/CT imaging
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72832-8 Quantification of regional murine ozone-induced lung inflammation using [ 18 F]F-FDG microPET/CT imaging
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The neuropathic phenotype of the K/BxN transgenic mouse with spontaneous arthritis: pain, nerve sprouting and joint remodeling
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72441-5
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Limited effect of radial oxygen loss on ammonia oxidizers in Typha angustifolia root hairs
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72653-9
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Sodium nitrate co-supplementation does not exacerbate low dose metronomic doxorubicin-induced cachexia in healthy mice
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71974-z
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Rheological analysis of sputum from patients with chronic bronchial diseases
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72672-6
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The effectiveness of a monetary reimbursement model for weight reduction via a smartphone application: a preliminary retrospective study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72908-5
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High-resolution crystal structure and biochemical characterization of a GH11 endoxylanase from Nectria haematococca
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72644-w
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Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions.
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Genome of Alexander Fleming's original penicillin-producing mould sequenced
Researchers have sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's penicillin mould for the first time and compared it to later versions.
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The Historic Fungus That Gave The World Penicillin Had Its Genome Sequenced
This is where the first mass-produced antibiotic came from.
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In Siberia forests, climate change stokes 'zombie fires'
Equipped with a shovel, Grigory Kuksin lifts and turns smouldering earth in the marshy clearing of a sprawling Siberian forest.
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NASA chief warns Congress about Chinese space station
NASA chief Jim Bridenstine told lawmakers Wednesday it was crucial for the US to maintain a presence in Earth's orbit after the International Space Station is decommissioned so that China does not gain a strategic advantage.
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Life still precarious for pangolins despite Vietnam's illegal trade crackdown
Head keeper Tran Van Truong gently takes a curled-up pangolin into his arms, comforting the shy creature rescued months earlier from traffickers in Vietnam.
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Australian rescuers forced to euthanise some beached whales as toll rises
Australian rescuers were forced Thursday to begin euthanising some surviving whales from a mass stranding that has already killed 380 members of the giant pod.
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Life still precarious for pangolins despite Vietnam's illegal trade crackdown
Head keeper Tran Van Truong gently takes a curled-up pangolin into his arms, comforting the shy creature rescued months earlier from traffickers in Vietnam.
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Australian rescuers forced to euthanise some beached whales as toll rises
Australian rescuers were forced Thursday to begin euthanising some surviving whales from a mass stranding that has already killed 380 members of the giant pod.
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SLAC invention could make particle accelerators 10 times smaller
Particle accelerators generate high-energy beams of electrons, protons and ions for a wide range of applications, including particle colliders that shed light on nature's subatomic components, X-ray lasers that film atoms and molecules during chemical reactions and medical devices for treating cancer.
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Lab uncovers new mechanism of action against SARS-CoV-2 by antiviral drug remdesivir
Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a novel, second mechanism of action by the antiviral drug remdesivir against SARS-CoV-2, according to findings published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Lab uncovers new mechanism of action against SARS-CoV-2 by antiviral drug remdesivir
Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a novel, second mechanism of action by the antiviral drug remdesivir against SARS-CoV-2, according to findings published today in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
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Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters: study
Viruses occur in astronomic numbers everywhere on Earth, from the atmosphere to the deepest ocean. Surprisingly, considering the abundance and nutrient-richness of viruses, no organisms are known to use them as food. In Frontiers in Microbiology, researchers publish the first compelling evidence that two groups of ecologically important marine protists, choanozoans and picozoans, are virus eaters,
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Sky islands and tropical alpine sunflowers at risk of disappearing
As temperatures rise around the world, many species may escape the heat by migrating to higher elevations. But what will happen to those species that are already as high as there is to go?
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New brain cell-like nanodevices work together to identify mutations in viruses
In the September issue of the journal Nature, scientists from Texas A&M University, Hewlett Packard Labs and Stanford University have described a new nanodevice that acts almost identically to a brain cell. Furthermore, they have shown that these synthetic brain cells can be joined together to form intricate networks that can then solve problems in a brain-like manner.
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Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters: study
Viruses occur in astronomic numbers everywhere on Earth, from the atmosphere to the deepest ocean. Surprisingly, considering the abundance and nutrient-richness of viruses, no organisms are known to use them as food. In Frontiers in Microbiology, researchers publish the first compelling evidence that two groups of ecologically important marine protists, choanozoans and picozoans, are virus eaters,
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Sky islands and tropical alpine sunflowers at risk of disappearing
As temperatures rise around the world, many species may escape the heat by migrating to higher elevations. But what will happen to those species that are already as high as there is to go?
