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The Pandemic's Wrongest Man
The pandemic has made fools of many forecasters. Just about all of the predictions whiffed . Anthony Fauci was wrong about masks . California was wrong about the outdoors . New York was wrong about the subways . I was wrong about the necessary cost of pandemic relief . And the Trump White House was wrong about almost everything else . In this crowded field of wrongness, one voice stands out. The
6h
The Strange New Doctrine of the Republican Party
In 2002, the Weyerhaeuser paper mill in Valliant, Oklahoma, faced a drug problem. Managers at the mill in the small town, just north of the Texas line, brought contraband-sniffing dogs into the parking lot to identify suspect cars. The dogs pointed out a number of vehicles. When the cars were opened, the contraband inside was not drugs. It was guns. A dozen employees lost their job. The firing tr
5h
Vaccinated People Don't Appear to Spread COVID, and That's Incredible News
According to new research by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, front liners who have been fully vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccines produced by Moderna and Pfizer no longer carry the virus and show an extremely reduced risk of infection. "We're vaccinating so very fast, our data from the CDC today suggests that vaccinated people do not carry the virus, don't get sick, and that it'
1h
NASA's Roman mission predicted to find 100,000 transiting planets
NASA's Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope will create enormous cosmic panoramas, helping us answer questions about the evolution of our universe. Astronomers also expect the mission to find thousands of planets using two different techniques as it surveys a wide range of stars in the Milky Way.
4h
Climate change cut global agricultural productivity 21% since 1960s
The University of Maryland (UMD) has collaborated with Cornell University and Stanford University to quantify the man-made effects of climate change on global agricultural productivity growth for the first time. In a new study published in Nature Climate Change, researchers developed a robust model of weather effects on productivity, looking at productivity in both the presence and absence of clim
1h
The Mets Are Losers
T he sight of Ray Knight rounding third base with the winning run of Game 6 in the 1986 World Series against the Boston Red Sox—completing a two-run, two-out, two-strike comeback in the bottom of the tenth inning—was the greatest moment of my life, and I have two kids. I will cherish the memories of my sweet, gorgeous, magical children drawing their first breaths until the day I draw my last. I'l
4h
The Hidden Toll of Remote Work
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. A t the end of January, I went back to teaching my students in person for the first time in 10 months. It was only two days a week, and an hour and a half at a time. We were all avoiding contact and wearing masks, so normal human interaction was almost nonexistent. But for me, it was like spr
6h
People Are Throwing Eggs at Google's Self-Driving Vans
Splat! In and around Phoenix Arizona, Waymo's self-driving vehicles still aren't exactly popular. The autonomous vehicle (AV) developer, owned by Google parent company Alphabet, has been using Phoenix as its testing grounds for years now — where the self-driving minivans have been the subject of eggings, shouting matches, and other spats with locals, the Phoenix New Times reports . Maybe it's jus
1h
Microsoft Is Selling $21.9 Billion of AR Headsets to the US Army
HoloLens Army Microsoft has been awarded a massive contract to supply the US Army with more than 120,000 augmented reality headsets, MSNBC reports . The contract, amounting to about $21.88 billion over ten years, follows a 2018 contract to build prototypes of the Army's Integrated Visual Augmented System (IVAS). The new contract will involve building working production versions of the system — a
1h
Global warming causes uneven changes in heat stress indicators
As the planet warms under the effects of human-caused climate change, prolonged periods of high temperatures are projected to become a significant public health challenge. The elderly are often more susceptible than others to the effects of temperature extremes, so the aging population worldwide may exacerbate this trend. To quantify the level of danger posed by particular weather conditions, rese
2h
Soil moisture drives year-to-year change in land carbon uptake
Earth's land ecosystems absorb a large portion of all the carbon dioxide emissions produced by human activities, helping to slow global warming. On average for a given year, plants and soil take up, or fix, about 30 percent of human emissions. But from one year to the next, that number can be as high as 40 percent or as low as 20 percent. Climate scientists aim to pin down exactly what produces th
3h
Researchers develop third and final 'made-to-order' nanotube synthesis technique
The current method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes—in essence rolled up sheets of graphene—is unable to allow complete control over their diameter, length and type. This problem has recently been solved for two of the three different types of nanotubes, but the third type, known as 'zigzag' nanotubes, had remained out of reach. Researchers with Japan's National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NI
1h
Amid the Pandemic, a Foray With Fungi Transformed Me
Last summer, when pandemic stress made my local urban woods more comforting than ever, I noticed many species of mushrooms in the understory. So began a self-directed deep-dive that would unearth lessons not only about mycology but about living through one of humanity's most trying times in recent memory.
