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One number could help reveal how infectious a COVID-19 patient is. Should test results include it?
CT value could flag at-risk patients and prioritize them for contact tracing
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Understanding the secretive networks used to move money offshore
In 2016, the world's largest ever data leak dubbed "The Panama Papers" exposed a scandal, uncovering a vast global network of people—including celebrities and world leaders, who used offshore tax havens, anonymous transactions through intermediaries and shell corporations to hide their wealth, grow their fortunes and avoid taxes.
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New research provides clues on optimizing cell defenses when viruses attack
Science's pursuits of unraveling how human cells fight viral infections kicked into high gear in 2020 with the devastating emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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NASA's infrared view of typhoon Kujira
NASA's Terra satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Typhoon Kujira as it tracked through the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Titan's lakes can stratify like those on Earth
Lakes on Saturn's moon Titan, composed of methane, ethane, and nitrogen rather than water, experience density driven stratification, forming layers similar to lakes on Earth. However, whereas lakes on Earth stratify in response to temperature, Titan's lakes stratify solely due to the strange chemical interactions between its surface liquids and atmosphere, says a paper by Planetary Science Institu
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Even if times are tough, working parents are happier on the job
A new survey reveals that working parents are happier with their job, and they are getting more done, than people without children. Researchers attribute the surprising results to a sharp increase in the number of men helping with childcare and housework during the pandemic. "We found that men's increased contributions at home have a positive influence on women's job satisfaction and productivity
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Battling harmful insects by understanding their sense of smell
In NTNU's Dragvoll laboratory in Trondheim, researchers keep different things in the closet than most of us do. Jars of moths stand in rows. The insects are actually pretty cute, but the Norwegian name for them suggests that they may be a little annoying: "Pest phage fly" is not exactly a name you give to a friend.
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New research provides clues on optimizing cell defenses when viruses attack
Science's pursuits of unraveling how human cells fight viral infections kicked into high gear in 2020 with the devastating emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.
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Super cheap hearing aid uses parts that cost $1
A device that uses a dollar's worth of open-source parts and a 3D-printed case could help the hundreds of millions of older people worldwide who can't afford existing hearing aids to address age-related hearing loss. Scientists designed the ultra-low-cost, proof-of-concept device, known as LoCHAid, to be easily manufactured and repaired in locations where conventional hearing aids are priced beyo
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Covid-19 news: UK government criticised for confusion over new rules
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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D-Wave claims it has the world's most powerful quantum computer
D-Wave calls its new Advantage quantum computing system "the largest and most powerful quantum computer in existence" – but experts are sceptical about that claim
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Europe's second covid-19 wave is here but is it bigger than the first?
Several countries are reporting more daily covid-19 cases than during the first wave in March, though the higher numbers may be due to more people being tested
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Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure, study suggests
Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to new research.
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UK records highest daily number of coronavirus cases
Johnson's advisers want tougher measures to curb Covid-19, but face opposition from some Tory MPs
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These leaf droplets are great food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps, and flies, according to new research. The study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences suggests these droplets are an important but under-explored feature in plants, with profound implications for insects in agricultural and natural ecosystems. "Ou
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Study: Childhood chemo alters heart's caretaker cells
Why do 20% of children who receive cancer chemotherapy go on to develop heart failure later in life? UT Health San Antonio researchers led by Gregory Aune, MD, PhD, are studying this question and report a clue in a new journal article.
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New research provides clues on optimizing cell defenses when viruses attack
Researchers studying interferons, immune response proteins released naturally by human cells when viruses are detected, have uncovered new details on the mechanisms underlying cell defenses. They describe the intricate, time-dependent regulatory mechanisms that human cells use to control the duration and strength of antiviral responses triggered by interferon. Based on these findings, researchers
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Klimavagthund advarer: Regeringen skaber usikkerhed om klimamålet
Regeringens store satsning på nye teknologier er farlig, lyder det fra Klimarådet og regeringens egne støttepartier.
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Residue reveals plants Native Americans smoked 1,500 years ago
Metabolomics—a big-data approach to study small molecules called metabolites—has helped uncover what plants Native Americans smoked before and after European colonization of North America, researchers report. Researchers used the approach to study the differences between closely related plant species found in ancient pipes. This is the first time that a metabolomics-based research approach has be
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Injuries Went Up When Amazon Deployed Warehouse Robots
Back in 2018, an Amazon warehouse robot malfunctioned and tore open a can of bear repellent , sending 24 workers to the hospital. It was a dramatic illustration of an ominous trend: Amazon's warehouses have high rates of serious worker injury, a new investigation reveals — and the number has continued to climb since the online retail giant introduced warehouse robots into the mix. The revelation
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California Fires: 3 More People Killed As Blazes Rage In Wine Country
Gusty winds on Monday helped the Zogg and Glass fires to multiply in size. Winds eased overnight, raising hopes that firefighters could make progress containing the blazes.
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New Texas poll: Trump up in close race
President Donald Trump has an apparent lead over former Vice President Joe Biden in a close contest for Texas' 38 electoral votes according to a new poll of likely voters in the state released today.
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New NC poll: Biden and Trump tied
President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden are deadlocked in the race for North Carolina's 15 electoral votes, according to a new poll released today.
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New NH poll: Biden leads Trump in run for president
Former Vice President Joe Biden has an eight-point lead over President Donald Trump among likely New Hampshire voters, according to a new poll released today by the UMass Lowell Center for Public Opinion.
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The secretive networks used to move money offshore
The researchers at USC have made some discoveries about the network behind the Panama Papers, uncovering uniquely fragmented network behavior and transactions. This is vastly different from more traditional social or organizational networks, demonstrating why these systems of transactions and associations are so robust and difficult to infiltrate or take down
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Obstructive sleep apnea risk varies in patients with different types of epilepsy
People with generalized epilepsy who have seizures arising from both sides of the brain simultaneously, have a higher risk of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) compared to patients who have focal epilepsy where seizures emanate from one area of the brain, according to a Rutgers study.
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Volcanic ash could help reduce CO2 associated with climate change
Scientists investigating ways of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases from our atmosphere believe volcanic ash could play an important role.
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Are China's pollution remediation efforts making the planet warmer?
A 10-year effort by China to improve air quality and reduce pollution-related health risks has caused warming in areas across the northern hemisphere, according to new work.
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Untapped potential exists for blending hydropower, floating solar panels
Hybrid systems of floating solar panels and hydropower plants may hold the technical potential to produce a significant portion of the electricity generated annually across the globe, according to a new analysis.
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Professor i sociale data bliver prorektor
Professor David Dreyer Lassen tiltræder 1. januar en nyoprettet stilling som prorektor ved Københavns…
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NASA Says the International Space Station Is Leaking Faster Now
Like a Sieve In August, NASA detected a leak on the International Space Station. What followed was several weeks of investigation, including the isolation of crew members into one of the station's Russian modules as an extreme precaution. Ironically, NASA now believes the leak is located in the main work area of the Zvezda Service Module, the same one that was used for the evacuations. More alarm
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Redefining drought in the U.S. Corn Belt
As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought. But are scientists and producers focusing on the right metric when measuring crop-relevant drought? Not exactly, according to new research from University of Illinois scientists, who urge the scientific community to redefine the term.
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Providing accurate modeling of climate change impacts on water resources
To better document the repercussions of climate change on regional water resources, researchers from around the world now have access to HYSETS, a database of hydrometric, meteorological and physiographic data created by a team at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), which contains 70 years' worth of data on 14,425 North American watersheds.
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MIT Researchers Say Their Fusion Reactor Is "Very Likely to Work"
A team of researchers at MIT and other institutions say their "SPARC" compact fusion reactor should actually work — at least in theory, as they argue in a series of recently released research papers. In a total of seven papers penned by 47 researchers from 12 institutions, the team argues that no unexpected impediments or surprises have shown up during the planning stages. In other words, the res
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Researchers Successfully Test Hydrogen-Powered Passenger Plane
Maiden Flight Last week, the aviation company ZeroAvia ran a successful flight test of its new hydrogen-powered passenger plane. The Piper M-class aircraft — which can seat up to six, so it's on the smaller end of the passenger aircraft spectrum — took off, flew in a loop around England's Cranfield Airport and then safely landed, CNBC reports . While it will be years before the aviation industry
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In 2020, more men and women are likely to consider sex with a robot
In 2016, "Harmony", the world's first AI sex robot was designed by a tech firm called Realbotix. According to 2020 survey data, more than one in five Americans (22 percent) say they would consider having sex with a robot. This is an increase from a survey conducted in 2017. Robots (and robotic tech) already play a vital role in speeding up manufacturing, packaging, and processing across various i
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Russia reports 'non-standard' air leak on Space Station
Russia said Tuesday that astronauts had found an air leak in its section of the International Space Station, with a senior space official calling the air loss beyond expected levels.
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Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones
If you dive in the Mediterranean Sea, the cluster anemone is among the most fascinating and magnificent corals you could see. You can find it on rocks or sponges, in scarcely lit areas such as sea caves and gorges, where it clusters in dense agglomerations resembling yellow and orange carpets. In a study published in Scientific Reports, a research group of the University of Bologna found evidence
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Novel Drosophila-based disease model to study human intellectual disability syndrome
The researchers from the TalTech molecular neurobiology laboratory headed by professor Tõnis Timmusk used the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster to develop a novel disease model for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). Their study was reported in the July issue of Disease Models and Mechanisms.
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A Quarter of All Reptile Species, Many of Them Endangered, Are Sold Online
A new study finds 75 percent of the species sold are not regulated by any trade agreement
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Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones
If you dive in the Mediterranean Sea, the cluster anemone is among the most fascinating and magnificent corals you could see. You can find it on rocks or sponges, in scarcely lit areas such as sea caves and gorges, where it clusters in dense agglomerations resembling yellow and orange carpets. In a study published in Scientific Reports, a research group of the University of Bologna found evidence
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Novel Drosophila-based disease model to study human intellectual disability syndrome
The researchers from the TalTech molecular neurobiology laboratory headed by professor Tõnis Timmusk used the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster to develop a novel disease model for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). Their study was reported in the July issue of Disease Models and Mechanisms.
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Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown.
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NASA's infrared view of typhoon Kujira
NASA's Terra satellite used infrared light to identify strongest storms and coldest cloud top temperatures in Typhoon Kujira as it tracked through the northwestern Pacific Ocean.
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Buying emergency contraception is legal but not always easy at small, mom-and-pop pharmacies
Amie Ashcraft has studied the availability and accessibility of emergency contraception in West Virginia pharmacies. She and her research team found that chain pharmacies–like CVS and Walmart–were more likely than independent ones to keep emergency contraception in stock.
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Redefining drought in the US corn belt
As the climate trends warmer and drier, global food security increasingly hinges on crops' ability to withstand drought. But are scientists and producers focusing on the right metric when measuring crop-relevant drought? Not exactly, according to new research from University of Illinois scientists, who urge the scientific community to redefine the term.
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Global poll of views on environment and science finds sharpest divide in US
Only one in five Americans with right-wing outlook said they had a lot of trust in scientists People in the US are more sharply divided along political lines when it comes to science and environmental issues than in other parts of the world, new research shows. Globally, people who see themselves on the left side of politics are more likely to be concerned about the environment than those who see
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Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown.
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How to Win Any Debate
Arguing, especially with strangers on the internet, is generally a bad idea—but if you have to, here's how to win.
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Study aims to use microbial information to inform global climate change models
Jizhong Zhou, the Director of the Institute for Environmental Genomics, a George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the OU College of Arts and Sciences and the lead for the study, tackles a problem that has challenged scientists for more than a decade.
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Nanotech filter coating offers promise against COVID-19
A physics professor from the University of Houston has developed a nanotech coating designed to allow air filters to capture airborne or aerosolized droplets of the virus that causes COVID-19.
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Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce ordered outcomes
Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists from the University of Groningen found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way. By combining spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical physics, they discovered how disorder at the mo
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Common antioxidant enzyme may provide potential treatment for COVID-19
Researchers from UCLA and China have found that catalase, a naturally occurring enzyme, holds potential as a low-cost therapeutic drug to treat COVID-19 symptoms and suppress the replication of coronavirus inside the body. A study detailing the research was published in Advanced Materials.
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Wearable exosuit that lessens muscle fatigue could redesign the future of work
A new clothing-like exoskeleton can reduce back muscle fatigue and providing needed physical relief to material handlers, medical professionals and frontline workers.
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Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn's
A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn. The discovery has implications for wound treatment and preventing some of the aging process in skin. Researchers identified a factor in the skin of baby mice controlling hair follicle formation. When it was activated in adult mice, their skin was able to heal wounds without scarring. The reformed skin
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Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.
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Second alignment plane of solar system discovered
A study of comet motions indicates that the Solar System has a second alignment plane. Analytical investigation of the orbits of long-period comets shows that the aphelia of the comets, the point where they are farthest from the Sun, tend to fall close to either the well-known ecliptic plane where the planets reside or a newly discovered 'empty ecliptic.' This has important implications for models
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Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain
Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior. The findings support a growing body of evidence that obesity is a disease whose roots are in the brain.
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Cosmic diamonds formed during gigantic planetary collisions
Geoscientists have found the largest extraterrestrial diamonds ever discovered – a few tenths of a millimeter in size nevertheless – inside meteorites. Together with an international team of researchers, they have now been able to prove that these diamonds formed in the early period of our solar system when minor planets collided together or with large asteroids. These new data disprove the theory
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Astrophysicist probes cosmic 'dark matter detector'
An astrophysicist is searching the light coming from a distant, and extremely powerful celestial object, for what may be the most elusive substance in the universe: dark matter.
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Common antioxidant enzyme may provide potential treatment for COVID-19
Researchers from UCLA and China have found that catalase, a naturally occurring enzyme, holds potential as a low-cost therapeutic drug to treat COVID-19 symptoms and suppress the replication of coronavirus inside the body. A study detailing the research was published in Advanced Materials.
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Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Shannon Meseck, a NOAA Fisheries research chemist and marathon runner, was initially interested in how ultra-runners can tolerate higher levels of carbon dioxide than non-athletes. A chance conversation with a medical doctor about ciliated cells in the human lung turned on a light bulb in her head. Could similarities between the function of these cells in humans and in blue mussels explain the mus
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Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Shannon Meseck, a NOAA Fisheries research chemist and marathon runner, was initially interested in how ultra-runners can tolerate higher levels of carbon dioxide than non-athletes. A chance conversation with a medical doctor about ciliated cells in the human lung turned on a light bulb in her head. Could similarities between the function of these cells in humans and in blue mussels explain the mus
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Volcanic ash could help reduce carbon dioxide associated with climate change
University of Southampton scientists investigating ways of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases from our atmosphere believe volcanic ash could play an important role.
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Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid "catastrophizing" worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University.
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Genomes of two millipede species shed light on their evolution, development and physiology
Millipedes, those many-legged denizens of the soil surface throughout the world, don't always get the recognition they deserve. But a new study by Jerome Hui of Chinese University of Hong Kong and colleagues puts them in the spotlight, sequencing and analyzing complete genomes from two very different millipede species. The study, publishing on September 29th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology
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New mechanism for anti-infection effects of dietary fiber
New research in mice has uncovered a previously unknown interaction between molecules derived from dietary fiber and an immune cell protein, which triggers protection against infection with Salmonella bacteria. Hitoshi Tsugawa of Keio University School of Medicine in Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues present their findings in a paper publishing on September 29th, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Bi
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Genomes of two millipede species shed light on their evolution, development and physiology
Millipedes, those many-legged denizens of the soil surface throughout the world, don't always get the recognition they deserve. But a new study by Jerome Hui of Chinese University of Hong Kong and colleagues puts them in the spotlight, sequencing and analyzing complete genomes from two very different millipede species. The study, publishing on September 29th in the open-access journal PLOS Biology
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New mechanism for anti-infection effects of dietary fiber
New research in mice has uncovered a previously unknown interaction between molecules derived from dietary fiber and an immune cell protein, which triggers protection against infection with Salmonella bacteria. Hitoshi Tsugawa of Keio University School of Medicine in Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues present their findings in a paper publishing on September 29th, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Bi
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Understanding the effect of aging on the genome
Time may be our worst enemy, and aging its most powerful weapon. Our hair turns gray, our strength wanes, and a slew of age-related diseases represent what is happening at the cellular and molecular levels. Aging affects all the cells in our body's different tissues, and understanding its impact would be of great value in fighting this eternal enemy of all ephemeral life forms.
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Understanding the effect of aging on the genome
Time may be our worst enemy, and aging its most powerful weapon. Our hair turns gray, our strength wanes, and a slew of age-related diseases represent what is happening at the cellular and molecular levels. Aging affects all the cells in our body's different tissues, and understanding its impact would be of great value in fighting this eternal enemy of all ephemeral life forms.
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Ninety Percent of U.S. Cars Must Be Electric by 2050 to Meet Climate Goals
Any move away from gas-powered cars should also be accompanied by efforts to beef up public transportation — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Understanding ghost particle interactions
Scientists have constructed a nuclear physics model capturing the interactions between neutrinos and atomic nuclei. This model building is part of a larger project to understand the role of neutrinos in the early universe.
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Gaps between night and day heat drive severe storms
New research sheds light on one particular mechanism that has the potential to spawn powerful thunderstorms and cloud bursts. When thunderstorms accumulate in clusters, these storms are often accompanied by violent cloud bursts and flooding , which can devastate the areas affected. "We conclude that the atmosphere's ability to generate large thunderstorms is influenced, among other things, by the
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Study suggests link between unexplained miscarriages and how women perceive men's body odor
Women who have suffered unexplained repeated pregnancy loss (uRPL) have altered perceptions and brain responses to male body odors, in comparison to those with no history of uRPL, suggests a new study.
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Lessons from a cooling climate
Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years. While it's true that plants take up large amounts of carbon from the atmosphere, the rocks themselves mediate a great deal of the carbon cycle over geological timescales. Pr
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Understanding ghost particle interactions
Scientists have constructed a nuclear physics model capturing the interactions between neutrinos and atomic nuclei. This model building is part of a larger project to understand the role of neutrinos in the early universe.
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'Insect Armageddon': Low doses of the insecticide, Imidacloprid, cause blindness in insects
New research provides important evidence on the role of insecticides on the longevity of insect population.
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Evidence that prehistoric flying reptiles probably had feathers refuted
Experts have examined the evidence that prehistoric flying reptiles called pterosaurs had feathers and believe they were, in fact, bald.