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Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change, say scientists
Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature. Species that rely most on finding a suitably shady location to keep cool are at the greatest risk of population decline. The results predict how climate change might impact butterfly communities, and will inform conservation strategies to protect them.
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Vikingens värld mycket äldre än du tror
Nordmännens överraskande attack på det engelska klostret Lindisfarne år 793 brukar räknas som vikingatidens start, men det har länge ifrågasatts. Ny forskning visar att mycket av det vi förknippar med vikingatiden är äldre än så.
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Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change, say scientists
Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature. Species that rely most on finding a suitably shady location to keep cool are at the greatest risk of population decline. The results predict how climate change might impact butterfly communities, and will inform conservation strategies to protect them.
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Hviderussisk nobelpristager får Sonningprisen
Den hviderussiske forfatter og systemkritiker Svetlana Aleksijevitj modtager Sonningprisen 2021. Hun…
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Does forgetting a name or word mean that I have dementia?
The number of cases of dementia in the U.S. is rising as baby boomers age, raising questions for boomers themselves and also for their families, caregivers and society. Dementia , which is not technically a disease but a term for impaired ability to think, remember or make decisions, is one of the most feared impairments of old age. Incidence increases dramatically as people move into their 90s .
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Climate pledges 'like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing'
Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.
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6,178 new Covid cases recorded – close to record from early May – as it happened
Scotland records highest daily cases total ; Keir Starmer presses Boris Johnson on Covid testing at PMQs ; 'clear upward curve' in cases in Wales Shortages threaten Johnson's pledge of 500,000 UK Covid tests a day 10pm nightlife ban 'not a silver bullet', Raab admits Six ways to get through the next six months Global coronavirus updates – live 5.57pm BST Just interviewed the Labour leader @Keir_S
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Virtual reality blir viktig del i framtidens testkörningar
Virtual reality (VR) kan i framtiden bli ett viktigt komplement till testkörningar och körsimulatorer vid utprovningen av bilars säkerhetssystem. Men tekniken har brister och kan inte användas till vad som helst, visar ett forskningssamarbete från Linköpings universitet och VTI, Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut. Allt mer avancerade säkerhetssystem i moderna bilar gör testningen och ut
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Supercomputer kører i tomgang: Ingen DNA-prøver er gemt endnu
PLUS. Mere end et år efter, at Nationalt Genom Center blev etableret, er der endnu ikke gemt en eneste dna-prøve i den nationale database.
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Climate scientists are terrified of a second Trump term
Daniel Schrag has spent most of his life working on climate change. He studied the planet's ancient warming periods early in his career, served as a climate advisor to President Barack Obama, and is now director of Harvard's Center for the Environment. But when he imagines the possibilities if President Donald Trump is reelected, climate change isn't the issue he's most concerned about. "I immedi
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Coronavirus: fifth of people likely to refuse Covid vaccine, UK survey finds
Survey of 70,000 people finds only 49% are 'very likely' to get vaccine once one is available Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A fifth of people are likely to refuse a Covid vaccine when one becomes available, according to the largest survey of UK attitudes and behaviour during the pandemic. The survey by University College London of 70,000 people, which was launched
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FN og Storbritannien indkalder til klimamøde
Fem år efter Parisaftalen og et år inden næste COP-møde er der brug for højere ambitioner på klimaområdet.
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Covid-19 under graviditeten gav inga komplikationer hos barnet
Närmare två av tre gravida som testades positivt för SARS-CoV-2 saknade symtom på covid-19, och det fanns inte någon högre förekomst av förlossningskomplikationer eller ohälsa hos barnet vid födseln. Däremot var havandeskapsförgiftning vanligare hos infekterade kvinnor, visar en studie på kvinnor som fött barn under coronapandemin. I studien har forskare vid Karolinska Institutet och Karolinska U
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Nothing Eats Viruses, Right? Meet Some Hungry Protists
New genetic evidence builds the case that single-celled marine microbes might chow down on viruses.