6h
Error-riddled data sets are warping our sense of how good AI really is
The 10 most cited AI data sets are riddled with label errors, according to a new study out of MIT , and it's distorting our understanding of the field's progress. Data backbone: Data sets are the backbone of AI research, but some are more critical than others. There are a core set of them that researchers use to evaluate machine-learning models as a way to track how AI capabilities are advancing
1h
Challenging perspectives on magma chambers with new findings
Magma chambers are large bodies of molten rock located several kilometers below Earth's surface. They are difficult to study in real-time because of their vast distances from the surface of Earth. Geologists examine the igneous rocks that form when these magma chambers cool and eventually become exposed at Earth's surface due to the forces of erosion, to understand the processes that occurred with
2h
A Computer Scientist Who Tackles Inequality Through Algorithms
When Rediet Abebe arrived at Harvard University as an undergraduate in 2009, she planned to study mathematics. But her experiences with the Cambridge public schools soon changed her plans. Abebe, 29, is from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia's capital and largest city. When residents there didn't have the resources they needed, she attributed it to community-level scarcity. But she found that argument unconv
2h
From dinner to sustainable electronics, the surprising versatility of crabs
As the worldwide demand for electronic devices continues to grow, so too does the strain on the finite resources used in their production, such as metals and fossil fuels. In an effort to provide renewable alternatives, researchers from Osaka University have developed a nanocarbon material for electronics applications made from chitin derived from crab shells. Their findings were published in Jour
3h
Century-old problem solved with 3D atomic imaging of an amorphous solid
For more than a century, an important class of matter — the amorphous solid — has eluded scientists' ability to depict nature at the level of atoms and molecules. Until now. A new study reports the first-ever determination of an amorphous solid's three-dimensional atomic structure. Amorphous solids are all around us, and include glass, rubber and plastics. The new research could lead to discover
2h
D-vitamin skyddar mot luftvägsinfektioner
D-vitamintillskott kan skydda mot luftvägsinfektioner, men det gäller framför allt riskgrupper: – Friska personer blir inte ännu friskare av D-vitamin, säger forskaren Peter Bergman. Frågan om D-vitamin kan minska risken för infektioner är omdiskuterad. För fyra år sedan publicerades en sammanställning av aktuell forskning som visade att tillskott av D-vitamin kan ge visst skydd mot luftvägsinfek
6h
Risk that the terrestrial carbon sink declines in the future
Climate consequences can in the future become even bigger than thought, because the capacity of the land vegetation to absorb carbon dioxide is likely to decline. This is the conclusion of a large international study with contribution by Umeå University. So far the vegetation has dampened climate change by taking up a significant fraction of carbon dioxide emissions, but it is uncertain if this ef
4h
Smart glass has a bright future
Substituting the inefficient glazing areas of buildings with energy-efficient smart glazing windows has great potential to decrease energy consumption for lighting and temperature control. Harmut Hillmer et al. of the University of Kassel in Germany demonstrate that potential in "MOEMS micromirror arrays in smart windows for daylight steering," a paper published in the inaugural issue of the Journ
6min
New research on Alzheimer's Disease shows 'lifestyle origin at least in some degree'
A new study in journal Alzheimer's & Dementia finds novel cellular-level support for an alternate theory that is growing in strength: Alzheimer's could actually be a result of metabolic dysfunction in the brain. "Alzheimer's Disease is increasingly being referred to as insulin resistance of the brain or Type 3 Diabetes," said senior study author Benjamin Bikman, a professor of physiology and devel
6min
Diet and exercise may increase efficacy of chemotherapy for children with cancer
New research published today in the journal Blood Advances is the first to show that restricting calories, reducing fat and sugar intake, and increasing physical activity may boost the effectiveness of chemotherapy for older children and adolescents with leukemia. This intervention, which improved chemotherapy outcomes for children being treated at two institutions, will be further studied through
6min
NASA's InSight detects two sizable quakes on Mars
NASA's InSight lander has detected two strong, clear quakes originating in a location of Mars called Cerberus Fossae—the same place where two strong quakes were seen earlier in the mission. The new quakes have magnitudes of 3.3 and 3.1; the previous quakes were magnitude 3.6 and 3.5. InSight has recorded over 500 quakes to date, but because of their clear signals, these are four of the best quake
9min
NASA's Europa Clipper builds hardware, moves toward assembly
Europa Clipper, NASA's upcoming flagship mission to the outer solar system, has passed a significant milestone, completing its Critical Design Review. During the review, experts examined the detailed design of the spacecraft to ensure that it is ready to complete construction. The mission is now able to complete hardware fabrication and testing, and move toward the assembly and testing of the spac
9min
NASA OSIRIS-REx's final asteroid observation run
NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission is on the brink of discovering the extent of the mess it made on asteroid Bennu's surface during last fall's sample collection event. On Apr. 7, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will get one last close encounter with Bennu as it performs a final flyover to capture images of the asteroid's surface.