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How AI will revolutionize manufacturing
Ask Stefan Jockusch what a factory might look like in 10 or 20 years, and the answer might leave you at a crossroads between fascination and bewilderment. Jockusch is vice president for strategy at Siemens Digital Industries Software, which develops applications that simulate the conception, design, and manufacture of products like cell phones or smart watches. His vision of a smart factory is ab
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Så minskar du matsvinnet – forskarens enkla tips
29 september 2020 är det premiär för FN:s nyinstiftade Internationella matsvinnsdagen. En bra dag att se över sitt eget matsvinn, menar Helén Williams, docent miljö- och energisystem vid Karlstads universitet, och ger 6 enkla tips på hur man startar en hållbarare mathållning hemmavid. Matsvinn innebär att alla resurser som vatten, gödning, förpackningar och bränsle som investerats under odling, f
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6 books to help you through anxious times
Anxiety levels are increasing due to the pandemic and political uncertainty right now. Anxiety and depression cost the economy $50 billion in health care costs and lost work every year. These six books cover anxiety's physiology, environmental factors, and potential treatments. With just over a month until the next presidential election, November is predicted to be a dark moment in American histo
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
Ancestry of New Guinea singing dogs Highland wild dog. Image credit: Anang Dianto (photographer). New Guinea singing dogs (NGSD) are a rare canine population from the highlands of New Guinea that owe their name to a recognizable vocalization evoking wolf howls and whale song. Once abundant on the island, the…
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Using the curriculum vitae to promote gender equity during the COVID-19 pandemic [Social Sciences]
We commend Malisch et al. on their Opinion (1) on immediate solutions to ensure gender equity during the COVID-19 pandemic given the disproportionate burden placed on women due to childcare and household responsibilities. Given early reports showing fewer women are submitting academic papers during the pandemic (2), we encourage institutions…
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Reply to Arora et al.: Concerns and considerations about using the CV as an equity tool [Social Sciences]
As increasing evidence emerges concerning the disproportionate impact of COVID-19 on women academics (1, 2), we hope our work continues to prompt institutions and departments to advance gender equity in tenure and promotion (3). For example, Arora et al. (4) have developed a department-specific rubric to assess COVID-19's impact on…
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Genetic variant rs7820258 regulates the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 in brain regions [Biological Sciences]
Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1), the enzyme catalyzing the rate-limiting step along the kynurenine pathway, is widely known for being a powerful immune regulator via depletion of tryptophan, an essential amino acid, and production of kynurenines, some of which are endowed with immunoregulatory effects. In humans, IDO1 expression and activity are…
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Reply to Han et al.: On track for an IDO1-based personalized therapy in autoimmunity [Biological Sciences]
Advances in genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have highlighted the heterogeneous nature of autoimmune diseases (1), conditions whereby malfunctioning of molecular mechanisms underlying tolerance translates into the activation of autoreactive immune cells. Immune checkpoint molecules are regulators of the immune system that preserve self-tolerance and prevent autoimmunity. Indoleamine 2,3-dio
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QnAs with Janet Currie [QnAs]
Many mental illnesses arise in adolescence, and a study of national insurance claims in the United States finds a large variance in how adolescent patients are treated even within the same zip code. The findings, reported in Janet Currie's Inaugural Article (IA) (1), reveal that 45% of adolescents receive first-line…
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Profile of Cynthia Friend [Profiles]
In 2015, the United Nations released Sustainable Development Goals aimed at improving the environment and supporting vulnerable populations around the globe (1). Among the goals are those intended to reduce energy consumption and invest in clean energy, to encourage innovation in industry and develop efficient production methods, and to promote…
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The immune signatures of multiple sclerosis: Lessons from twin studies [Immunology and Inflammation]
The advances of immunology in the last decades have been spectacular, both at the basic and the translational level. This progress has led to the discovery of many immunotherapies for autoimmune diseases and cancer. Besides, whole-genome sequencing studies have confirmed that the genetic susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as multiple…
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Predators and rainfall control spatial biogeochemistry in a landscape of fear [Ecology]
Scientists have long pondered what the world might have been like during the geological epochs immediately predating the late Pleistocene extinction events, when very large, wild mammals occupied almost every ecosystem on Earth (1–4). By piecing together whatever evidence can be gathered from the fossil record, it is speculated that…
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Expanding the horizons of genome editing in the fruit fly with Cas12a [Genetics]
For well over a century, geneticists have relentlessly bombarded the genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster with increasingly sophisticated mutagenic agents (1). Collectively, these loss-of-function studies have been astoundingly informative, providing fundamental breakthroughs in nearly all fields of biology (2, 3). Initially, such studies relied on mutagens that attack…
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Opportunities and limitations of genetically modified nonhuman primate models for neuroscience research [Neuroscience]
The recently developed new genome-editing technologies, such as the CRISPR/Cas system, have opened the door for generating genetically modified nonhuman primate (NHP) models for basic neuroscience and brain disorders research. The complex circuit formation and experience-dependent refinement of the human brain are very difficult to model in vitro, and thus…
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Donor-derived spermatogenesis following stem cell transplantation in sterile NANOS2 knockout males [Agricultural Sciences]
Spermatogonial stem cell transplantation (SSCT) is an experimental technique for transfer of germline between donor and recipient males that could be used as a tool for biomedical research, preservation of endangered species, and dissemination of desirable genetics in food animal populations. To fully realize these potentials, recipient males must be…
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El Nino resilience farming on the north coast of Peru [Anthropology]
El Niño–Southern Oscillation has been treated as a disruptor of environmental and socioeconomic equilibrium both in ancient times and in modern-day Peru. Recent work in the coastal desert plain, known as the Pampa de Mocan, challenges this view by demonstrating that prehispanic irrigation systems were designed to incorporate floods and…
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Extracellular microRNAs in human circulation are associated with miRISC complexes that are accessible to anti-AGO2 antibody and can bind target mimic oligonucleotides [Applied Biological Sciences]
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) function cell-intrinsically to regulate gene expression by base-pairing to complementary mRNA targets while in association with Argonaute, the effector protein of the miRNA-mediated silencing complex (miRISC). A relatively dilute population of miRNAs can be found extracellularly in body fluids such as human blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)….
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Near-zero-index media as electromagnetic ideal fluids [Applied Physical Sciences]
Near-zero-index (NZI) supercoupling, the transmission of electromagnetic waves inside a waveguide irrespective of its shape, is a counterintuitive wave effect that finds applications in optical interconnects and engineering light–matter interactions. However, there is a limited knowledge on the local properties of the electromagnetic power flow associated with supercoupling phenomena. Here,…
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Shear-assisted grain coarsening in colloidal polycrystals [Applied Physical Sciences]
Grain growth under shear annealing is crucial for controlling the properties of polycrystalline materials. However, their microscopic kinetics are not well understood because individual atomic trajectories are difficult to track. Here, we study grain growth with single-particle kinetics in colloidal polycrystals using video microscopy. Rich grain-growth phenomena are revealed in…
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Functional advantages of Levy walks emerging near a critical point [Applied Physical Sciences]
A special class of random walks, so-called Lévy walks, has been observed in a variety of organisms ranging from cells, insects, fishes, and birds to mammals, including humans. Although their prevalence is considered to be a consequence of natural selection for higher search efficiency, some findings suggest that Lévy walks…
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Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activates O2 by electron transfer [Biochemistry]
Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) is the cornerstone of atmospheric CO2 fixation by the biosphere. It catalyzes the addition of CO2 onto enolized ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP), producing 3-phosphoglycerate which is then converted to sugars. The major problem of this reaction is competitive O2 addition, which forms a phosphorylated product (2-phosphoglycolate) that…
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Victorin, the host-selective cyclic peptide toxin from the oat pathogen Cochliobolus victoriae, is ribosomally encoded [Biochemistry]
The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Cochliobolus victoriae produces victorin, a host-selective toxin (HST) essential for pathogenicity to certain oat cultivars with resistance against crown rust. Victorin is a mixture of highly modified heterodetic cyclic hexapeptides, previously assumed to be synthesized by a nonribosomal peptide synthetase. Herein, we demonstrate that victorin is…
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Exploring the landscape of model representations [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The success of any physical model critically depends upon adopting an appropriate representation for the phenomenon of interest. Unfortunately, it remains generally challenging to identify the essential degrees of freedom or, equivalently, the proper order parameters for describing complex phenomena. Here we develop a statistical physics framework for exploring and…
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Interfacial plasticity facilitates high reaction rate of E. coli FAS malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase, FabD [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Fatty acid synthases (FASs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) iteratively elongate and often reduce two-carbon ketide units in de novo fatty acid and polyketide biosynthesis. Cycles of chain extensions in FAS and PKS are initiated by an acyltransferase (AT), which loads monomer units onto acyl carrier proteins (ACPs), small, flexible proteins…
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Uncovering a membrane-distal conformation of KRAS available to recruit RAF to the plasma membrane [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The small GTPase KRAS is localized at the plasma membrane where it functions as a molecular switch, coupling extracellular growth factor stimulation to intracellular signaling networks. In this process, KRAS recruits effectors, such as RAF kinase, to the plasma membrane where they are activated by a series of complex molecular…
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General and robust covalently linked graphene oxide affinity grids for high-resolution cryo-EM [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Affinity grids have great potential to facilitate rapid preparation of even quite impure samples in single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (EM). Yet despite the promising advances of affinity grids over the past decades, no single strategy has demonstrated general utility. Here we chemically functionalize cryo-EM grids coated with mostly one or two…
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Proline-rich domain of human ALIX contains multiple TSG101-UEV interaction sites and forms phosphorylation-mediated reversible amyloids [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Proline-rich domains (PRDs) are among the most prevalent signaling modules of eukaryotes but often unexplored by biophysical techniques as their heterologous recombinant expression poses significant difficulties. Using a "divide-and-conquer" approach, we present a detailed investigation of a PRD (166 residues; ∼30% prolines) belonging to a human protein ALIX, a versatile…
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Disruption of a key ligand-H-bond network drives dissociative properties in vamorolone for Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder that shows chronic and progressive damage to skeletal and cardiac muscle leading to premature death. Antiinflammatory corticosteroids targeting the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are the current standard of care but drive adverse side effects such as deleterious bone loss. Through subtle modification to a…
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Supertertiary protein structure affects an allosteric network [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The notion that protein function is allosterically regulated by structural or dynamic changes in proteins has been extensively investigated in several protein domains in isolation. In particular, PDZ domains have represented a paradigm for these studies, despite providing conflicting results. Furthermore, it is still unknown how the association between protein…
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Tuning the Baird aromatic triplet-state energy of cyclooctatetraene to maximize the self-healing mechanism in organic fluorophores [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Bright, photostable, and nontoxic fluorescent contrast agents are critical for biological imaging. "Self-healing" dyes, in which triplet states are intramolecularly quenched, enable fluorescence imaging by increasing fluorophore brightness and longevity, while simultaneously reducing the generation of reactive oxygen species that promote phototoxicity. Here, we systematically examine the self-heal
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Hemostasis vs. homeostasis: Platelets are essential for preserving vascular barrier function in the absence of injury or inflammation [Cell Biology]
Platelets are best known for their vasoprotective responses to injury and inflammation. Here, we have asked whether they also support vascular integrity when neither injury nor inflammation is present. Changes in vascular barrier function in dermal and meningeal vessels were measured in real time in mouse models using the differential…
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Kindlin-3 loss curbs chronic myeloid leukemia in mice by mobilizing leukemic stem cells from protective bone marrow niches [Cell Biology]
Kindlin-3 (K3)–mediated integrin adhesion controls homing and bone marrow (BM) retention of normal hematopoietic cells. However, the role of K3 in leukemic stem cell (LSC) retention and growth in the remodeled tumor-promoting BM is unclear. We report that loss of K3 in a mouse model of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)…
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Visualizing conical intersection passages via vibronic coherence maps generated by stimulated ultrafast X-ray Raman signals [Chemistry]
The rates and outcomes of virtually all photophysical and photochemical processes are determined by conical intersections. These are regions of degeneracy between electronic states on the nuclear landscape of molecules where electrons and nuclei evolve on comparable timescales and thus become strongly coupled, enabling radiationless relaxation channels upon optical excitation….
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Polyamorphism of vapor-deposited amorphous selenium in response to light [Chemistry]
Enhanced surface mobility is critical in producing stable glasses during physical vapor deposition. In amorphous selenium (a-Se) both the structure and dynamics of the surface can be altered when exposed to above-bandgap light. Here we investigate the effect of light on the properties of vapor-deposited a-Se glasses at a range…
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Thermodynamic and kinetic design principles for amyloid-aggregation inhibitors [Chemistry]
Understanding the mechanism of action of compounds capable of inhibiting amyloid-fibril formation is critical to the development of potential therapeutics against protein-misfolding diseases. A fundamental challenge for progress is the range of possible target species and the disparate timescales involved, since the aggregating proteins are simultaneously the reactants, products, intermediates,…
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Modeling the stability of polygonal patterns of vortices at the poles of Jupiter as revealed by the Juno spacecraft [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
From its pole-to-pole orbit, the Juno spacecraft discovered arrays of cyclonic vortices in polygonal patterns around the poles of Jupiter. In the north, there are eight vortices around a central vortex, and in the south there are five. The patterns and the individual vortices that define them have been stable…
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The seawater carbon inventory at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Paleocene–Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) (55.6 Mya) was a geologically rapid carbon-release event that is considered the closest natural analog to anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Recent work has used boron-based proxies in planktic foraminifera to characterize the extent of surface-ocean acidification that occurred during the event. However, seawater acidity alone provides…
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Treatment of mental illness in American adolescents varies widely within and across areas [Economic Sciences]
Many mental health disorders first manifest in adolescence, and early treatment may affect the course of the disease. Using a large national database of insurance claims, this study focuses on variations in the type of care that adolescent patients receive when they are treated for an initial episode of mental…
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Untethered control of functional origami microrobots with distributed actuation [Engineering]
Deployability, multifunctionality, and tunability are features that can be explored in the design space of origami engineering solutions. These features arise from the shape-changing capabilities of origami assemblies, which require effective actuation for full functionality. Current actuation strategies rely on either slow or tethered or bulky actuators (or a combination)….
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Engineered biomimetic nanoparticle for dual targeting of the cancer stem-like cell population in sonic hedgehog medulloblastoma [Engineering]
The sonic hedgehog subtype of medulloblastoma (SHH MB) is associated with treatment failure and poor outcome. Current strategies utilizing whole brain radiation therapy result in deleterious off-target effects on the normal developing childhood brain. Most conventional chemotherapies remain limited by ineffective blood–brain barrier (BBB) penetrance. These challenges signify an unmet…
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Holocene coastal evolution preceded the expansion of paddy field rice farming [Environmental Sciences]
Rice agriculture is the foundation of Asian civilizations south of the Yangtze River. Although rice history is well documented for its lower Yangtze homeland area, the early southward expansion of paddy rice farming is poorly known. Our study investigates this process using a compilation of paleoenvironmental proxies from coastal sediment…
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Late lactation in small mammals is a critically sensitive window of vulnerability to elevated ambient temperature [Environmental Sciences]
Predicted increases in global average temperature are physiologically trivial for most endotherms. However, heat waves will also increase in both frequency and severity, and these will be physiologically more important. Lactating small mammals are hypothesized to be limited by heat dissipation capacity, suggesting high temperatures may adversely impact lactation performance….
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Synchrony matters more than species richness in plant community stability at a global scale [Environmental Sciences]
The stability of ecological communities is critical for the stable provisioning of ecosystem services, such as food and forage production, carbon sequestration, and soil fertility. Greater biodiversity is expected to enhance stability across years by decreasing synchrony among species, but the drivers of stability in nature remain poorly resolved. Our…
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Reconstruction of the birth of a male sex chromosome present in Atlantic herring [Evolution]
The mechanisms underlying sex determination are astonishingly plastic. Particularly the triggers for the molecular machinery, which recalls either the male or female developmental program, are highly variable and have evolved independently and repeatedly. Fish show a huge variety of sex determination systems, including both genetic and environmental triggers. The advent…
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Causal inference in genetic trio studies [Genetics]
We introduce a method to draw causal inferences—inferences immune to all possible confounding—from genetic data that include parents and offspring. Causal conclusions are possible with these data because the natural randomness in meiosis can be viewed as a high-dimensional randomized experiment. We make this observation actionable by developing a conditional…
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New Guinea highland wild dogs are the original New Guinea singing dogs [Genetics]
New Guinea singing dogs (NGSD) are identifiable by their namesake vocalizations, which are unlike any other canid population. Their novel behaviors and potential singular origin during dog domestication make them an attractive, but elusive, subject for evolutionary and conservation study. Although once plentiful on the island of New Guinea (NG),…
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A CRISPR homing gene drive targeting a haplolethal gene removes resistance alleles and successfully spreads through a cage population [Genetics]
Engineered gene drives are being explored as a new strategy in the fight against vector-borne diseases due to their potential for rapidly spreading genetic modifications through a population. However, CRISPR-based homing gene drives proposed for this purpose have faced a major obstacle in the formation of resistance alleles that prevent…
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Suboptimal SARS-CoV-2-specific CD8+ T cell response associated with the prominent HLA-A*02:01 phenotype [Immunology and Inflammation]
An improved understanding of human T cell-mediated immunity in COVID-19 is important for optimizing therapeutic and vaccine strategies. Experience with influenza shows that infection primes CD8+ T cell memory to peptides presented by common HLA types like HLA-A2, which enhances recovery and diminishes clinical severity upon reinfection. Stimulating peripheral blood…
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Early programming of CD8+ T cell response by the orphan nuclear receptor NR4A3 [Immunology and Inflammation]
Enhancing long-term persistence while simultaneously potentiating the effector response of CD8+ T cells has been a long-standing goal in immunology to produce better vaccines and adoptive cell therapy products. NR4A3 is a transcription factor of the orphan nuclear receptor family. While it is rapidly and transiently expressed following T cell…
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ORAI1 and ORAI2 modulate murine neutrophil calcium signaling, cellular activation, and host defense [Immunology and Inflammation]
Calcium signals are initiated in immune cells by the process of store-operated calcium entry (SOCE), where receptor activation triggers transient calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum, followed by opening of plasma-membrane calcium-release activated calcium (CRAC) channels. ORAI1, ORAI2, and ORAI3 are known to comprise the CRAC channel; however, the contributions…
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Tumor regression and resistance mechanisms upon CDK4 and RAF1 inactivation in KRAS/P53 mutant lung adenocarcinomas [Medical Sciences]
KRAS mutant lung adenocarcinomas remain intractable for targeted therapies. Genetic interrogation of KRAS downstream effectors, including the MAPK pathway and the interphase CDKs, identified CDK4 and RAF1 as the only targets whose genetic inactivation induces therapeutic responses without causing unacceptable toxicities. Concomitant CDK4 inactivation and RAF1 ablation prevented tumor progression..