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10,000 more deaths than usual occurred in UK homes since June
Excess deaths in private homes prompts fears people are avoiding hospitals due to Covid Some 10,000 more deaths than usual have occurred in peoples' private homes since mid June, long after the peak in Covid deaths, prompting fears that people may still be avoiding health services and delaying sending their loved ones to care homes. It brings to more than 30,000 the total number of excess deaths
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"Health Freedom" group promotes legislation negating masks, other public health measures
National Health Freedom Action is promoting state legislation that would block enforcement of public health measures (e.g., mask wearing and social distancing) during epidemics and other emergencies. The organization and its allies embrace junk science and have successfully passed laws protecting quacks. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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A new strategy of cell entry for some types of parvoviruses
Researchers at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS), in collaboration with American scientists, have uncovered a new parvovirus strategy for reaching the cell nucleus which is their site of replication. This new method of entry is a good example of host-driven evolution. Their results were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United S
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Climate pledges 'like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing'
Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.
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Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change, say scientists
Researchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature. Species that rely most on finding a suitably shady location to keep cool are at the greatest risk of population decline. The results predict how climate change might impact butterfly communities, and will inform conservation strategies to protect them.
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Sweet success: Heavy consumption of sugary beverages declined in the US from 2003 to 2016
According to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, the percentage of heavy sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumers – those who drink more than 500 calories of SSBs daily – trended downwards in the United States between 2003 and 2016.
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Sky islands and tropical alpine sunflowers at risk of disappearing
The plants that live among the mountaintops of the Andes are among those most threatened by climate change because these species have no place left to go to escape rising temperatures. A recent study predicts how well a tropical alpine plant—relatives of sunflowers in the genus Espeletia–might adapt to both climate change and other human activities such as agriculture, mining and rising human p
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Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eaters – study
Scientists used single-cell genomics to show that two groups of poorly known marine protists routinely ingest viruses. They hypothesize that this serves to absorb phosphorus and nitrogen – that is, using viruses as food. This discovery has important implications for our understanding of oceanic food webs and carbon cycles.
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How Finland kept Covid in check
Country has one of lowest infection rates in Europe and its economy held up better than others
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Why eating insects is about to become big business
Edible bugs, now taking off in the west, offer environmental and nutritional benefits
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Stor affaldsbrand når 700 grader: En »træls situation« der kan vare måneder
PLUS. Det kan i værste fald vare månedsvis, før flammerne går ud i den store bunke ulmende haveaffald ved virksomheden Solum i Roskilde.
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Arktis bliver grønnere: 'Det påvirker både planter, dyr og mennesker'
Det kan have konsekvenser for moskuskokser og rensdyr, når klimaforandringer gør Arktis grønnere.
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A smiling whale makes a record deep dive
Nature, Published online: 23 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02701-x The elusive Cuvier's beaked whale, already known for its prowess as a diver, turns out to have even more staying power than scientists thought.
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Have you experienced worrisome changes in thoughts or feelings? Participate in online paid research at the University of Georgia!
What is the purpose of the study? We want to better understand the development of psychiatric symptoms in adolescents and young adults Who can participate? Males and females in Georgia, USA ages 12-34 who have experienced one or more of the following: · Unusual thoughts · Suspiciousness · A sense of having special powers or unrealistic plans for the future · Changes in sensory experiences such as
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Who should get credit for AI-generated art?
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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Newbie to Cogsci — Advice for Mech eng student wanting Cogsci Phd/career?
I am trying to figure out what to do with my life. I recently graduated with my BS in mechanical engineering, and have been working for about a year and half. I have realized I really think I am meant to go back to school. I have always been very interested in psychology/philosophy, and technology, so I was looking at neuroscience and then I found this amazing thing titled ~Cognitive Science~ whi
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Transferring structural knowledge across cognitive maps in humans and models
submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]
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Angreb på Aalborg Universitet breder sig: Hackere havde adgang til sundhedsdata
Sagen om hackerangrebet på Aalborg Universitet ruller stadigvæk, og på mindre end to måneder er den officielle historie gået fra, at ingen persondata var lækket til, at hackere har haft adgang til både CPR-numre og lønoplysninger. Nu viser en aktindsigt, at flere brugere også har fået kompromitte…
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WIRED 25 Day 2: How to Build a More Resilient World
Guests like Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar, hacker Matt Mitchell, and journalist Maria Ressa talk about shifting power dynamics—and changing who's in control.
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The Fungal Evangelist Who Would Save the Bees – Issue 90: Something Green
If anyone knows about going fungal, it's Paul Stamets. I have often wondered whether he has been infected with a fungus that fills him with mycological zeal—and an irrepressible urge to persuade humans that fungi are keen to partner with us in new and peculiar ways. I went to visit him at his home on the west coast of Canada. The house is balanced on a granite bluff, looking out to sea. The roof
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Junk Food Is Bad For Plants, Too – Issue 90: Something Green
Most of us are familiar with the much-maligned Western diet and its mainstay of processed food products found in the middle aisles of the grocery store. Some of us beeline for the salty chips and others for the sugar-packed cereals. But we are not the only ones eating junk food. An awful lot of crops grown in the developed world eat a botanical version of this diet—main courses of conventional fe
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The Importance of Face Masks and the Tragedy of Downplaying Them – Issue 90: Something Green
Let's start all over again about face masks. The noise about them is a Judas Priest blare. Can we turn down the volume for a moment? OK, good, thanks. Now, let's talk about their value. Why there is such discord about them. After all, what has the clamor wrought? Nothing good, says Monica Gandhi, a professor of medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and associate division chief
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14-3-3{zeta}-TRAF5 axis governs interleukin-17A signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]
IL-17A is a therapeutic target in many autoimmune diseases. Most nonhematopoietic cells express IL-17A receptors and respond to extracellular IL-17A by inducing proinflammatory cytokines. The IL-17A signal transduction triggers two broad, TRAF6- and TRAF5-dependent, intracellular signaling pathways to produce representative cytokines (IL-6) and chemokines (CXCL-1), respectively. Our limited unders
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Ancient agriculture and climate change on the north coast of Peru [Commentaries]
Because of its long-term perspective on human–environment relationships, archaeology is well positioned to study how people respond to past climate change and natural disasters. In interpreting these relationships, archaeological perspectives have shifted from viewing people as passively reacting to environmental change, to instead focusing on human action, decision making, and…
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Heterotrophic eukaryotes show a slow-fast continuum, not a gleaner-exploiter trade-off [Ecology]
Gleaners and exploiters (opportunists) are organisms adapted to feeding in nutritionally poor and rich environments, respectively. A trade-off between these two strategies—a negative relationship between the rate at which organisms can acquire food and ingest it—is a critical assumption in many ecological models. Here, we evaluate evidence for this trade-off…
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Longin R-SNARE is retrieved from the plasma membrane by ANTH domain-containing proteins in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
The plasma membrane (PM) acts as the interface between intra- and extracellular environments and exhibits a tightly regulated molecular composition. The composition and amount of PM proteins are regulated by balancing endocytic and exocytic trafficking in a cargo-specific manner, according to the demands of specific cellular states and developmental processes….
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Tunable layered-magnetism-assisted magneto-Raman effect in a two-dimensional magnet CrI3 [Applied Physical Sciences]
We used a combination of polarized Raman spectroscopy experiment and model magnetism–phonon coupling calculations to study the rich magneto-Raman effect in the two-dimensional (2D) magnet CrI3. We reveal a layered-magnetism–assisted phonon scattering mechanism below the magnetic onset temperature, whose Raman excitation breaks time-reversal symmetry, has an antisymmetric Raman tensor, and…
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DNA binding induces a cis-to-trans switch in Cre recombinase to enable intasome assembly [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Mechanistic understanding of DNA recombination in the Cre-loxP system has largely been guided by crystallographic structures of tetrameric synaptic complexes. Those studies have suggested a role for protein conformational dynamics that has not been well characterized at the atomic level. We used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to discover…
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Integrated chromosomal and plasmid sequence analyses reveal diverse modes of carbapenemase gene spread among Klebsiella pneumoniae [Microbiology]
Molecular and genomic surveillance systems for bacterial pathogens currently rely on tracking clonally evolving lineages. By contrast, plasmids are usually excluded or analyzed with low-resolution techniques, despite being the primary vectors of antibiotic resistance genes across many key pathogens. Here, we used a combination of long- and short-read sequence data…
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Trajectory and uniqueness of mutational signatures in yeast mutators [Genetics]
The acquisition of mutations plays critical roles in adaptation, evolution, senescence, and tumorigenesis. Massive genome sequencing has allowed extraction of specific features of many mutational landscapes but it remains difficult to retrospectively determine the mechanistic origin(s), selective forces, and trajectories of transient or persistent mutations and genome rearrangements. Here, we…