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PIK3CA C-terminal frameshift mutations are novel oncogenic events that sensitize tumors to PI3K-{alpha} inhibition [Medical Sciences]
PIK3CA hotspot mutation is well established as an oncogenic driver event in cancer and its durable and efficacious inhibition is a focus in the development and testing of clinical cancer therapeutics. However, hundreds of cancer-associated PIK3CA mutations remain uncharacterized, their sensitivity to PI3K inhibitors unknown. Here, we describe a series…
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Regulation of hepatic insulin signaling and glucose homeostasis by sphingosine kinase 2 [Medical Sciences]
Sphingolipid dysregulation is often associated with insulin resistance, while the enzymes controlling sphingolipid metabolism are emerging as therapeutic targets for improving insulin sensitivity. We report herein that sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2), a key enzyme in sphingolipid catabolism, plays a critical role in the regulation of hepatic insulin signaling and glucose…
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Short Vi-polysaccharide abrogates T-independent immune response and hyporesponsiveness elicited by long Vi-CRM197 conjugate vaccine [Microbiology]
Polysaccharide-protein conjugates have been developed to overcome the T-independent response, hyporesponsiveness to repeated vaccination, and poor immunogenicity in infants of polysaccharides. To address the impact of polysaccharide length, typhoid conjugates made with short- and long-chain fractions of Vi polysaccharide with average sizes of 9.5, 22.8, 42.7, 82.0, and 165 kDa…
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SARS-CoV-2 detection using isothermal amplification and a rapid, inexpensive protocol for sample inactivation and purification [Microbiology]
The current severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic has had an enormous impact on society worldwide, threatening the lives and livelihoods of many. The effects will continue to grow and worsen if economies begin to open without the proper precautions, including expanded diagnostic capabilities. To address this need…
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Multiheme hydroxylamine oxidoreductases produce NO during ammonia oxidation in methanotrophs [Microbiology]
Aerobic and nitrite-dependent methanotrophs make a living from oxidizing methane via methanol to carbon dioxide. In addition, these microorganisms cometabolize ammonia due to its structural similarities to methane. The first step in both of these processes is catalyzed by methane monooxygenase, which converts methane or ammonia into methanol or hydroxylamine,…
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Microglia depletion exacerbates demyelination and impairs remyelination in a neurotropic coronavirus infection [Microbiology]
Microglia are considered both pathogenic and protective during recovery from demyelination, but their precise role remains ill defined. Here, using an inhibitor of colony stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R), PLX5622, and mice infected with a neurotropic coronavirus (mouse hepatitis virus [MHV], strain JHMV), we show that depletion of microglia during…
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Modulation of acyl-carnitines, the broad mechanism behind Wolbachia-mediated inhibition of medically important flaviviruses in Aedes aegypti [Microbiology]
Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes are refractory to flavivirus infections, but the role of lipids in Wolbachia-mediated virus blocking remains to be elucidated. Here, we use liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to provide a comprehensive picture of the lipidome of Aedes aegypti (Aag2) cells infected with Wolbachia only, either dengue or Zika virus only,…
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Nanaerobic growth enables direct visualization of dynamic cellular processes in human gut symbionts [Microbiology]
Mechanistic studies of anaerobic gut bacteria have been hindered by the lack of a fluorescent protein system to track and visualize proteins and dynamic cellular processes in actively growing bacteria. Although underappreciated, many gut "anaerobes" are able to respire using oxygen as the terminal electron acceptor. The oxygen continually released…
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Structure-function studies of Rgg binding to pheromones and target promoters reveal a model of transcription factor interplay [Microbiology]
Regulator gene of glucosyltransferase (Rgg) family proteins, such as Rgg2 and Rgg3, have emerged as primary quorum-sensing regulated transcription factors in Streptococcus species, controlling virulence, antimicrobial resistance, and biofilm formation. Rgg2 and Rgg3 function is regulated by their interaction with oligopeptide quorum-sensing signals called short hydrophobic peptides (SHPs). The mol
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Netrin1 deficiency activates MST1 via UNC5B receptor, promoting dopaminergic apoptosis in Parkinson's disease [Neuroscience]
The Hippo (MST1/2) pathway plays a critical role in restricting tissue growth in adults and modulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration in developing organs. Netrin1, a secreted laminin-related protein, is essential for nervous system development. However, the mechanisms underlying MST1 regulation by the extrinsic signals remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate…
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Homeostatic mechanisms regulate distinct aspects of cortical circuit dynamics [Neuroscience]
Homeostasis is indispensable to counteract the destabilizing effects of Hebbian plasticity. Although it is commonly assumed that homeostasis modulates synaptic strength, membrane excitability, and firing rates, its role at the neural circuit and network level is unknown. Here, we identify changes in higher-order network properties of freely behaving rodents during…
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Distance-dependent regulation of NMDAR nanoscale organization along hippocampal neuron dendrites [Neuroscience]
Hippocampal pyramidal neurons are characterized by a unique arborization subdivided in segregated dendritic domains receiving distinct excitatory synaptic inputs with specific properties and plasticity rules that shape their respective contributions to synaptic integration and action potential firing. Although the basal regulation and plastic range of proximal and distal synapses are…
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Hair cell {alpha}9{alpha}10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor functional expression regulated by ligand binding and deafness gene products [Neuroscience]
Auditory hair cells receive olivocochlear efferent innervation, which refines tonotopic mapping, improves sound discrimination, and mitigates acoustic trauma. The olivocochlear synapse involves α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), which assemble in hair cells only coincident with cholinergic innervation and do not express in recombinant mammalian cell lines. Here, genome-wide screenin
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Fifty years of capacity building in the search for new marine natural products [Pharmacology]
The Convention on Biological Diversity, and the Nagoya Protocol in particular, provide a framework for the fair and equitable sharing of benefits arising from the utilization of biological resources and traditional knowledge, and ultimately aim to promote capacity-building in the developing world. However, measuring capacity-building is a challenging task due…
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Geodesic fibrations for packing diabolic domains [Physics]
We describe a theory of packing hyperboloid "diabolic" domains in bend-free textures of liquid crystals. The domains sew together continuously, providing a menagerie of bend-free textures akin to the packing of focal conic domains in smectic liquid crystals. We show how distinct domains may be related to each other by…
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Emergence of anomalous dynamics in soft matter probed at the European XFEL [Physics]
Dynamics and kinetics in soft matter physics, biology, and nanoscience frequently occur on fast (sub)microsecond but not ultrafast timescales which are difficult to probe experimentally. The European X-ray Free-Electron Laser (European XFEL), a megahertz hard X-ray Free-Electron Laser source, enables such experiments via taking series of diffraction patterns at repetition…
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Regulation of titin-based cardiac stiffness by unfolded domain oxidation (UnDOx) [Physiology]
The relationship between oxidative stress and cardiac stiffness is thought to involve modifications to the giant muscle protein titin, which in turn can determine the progression of heart disease. In vitro studies have shown that S-glutathionylation and disulfide bonding of titin fragments could alter the elastic properties of titin; however,…
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Architecture of DNA elements mediating ARF transcription factor binding and auxin-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
The hormone auxin controls many aspects of the plant life cycle by regulating the expression of thousands of genes. The transcriptional output of the nuclear auxin signaling pathway is determined by the activity of AUXIN RESPONSE transcription FACTORs (ARFs), through their binding to cis-regulatory elements in auxin-responsive genes. Crystal structures,…
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Political partisanship influences behavioral responses to governors' recommendations for COVID-19 prevention in the United States [Political Sciences]
Voluntary physical distancing is essential for preventing the spread of COVID-19. We assessed the role of political partisanship in individuals' compliance with physical distancing recommendations of political leaders using data on mobility from a sample of mobile phones in 3,100 counties in the United States during March 2020, county-level partisan…
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Estimation of Rift Valley fever virus spillover to humans during the Mayotte 2018-2019 epidemic [Population Biology]
Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an emerging, zoonotic, arboviral hemorrhagic fever threatening livestock and humans mainly in Africa. RVF is of global concern, having expanded its geographical range over the last decades. The impact of control measures on epidemic dynamics using empirical data has not been assessed. Here, we fitted…
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Local lockdowns outperform global lockdown on the far side of the COVID-19 epidemic curve [Population Biology]
In the late stages of an epidemic, infections are often sporadic and geographically distributed. Spatially structured stochastic models can capture these important features of disease dynamics, thereby allowing a broader exploration of interventions. Here we develop a stochastic model of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) transmission among an…
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Early preference for face-like stimuli in solitary species as revealed by tortoise hatchlings [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
At the beginning of life, inexperienced babies and human fetuses, domestic chicks, and monkeys exhibit a preference for faces and face-like configurations (three blobs arranged like an upside-down triangle). Because all of these species have parental care, it is not clear whether the early preference for faces is a mechanism…
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Goal-directed and stimulus-driven selection of internal representations [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Adaptive behavior relies on the selection of relevant sensory information from both the external environment and internal memory representations. In understanding external selection, a classic distinction is made between voluntary (goal-directed) and involuntary (stimulus-driven) guidance of attention. We have developed a task—the anti-retrocue task—to separate and examine voluntary and involuntar
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Open science, communal culture, and women's participation in the movement to improve science [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Science is undergoing rapid change with the movement to improve science focused largely on reproducibility/replicability and open science practices. This moment of change—in which science turns inward to examine its methods and practices—provides an opportunity to address its historic lack of diversity and noninclusive culture. Through network modeling and semantic…
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Hierarchical structure is employed by humans during visual motion perception [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
In the real world, complex dynamic scenes often arise from the composition of simpler parts. The visual system exploits this structure by hierarchically decomposing dynamic scenes: When we see a person walking on a train or an animal running in a herd, we recognize the individual's movement as nested within…
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Spatial heterogeneity can lead to substantial local variations in COVID-19 timing and severity [Social Sciences]
Standard epidemiological models for COVID-19 employ variants of compartment (SIR or susceptible–infectious–recovered) models at local scales, implicitly assuming spatially uniform local mixing. Here, we examine the effect of employing more geographically detailed diffusion models based on known spatial features of interpersonal networks, most particularly the presence of a long-tailed but…
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National population mapping from sparse survey data: A hierarchical Bayesian modeling framework to account for uncertainty [Statistics]
Population estimates are critical for government services, development projects, and public health campaigns. Such data are typically obtained through a national population and housing census. However, population estimates can quickly become inaccurate in localized areas, particularly where migration or displacement has occurred. Some conflict-affected and resource-poor countries have not conducte
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Overstated carbon emission reductions from voluntary REDD+ projects in the Brazilian Amazon [Sustainability Science]
Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) has gained international attention over the past decade, as manifested in both United Nations policy discussions and hundreds of voluntary projects launched to earn carbon-offset credits. There are ongoing discussions about whether and how projects should be integrated into national climate change…
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Correction for Reitz et al., Genomic analysis of siderophore {beta}-hydroxylases reveals divergent stereocontrol and expands the condensation domain family [Correction]
BIOCHEMISTRY, CHEMISTRY Correction for "Genomic analysis of siderophore β-hydroxylases reveals divergent stereocontrol and expands the condensation domain family," by Zachary L. Reitz, Clifford D. Hardy, Jaewon Suk, Jean Bouvet, and Alison Butler, which was first published September 16, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1903161116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 116, 19805–19814). The authors note…
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Correction for Liu et al., {beta}-Arrestin2 is a critical component of the GPCR-eNOS signalosome [Correction]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "β-Arrestin2 is a critical component of the GPCR–eNOS signalosome," by Songling Liu, Louis M. Luttrell, Richard T. Premont, and Don C. Rockey, which was first published May 13, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1922608117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 11483–11492). The editors wish to note that the following competing…
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Correction for Hirose et al., Acrosin is essential for sperm penetration through the zona pellucida in hamsters [Correction]
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY Correction for "Acrosin is essential for sperm penetration through the zona pellucida in hamsters," by Michiko Hirose, Arata Honda, Helena Fulka, Miwa Tamura-Nakano, Shogo Matoba, Toshiko Tomishima, Keiji Mochida, Ayumi Hasegawa, Kiyoshi Nagashima, Kimiko Inoue, Masato Ohtsuka, Tadashi Baba, Ryuzo Yanagimachi, and Atsuo Ogura, which was first published…
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Correction for Xiang et al., Using synthetic biology to overcome barriers to stable expression of nitrogenase in eukaryotic organelles [Correction]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Using synthetic biology to overcome barriers to stable expression of nitrogenase in eukaryotic organelles," by Nan Xiang, Chenyue Guo, Jiwei Liu, Hao Xu, Ray Dixon, Jianguo Yang, and Yi-Ping Wang, which was first published June 29, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2002307117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 16537–16545). The authors…
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Turning to Drosophila for help in resolving general anesthesia [Letters (Online Only)]
A recent study (1) uses Drosophila flies to support a mechanism for general anesthesia. The authors find a specific effect on TWIK-related K+ (TREK-1) channels (a class of potassium leak channels) that results from a nonspecific effect on cholesterol-rich rafts in neuronal membranes. Using primarily in vitro assays, the study…
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Reply to van Swinderen and Hines: Drosophila model establishes the lipid membrane as a target of anesthetics [Letters (Online Only)]
We thank van Swinderen and Hines (1) for their response to our recent article, where we find that anesthetics disrupt lipid rafts and activate phospholipase D (PLD) through a membrane-mediated mechanism (2). Here we take the opportunity to address some minor misunderstandings and clarify our experimental procedures. Our chloroform induction…
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Coronavirus hemagglutinin-esterase and spike proteins coevolve for functional balance and optimal virion avidity [Microbiology]
Human coronaviruses OC43 and HKU1 are respiratory pathogens of zoonotic origin that have gained worldwide distribution. OC43 apparently emerged from a bovine coronavirus (BCoV) spillover. All three viruses attach to 9-O-acetylated sialoglycans via spike protein S with hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) acting as a receptor-destroying enzyme. In BCoV, an HE lectin domain…
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Experimental infection of domestic dogs and cats with SARS-CoV-2: Pathogenesis, transmission, and response to reexposure in cats [Microbiology]
The pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has reached nearly every country in the world with extraordinary person-to-person transmission. The most likely original source of the virus was spillover from an animal reservoir and subsequent adaptation to humans sometime during the winter of 2019 in Wuhan…
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Trump's FCC Is Using Junk Data to Downplay Broadband Woes
Tens of millions of Americans have either cripplingly slow or no internet at all. And the FCC's shameful practices are making a bad situation worse.
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Daily briefing: One million people have died from COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02769-5 One million deaths have been attributed to COVID-19 — and the true toll is probably even higher. Plus, three lakes discovered under Mars's south pole and how to digitize your lab notebooks using only a smartphone.
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Social media use linked with depression, secondary trauma during COVID-19
Can't stop checking social media for the latest COVID-19 health information? You might want to take a break, according to researchers at Penn State and Jinan University who discovered that excessive use of social media for COVID-19 health information is related to both depression and secondary trauma.
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Study reveals dietary fructose heightens inflammatory bowel disease
Diet remains an important part of disease prevention and management, and a new study suggests that consumption of fructose may worsen intestinal inflammation common to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).
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Coming soon to a circuit near you
We know that DNA molecules express heredity through genetic information. However, in the past few years, scientists have discovered that DNA can conduct electrical currents. This makes it an interesting candidate for roles that nature did not intend for this molecule, such as smaller, faster and cheaper electric circuits in electronic devices, and to detect the early stages of diseases like cancer
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Rio Tinto: Mining giant accused of poisoning rivers in Papua New Guinea
More than 150 people in Bougainville have filed a complaint against the embattled Rio Tinto company.
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Utility shut-offs, evictions more likely for households of color
Disconnected utilities, evictions, and debt are disproportionately affecting households of color during the pandemic, researchers report. Researchers from the Indiana University O'Neill School of Public and Environmental Affairs surveyed more than 1,800 Americans at or below 200% of the federal poverty line. The survey, which professors Sanya Carley and David Konisky conducted, is the second wave
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Thinner sea ice benefits some polar bears, but for how long?
Despite warming conditions, a small subpopulation of polar bears that live far above the Arctic Circle are, on average, healthier than they were in the 1990s, a new study shows. The roughly 300 to 350 polar bears that live on what used to be thick, multiyear sea ice in Kane Basin, a frigid channel between Canada's Ellesmere Island and Greenland, make up about 1-2% of the world's polar bears. The
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Archaeologists Determined the Step-by-Step Path Taken by the First People to Settle the Caribbean Islands
What route did the first settlers to colonize the islands of the Caribbean take?
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Vessel noise present year-round at Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary
The environment in the Cordell Bank National Marine Sanctuary off the coast of San Francisco is not a refuge from the noise generated by ship traffic, the first underwater marine acoustic study of the region has shown.
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Many ventilation systems may increase risk of COVID-19 exposure, study suggests
Ventilation systems in many modern office buildings, which are designed to keep temperatures comfortable and increase energy efficiency, may increase the risk of exposure to the coronavirus, particularly during the coming winter, according to research published in the Journal of Fluid Mechanics.
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OU-led study aims to use microbial information to inform global climate change models
A study led by researchers from the OU Institute of Environmental Genomics tackles a problem that has challenged scientists for more than a decade. The findings from which may have important implications for understanding and predicting the ecological consequences of climate warming.
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First 'pathoconnectome' could point toward new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases
Scientists from the John A. Moran Eye Center at the University of Utah have achieved another first in the field of connectomics, which studies the synaptic connections between neurons. The lab has produced the first pathoconnectome, showing how eye disease alters retinal circuitry.
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Untapped potential exists for blending hydropower, floating PV
Hybrid systems of floating solar panels and hydropower plants may hold the technical potential to produce a significant portion of the electricity generated annually across the globe, according to an analysis by researchers at the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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Achieving clean air for all is possible
Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year. A new study however shows that it is possible to achieve clean air worldwide with fundamental transformations of today's practices in many sectors, supported by strong political will.
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Study highlights lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.
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Coffee (or tea!) mugs that make for easy gifts
The gift of warmth. (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/) Nearly everyone starts their day with some kind of warm beverage, whether it's a steaming cup of joe to crowbar your eyes open or a gentle tea to ease you into your day. The point is, everyone can use a good, dependable mug. And if that mug can make them smile or remind them of something they enjoy, all the better. We found a wide variety of mugs t
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Study highlights lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.
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More popular teens report fewer signs of depression later
Teens who have a larger number of friends may be less likely to suffer from depression later in life, especially women, a new study finds. For female adolescents, popularity can lead to increased depression during the teen years, but can provide lasting benefits of fewer depressive symptoms later in life. Teens who reported fewer friends show higher rates of depression in adulthood, says Molly Co
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How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
It is well known that an individual infected with the coronavirus can spread it to others through respiratory droplets projected by violent expiratory events like coughing and sneezing.
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Climate change and concrete turn up heat on vulnerable communities in New Jersey's cities
By Michael Sol Warren | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com and Charles Wohlforth | Climate Central Down Bottom Farms, an urban farm operated by the Ironbound Community Corporation in Newark's Ironbound neighborhood. September 21, 2020. (Michael Sol Warren | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com) Michael Sol Warren | NJ Advance Media for NJ.com Where Newark is a desert of concrete and asphalt, Down Bottom Farms is
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Watch a Meteoroid Bounce Off the Earth's Atmosphere
Swinging By Last week, a small meteoroid stopped by for a quick visit into our atmosphere before bouncing back off into the cosmos. Earthgrazing meteoroids, as they're called, are already pretty rare, according to Universe Today , showing up just a few times per year. But even more uncommon: This one was caught on tape — and as more meteoroid-spotting cameras are set up around the world, videos l
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Smart cruise control steers drivers toward better decisions
Smart cruise control, better human decisions. Michigan Tech engineers study how cars and trucks move cooperatively on the road, respond to each other's environmental sensors and react as a group to lessen traffic jams and protect the humans inside.
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Volcanic ash could help reduce CO2 associated with climate change
University of Southampton scientists investigating ways of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases from our atmosphere believe volcanic ash could play an important role.
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Vitamin D deficiency leads to obesity, stunted growth in zebrafish
Using a zebrafish model, researchers have found that vitamin D deficiency during early development can disrupt the metabolic balance between growth and fat accumulation.
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New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color
Through the development of new technology, University of Minnesota researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly's brain responds to seeing color.
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Sensational COVID-19 communication erodes confidence in science
Scientists, policymakers and the media should acknowledge inherent uncertainties in epidemiological models projecting the spread of COVID-19 and avoid "catastrophizing" worst-case scenarios, according to new research from Cornell University.
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Are China's pollution remediation efforts making the planet warmer?
A 10-year effort by China to improve air quality and reduce pollution-related health risks has caused warming in areas across the northern hemisphere, according to new work published in Environmental Research Letters.
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Pioneering dual surgery a safe option for patients with polycystic kidney disease
Patients with large polycystic kidneys in need of a kidney transplant can have their diseased kidneys safely removed laparoscopically at the same time as their transplant surgery. That is the finding of a Mayo Clinic study recently published in the American Journal of Transplantation.
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A revised map of where working memory resides in the brain
Findings from genetically diverse mice challenge long-held assumptions about how the brain is able to briefly hold onto important information.
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Attention science: some people have only one name
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02761-z Registration forms, grant applications and publishing all create hurdles for single-name researchers. A culturally sensitive approach is needed.
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Vaughan Jones (1952–2020)
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02752-0 Mathematician whose invention connected knots to quantum physics.
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UK coronavirus news: country records highest daily rise in infections with 7,143 new cases
Record comes amid large increase in testing; Williamson says students can go home for Christmas – but might have to self-isolate first Boris Johnson apologises for getting lockdown rules wrong Covid lockdowns in north-east England: new rules explained Is Boris Johnson really 'fit as a butcher's dog'? UK economy faltering before second Covid-19 wave Coronavirus – latest global updates 5.53pm BST H
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Covid 'Testing Hell': Devices Given to Nursing Homes Bring New Problems
The federal government sent free rapid-test machines to 14,000 facilities. But they have come with unexpected costs, cumbersome reporting rules and questions about accuracy.
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Brain circuitry shaped by competition for space as well as genetics
Complex brain circuits in rodents can organize themselves with genetics playing only a secondary role, according to a new computer modeling study published today in eLife.
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Brain circuitry shaped by competition for space as well as genetics
Complex brain circuits in rodents can organize themselves with genetics playing only a secondary role, according to a new computer modeling study published today in eLife.
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Machine learning homes in on catalyst interactions to accelerate materials development
A machine learning technique rapidly rediscovered rules governing catalysts that took humans years of difficult calculations to reveal—and even explained a deviation. The University of Michigan team that developed the technique believes other researchers will be able to use it to make faster progress in designing materials for a variety of purposes.
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Astrophysicist probes cosmic 'dark matter detector'
A University of Colorado Boulder astrophysicist is searching the light coming from a distant, and extremely powerful celestial object, for what may be the most elusive substance in the universe: dark matter.
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In a field where smaller is better, researchers discover the world's tiniest antibodies
Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK and biopharma company UCB have found a way to produce miniaturized antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.
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Is there a cognitive bias for coincidences that happen very close together?
My roommate and I were watching a movie while drinking moonshine, and I made a dumb comment saying "I wonder if they make a drink called sunshine". Within 90 seconds of this, one of the lines in the movie included the word sunshine, and we both just looked at each other and laughed. I know it was probably just dumb luck, but things like this seem to happen to me quite often, so I was wondering if
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Coastal flooding will disproportionately impact people on river deltas
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18531-4 Coastal river delta regions are particularly impacted by the effects of climate change, yet though these regions are densely inhabited, robust estimates of population are lacking. Here the authors use global datasets to predict the number of people and regions most threatened by flooding and extreme weather
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Gear to make every day feel like National Coffee Day
You don't need a national "holiday" to make yourself a fine cup of coffee. (Nolan Issac via Unsplash/) Coffee is one of the first things people think about every morning. Brewing your caffeine fix is a ritual that helps us wipe off our eye crusties, wade our way through mental fog, and bring us into the more productive hours of our day. In honor of National Coffee Day, elevate your java set-up. H
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In a field where smaller is better, researchers discover the world's tiniest antibodies
Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK and biopharma company UCB have found a way to produce miniaturized antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.
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Why people in your company may or may not act on your strategy
Despite extensive communication efforts or control systems, many employees still do not understand a given organization's strategic goals, let alone act upon them. How could this be changed?
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'Cool' sampling sites more likely to show false trends
To manage and conserve natural ecosystems, it is essential to know how biodiversity changes. As one of those questions, it is important to know whether we are we gaining or loosing species. However, getting reliable measurements to study this is a complex task. Data can be collected by researchers during field trips, but a vast amount of data is also provided by different initiatives such as citiz
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Welsh-medium school pupils underperform in tests despite more advantaged backgrounds
Secondary schools in Wales that teach pupils through the medium of Welsh are outperformed by their English-speaking counterparts in maths, reading and science tests, according to a new study by Lancaster University.
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Potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon
Researchers from Australia's national science agency CSIRO joined scientists from 17 other countries to publish a first of its kind, 'wall-to-wall,' global, 1-km resolution map that highlights areas with the greatest carbon returns, when they are allowed to reforest naturally.
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Filtering radioactive elements from water
The nuclear accident in Fukushima remains etched into many people's memories. It was a catastrophe that caused huge amounts of radioactively contaminated water to be released, which the operators of the nuclear power plant subsequently had to clean up. One of the methods they used was reverse osmosis but it wasn't particularly effective. Although it is possible to purify up to 70 percent of the co
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First observation of nutation in magnetic materials
Much of the 'memory' of the world and all our digital activities are based on media, hard disks, where the information is encoded thanks to magnetism, by orienting the spin of electrons in one direction or the other.
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'Cool' sampling sites more likely to show false trends
To manage and conserve natural ecosystems, it is essential to know how biodiversity changes. As one of those questions, it is important to know whether we are we gaining or loosing species. However, getting reliable measurements to study this is a complex task. Data can be collected by researchers during field trips, but a vast amount of data is also provided by different initiatives such as citiz
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No vehicle means a hard road to health care for millions of people
Nature, Published online: 28 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02737-z More than 40% of people globally face a long trip to a health-care facility unless they find a ride by car, bus or similar form of transport.
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Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean
Feeding rates of blue mussels slow down under ocean acidification conditions, and the cause may be the slowing beat of gill cilia, similar to a known response in human lung cells.
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Achieving clean air for all is possible
Air pollution is currently the largest environmental risk factor for human health globally and can be linked to several million cases of premature deaths every year. A new study however shows that it is possible to achieve clean air worldwide with fundamental transformations of today's practices in many sectors, supported by strong political will.
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UC researchers uncover clues for COVID-19 treatment
By examining preexisting research for other conditions, researchers at the University of Cincinnati have found a potential treatment that could be applied to COVID-19.
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Lessons from a cooling climate
Usually, talk of carbon sequestration focuses on plants: forests storing carbon in the trunks of massive trees, algae blooming and sinking to the seabed, or perhaps peatlands locking carbon away for tens of thousands of years.
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Research news tip sheet: Story ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
Research News Tip Sheet: Story Ideas from Johns Hopkins Medicine
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Scientists found a connection between amino acid metabolism and joint hypermobility in autistic children
A team of researchers found out that children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) have increased levels of the amino acid hydroxyproline. According to the medics, this may be associated with joint hypermobility, a common symptom in ASD patients. This information can help improve anti-ASD therapy.
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Researchers create artificial lung to support pre-term babies in distress
An international team led by current and former McMaster University researchers has developed an artificial lung to support pre-term and other newborn babies in respiratory distress.
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Computer model explains altered decision making in schizophrenia
Scientists have built a computer 'brain circuit', or artificial neural network, that mirrors human decision-making processes and sheds light on how circuits might be altered in psychiatric diseases.
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Study identifies shortcomings in FDA evaluations for new opioid drug approvals over two decades
Approvals of prescription opioids by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over more than two decades have been based on evaluations in narrowly defined patient groups for which certain safety-related outcomes have been rarely systematically assessed.
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Harnessing big data and artificial intelligence to predict future pandemic spread
During COVID-19, artificial intelligence (AI) has been used to enhance diagnostic efforts, deliver medical supplies and even assess risk factors from blood tests. Now, artificial intelligence is being used to forecast future COVID-19 cases.
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Argonne targets lithium-rich materials as key to more sustainable cost-effective batteries
Researchers are developing new ways to advance lithium-rich batteries and using new materials for practical use, according to researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory.
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Study suggests link between unexplained miscarriages and how women perceive men's body odor
Women who have suffered unexplained repeated pregnancy loss (uRPL) have altered perceptions and brain responses to male body odours, in comparison to those with no history of uRPL, suggests a new study published today in eLife.
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Study highlights lack of evidence for plasticity-led evolution in lizards
Scientists have challenged a popular theory behind the evolution of similar traits in island lizards, in a study published recently in eLife.
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Prototype graft, designed to replace damaged heart vessels, shows promise in cell study
North Carolina State University researchers reported promising preclinical findings for a prototype of a vascular graft designed as a replacement for a damaged or blocked coronary artery, which supplies blood to the heart.
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Why disordered light-harvesting systems produce ordered outcomes
Scientists typically prefer to work with ordered systems. However, a diverse team of physicists and biophysicists from the University of Groningen found that individual light-harvesting nanotubes with disordered molecular structures still transport light energy in the same way. By combining spectroscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical physics, they discovered how disorder at the mo
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Novel Drosophila-based disease model to study human intellectual disability syndrome
The researchers from the TalTech molecular neurobiology laboratory headed by professor Tõnis Timmusk used the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster to develop a novel disease model for Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS). Their study was reported in the July issue of Disease Models and Mechanisms.
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NASA: Next SpaceX Astronaut Launch Will Be on Halloween
Costume Party NASA has officially set the date for SpaceX's long awaited Crew-1 mission to the International Space Station for 2:40 am EST on October 31. A SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft will take off on top a Falcon 9 rocket from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Crew-1 will mark the first time that an international crew will fly aboard a commercially-owned and operate
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Brain circuitry shaped by competition for space as well as genetics
Complex brain circuits in rodents can organise themselves with genetics playing only a secondary role, according to a new computer modelling study published today in eLife.
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Scientists got one step closer to solving a major problem of hydrogen energy
A team of scientists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) together with their colleagues from Austria, Turkey, Slovakia, Russia (MISIS, MSU), and the UK found a way to hydrogenate thin metallic glass layers at room temperature. This technology can considerably expand the range of cheap, energy-efficient, and high-performance materials and methods that can be used in the field of hydrogen ene
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Blocking enzyme's self-destruction process may mitigate age-related diseases
Stopping the cannibalistic behavior of a well-studied enzyme could be the key to new drugs to fight age-related diseases, according to a new study published online in Nature Cell Biology. For the first time, researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania show how the self-eating cellular process known as autophagy is causing the SIRT1 enzyme, long known to play a
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Successful Dartmouth TB vaccine moves forward after phase 2 trial
Results from the Phase 2 trial of the DAR-901 tuberculosis (TB) vaccine were announced today by investigators at Dartmouth's Geisel School of Medicine and published in the journal Vaccine. The three-year trial was conducted among 650 adolescents in Tanzania, a nation with high rates of TB infection, and showed that the vaccine was safe and induced immune responses against the disease.
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Geoscience: Cosmic diamonds formed during gigantic planetary collisions
Geoscientists from Goethe University have found the largest extraterrestrial diamonds ever discovered – a few tenths of a millimetre in size nevertheless – inside meteorites. Together with an international team of researchers, they have now been able to prove that these diamonds formed in the early period of our solar system when minor planets collided together or with large asteroids. These new d
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Kawasaki disease is not a homogenous disease nor are its triggers
Researchers at UC San Diego report that while Kawasaki disease occurs in clusters, the traits, and thus the triggers of the inflammatory disease vary among clusters.
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Discovery of cells that heal cardiac damage after infarction
Researchers at Cima and the Clinica Universidad de Navarra (Spain) have led an international study identifying the cardiac cells responsible for repairing the damage to this organ after infarction. These "restorative" cells are a subpopulation of cardiac fibroblasts that play a fundamental role in the creation of the collagen scar needed to avoid the rupture of the ventricular wall. The research a
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Scientists studied nanoparticles embedded in silver-ion-exchanged glasses
Researchers have registered the formation of silver nanoparticles in an ion-exchanged glass as a result of infrared laser irradiation. The research of current studies were published in the journal of Nanomaterials.
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Machine learning homes in on catalyst interactions to accelerate materials development
A machine learning technique rapidly rediscovered rules governing catalysts that took humans years of difficult calculations to reveal–and even explained a deviation. The University of Michigan team that developed the technique believes other researchers will be able to use it to make faster progress in designing materials for a variety of purposes.
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Stop Calling Breonna Taylor's Killing a 'Tragedy'
Using the word tragedy to describe Breonna Taylor's killing is an insult to her memory. When Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron announced last week that only one of the police officers involved in Taylor's death would face criminal charges, he called the Louisville resident's fate a "tragedy under any circumstances." This description sounded as if the bullets that killed her in her own apar
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This Robot Is So Tiny You Could Fit Ten of Them on a Single Period
Jitterbug A team of Cornell University scientists developed a new robot — so small that it's invisible to the naked eye — that they hope will someday crawl around inside the human body and hunt for disease. The robots themselves are little more than microchips attached to four origami-inspired legs, BBC News reports . But their simplicity — the engineers can manufacture 1 million of the bots ever
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Nasal calcium rich salts show reduction of exhaled aerosol particles up to 99%
In a paper published in Molecular Frontiers Journal, researchers from Cambridge, Massachusetts have discovered a more effective way of eliminating airborne particles from airways using nasal calcium-rich salts called FEND, which have potential applications in the fight against Covid-19.
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New genetic knowledge on the causes of severe COVID-19
A proportion of the most severe COVID-19 cases can be explained by genetic defects in the patients' immune system. Professor Trine Mogensen from Aarhus University, Denmark, is participating in an international research consortium as the only Danish researcher, and thereby helping to generate new knowledge which may in the future lead to early and improved treatment of those who are affected by sev
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A cancer shredder
Researchers at the universities of Würzburg and Frankfurt (Germany) have developed a new compound for treating cancer. It destroys a protein that triggers its development.
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Astrophysicist probes cosmic "dark matter detector"
A CU Boulder astrophysicist is searching the light coming from a distant, and extremely powerful celestial object, for what may be the most elusive substance in the universe: dark matter.
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How everyday speech could transmit viral droplets
High-speed imaging of an individual producing common speech sounds shows that the sudden burst of airflow produced from the articulation of consonants like /p/ or /b/ carry salivary and mucus droplets for at least a meter in front of a speaker.
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In a field where smaller is better, researchers discover the world's tiniest antibodies
Researchers at the University of Bath in the UK and biopharma company UCB have found a way to produce miniaturised antibodies, opening the way for a potential new class of treatments for diseases.
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New woodlands can help reduce flooding risk within 15 years
New research by the University of Plymouth suggests the planting of more trees could have a significant and positive effect in preventing flash flooding.
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Scientists present a comprehensive physics basis for a new fusion reactor design
As part of the Journal of Plasma Physics' continuing focus on the scientific progress in fusion physics, the journal editors and Cambridge University Press are proud to present an important Special Issue of JPP, the 'Status of the SPARC Physics Basis'.
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Understanding the effect of aging on the genome
EPFL scientists have measured the molecular footprint that aging leaves on various mouse and human tissues. Using the data, they have identified likely regulators of this central process.
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Under-regulated pet trade leaves thousands of species vulnerable
In a recent study, researchers from Thailand's Suranaree University of Technology and the Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) revealed a worrying situation where a huge number of reptile species are being exploited, with little international regulation, implying a lack of reliable a priori estimates of the impact on wild populations.
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Alcohol consumption rises sharply during pandemic shutdown
Anecdotal information has suggested that people are buying and consuming more alcohol during the pandemic shutdown. Now some of the first survey-based information shows that American adults have sharply increased their consumption of alcohol during the pandemic, with women increasing their heavy drinking episodes (four or more drinks within a couple of hours) by 41%.
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Clinical screening for COVID-19 in asymptomatic patients with cancer
A repeated testing protocol for COVID-19 among patients with cancer was examined in this quality improvement study.
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Changes in adult alcohol use, consequences during COVID-19 pandemic
Individual-level changes in alcohol use and the consequences associated with alcohol use by US adults from before to during the COVID-19 pandemic are examined in this study.
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Preferences for public allocation of vaccine for COVID-19
This survey study describes the public's preferences for allocating a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.
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Finding right drug balance for Parkinson's patients
Parkinson's disease is most commonly treated with levodopa, but the benefits wear off as the disease progresses and high doses can result in dyskinesia, which are involuntary and uncontrollable movements. To better understand the underlying reasons behind these effects, researchers created a model of the interactions between levodopa, dopamine, and the basal ganglia, an area of the brain that play
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Evolution of pine needles helps trees cope with rainfall impact
If you have been surrounded by the sight and smell of pine trees, you may have taken a closer look at the needles and then wondered how their properties are influenced by rainfall. In Physics of Fluids, researchers are currently probing how well pine needles allay the impact of rain beneath the tree. They explored the impact of raindrops onto fixed, noncircular fibers of the longleaf pine by using
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Virus turns deadly fungus from foe to friend in plants
Researchers have discovered that a fungal virus (also called a mycovirus) can convert deadly fungal pathogens into beneficial fungus in rapeseed plants. Once transformed, the fungus boosts the plant's immune system, making the plant healthier and more resistant to diseases. These findings, published on September 29 in the journal Molecular Plant, indicate that some fungal viruses can be used for d
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The magnetization dynamics of rare-earth metals and the role of ultrafast magnon generation
Rare-earth magnetism is dominated by localized 4f electrons, relative to inner transition metals (that are mostly comprised of lanthanides) and cannot be directly excited through an optical laser pulse. As a result, ultrafast demagnetization of rare-earth metals involves a distinct process in contrast to other elements of the periodic table. During demagnetization of rare-earth metals, researchers
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Automating Cell-based Assays from Culture to Analysis
Download this ebook to learn where and how automation can help improve data accuracy and reproducibility!