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Distinct hypertrophic cardiomyopathy genotypes result in convergent sarcomeric proteoform profiles revealed by top-down proteomics [Medical Sciences]
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common heritable heart disease. Although the genetic cause of HCM has been linked to mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, the ability to predict clinical outcomes based on specific mutations in HCM patients is limited. Moreover, how mutations in different sarcomeric proteins can result…
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Early termination of the Shiga toxin transcript generates a regulatory small RNA [Microbiology]
Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli is a significant human pathogen that causes disease ranging from hemorrhagic colitis to hemolytic uremic syndrome. The latter can lead to potentially fatal renal failure and is caused by the release of Shiga toxins that are encoded within lambdoid bacteriophages. The toxins are encoded within the late…
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Health benefits of on-road transportation pollution control programs in China [Sustainability Science]
China started to implement comprehensive measures to mitigate traffic pollution at the end of 1990s, but the comprehensive effects, especially on ambient air quality and public health, have not yet been systematically evaluated. In this study, we analyze the effects of vehicle emission control measures on ambient air pollution and…
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Inner Workings: Researchers peek into chromosomes' 3D structure in unprecedented detail [Chemistry]
Clodagh O'Shea will never forget the moment in early 2015 when she peered at the cell's nucleus in a way no one had ever done before. Using a new technique to visualize three-dimensional (3D) chromosomes as they exist in the active, unadulterated nucleus, O'Shea was able to zoom in on…
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Bill Gates: The Pandemic Has Erased Years of Progress
Editor's Note: This article is part of our coverage of The Atlantic Festival. Learn more and watch festival sessions here . In April 2018, I spoke with Bill Gates about two near certainties—that the world would eventually face a serious pandemic and that it was not prepared for one. Even then, Gates acknowledged that this was the rare scenario that punctured his trademark optimism about global pr
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Chief Executive of Embattled Alaskan Mine Project Resigns
The executive made "offensive" remarks about the state's political leaders, the company said, in meetings recorded by an environmental group.
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The longest whale dive ever recorded clocks in at almost 4 hours
A Cuvier's beaked whale did a dive lasting 3 hours and 42 minutes, breaking the previous record by an hour. How they manage to hold their breath for such long periods is not understood
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Trump Accuses FDA Of Playing Politics With COVID-19 Vaccine Guidelines
Referring to a report that the FDA plans to tighten requirements for a vaccine, Trump said, "That sounds like a political move." (Image credit: Joshua Roberts/Getty Images)
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Low tax on heating is bad for climate, report says
The rich benefit most from a de facto subsidy for home heating, a report says.
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California looks to eliminate gas guzzlers—but legal hurdles abound
California governor Gavin Newsom made a bold attempt today to eliminate sales of new gas-guzzling cars and trucks, marking a critical step in the state's quest to become carbon neutral by 2045. But the effort to clean up the state's largest source of climate emissions is almost certain to face serious legal challenges, particularly if President Donald Trump is reelected in November. Newsom issued
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California Plans to Ban Sales of Gas-Powered Cars by 2035
Governor Gavin Newsom outlines an ambitious plan for the nation's largest state to rely exclusively on electric-powered passenger cars and trucks.
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The Atlantic Daily: A Q&A With Barton Gellman
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . This election could be the one that breaks America, Barton Gellman warns in our November cover story. Given its magnitude, we published the piece early online; read it now . Bart and I caught up
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New Covid tracing app to launch in England and Wales
After months of delays, addition to test-and-trace system uses technology from Apple and Google to alert users
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Astronomers may have found the first planet in another galaxy
The first planet found outside the Milky Way may be in the Whirlpool galaxy, 28 million light years away. If it is confirmed, it would be the most distant planet ever spotted
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Face-covering use up, more people are taking COVID-19 threats seriously, study finds
A new survey of six U.S. states has found that during the past two months, more people are wearing masks, vaccine uncertainty is on the rise, and many people are overestimating their risk of becoming seriously ill and dying from COVID-19.
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Statins reduce COVID-19 severity, likely by removing cholesterol that virus uses to infect
Analyzing anonymized patient medical records, researchers discovered that cholesterol-lowering statins reduced risk of severe COVID-19 infection, while lab experiments uncovered a cellular mechanism that helps explain why.