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COVID vaccine confidence requires radical transparency
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02738-y Public trust in a potential vaccine is under threat. Drug companies and their academic partners must disclose protocols and results data.
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Thousands of reptile species threatened by under-regulated global trade
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18523-4 There are gaps in international efforts to monitor the wildlife trade, with many species potentially being undetected by the established monitoring groups. Here the authors use an automated web search to document the sale of reptiles online, revealing over 36% of all known reptile species are in trade, incl
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Why do brains need sleep? These 'twinkling' star-shaped cells may help us find out
Astrocytes in the brain expressing a fluorescent calcium indicator captured with a two-photon microscope. (Ashley Ingiosi, courtesy of Current Biology/) Scientists still haven't nailed down the exact reason why we need to sleep—they only really know what happens to our brains when we don't. But a new study published last week in Current Biology investigates a unique kind of star-shaped cell that
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Infected by a Virus, a Killer Fungus Turns Into a Friend
A fungus known as white mold can kill a plant in days. Unless, that is, a virus is around to tame it.
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Some Physicists See Signs of Cosmic Strings From the Big Bang
Cosmologists think that at the beginning of the universe, all the forces of nature were, for a brief fraction of a second, unified. But as the universe expanded and cooled, this superforce condensed into its familiar parts: gravity, electromagnetism and the strong and weak forces. According to some calculations, the cosmos might have cooled so quickly that the fabric of space-time became fracture
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Virus turns deadly fungus from foe to friend in plants
Researchers have discovered that a fungal virus (also called a mycovirus) can convert deadly fungal pathogens into beneficial fungus in rapeseed plants. Once transformed, the fungus boosts the plant's immune system, making the plant healthier and more resistant to diseases. These findings, published on September 29 in the journal Molecular Plant, indicate that some fungal viruses can be used for d
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Evolution of pine needles helps trees cope with rainfall impact
If you have ever hiked in the woods and been surrounded by the sight and smell of pine trees, you may have taken a closer look at pine needles and wondered how their shape, material properties, and surface wettability are all influenced by rainfall.
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Under-regulated pet trade leaves thousands of species vulnerable
More reptiles are kept as pets than you might expect. In 2008, the British Federation for Herpetologists reported that reptiles outnumbered dogs as the top pet in the U.K., with an estimated 8 million in captivity. Yet, unlike dogs, many of these animals are not bred in captivity, and international regulations on trade only apply to 9% of the over 11,000 known reptile species.
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Online Reptile Trade Is a Free-for-All That Threatens Thousands of Species
More than one third of all reptile species, including highly endangered ones, are sold internationally, primarily as pets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Colorado's Grizzly Creek Fire Shows Climate Change's Threat To Transport Routes
A huge wildfire shut down a portion of a cross-country interstate highway for two weeks. Now, in a ripple effect of the fire, the newly treeless area is vulnerable to flash floods and landslides. (Image credit: Helen H. Richardson/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images)
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Paramedics Test Jetpack For Daring Mountain Rescues
Jetpack Paramedic The Great North Air Ambulance Service, a UK registered charity dedicated to providing helicopter emergency services, is testing a jetpack made by Gravity Industries to one day allow paramedics to fly up a mountain to provide first aid, the BBC reports . A jetpack could allow paramedics to soar up the mountain in 90 seconds rather than hiking for 30 minutes, according to GNAAS di
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Virus turns deadly fungus from foe to friend in plants
Researchers have discovered that a fungal virus (also called a mycovirus) can convert deadly fungal pathogens into beneficial fungus in rapeseed plants. Once transformed, the fungus boosts the plant's immune system, making the plant healthier and more resistant to diseases. These findings, published on September 29 in the journal Molecular Plant, indicate that some fungal viruses can be used for d
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Reptiles vulnerable to unscrupulous pet trading: study
More than a third of reptile species are bought and sold online in often-unregulated international trade, researchers said Tuesday, warning of the impact on wild populations of a pet market that puts a bounty on rare and newly discovered animals.
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Identified the cellular process by which Cisplatin chemotherapy causes neuronal damage
Cisplatin induces senescence of peripheral neurons through overexpression of the p21 protein, which would explain the neuropathy.
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'Cool' sampling sites more likely to show false trends
Data collected by citizen science initiatives, museums and national parks is an important basis for research on biodiversity change. However, scientists found that sampling sites are oftentimes not representative, which may lead to false conclusions about how biodiversity changes. Their research, published in Conservation Biology, calls for more objective site selection and better training for cit
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Forgetting past misdeeds to justify future ones
Proven fact: we remember our altruistic behaviour more easily than selfish actions or misdeeds that go against our own moral sense. Described as 'unethical amnesia' by scientists, it is generally explained by self-image maintenance. But could these selective oversights, not necessarily conscious, have a more strategic aim? To find out, a team of behavioural economists from the CNRS recruited 1322
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Welsh-medium school pupils underperform in tests despite more advantaged backgrounds
Secondary schools in Wales that teach pupils through the medium of Welsh are outperformed by their English-speaking counterparts in maths, reading and science tests, according to a new study by Lancaster University.The average results of pupils attending Welsh-language secondary schools are markedly lower than pupils in English-language schools – despite Welsh-medium school pupils having more book
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Paul McDonald obituary
My friend Paul McDonald, who has died aged 74, was a physicist and expert in cryogenics whose work advanced a variety of technologies, including satellite tracking, superconducting magnets and cryostat thermometers. He was also a keen supporter of Cruisewatch, the protest group that tracked cruise missile convoys at Greenham Common, Berkshire, in the 1980s. Born in Salford, Paul was the eldest so
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Online Reptile Trade Is a Free-for-All That Threatens Thousands of Species
More than one third of all reptile species, including highly endangered ones, are sold internationally, primarily as pets — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A global movement to solve global problems | Colombe Cahen-Salvador
We need to think beyond national borders to solve global problems, says activist Colombe Cahen-Salvador. Reimagining the world's fractured systems of governance and calling out their ineffective responses to major issues — from the coronavirus pandemic to climate change and human rights — she introduces NOW!, a movement unifying people to create a truly democratic world.
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Science and scientists held in high esteem across global publics
As publics around the world look to scientists and the research and development process to bring new treatments and preventive strategies for the novel coronavirus, a new Pew Research Center international survey finds scientists and their research are widely viewed in a positive light across global publics, and large majorities believe government investments in scientific research yield benefits f
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Træt af at gå den samme tur? Her er 27 billeder fra steder, du kan opleve i den danske natur
DR's brugere har indsendt over 20.000 billeder af vores natur. Her er de bedste.
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How A Beloved Gemstone Became A Symbol Of Environmental Tragedy In Myanmar
Decades of mining for jade has left the landscape desolate. Local activists want to make a change — but can they stand up to the powerful companies that dominate the industry? (Image credit: Hkun Lat)
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Kritisk granskning på internet är mer än källkritik
Tack vare internet är det lättare än någonsin att ta del av forskningsrön och annan information om hälsa. Men vad är trovärdigt? Och hur ska man tolka motstridiga argument? En avhandling visar hur gymnasieelevers förmåga till kritisk granskning kan utvecklas i naturvetenskaplig undervisning. I ämnesplanen för gymnasieskolan betonas betydelsen av att elever får möjligheter att utveckla förmågan at
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Filtering radioactive elements from water
Some time ago, ETH researchers developed a filter membrane made out of whey proteins and activated carbon. In a new study, they now demonstrate just how efficient this membrane is at filtering radioactive elements from contaminated water.
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Second alignment plane of solar system discovered
A study of comet motions indicates that the Solar System has a second alignment plane. Analytical investigation of the orbits of long-period comets shows that the aphelia of the comets, the point where they are farthest from the Sun, tend to fall close to either the well-known ecliptic plane where the planets reside or a newly discovered 'empty ecliptic.' This has important implications for models
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Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW.
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Is it one or two species? The case of the cluster anemones
Their scientific name is "Parazoanthus axinellae" and they are among the most fascinating corals of the Mediterranean Sea. A genetic analysis suggests they may belong to two different species and, therefore, there could be two types of cluster anemone. Researchers claim this may lead to more effective conservation strategies against the negative impact of climate change on this sea population
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Microwaves are useful to combine amino acids with hetero-steroids
Aza-steroids are important class of compounds because of their numerous biological activities. The hetero steroids have different hydrogen bonding ability and hydrophobicity in comparison to steroids.
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Breast cancer medication risk
New research led by Flinders University has found a link between beta-blockers and survival outcomes in some breast cancer patients. Beta-blockers, commonly used to manage cardiovascular disease, were negatively associated with survival outcomes in patients with HER2 (Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2) positive advanced breast cancer, according to a new paper in the Frontiers In Oncology.
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Prostate cancer: immunotherapy offers hope
An antibody for treating advanced prostate cancer improves progression-free survival in patients with metastasised, castration-resistant prostate cancer. This is the finding of the long-term analyses of an international phase 3 clinical trial, recently published in the leading journal "European Urology". The study showed that overall survival was 2 – 3 times higher than in the placebo arm.
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Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.
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High-fibre diet, low level inflammation: sidestepping the effects of radiation
Loved or hated, the humble oat could be the new superfood for cancer patients as international research shows a diet rich in fibre could significantly reduce radiation-induced gut inflammation.
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First observation of nutation in magnetic materials
An international team of scientists has managed for the first time to observe the 'nutation' of spins in magnetic materials (the oscillations of their axis during precession). The measured nutation period was of the order of one picosecond. The discovery was published by Nature Physics
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Wildcats threatened by their domestic cousins
European wildcats, thought to be extinct 50 or so years ago in the Jura mountains, have since recolonised part of their former territory. This resurgence in an area occupied by domestic cats has gone hand-in-hand with genetic crosses between the two species. The hybridisation between wild and domesticated organisms is known to endanger the gene pool of wild species. In a study to be published in t
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New evidence suggests it was matter ejected from the Chicxulub crater that led to impact winter
A team of researchers from the U.S., Australia and the U.K. has found evidence that suggests material thrown into the atmosphere by the asteroid that struck the Earth approximately 66 million years ago, and not massive wildfires, led to a mass extinction event. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study of sediment from the Chicxulu
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Wildcats threatened by their domestic cousins
European wildcats, thought to be extinct 50 or so years ago in the Jura mountains, have since recolonised part of their former territory. This resurgence in an area occupied by domestic cats has gone hand-in-hand with genetic crosses between the two species. The hybridisation between wild and domesticated organisms is known to endanger the gene pool of wild species. In a study to be published in t
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Republicans Are Trapped on Preexisting Conditions
There's a reason Donald Trump has never produced a health-care plan that protects consumers with preexisting medical conditions: Ending protections for the sick is the central mechanism that all GOP health-care proposals use to try to lower costs for the healthy. Every alternative to the Affordable Care Act that Republicans have offered relies on the same strategy—retrenching the many ACA provisi
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U.S. Emission Reductions Slowed After Trump Pulled Out Of Paris Accord
China is investing in both coal and renewable energy, the European Union promises to dramatically reduce carbon emissions and the U.S. is leaving the Paris Agreement altogether. What will 2021 hold? (Image credit: Charlie Riedel/AP)
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Solar storms could be more extreme if they 'slipstream' behind each other
Modeling of an extreme space weather event that narrowly missed Earth in 2012 shows it could have been even worse if paired with another event.
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Drone-based photogrammetry a new addition to geologic research services
Southwest Research Institute is offering new drone-based, remote-sensing techniques to digitally map and model exposed geologic structures, or outcrops, to better understand subsurface structures associated with petroleum and water reservoirs. Through digital photogrammetry—reconstructing real-world objects in 3-D from overlapping digital images—SwRI can extract accurate and reliable geologic info
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New method allows precise gene control by light
A novel optical switch makes it possible to precisely control the lifespan of genetic 'copies'. These are used by the cell as building instructions for the production of proteins.
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Mars: mounting evidence for subglacial lakes, but could they really host life?
Venus may harbour life some 50km above its surface, we learned a couple of weeks ago. Now a new paper, published in Nature Astronomy, reveals that the best place for life on Mars might be more than a kilometre below its surface, where an entire network of subglacial lakes has been discovered.
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Japan Outlines Plan to Power Spacecraft With Moon Ice
Mining Hydrogen The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has revealed plans to extract hydrogen from the Moon's ice deposits to use as a fuel source, the major Tokyo-based newspaper Japan Times reports . The goal is to cut costs during the nation's planned lunar explorations in the mid-2030s by creating a fuel source locally rather than lugging copious amounts of fuel all the way from Earth.
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How democracies can claim back power in the digital world
Should Twitter censor lies tweeted by the US president? Should YouTube take down covid-19 misinformation? Should Facebook do more against hate speech? Such questions, which crop up daily in media coverage, can make it seem as if the main technologically driven risk to democracies is the curation of content by social-media companies. Yet these controversies are merely symptoms of a larger threat:
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Carlsberg vil halvere vandforbrug ved at genvinde procesvand
PLUS. Mindre end hver ­tiende dråbe procesvand går til spilde, når Carlsbergs bryggeri i Fredericia til nytår tager et nybygget genvindingsanlæg i brug.
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Gillian Flynn Is Obsessed With Conspiracies
With her new series, Flynn wants to help pop culture catch up to reality. (Peter Hoffman / Redux) Gillian Flynn has a penchant for writing angry women, women who become so paralyzed by their circumstances and suffocated by expectations, they're driven to madness or something like it. In Flynn's first novel, Sharp Objects , the journalist Camille directs her pain inward, slicing words into her ski
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Students used their mobile phones for over 8 hours a day during lockdown
The study relates the number of hours that young people spend sitting down, their level of physical activity and state of mind when using a mobile phone. Students with lower levels of physical activity used their mobile phones almost three times more than others. Those reporting poorer sleep quality also used these devices more.
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Why do structural differences in α-synuclein aggregates cause different pathologies?
Abnormal α-synuclein aggregation has been implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases and is known to spread in a prion-like manner. There is a relationship between protein aggregate structure (strain) and clinical phenotype in prion diseases, however, whether differences in the strains of α synuclein aggregates account for the different pathologies remained unclear. Researchers in Tokyo Metr
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Genetic risk of developing obesity is driven by variants that affect the brain
Some people are at higher risk of developing obesity because they possess genetic variants that affect how the brain processes sensory information and regulates feeding and behavior. The findings from scientists at the University of Copenhagen support a growing body of evidence that obesity is a disease whose roots are in the brain.
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Preheating gelatin as a facile approach to increase 3D printing duration
SUTD researchers' new approach finds that preheating gelatin extended its 3D printing time compared to freshly prepared gelatin and enhanced the printability of the ink, which is essential for extrusion-based bioprinting and food printing.
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Microcomb-injected pulsed lasers as variable microwave gears
Optical frequency combs can link frequencies in the microwave domain to high-purity laser emissions, yielding unprecedented precision in time-keeping and metrology. Now EPFL scientists and their colleagues have generated variable low-noise microwave signals by building variable microwave gears with two compact optical frequency combs.
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Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk
A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found.
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VirScan offers new insights into COVID-19 antibody response
VirScan, a technology that can determine which of more than 1,000 different viruses have infected a person, can now also detect evidence of infection from coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2.
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An in-depth analysis of antibody responses to SARS-CoV-2
Using a technology called VirScan to study coronavirus antibody responses in a large cohort of SARS-CoV-2-infected and control individuals, researchers identified epitopes recognized by a large fraction of COVID-19 patients, epitopes cross-reactive with antibodies developed in response to other human coronaviruses, and 10 epitopes likely recognized by neutralizing antibodies.
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Diabetes drug boosts survival in patients with type 2 diabetes and COVID-19 pneumonia
Sitagliptin, a drug to lower blood sugar in type 2 diabetes, also improves survival in diabetic patients hospitalized with COVID-19, suggests a multicenter observational study in Italy. Patients given sitagliptin in addition to insulin had a mortality rate of 18 percent as compared with 37 percent in matched patients receiving only insulin. Led by Paolo Fiorina, MD, PhD, of Boston Children's Hospi
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Science and scientists held in high esteem across global publics
A new Pew Research Center survey conducted in 20 publics around the world examining global trust in scientists and international views of various scientific topics, including climate change and the environment, vaccines, and artificial intelligence.
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Deep learning model provides rapid detection of stroke-causing blockages
A sophisticated type of artificial intelligence (AI) called deep learning can help rapidly detect blockages in the arteries that supply blood to the head, potentially speeding the onset of life-saving treatment, according to a study.
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Acid reflux drug could help newborn babies recover from brain injury, study suggests
Researchers in China have discovered a potential way to prevent a lack of oxygen or blood flow from causing long-lasting brain damage in newborn children. The study, which will be published September 29 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), suggests that targeting the histamine H2 receptor with drugs already used to treat acid reflux in infants could help newborns recover from hypoxic-isc
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COVID-19 control rests with human behavior, at least until a vaccine arrives
As the world awaits a COVID-19 vaccine and confirmed cases exceed 30M, Australian and American behavioural researchers say the key to containment rests in understanding human behaviour and how our personalities may influence better cooperative behaviour for the global good. Some countries are more agreeable and compliant than others.
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How even a casual brush with the law can permanently mar a young man's life – especially if he's Black
George Floyd's death highlighted how even a minor alleged infraction—in his case, over a fake $20 bill—can lead to a fatal interaction with law enforcement.
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Researchers set to take to the air above the Arctic and New York City
Atmospheric scientists are embarking on two new research projects supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation that involve using sophisticated planes to understand the atmospheric chemistry and levels of pollutants in two regions: the Arctic and the metropolitan region of New York.
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CERN meets quantum technology
Today's information and communication technology grew out of the invention and development of quantum mechanics during the last century. But, nifty as it is that billions of transistors can be packed into your smartphone or that photons are routed around the internet with the help of lasers, the devices underpinning the "first quantum revolution" merely rely on the weird properties of quantum mech
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E. coli engineered to grow on carbon dioxide and formic acid as sole carbon sources
Most biorefinery processes have relied on the use of biomass as a raw material for the production of chemicals and materials. Even though the use of CO₂as a carbon source in biorefineries is desirable, it has not been possible to make common microbial strains such as E. coli grow on CO₂.
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Rocky icebergs and deep anchors – new research on how planetary forces shape the Earth's surface
Have you ever wondered why the Earth's surface is separated into two distinct worlds—the oceans and large tracts of land?
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More than half of Americans have found ways to help those hit by COVID-19 hardship
Despite facing a global health crisis and economic recession, more than half of all U.S. households—56% – expressed some form of generosity during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, my colleagues at the Women's Philanthropy Institute and I found.
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A new test from the WHO could be a game changer in the fight against Covid | Charlotte Summers
Many nations lack access to affordable testing. Now 120m antigen tests will help tackle this dangerous inequality Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The principles of managing infectious disease outbreaks, whether of measles, tuberculosis or Covid-19, are similar. You identify who has been infected by testing for the disease, discover where they acquired the infection a
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E. coli engineered to grow on carbon dioxide and formic acid as sole carbon sources
Most biorefinery processes have relied on the use of biomass as a raw material for the production of chemicals and materials. Even though the use of CO₂as a carbon source in biorefineries is desirable, it has not been possible to make common microbial strains such as E. coli grow on CO₂.
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Noise can put you off your food
Noise can make or break a dining experience, according to a laboratory study replicating common noise levels in restaurants.
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New woodlands can reduce flooding risk within 15 years
The planting of woodlands in upland areas could play a significant role in preventing the flash flooding which has increasingly affected communities across the UK in recent years.
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New model examines how societal influences affect U.S. political opinions
Northwestern University researchers have developed the first quantitative model that captures how politicized environments affect U.S. political opinion formation and evolution.
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Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.
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Second alignment plane of solar system discovered
A study of comet motions indicates that the solar system has a second alignment plane. Analytical investigation of the orbits of long-period comets shows that the aphelia of the comets, the point where they are farthest from the Sun, tend to fall close to either the well-known ecliptic plane where the planets reside or a newly discovered "empty ecliptic." This has important implications for models
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Cannabis data lacking, but machine learning could help fill the gap
Anyone who has used, sold, studied or even read much about marijuana likely recognizes these acronyms as active ingredients in the plant.
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Marine biodiversity reshuffles under warmer and sea ice-free Pacific Arctic
Climate warming will alter marine community compositions as species are expected to shift poleward, significantly impacting the Arctic marine ecosystem.
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Cannabis data lacking, but machine learning could help fill the gap
Anyone who has used, sold, studied or even read much about marijuana likely recognizes these acronyms as active ingredients in the plant.
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The American Public Still Trusts Scientists, Says a New Pew Survey
So why don't we act like it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Whale 'roadkill' is on the rise off California. A new detection system could help.
View this post on Instagram 🎥 @dolphindronedom "What would you do if the largest animal on earth decided to come right at you!? Filmed aboard @gonewhalewatching 70 miles from shore!" A post shared by Whales Nation (@whalesnation) on Aug 25, 2020 at 11:34am PDT
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Can the common cold help protect you from COVID-19?
A new study in mBio provides the first evidence that the seasonal colds you've had in the past could protect you from COVID-19. The study, authored by infectious disease experts at the University of Rochester Medical Center, also suggests that immunity to COVID-19 is likely to last a long time – maybe even a lifetime.
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Repeated pregnancy loss may be tied to the olfactory system
Understanding the connection could lead to a new search for the causes of unexplained spontaneous miscarriage
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Discovery enables adult skin to regenerate like a newborn's
A newly identified genetic factor allows adult skin to repair itself like the skin of a newborn. The discovery has implications for wound treatment and preventing some of the aging process in skin. Researchers identified a factor in the skin of baby mice controlling hair follicle formation. When it was activated in adult mice, their skin was able to heal wounds without scarring. The reformed skin
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Potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon
A major new study that maps potential aboveground carbon accumulation rates for forest regrowth across the globe.
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E. coli engineered to grow on CO2 and formic acid as sole carbon sources?
A metabolic engineering research group at KAIST has developed a strategy to grow an E. coli strain to higher cell density solely on CO?and formic acid. Formic acid is a one carbon carboxylic acid, and can be easily produced from CO?using a variety of methods.
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The key to lowering CO2 emissions is made of metal
Researchers at Osaka City University produce malic acid, which contains 4 carbon atoms, through artificial photosynthesis by simply adding metal ions like aluminum and iron. This solves a problem with current artificial photosynthesis technology of only producing molecules with 1 carbon atom and paves the way to exploring the use of CO2 as a raw material.
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Researchers extract DNA from insects embedded in resin
For the first time, Senckenberg scientist Mónica Solórzano-Kraemer, together with lead authors David Peris and Kathrin Janssen of the University of Bonn and additional colleagues from Spain and Norway, successfully extracted genetic material from insects that were embedded in six- and two-year-old resin samples. DNA—in particular, DNA from extinct animals—is an important tool in the identification
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More than half of construction industry insiders think industry is not sustainable, study finds
A new University of Melbourne research project on the health of the Australian construction industry has found more than half of industry insiders who were surveyed thought the industry was not healthy or sustainable.
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Do raccoons fear coyotes?
A new study in North Carolina caught raccoons on camera foraging with other animals including deer, foxes and flying squirrels and even coyotes. The raccoons' lack of worry about the threat of predation supported researchers' conclusion that raccoons are unlikely prey for coyotes.
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How will the ocean carbon cycle evolve in the future? New project aims to find out
The global ocean covers 70 percent of the planet and is essential to humanity's survival, providing food, sustaining livelihoods, and capturing and storing huge amounts of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. A key scientific question for oceanographers and climate scientists is just how much CO2 can the ocean keep absorbing as the planet warms? This is also a key question for society and for decis
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How to multitask when nuclear nonproliferation is on the line
New cognitive science research from Sandia National Laboratories shows that while maps can help someone identify landmarks while being escorted, using one also limits situational awareness and knowledge of surroundings not highlighted on the map.
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'Where Law Ends' Review: How the Mueller Investigation Fell Flat
Prosecutor Andrew Weissmann's Where Law Ends doesn't fill the hole at the center of the Trump-Russia probe, but does help explain why it's there.
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'The Social Dilemma' Will Freak You Out—But There's More to the Story
Is social media ruining the world? Dramatic political polarization. Rising anxiety and depression. An uptick in teen suicide rates. Misinformation that spreads like wildfire. The common denominator of all these phenomena is that they're fueled in part by our seemingly innocuous participation in digital social networking. But how can simple acts like sharing photos and articles, reading the news,
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Do raccoons fear coyotes?
A new study in North Carolina caught raccoons on camera foraging with other animals including deer, foxes and flying squirrels and even coyotes. The raccoons' lack of worry about the threat of predation supported researchers' conclusion that raccoons are unlikely prey for coyotes.
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Compact Nuclear Fusion Reactor Is 'Very Likely to Work,' Studies Suggest
A series of research papers renews hope that the long-elusive goal of mimicking the way the sun produces energy might be achievable.
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The American Public Still Trusts Scientists, Says a New Pew Survey
So why don't we act like it? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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När uppnår vi egentligen flockimmunitet?
Tillräckligt många måste ha immunitet mot coronaviruset SARS-CoV-2 för att vi ska kunna få stopp på den pågående pandemin. Det verkar de flesta eniga om. Men hur uppnås så kallad flockimmunitet bäst? Den 6 april 2020 satt Tom Britton, matematikprofessor vid Stockholms universitet, i SVT:s morgonstudio och sa att halva Sveriges befolkning kommer att vara smittade innan månadens slut. Två veckor se
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Archaeologists determined the step-by-step path taken by the first people to settle the Caribbean islands
For the millions of people around the world who live on islands today, a plane or boat can easily enough carry them to the mainland or other islands.
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'Stretching rack' for cells
An ingenious device, only a few micrometers in size, lets researchers study the reaction of individual biological cells to mechanical stress.
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Secure nano-carrier delivers medications directly to cells
Researchers have developed a stable nano-carrier for medications. A special mechanism makes sure the drugs are only released in diseased cells.
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'Virtue signalling,' a slur meant to imply moral grandstanding that might not be all bad
Last month, on the centennial of the 19th amendment granting American women the vote, US President Donald Trump announced he would issue a posthumous pardon for Susan B. Anthony. A suffragette, Anthony was convicted of voting illegally as a woman in 1872. The response was mixed. Some applauded the president, others accused him of virtue signaling.
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Researcher studies how Black young women use language to fight back
How can Black women push back against the instances of racism, sexism, stereotyping and oppression they've experienced in their lives, in the media and in society at large?
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A 'cancer shredder' substance with new mechanism of action found
The villain in this drama has a pretty name: Aurora—Latin for dawn. In the world of biochemistry, however, Aurora (more precisely: Aurora-A kinase) stands for a protein that causes extensive damage. It has been known for a long time that Aurora often causes cancer. It triggers the development of leukemias and many pediatric cancers, such as neuroblastomas.
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Climate warming is altering animals' gut microbes, which are critical to their health and survival
It seems like each day scientists report more dire consequences of climate change on animals and plants worldwide. Birds that are migrating later in the year can't find enough food. Plants are flowering before their insect pollinators hatch. Prey species have less stamina to escape predators. In short, climatic shifts that affect one organism are likely to trigger ripple effects that can disturb t
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Climate warming is altering animals' gut microbes, which are critical to their health and survival
It seems like each day scientists report more dire consequences of climate change on animals and plants worldwide. Birds that are migrating later in the year can't find enough food. Plants are flowering before their insect pollinators hatch. Prey species have less stamina to escape predators. In short, climatic shifts that affect one organism are likely to trigger ripple effects that can disturb t
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A 'cancer shredder' substance with new mechanism of action found
The villain in this drama has a pretty name: Aurora—Latin for dawn. In the world of biochemistry, however, Aurora (more precisely: Aurora-A kinase) stands for a protein that causes extensive damage. It has been known for a long time that Aurora often causes cancer. It triggers the development of leukemias and many pediatric cancers, such as neuroblastomas.
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Video: Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich preparing for launch
A European satellite built to carry out precise measurements of sea level changes has arrived in California in preparation for launch. The Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite forms part of the European Union's Copernicus Earth Observation programme and will employ radar to map sea surface topography.
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How future fish stocks are affected by phytoplankton and iron uptake
Research by the University of Liverpool sheds new light on the complex relationship between phytoplankton, iron uptake, global warming and fish stocks which is essential in helping policymakers develop effective conservation and fisheries management policies under climate change.
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Does Australia really have the deadliest snakes? We debunk 6 common myths
As we settle into spring and temperatures rise, snakes are emerging from their winter hideouts to bask in the sun. But don't be alarmed if you spot one, it's hard to imagine a more misunderstood group of animals than snakes.
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How future fish stocks are affected by phytoplankton and iron uptake
Research by the University of Liverpool sheds new light on the complex relationship between phytoplankton, iron uptake, global warming and fish stocks which is essential in helping policymakers develop effective conservation and fisheries management policies under climate change.
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Does Australia really have the deadliest snakes? We debunk 6 common myths
As we settle into spring and temperatures rise, snakes are emerging from their winter hideouts to bask in the sun. But don't be alarmed if you spot one, it's hard to imagine a more misunderstood group of animals than snakes.
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NUS researchers solve decades-old problem of how to uniformly switch memristors
An international team, led by the scientists from the National University of Singapore, has developed a solution to uniformly switch memristors. This innovation addresses a long-standing problem in the field of organic and molecular electronics.
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Cardiac arrhythmias linked to gene mutations
Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias can be linked to the functional and structural consequences of gene mutations.
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Covert tobacco industry marketing tactics exposed by former employees
Tobacco companies use covert marketing tactics and exploit loopholes in Australian tobacco control laws to promote their products despite current tobacco advertising bans, finds new research from University of Sydney and Cancer Council NSW. To circumvent current tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship (TAPS) laws in Australia, tobacco companies are incentivising retailers with cash payments
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COVID-19 shapes political approval ratings
During the early days of the pandemic, COVID-19 created a rally effect around political leaders, according to new study. The rise of COVID-19 cases was associated with a 15- to 20-point boost in approval for United States governors and an average 14-point gain for world leaders. It's unclear how long the effect lasts, but the health crisis might be a catalyst to help incumbent governments win re-e
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Does U.S. military training incubate coups in Africa? The jury is still out
Military officers overthrew Mali's government in a coup d'état on August 18, 2020. Among the more worrying aspects of the coup is the fact that a number of the officers involved had received foreign training, most notably from the United States.
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Praktiserende læge er ny næstformand i Lægeforeningen
Speciallæge i almen medicin Anna Mette Nathan er valgt som ny næstformand i Lægeforeningen.
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Øget testkapacitet er ikke (hele) svaret på coronaflaskehals
Når sundhedsvæsenet øger kapaciteten på coronatest, stiger efterspørgslen samtidig. De aktuelle ventetider imødegås derfor smartere ved at prioritere adgangen til test end ved at øge testkapaciteten, skriver VIVEs professor i sundhedsøkonomi, Jakob Kjellberg.
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Going cashless isn't straightforward—ask Sweden or Zimbabwe
"No Cash Accepted" signs are increasingly common in Australian shops, thanks to COVID-19. Even before the the pandemic struck, though, we were well along the cashless path, with demand for coins halving between 2013 and 2019.
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Stop telling students to study STEM instead of humanities for the post-coronavirus world
Finally, someone has figured out how to put an end to students wasting their lives in the quixotic pursuit of knowledge associated with the humanities.
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Video shows a meteoroid skipping off Earth's atmosphere
Here's something we don't see very often: an Earth-grazing meteoroid.
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A sustainable new solution for ageing, corroding infrastructure
Surrounded by ocean, most of New Zealand's reinforced-concrete infrastructure lies close to the coast, making it susceptible to corrosion. Could new glass-based reinforcing hold the answer?
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Advanced mathematics condense COVID-19 complexity
Scientists are racing to keep pace with COVID-19, creating new tools to figure out how the novel coronavirus works.
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Deepfake Putin is here to warn Americans about their self-inflicted doom
The news: Two political ads will broadcast on social media today, featuring deepfake versions of Russian president Vladimir Putin and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Both deepfake leaders will be giving the same message: that America doesn't need any election interference from them; it will ruin its democracy by itself. What are they for? Yes, the ads sound creepy, but they're meant for a good c
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Noise can put you off your food
Noise can make or break a dining experience, according to a laboratory study replicating common noise levels in restaurants. The acoustic experts say the study proves that high noise levels can play a major part in a dining experience – along with the quality of the food and restaurant service.
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Vanderbilt wearable exosuit that lessens muscle fatigue could redesign the future of work
Zelik and team demonstrate how a clothing-like exoskeleton can reduce back muscle fatigue and providing needed physical relief to material handlers, medical professionals and frontline workers.
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Mussels connect antibodies to treat cancer
POSTECH research team develops innovative local anticancer immunotherapy technology using mussel protein.
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Facile synthesis of quinoline in water
This review summarizes an overview of the synthesis and functionalisation of quinoline scaffolds in aqueous medium. This method may encourage researchers to adopt green chemistry and to apply these environmentally safe methods in designing important heterocyclic cores.
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Cannabis data lacking, but machine learning could help
Everyone's heard of THC and CBD. But many other active compounds in cannabis interact to influence its effects. A new study confirms that those compounds are seldom tested for, and strain name is not indicative of potency or chemical makeup. Machine learning techniques could help fill the knowledge gap.
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Common antioxidant enzyme may provide potential treatment for COVID-19
Catalase, a naturally occurring enzyme, holds potential as a low-cost therapeutic drug to treat COVID-19 symptoms and suppress the replication of coronavirus inside the body.
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Why do veterans take their own lives? New study finds surprising answers
A George Mason University study of US veterans found that while social determinants of health – like homelessness, social isolation, or unemployment — can predict suicide, they are not the cause of it. Mental illness leads to both adverse life events, such as social isolation and suicide, creating the incorrect appearance that adverse events cause suicide. Dr. Farrokh Alemi led the study that sug
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Validating the physics behind the new MIT-designed fusion experiment
MIT researchers have published seven papers outlining details of the physics behind the ambitious SPARC fusion research experiment being developed by MIT and Commonwealth Fusion Systems.
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Luleåforskare banar väg för smartare skogsbruk
Tanken med projektet är detsamma som med all självkörande teknik – att utveckla maskiner som är mer effektiva och har högre precision än vi människor, i detta fall inom skogs- och jordbruk. På vägen dit väntar många forskningsstudier, där maskinen som nu står färdig ska användas för att underlätta processen. Maskinen tog sex år att bygga och är den första i sitt slag.
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The Most Confused of the Scientific Branches
An experimental twist on the Schrödinger's cat paradox could overturn cherished assumptions in metaphysics — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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3 things would cut coronavirus spread in prison
The deadly new coronavirus is spreading faster in America's jails and prisons than it did on the Princess Diamond cruise ship or at the pandemic's outbreak in Wuhan, China, research finds. Why? Few opportunities for social distancing and relatively low sanitary conditions. "These interventions include depopulation, increased single celling, and widespread testing of asymptomatic people who are in
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Wildfires: count lives and homes, not hectares burnt
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02740-4 Smarter ways to assess fires will bring better methods of preventing damage.
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13 Books You Need to Read This Fall
New movies are few; new TV is fast diminishing. Here are the books we think you should pick up instead.
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Validating the physics behind the new MIT-designed fusion experiment
Two and a half years ago, MIT entered into a research agreement with startup company Commonwealth Fusion Systems to develop a next-generation fusion research experiment, called SPARC, as a precursor to a practical, emissions-free power plant.
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CXOGBS J175553.2-281633 is a cataclysmic variable, study finds
An international team of astronomers has performed photometric observations of a binary system known as CXOGBS J175553.2-281633. Results of the study indicate that the object is a cataclysmic variable system. The finding is reported in a paper published September 18 on arXiv.org.
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Lessons from AIDS for the COVID-19 Pandemic
We can learn from parallels between the coronavirus and HIV crises — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Coronavirus global death toll passes 1m mark
Grim milestone is reached 8 months after first confirmed fatality in Wuhan
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Let the coronavirus spread among young people? It's not a good idea
As a rise in cases of covid-19 is met with anti-lockdown protests, a small minority are arguing that we should let the virus rip through the young and healthy
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Wine bottle holders and racks that make sophisticated gifts
A better place to hold your bottles. (John Cameron via Unsplash/) Few things are more relaxing than sitting down with a glass of wine at the end of a long day or to celebrate a special occasion. Wine bottle holders make great gifts because they mark these special occasions, and remind us of those times when we're able to slow down and appreciate the moment. Whether you know any budding wine colle
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Covid-19 news: Travel abroad linked to positive test rate in England
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
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Mars's south pole may have an underground lake surrounded by ponds
The south pole of Mars may be hiding a cold lake of liquid water surrounded by ponds, all buried 1400 metres beneath the planet's ice caps
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The paleo diet may make your biological age older than your real age
A new way of calculating biological age based on the bacteria in our gut has thrown up some surprising results, including that people on the paleo diet are biologically almost two years older than their real age
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The theory of evolution is a vibrant, living entity still in its prime
Charles Darwin's theory of evolution is one of the greatest accomplishments of human intellect and it is continuing to bring further insights under its wing
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Coronavirus death toll reaches 1 million – how did we get here?