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Author Correction: Selective, high-contrast detection of syngeneic glioblastoma in vivo
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72364-1
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Publisher Correction: 3D Magnetic Resonance Spirometry
Scientific Reports, Published online: 24 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72363-2
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Study suggests link between decreasing viral load and proportion of COVID-19 patients needing intensive care
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) suggests that, as lockdown took effect and case numbers dropped, the amount of virus patients were exposed to (viral load) fell, and this could be linked to lower proportions of patients requiring intensive care and dying.
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US study shows decline in viral load of patients with COVID-19 as pandemic progressed
A US study from the city of Detroit, presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCMID, online 23-25 September) shows that the initial SARS-CoV-2 viral load in nasopharyngeal samples has been decreasing as the pandemic progressed. The authors also observed that the decline in viral load was associated with a decrease in death rate.
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Large study confirms men have 62% increased risk of COVID-19 associated death, possibly related to higher degree of inflammation
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) confirms that men with COVID-19 have worse outcomes than women, possibly related to them experiencing higher levels of inflammation. The study is by Dr Frank Hanses, University Hospital Regensburg, Germany, and colleagues, and shows that men have a 62% increased risk of COVID-19 associat
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Study suggests elderly care home outbreaks in England were caused by multiple indepedent infections and also within-home spread
New research presented at this week's ESCMID Congress on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) shows that outbreaks of COVID-19 in elderly care homes were caused by multiple independent infections from outside, plus within care home spread. There is also evidence of transmission between residents and healthcare workers, including paramedics, possibily linking care home outbreak
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COVID-19 antibody studies across Brazil reveal Amazon region badly affected, with poorer Indigenous communities hit hardest
Two nationwide COVID-19 antibody seroprevalence studies from Brazil show that many cities along the Amazon were hit hardest at the beginning of the epidemic in May and June, along with poorer and Indigenous communities. The research is presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) and published in The Lancet Global Health.
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Head to head comparison of five assays used to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies shows Siemens and Oxford assays met regulatory targets
New research being presented at the ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online 23-25 September) shows that, in a head-to-head comparison of five tests used to detect SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (known as 'immunoassays'), an assay manufactured by Siemens and one developed by an academic partnership led by the University of Oxford had the most accurate results.
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UK's preventive measures to shield homeless people from COVID-19 have prevented hundreds of deaths
Timely preventive measures against COVID-19 such as providing hotel room accommodation for homeless people in the UK are estimated to have prevented hundreds of deaths in this vulnerable population, according to research presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, held online 23-25 September) and published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine .
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Study shows diagnoses of common conditions at family doctor halved during COVID-19 lockdown
New research from the UK, being presented at this week's ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Disease (ECCVID, online from 23-25 September) shows that the diagnosis of several common conditions including cardiovascular and cerebrovascular (circulatory) disease, diabetes, and mental health conditions approximately halved during the country's COVID-19 lockdown. The study is to be published in The Lancet
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The Lancet journals: Papers at Lancet journals' session at ESCMID Conference on Coronavirus Diseases (ECCVID)
The following papers will be presented at a Lancet journals' session at ECCVID 2020, organised by European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. The conference will take place online on Wednesday 23rd to Friday 25th September 2020, the society's first online conference focussing exclusively on COVID-19.
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High-intensity interval training combining rowing and cycling improves insulin sensitivity, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in obesity and type 2 diabetes
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) combining cycling and rowing markedly improves insulin sensitivity, body composition and cardiorespiratory fitness in cases of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D)
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Study shows that cycling is associated with reduced risk of both all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among people with diabetes
New research presented at this year's Annual Meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows that cycling reduces the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality among people with diabetes, and could be a useful addition to existing physical activity referral schemes for patients with the disease.
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Study shows the disproportionate impact of early-onset adult type 2 diabetes on individuals of South Asian and African-Caribbean ethnicity
A new study presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) shows the disproportionate impact of early-onset adult type 2 diabetes (T2D) on individuals of South Asian and African-Caribbean ethnicity in the UK.
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Study shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes, regardless of genetic risk
New research presented at this year's annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD), held online this year, shows the importance of good cardiovascular health in preventing type 2 diabetes (T2D) among middle-aged individuals, regardless of any genetic predisposition they may have towards developing the disease.
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Beaked Whale Shatters Record With 3 Hour 42 Minute Dive
Scientists still don't know how the marine mammals go so long without air.
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Shadow of black hole in M87 galaxy is wobbling and has been for a while
A new analysis reveals the behavior of the supermassive black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy across multiple years, indicating the crescent-like shadow feature appears to be wobbling.
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