Despite a global health response, the coronavirus pandemic has claimed a million lives since it first emerged in Wuhan, China. How did we get here?
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More accurate modelling of climate change impacts on water resources
To better document the repercussions of climate change on regional water resources, researchers from around the world now have access to HYSETS, a database of hydrometric, meteorological and physiographic data created by a team at the École de technologie supérieure (ÉTS), which contains 70 years' worth of data on 14,425 North American watersheds
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COVID – Not Close to Herd Immunity
One question weighing on the minds of many people today is – when will this all end? And by "this" (well, one of the "thises") I mean the pandemic. Experts have been saying all along that we need to buckle up and get read for a long ride on the pandemic express. This is a marathon, and we need to be psychologically prepared for what we are doing now being the new normal for a long time. The big q
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The Moon Has More Radiation Than We Thought, a New Problem for Astronauts
No one expects spacetravel to be risk-free, but we're just beginning to learn how harsh the universe can be outside our little bubble of atmosphere. A new analysis of conditions on the moon much higher levels of radiation than expected . The Chinese-German team claims the lunar surface is so unsafe that humans will be unable to spend long periods of time there. That could certainly complicate NAS
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The 10-step guide to survival in an emergency
When you head into the wild, you never know what's going to happen. (Kyle Glenn/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . When it comes to survival, there's no "average" emergency. Each crisis is unique. Specifics like the setting, the weather, the people, and the events combine to create an occurrence that has never happened before and will never happen again. Yet in the fa
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Trafikforsker: Det er vigtigere at begrænse salget af benzin- og dieselbiler end at øge andelen af elbiler
PLUS. En høj andel af elbiler i den samlede bilbestand er vigtig for at nå reduktionsmålet på 70 procent i 2030. Derfor er der frem mod 2030 brug for klare politiske signaler om et højt ambitionsniveau for nuludslipsbiler afgørende, siger dansk trafikforsker.
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When Young People Get COVID-19, Infections Soon Rise Among Older Adults
As college campuses grapple with outbreaks of coronavirus infections, research from the CDC suggests young adults are driving infection rates, putting older, more vulnerable people at risk. (Image credit: Michael Conroy/AP)
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Fish Form Social Networks—and They're Actually Good
New models of coral reefs show how fish species communicate with one another. The findings may well help save these threatened ecosystems.
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America Can Still Achieve Its Techno-Utopian Dream
The tools for curbing Silicon Valley's outsize power and restoring hope in tech are already available and, in some cases, have been for hundreds of years.
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The key to lowering carbon dioxide emissions is made of metal
Carbon dioxide (CO2) levels are rising and our planet is heating up. What do we do? What if we used this excess CO2 as a raw material to produce things we need—similar to how plants use it to produce oxygen.
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Should I Help Incarcerate the Man Who Tried to Sexually Assault Me?
He was the first stranger to enter our house in 105 days. It was 4:13 a.m. on a Friday, and my husband, who works at night in an office in our backyard, was listening to music with headphones. He didn't hear the stranger pass through the gate, walk up the back steps, and enter through the back door of our house. I woke when the man switched on the bedroom light. For an instant, I was simply confu
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How to Narrow Achievement Gaps for Underrepresented Students
Techniques such as inclusive teaching can inspire "hyperpersistence" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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How to Narrow Achievement Gaps for Underrepresented Students
Techniques such as inclusive teaching can inspire "hyperpersistence" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Boris Johnson announces 'radical' plan to boost vocational training
PM says young people need new skills to compete as Covid-19 has accelerated changes in economy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has promised to end the "pointless, nonsensical gulf" between university and vocational education, in what he called a "radical" shakeup of funding for post-18 education. Giving an upbeat speech at Exeter college, Johnson said t
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Buried lakes of liquid water discovered on Mars
The underground lakes were detected in the Red Planet's south polar region.
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Digital technologies will help build resilient communities after the coronavirus pandemic
Amid the horrific public health and economic fallout from a fast-moving pandemic, a more positive phenomenon is playing out: COVID-19 has provided opportunities to businesses, universities and communities to become hothouses of innovation.
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Automated image processing could aid crop evals
Sunlight allows crops to engage photosynthesis and produce the yields that become food, feed, fiber and fuel.
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Do smart assistants need a feminist reboot? Part 1
From Rosie the Robot in the 1960s animated sitcom The Jetsons to Siri and Alexa today, technologies that perform the roles of housekeeper and secretary are often presented as female. What does the gendering of these machines say about our expectations of who should be doing this kind of work? In the first of two episodes exploring the world of fembots and female AI assistants, the Guardian's UK te
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Automated image processing could aid crop evals
Sunlight allows crops to engage photosynthesis and produce the yields that become food, feed, fiber and fuel.
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Coupling deep transcriptome and metabolome analysis unveils thermotolerance in cool-season turfgrass
Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is the predominant forage and cool-season perennial species in the U.S., China and several European countries, which grows at optimum temperature ranging from 18 to 25 oC.
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Stepwise inversion method to profile near-borehole formation velocities
The radial heterogeneity of near-wellbore formation, usually manifested as the variations of formation wave velocities in radial position, is encountered in petroleum exploration and production. Mapping radial variations of formation velocities is significant in identifying invaded zones and determining rock properties, which are valuable for engineering measures.
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Women equal men in computing skill, but are less confident
In the workplace, women are now as good as men when it comes to computing performance, but there is still a gender gap when it comes to confidence, according to our new research.
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Democracy suffers when government statistics fail
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02733-3 The United States must change how it measures society, argues metrics maven Julia Lane.
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The lockdown tweet that launched a COVID-19 'supertracker'
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02760-0 Lukas Lehner wanted to capture how different economies are addressing COVID-19 challenges. His Twitter call-out helped to create a global directory of policy resources based on swarm intelligence, and led to a research project.
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Coupling deep transcriptome and metabolome analysis unveils thermotolerance in cool-season turfgrass
Tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) is the predominant forage and cool-season perennial species in the U.S., China and several European countries, which grows at optimum temperature ranging from 18 to 25 oC.
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Covid lockdowns in north-east England: new rules explained
Stricter measures will come into force in areas of the region from midnight on Wednesday Lockdown tightened in north-east England Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A swathe of north-east England has been put under enhanced lockdown measures by the government. Continue reading…
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Do smart assistants need a feminist reboot? Part 1 – podcast
From Rosie the Robot in the 1960s animated sitcom The Jetsons to Siri and Alexa today, technologies that perform the roles of housekeeper and secretary are often presented as female. What does the gendering of these machines say about our expectations of who should be doing this kind of work? In the first of two episodes exploring the world of fembots and female AI assistants, the Guardian's UK t
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Trump Is Trying to Trick Americans Into Giving Up on Democracy
Democracy depends on belief in democracy—on an extraordinary leap of faith by ordinary people that their rulers will abide by the rules, that their votes will count, that their compatriots won't tear the country apart, that lies won't become truth. When the checks and balances have all given way, the last barrier to an authoritarian regime is public opinion. It will stand or fall on November 3. A
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Regeringen: Vores plan viser, at vi når 70 pct. målet i 2030
Regeringen har tirsdag offentliggjort sit klimaprogram, som den er forpligtet til via klimaloven. Programmet viser, at det er muligt at nå målet om en 70 procents drivhusgasreduktion i 2030.
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During Covid, Eating Disorder Patients Turn to Apps
Anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating patients are facing novel challenges as in-person care is on hold. Can tech tools fill in the treatment gaps?
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Your Photos Are Irreplaceable. Get Them Off Your Phone
When's the last time you backed up your photos? Would you be upset if you lost them? You see where we're going here, right?
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The Cyber-Avengers Protecting Hospitals From Ransomware
As medical facilities strain amid the pandemic, they're especially vulnerable to cyberattacks. A global coalition of volunteer experts has stepped into the breach.
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The National Guard's Fire-Mapping Drones Get an AI Upgrade
Algorithms that quickly track the movement of wildfires could help firefighters‚ but the tech could also be put to non-humanitarian use.
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Nature's Splendor Exceeds Our Imagination
When you're unprepared to find exceptional things, you never will — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Unga vittnar om mer stillasittande under corona
Unga hamnade hemma framför skärmen när skolor stängde och idrotten lade ner. En av tre mellan 16-20 år har rört sig mindre under coronapandemin, visar en studie från Malmö universitet. Forskarna bakom är oroade för följderna. I våras startade ett forskningsprojekt vid Malmö universitet med syfte att studera coronakrisens effekter på idrott och fysisk aktivitet. – Enkätsvaren vi har fått in visar
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Superconductivity with a twist explained
Leiden physicists and international colleagues from Geneva and Barcelona have confirmed the mechanism that makes magic-angle graphene superconducting. This is a key step in elucidating high-temperature superconductivity, a decades-old mystery central to physics, which may lead to technological breakthroughs.
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Throwing a warm sheet over our understanding of ice and climate
Temperatures at Earth's highest latitudes were nearly as warm after Antarctica's polar ice sheets developed as they were prior to glaciation, according to a new study led by Yale University. The finding upends most scientists' basic understanding of how ice and climate develop over long stretches of time.
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The Ilopango volcanic eruption that shocked the Maya's civilization 1590 years ago
In 431 CE, 1590 years ago, the Maya civilization was laid waste as the Ilopango volcano erupted, killing every living thing within 40 km around the volcano, according to a new study carried out by an international team of scientists and with the participation of Dario Pedrazzi, researcher at Geosciences Barcelona–CSIC (GEO3BCN). The article has been published in the journal PNAS.
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Satcom to foster resilient digital systems
Telecommunications are becoming increasingly crucial to our society, economy and security. ESA is supporting the European satellite communication industry's efforts to identify how to meet future worldwide demands for more secure and resilient digital systems.
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Machine-learning nanosats to inform global trade
The latest batch of tiny satellites to monitor trade on Earth from space have launched.
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New insights into the origin of diamonds in meteorites
Scientists have offered new insights into the origin of diamonds in ureilites (a group of stony meteorites). These diamonds most likely formed by rapid shock transformation from graphite (the common low-pressure form of pure carbon) during one or more major impacts into the ureilite parent asteroid in the early solar system.
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DTU-forsker udvikler coatingteknologi til ESA-mission
Sonny Massahi har i et ph.d.-projekt udviklet en industriel teknik til coating af spejlet på ny stor europæisk satellit, der skal opfange intense røntgensignaler.
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Researchers develop a new membraneless fuel cell
The research team of INRS Professor Mohamed Mohamedi has designed a green membraneless fuel cell that uses oxygen from the air. The results of this innovative microfluidic application—a first in Canada—were published in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.
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Fejl i Smittstop-appen bliver rettet: Nu skal flere have besked om corona-risiko
»En uhensigtsmæssighed i implementeringen« af den bagvedliggende teknologi i Smittestop-appen har ført til, at flere personer ikke er blevet advaret gennem appen, hvis deres nære kontakter er blevet testet positiv for coronavirus. Nu er fejlen rettet, oplyser Sundheds- og Ældreministeriet.
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A Debate Is Much More Than a Fact-Checking Exercise
When Donald Trump and Joe Biden take the debate stage in Cleveland tonight, many in the audience will want the moderator, Chris Wallace, to fact-check the candidates aggressively. Political partisans are like basketball fans: They want to see fouls called on the opponent, not on the home team. Yet Wallace and the moderators of subsequent debates will have to find balance, just as NBA referees do.
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NHS hit by staff shortages due to lack of Covid tests for children
Frontline doctors forced to take time off work as they struggle to secure family coronavirus results
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The Doctor Who Fooled The World: An excerpt from Brian Deer's new book about Andrew Wakefield
Retraction Watch readers are no doubt familiar with the case of Andrew Wakefield, the former gastroenterologist who led a 1998 paper in The Lancet — now retracted — that led him to claim a link between the MMR vaccine and autism. It was journalist Brian Deer who revealed the true details of that work, and … Continue reading
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Brain-eating amoebae are very rare, but warming waters may change that
Scientists are concerned that climate change may be making N. fowleri, colloquially known as the "brain-eating amoeba," infections more common. (Pexels/) After a six-year-old boy died of Naegleria fowleri -related brain infection earlier this month, and tests found the so-called "brain-eating amoeba" in its water supply, the Texas governor declared a state of disaster for Brazoria County. Residen
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I Worked on 5 SCOTUS Confirmation Hearings. Rushing the Process Will Be a Disaster.
As Donald Trump and Senate Republicans try to confirm Amy Coney Barrett as a justice of the Supreme Court in the 38 days between her nomination and Election Day—with many votes already being cast—much of the criticism has focused on the hypocrisy of moving this nomination forward when Republicans blocked Merrick Garland's nomination for 237 days before the 2016 election. That point is important,
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Hold Me, Squeeze Me, Bite My Head
Two recent research efforts looked into the southern alligator lizard, which has one of nature's more extreme mating strategies.
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Trump Allies Say the Virus Has Almost Run Its Course. 'Nonsense,' Experts Say.
The C.D.C. and leading experts have concluded, using different scientific methods, that as many as 90 percent of Americans are still vulnerable to infection.
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In California, Public Health Workers Given New Privacy Protection
Public health officers across the country have been receiving threats as they enforce Covid-19 regulations and at least 61 have resigned. Now, California is protecting their mailing addresses in a program previously offered only to victims of violence, abuse, stalking, and reproductive health care workers.
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Marine mammalogy must battle against unpaid work, argues petition
Nature, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-02758-8 Scientists in the discipline and elsewhere say that uncompensated internships and work placements create barriers to inclusion and diversity.
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The Children Who Desegregated America's Schools
In 1954, the Supreme Court decided that segregation of public schools was unconstitutional—but it was thousands of children who actually desegregated America's classrooms. The task that fell to them was a brutal one. In the years following Brown v. Board of Education , vicious legal and political battles broke out; town by town, Black parents tried to send their children to white schools, and whi
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The New York Town That Tried to Stop Desegregation
Editor's Note: This is the fifth story in The Firsts , a five-part series about the children who desegregated America's schools. I t was February 23, 1966, and Frederick K. Brewington had to walk less than a mile to get to school. He and his mom had mapped the routes: He would cross the street and enter the band of trees, tramping over the rocks in the creek. He would emerge from the trees to Bob
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The Persistence of Segregation in South Carolina
Editor's Note: This is the fourth story in The Firsts , a five-part series about the children who desegregated America's schools. M illicent Brown could only be honest. It was the summer of 1960, and she was standing in front of the school board in Charleston County, South Carolina. She was preparing to enter the seventh grade. The row of men—all white—studied her as they lobbed loaded questions
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Brexit: warnings for care sector in pandemic as freedom of movement ends
Wages should rise to make jobs more attractive to UK staff, say government advisers The end of freedom of movement after Brexit will increase pressure on the social care sector in the midst of a pandemic unless ministers make jobs more attractive to UK workers by increasing salaries, government advisers have said. The migration advisory committee (Mac) warned of the "stark consequences" of low wa
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Driving behavior less 'robotic' thanks to new Delft model
Researchers from TU Delft have now developed a new model that describes driving behaviour on the basis of one underlying 'human' principle: managing the risk below a threshold level. This model can accurately predict human behaviour during a wide range of driving tasks. In time, the model could be used in intelligent cars, to make them feel less 'robotic'. The research will be published in Nature
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App analyzes coronavirus genome on a smartphone
A team led by Garvan's Dr Ira Deveson developed the app 'Genopo' that can analyse the coronavirus genome on a portable Android device.
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Women received less aggressive care than men after a heart attack with pumping failure
Researchers found that when a heart attack was complicated by cardiogenic shock, women ages 18-55 years were 11% more likely to die in the hospital than men the same age.While in the hospital, women were also significantly less likely to receive prompt diagnostic tests and aggressive treatment compared to men.
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From chief technology officer to CEO
In the digital era, strong technology leadership correlates ever more closely with business revenue growth. Technology strategy, and the ability of chief technology officers to deliver it, is key to business success, not just for managing the performance and cost efficiency of enterprise technology, but to create the architecture and agility for new business models, taking advantage of emerging o
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Why security experts are braced for the next election hack-and-leak
When the New York Times published its blockbuster scoop about President Donald Trump's tax returns, a lot of cybersecurity experts had traumatic flashbacks to four years ago. Just a few weeks before the 2016 election, recordings were leaked of Trump on the set of Access Hollywood describing his strategy to sexually assault women. The news threatened to derail his presidential bid. Less than an ho
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Retrospective on a decade of machine learning for chemical discovery
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18556-9 Over the last decade, we have witnessed the emergence of ever more machine learning applications in all aspects of the chemical sciences. Here, we highlight specific achievements of machine learning models in the field of computational chemistry by considering selected studies of electronic structure, inter
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Frugivore-fruit size relationships between palms and mammals reveal past and future defaunation impacts
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18530-5 Extinctions of megafauna can have cascading effects on their ecological communities. Here, Lim et al. investigate the relationships of historical and current mammalian frugivore body size with palm fruit size, then project how further mammal extinctions are likely to affect palm communities.
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Strain localisation and failure at twin-boundary complexions in nickel-based superalloys
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18641-z Coherent twin boundaries in nickel-based superalloys are vulnerable sites for alloy failure in demanding environments. Here, the authors show that the abnormal γ″ precipitation mechanism at twin boundaries is responsible for pronounced strain localisation and subsequent failure.
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Myelin replacement triggered by single-cell demyelination in mouse cortex
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18632-0 Myelination is a highly regulated phenomenon. Here, the authors show that demyelination induced by the loss of a single oligodendrocyte triggers replenishment of a specific fraction the original myelin and myelination of previously unmyelinated axons in the mouse cortex.
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Author Correction: Relative configuration of micrograms of natural compounds using proton residual chemical shift anisotropy
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18927-2
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Flexopiezoelectricity at ferroelastic domain walls in WO3 films
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18644-w Observation of a strain-gradient-induced piezoresponse at domain walls remains a challenge. Here, the authors find the piezoelectric response to be enhanced in the ferroelastic domain walls of centrosymmetric tungsten trioxide thin films due to a large strain gradient over a wide width of the wall.
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A transient enhancement of Mercury's exosphere at extremely high altitudes inferred from pickup ions
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18220-2 Mercury has a global dayside exosphere that is very tenuous and does not extend far from the planet. Here, the authors show enhancement of neutral densities at high altitudes inferred from pickup ions that is most likely caused by the impact of a meteroid.
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Clarifying the quantum mechanical origin of the covalent chemical bond
Nature Communications, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-18670-8 The origin of the covalent H–H bond is understood to be driven by kinetic energy lowering. Here the authors show this is not the case for bonds between heavier elements likely due to the presence of core electrons, and that constructive quantum interference instead drives bond formation.
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The Quiet Desegregation of Alabama's Public Schools
Editor's Note: This is the third story in The Firsts , a five-part series about the children who desegregated America's schools. Everyone seems to make the same mistake. They look at the picture of him, Sonnie Hereford IV, and think they know the story. In the photo, he is 6 years old. He is holding his father's hand, walking down Governors Drive on September 3, 1963. People see him and see a boy
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The Undoing of a Tennessee Town
Editor's Note: This is the second story in The Firsts , a five-part series about the children who desegregated America's schools. T he dress Jo Ann Allen Boyce had picked out for her first day of school, August 27, 1956, was beautiful: a black top and matching skirt with a pattern around the hem. Her grandmother had made it. In fact, her grandmother, a brilliant seamstress, had made Jo Ann an ent
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Trump Secretly Mocks His Christian Supporters
One day in 2015, Donald Trump beckoned Michael Cohen, his longtime confidant and personal attorney, into his office. Trump was brandishing a printout of an article about an Atlanta-based megachurch pastor trying to raise $60 million from his flock to buy a private jet. Trump knew the preacher personally—Creflo Dollar had been among a group of evangelical figures who visited him in 2011 while he w
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The Limits of Desegregation in Washington, D.C.
Editor's Note: This is the first story in The Firsts , a five-part series about the children who desegregated America's schools. H ugh Price can recall only a few exceptions to the rigid segregation of the city he was born into on November 22, 1941. One was right down the street. Raymond Elementary was a long, red rectangle of a building that was a short walk from his home on New Hampshire Avenue
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Neo-antigens for the serological diagnosis of IgE-mediated drug allergic reactions to antibiotics cephalosporin, carbapenem and monobactam
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73109-w
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Dual-guiding-layer resonance structure with an embedded metasurface for quasi-critical coupling without a perfect mirror
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72983-8
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Dental black plaque: metagenomic characterization and comparative analysis with white-plaque
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72460-2
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Casein kinase 1.2 over expression restores stress resistance to Leishmania donovani HSP23 null mutants
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-72724-x
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Microtiter plate-based antibody-competition assay to determine binding affinities and plasma/blood stability of CXCR4 ligands
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-73012-4
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App analyzes coronavirus genome on a smartphone
A new mobile app has made it possible to analyze the genome of the SARS-CoV-2 virus on a smartphone in less than half an hour.
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App analyzes coronavirus genome on a smartphone
A new mobile app has made it possible to analyze the genome of the SARS-CoV-2 virus on a smartphone in less than half an hour.
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Alarm: Amazon kommer
PLUS. Giganten Amazon er ved at slå rødder i Sverige og er højst sandsynligt også på vej til Danmark. Det får en række danske netbutikker til at automatisere for at kunne tage konkurrencen op.
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Brazil revokes mangrove protections, triggering alarm
Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's government on Monday revoked regulations protecting mangroves and other fragile coastal ecosystems, in a measure environmentalists condemned as a "crime" that would lead to their destruction.
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Purging water system of brain-eating microbe to take 60 days
A Houston-area official said Monday it will take 60 days to ensure a city drinking water system is purged of a deadly, microscopic parasite that doctors believed killed a boy and that led to warnings for others not to drink tap water.
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United Arab Emirates to launch spacecraft to moon in 2024
A top official in the United Arab Emirates said Tuesday his country plans to send an unmanned spacecraft to the moon in 2024.
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Dying winds give crews hope in Northern California fires
Firefighters say they hoped dying winds would enable them to bear down on a wildfire that exploded in the Northern California wine country, prompting tens of thousands of evacuations while a second blaze killed at least three people.
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EPA ridicules California's proposed ban of new gas cars
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency chief Andrew Wheeler on Monday ridiculed California Gov. Gavin Newsom's plan to ban the sale of new gas-powered cars by 2035, saying the proposal raises "significant questions of legality."
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Covid vaccine tracker: when will a coronavirus vaccine be ready?
More than 170 teams of researchers are racing to develop a safe and effective vaccine. Here is their progress Researchers around the world are racing to develop a vaccine against Covid-19, with more than 170 candidate vaccines now tracked by the World Health Organization (WHO). Continue reading…
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Earth alienation: Hannah Arendt on outer space
On Wednesday 30th May, billionaire Elon Musk's SpaceX company launched its first human passengers into orbit from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, opening a door to the commercialization of space. With the National Aeronautics and Space Administration astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, and the SpaceX-manufactured manned orbital rocket, this was the first time that a private firm had carried h
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China's air pollutant reduction success could make it tougher to control climate change
China's success in improving air quality by cutting polluting emissions may have a negative knock-on effect on climate change overall, a new study has found.
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Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind.
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Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind.
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Understanding ghost particle interactions
Scientists often refer to the neutrino as the "ghost particle." Neutrinos were one of the most abundant particles at the origin of the universe and remain so today. Fusion reactions in the sun produce vast armies of them, which pour down on the Earth every day. Trillions pass through our bodies every second, then fly through the Earth as though it were not there.
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China's air pollutant reduction success could make it tougher to control climate change
China's success in improving air quality by cutting polluting emissions may have a negative knock-on effect on climate change overall, a new study has found.
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New interactive tool will help farmers contain the spread of clubroot
First described in the 13th century in Russia, clubroot has been affecting worldwide brassica production, including canola, broccoli, and black mustard, since. Clubroot is so tenacious because the casual pathogen produces resting spores that can survive in infected soil for decades, surviving harsh environments like cold winters and hot summers. It is also easily transferable from field to field w
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Study traces the evolution of gill covers
The emergence of jaws in primitive fish allowed vertebrates to become top predators. What is less appreciated is another evolutionary innovation that may have been just as important for the success of early vertebrates: the formation of covers to protect and pump water over the gills. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), USC Stem Cell scientists a
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More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted by researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and Brown University found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic res
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Amerikansk kvanteforsker på KU modtager H.C. Ørsted Guldmedalje
For første gang siden prisen blev indstiftet i 1909 går den til en udenlandsk forsker, der arbejder i Danmark.
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New interactive tool will help farmers contain the spread of clubroot
First described in the 13th century in Russia, clubroot has been affecting worldwide brassica production, including canola, broccoli, and black mustard, since. Clubroot is so tenacious because the casual pathogen produces resting spores that can survive in infected soil for decades, surviving harsh environments like cold winters and hot summers. It is also easily transferable from field to field w
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Study traces the evolution of gill covers
The emergence of jaws in primitive fish allowed vertebrates to become top predators. What is less appreciated is another evolutionary innovation that may have been just as important for the success of early vertebrates: the formation of covers to protect and pump water over the gills. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), USC Stem Cell scientists a
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Ground Glass Is Not a Poison
Some people think you can murder someone by putting ground glass in their food. That's a myth. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Läkemedel lovande vid aggressiv barncancer
Ett läkemedel har visat sig mycket lovande mot neuroblastom, en aggressiv form av barncancer. Studien leds av forskare vid Lunds universitet
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The Path toward an Aerographite Sail
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
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IBM Plans to Have a 1,000-Qubit Quantum Computer by 2023
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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Multiple 'water bodies' found under surface of Mars
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Salty water lakes found more than half a mile beneath Mars' surface.
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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How a Half-Dozen Raspberry Pis Help Keep This Maine Oyster Farm Afloat
submitted by /u/andyholla84 [link] [comments]
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NASA lays out $28 billion plan to return astronauts to the moon in 2024
submitted by /u/Just_For_Fun_XD [link] [comments]
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Talk of a scientific rift is a dangerous distraction in the fight against Covid-19 | Stephen Buranyi
Rival scientists divided over lockdowns may make a good story – but is it accurate? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The cardinal rule of coronavirus policy is that you must follow "the science". Or, at the very least, you must say that you are. After the US's disastrous response to the pandemic, Donald Trump still insists he is " guided by science ". In the UK, Boris
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Evictions Damage Public Health. The CDC Aims To Curb Them ― For Now
A survey of 17 cities found more than 50,000 pandemic-related eviction filings. Housing advocates worry that increased housing instability will lead to more COVID-19 and other illnesses. (Image credit: Coburn Dukehart/Wisconsin Watch)
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INRS researchers develop a new membraneless fuel cell
The research team of INRS (Institut national de la recherche scientifique) professor Mohamed Mohamedi has designed a green membraneless fuel cell that uses oxygen from the air. The results of this innovative microfluidic application — a first in Canada — were published in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews.
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Computer model shows how COVID-19 could lead to runaway inflammation
New study addresses a mystery first raised in March: Why do some people with COVID-19 develop severe inflammation? The research shows how the molecular structure and sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein could be behind life-threatening inflammatory conditions MIS-C and cytokine storm.
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Conversation quickly spreads droplets inside buildings
With implications for the transmission of diseases like COVID-19, researchers have found that ordinary conversation creates a conical 'jet-like' airflow that quickly carries a spray of tiny droplets from a speaker's mouth across meters of an interior space.
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Senescent cells may be good when it comes to a bad injury
It's called senescence, when stressed cells can no longer divide to make new cells, and it's considered a factor in aging and in some diseases. Now scientists have some of the first evidence that at a younger age at least, senescent cells show up quickly after a major injury and are protective.
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Plant droplets serve as nutrient-rich food for insects
Small watery droplets on the edges of blueberry bush leaves are loaded with nutrients for many insects, including bees, wasps and flies, according to a Rutgers-led study, the first of its kind. The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, suggests that these droplets are an important but underexplored feature in plants, with profound implications for
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More than 90% of driver's license suspensions are not related to traffic safety
A study conducted found that the vast majority of license suspensions are for non-driving-related events, such as failure to pay a fine or appear in court, and that these suspensions disproportionately affect those living in low-income communities and in communities with a greater percentage of Black and Hispanic residents.
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Girls benefit from doing sports
Extracurricular sport in middle childhood diminishes subsequent ADHD symptoms in girls, but not in boys, a new study suggests.
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COVID-19: Social distancing is more effective than travel bans, study finds
Travel bans will delay the peak of infection with days, while social distancing has a much stronger impact, amounting in up to 4 weeks delay, scientists report.
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COVID-19: Saliva tests could detect silent carriers
Testing self-collected saliva samples could offer an easy and effective mass testing approach for detecting asymptomatic COVID-19.
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One in three parents plan to skip flu shots for their kids during COVID-19 pandemic, poll finds
According to a new U.S. poll, COVID-19 may not influence parents' beliefs about the flu vaccine, with just one third believing it's more important for children to get vaccinated this year, while one in three parents don't plan to vaccinate children against the flu.
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Study reveals design flaws of chatbot-based symptom-checker apps
Millions of people turn to their mobile devices when seeking medical advice. They're able to share their symptoms and receive potential diagnoses through chatbot-based symptom-checker (CSC) apps. But how do these apps compare to a trip to the doctor's office? Not well, according to a new study.
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Until there's a Covid vaccine, we need to focus on treating longer-term health consequences | Elizabeth Hartland
We don't know yet how many of the ongoing symptoms could translate to chronic ill health in the future, and that's worrying As Covid-19 infection numbers show a welcome downward trend in Melbourne and the city's residents look forward to some easing of restrictions, it's time to consider the longer-term health consequences of the pandemic. More than 27,000 Australians – including some 20,000 Vict
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Mystisk fejl forhindrer tilfældige Iphones i at bruge NemID-app
Nets har intet meldt ud og har ingen kommentarer mens betalingsgigantens supportere knokler for at fortælle kunderne, hvad der foregår.
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Early introduction of gluten may prevent celiac disease in children, study finds
Introducing high doses of gluten from four months of age into infants' diets could prevent them from developing celiac disease, a study has found, though researchers say further studies are needed before being applied in practice.
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COVID-19 may deplete testosterone, helping to explain male patients' poorer prognosis
A study of patients hospitalized due to COVID-19 suggests that the disease might deteriorate men's testosterone levels. The study found that as men's testosterone level at baseline decreases, the probability for them to be in the intensive care unit (ICU) significantly increases.
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The Atlantic Daily: 'Trump Seems Tongue-Tied'
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . DREW ANGERER / GETTY Over the weekend, a key piece of the president's self-mythology crumbled, when The New York Times published a damning report on Trump's tax returns . The revelations leave Tr
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Pandemic condemns 38m to poverty in east Asia, World Bank warns
Lender says governments in the region need to liberalise economies to spark growth
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Coronavirus Deaths Pass One Million Worldwide
Over the past 10 months, the virus has taken more lives than H.I.V., malaria, influenza and cholera. And as it sows destruction in daily life around the globe, it is still growing quickly.
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The Arctic is burning in a whole new way
'Zombie fires' and burning of fire-resistant vegetation are new features driving Arctic fires — with strong consequences for the global climate — warn international fire scientists.
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Disastrous duo: Heatwaves and droughts
Simultaneous heatwaves and droughts are becoming increasingly common in western parts of the Unites States, according to a new study. Periods of dry and hot weather, which can make wildfires more likely, are becoming larger, more intense, and more frequent because of climate change.
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Climate change threatens breeding birds
Surviving on a warming planet can be a matter of timing — but simply shifting lifecycle stages to match the tempo of climate change has hidden dangers for some animals, according to new research. The study has uncovered drastic consequences for birds that are breeding earlier in lockstep with earlier starts of spring: chicks hatching earlier face increased risk of poor weather conditions, food sh
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How the brain balances emotion and reason
Navigating through life requires balancing emotion and reason, a feat accomplished by the brain region 'area 32' of the anterior cingulate cortex. The area maintains emotional equilibrium by relaying information between cognitive and emotional brain regions, according to new research.
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The testimony of trees: How volcanic eruptions shaped 2000 years of world history
Researchers have shown that over the past two thousand years, volcanoes have played a larger role in natural temperature variability than previously thought, and their climatic effects may have contributed to past societal and economic change.
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Dinosaurs Got Cancer, Too
Researchers seeking evidence for cancer in dinosaurs found it in a collection of bones at a paleontology museum in Alberta. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dinosaurs Got Cancer, Too
Researchers seeking evidence for cancer in dinosaurs found it in a collection of bones at a paleontology museum in Alberta.
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Dinosaurs Got Cancer, Too
Researchers seeking evidence for cancer in dinosaurs found it in a collection of bones at a paleontology museum in Alberta. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ancient Adélie penguin colony revealed by snowmelt at Cape Irizar, Ross Sea, Antarctica
Researchers encountered a puzzle at Cape Irizar, a rocky cape located just south of the Drygalski Ice Tongue on the Scott Coast, Ross Sea. He found both ancient and what appeared to be fresh remains of Adelie penguins, mostly of chicks, which frequently die and accumulate at these colonies. However, the 'fresh' remains were puzzling, he says, because there are no records of an active penguin colon
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Study links rising stress, depression in U.S. to pandemic-related losses, media consumption
Experiencing multiple stressors triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic — such as unemployment — and COVID-19-related media consumption are directly linked to rising acute stress and depressive symptoms across the United States, according to a new study.
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Landslides: long-term effects on tundra vegetation
Landslides have long-term effects on tundra vegetation, a new study shows. Conducting the study in North West Siberia, the researchers found that tundra vegetation regenerated rapidly after a major landslide event in 1989.
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Gasledning til Lolland kan ikke betale sig – men Energinet vil bygge den alligevel
PLUS. Energinet har bedt klimaministeren om lov til at bygge gasledning til Lolland-Falster, selvom samfundsøkonomien er negativ i to ud af tre tilfælde. Energiprofessor er rystet, og analytiker savner gedigne beregninger.
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Heating in vaping device as cause for lung injury, study shows
Early results of an experimental vaping study have shown significant lung injury from e-cigarette devices with nickel-chromium alloy heating elements.
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Pandemic sets off future wave of worsening mental health issues
Long after a COVID-19 vaccination is developed and years after the coronavirus death toll is tallied, the impact on mental health will linger, continuing to inflict damage if not addressed, according to new research.
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Strong activation of anti-bacterial T cells linked to severe COVID-19
A type of anti-bacterial T cells, so-called MAIT cells, are strongly activated in people with moderate to severe COVID-19 disease, according to a new study.
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The water-saving device wasting billions of litres every week
Low flush toilets often waste more water than they save due to poor engineering and confusing buttons.
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'Unprecedented' Wildfire Season Threatens California's Wine Region
The fires, which have scorched nearly 6,000 square miles in California, now threaten to tear through communities in the state's picturesque wine country, forcing thousands to evacuate. (Image credit: Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
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Trump Announces Plan to Ship 150 Million Rapid Coronavirus Tests
Governors of both parties welcomed the plan, but some health experts noted limitations of the kits made by Abbott Laboratories.
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The Coronavirus Mostly Spares Younger Children. Teens Aren't So Lucky.
Younger children are about half as likely as older teenagers and adults to become infected, new studies suggest.
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Salty ponds may be under Mars' icy surface, raising prospect of Martian life
Italian scientists provide further evidence of underground lake and smaller bodies of water in study A network of salty ponds may be gurgling beneath Mars' south pole alongside a large underground lake, raising the prospect of tiny, swimming Martian life. Italian scientists reported their findings Monday, two years after identifying what they believed to be a large buried lake. They widened their
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New drug targeting DNA repair shows promise in range of advanced cancers
A new precision drug which stops cancer from repairing its DNA has shown promise in an early-stage clinical trial – highlighting the potential of a new class of drugs known as ATR inhibitors.
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The Lancet: Radiotherapy following prostate cancer surgery can safely be avoided for many men
Most men receiving surgery for localised and locally advanced prostate cancer can have radiotherapy safely removed from their initial treatment, according to a systematic review and meta-analysis published in The Lancet.
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Author Correction: Pivotal role of CD103 in the development of psoriasiform dermatitis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 29 September 2020; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-71156-x
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Landau Genius Scale ranking of the smartest physicists ever
Nobel-Prize-winning Soviet physicist Lev Landau used a scale to rank the best physicists of the 20th century. The physicist based it on their level of contribution to science. The scale was logarithmic, with each level being 10 times more valuable. Lev Landau (1908-1968) was one of Soviet Union's best physicists. He made contributions to nuclear theory, quantum field theory, and astrophysics, amo
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New interactive tool will help farmers contain the spread of clubroot
'ClubrootTracker is an interactive tool that will help farmers locate clubroot-infected areas and can be used by farmers, researchers, and industry and government representatives to share the clubroot status of their land,' explained Edel Pérez-López, one of the plant pathologists involved in the development of this tool. 'We believe that the ClubrootTracker will be a gamechanger on the management
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ASU study finds association between screen time use, diet and other health factors
In a study recently published in BMC Public Health, Arizona State University researchers found that heavy users of screens — defined as those who use screens an average of 17.5 hours per day — reported the least healthful dietary patterns and the poorest health-related characteristics compared with moderate and light users, who averaged roughly 11.3 and 7 hours of screen use per day, respectivel
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