21min
Disrupted biochemical pathway in the brain linked to bipolar disorder
In new research, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found for the first time that disruptions to a particular protein called Akt can lead to the brain changes characteristic of bipolar disorder. The results offer a foundation for research into treating the often-overlooked cognitive impairments of bipolar disorder, such as memory loss, and add to a growing understanding of how
21min
Study detects lottery-like behavior in cryptocurrency market
Recent research from the University of Vaasa and the University of Jyväskyla shows that speculation and lottery-like behavior is a fundamental factor for the pricing of cryptocurrencies. Speculation could explain the enormous increase in the market capitalizations of cryptocurrencies.
22min
Rain, caves, and miracles: New study connects weather to ancient tales
Ancient climate patterns can be determined by examining the ratios of various isotopes. Isotopic signatures found in Italian cave stalagmites suggest that the Sixth Century was wetter than usual. The study provides a partial explanation for the origin of stories about saints performing water miracles. Ancient and near ancient records are often less than trustworthy. Even if you ignore the parts w
39min
Landslides: New early warning systems reduce false alarms
Many slopes in the Campania region of Italy are covered with layers of volcanic soil, the result of repeated eruptions over the course of millennia. As the impacts of climate change worsen, including the occurrence of very intense and short rainfall in localized areas, there is a growing need, especially in this and other Italian regions that are vulnerable to landslides, to understand the dynamic
40min
Spin-to-charge conversion achieves 95% overall qubit readout fidelity
A team led by Professor Du Jiangfeng and Professor Wang Ya from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) Key Laboratory of Microscale Magnetic Resonance of the University of Science and Technology of China put forward an innovative spin-to-charge conversion method to achieve high-fidelity readout of qubits, stepping closer towards fault-tolerant quantum computing.
40min
Keeping it fresh: New AI-based strategy can assess the freshness of beef samples
Although beef is one of the most consumed foods around the world, eating it when it's past its prime is not only unsavory, but also poses some serious health risks. Unfortunately, available methods to check for beef freshness have various disadvantages that keep them from being useful to the public. For example, chemical analysis or microbial population evaluations take too much time and require t
40min
U of A team identifies protein that blocks body's ability to clear bad cholesterol
A team of researchers at the University of Alberta has uncovered a long-sought link in the battle to control cholesterol and heart disease. The protein that interferes with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors that clear "bad" cholesterol from the blood was identified in findings recently published in Nature Communications. Excess LDL cholesterol can lead to atherosclerosis — a narrowing and h
42min
Microsoft Wins $21.9 Billion Contract to Supply AR Headsets to the US Army
Microsoft has won a contract with the US Army to provide augmented reality headsets suitable for battlefield conditions. The Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS) will be derived from Microsoft's HoloLens technology and augmented by a backend built on Microsoft Azure. This deal builds on a previous $480M agreement between Microsoft and the Army, and the $21.9 billion figure represents a be
49min
Monkeys experience the visual world just like we do
New research makes the case that one non-human species—the rhesus macaque—has a conscious awareness of the world around it that mirrors the human experience. Scientists and philosophers have asked whether humans are the only species that experiences the world consciously for millennia, yet finding answers—or even appropriate ways to ask the question—has proved elusive. Now researchers have devise
1h
Mimes help us 'see' objects that don't exist
When we watch a mime seemingly pull rope, climb steps or try to escape that infernal box, we don't struggle to recognize the implied objects — our minds automatically "see" them, a new study concludes.To explore how the mind processes the objects mimes seem to interact with, Johns Hopkins University cognitive scientists brought the art of miming into the lab, concluding that invisible, implied su
1h
Potential new treatment strategy for breast cancer cells that have spread to the brain
Access to fat is more limited in brain tissue than in other tissues in the body, and breast cancer cells that spread to the brain must increase their production of fatty acids, the building blocks of fat. In mice, blocking such cells' ability to synthesize fatty acids reduced breast tumor growth in the brain. The findings may be helpful for designing new treatments for patients whose cancer has sp
1h
UMD helps quantify how climate change has slowed global agricultural productivity growth
The University of Maryland (UMD) collaborated to quantify the man-made effects of climate change on global agricultural productivity growth for the first time. Results indicate a 21% reduction in global agricultural productivity since 1961, equivalent to completely losing the last 7 years of productivity growth. This work suggests that global agriculture is becoming more vulnerable to ongoing clim
1h
Replacing what was lost: A novel cell therapy for type I diabetes mellitus
Researchers from The University of Tokyo developed a novel device for the safe and effective transplantation of human pancreatic beta-cells in type I diabetes mellitus (T1D). By constructing a millimeter-thick graft encapsulating beta-cells and transplanting it in diabetic mice, they were able to show that the device was removable for up to 1 year and without a significant foreign body response. T
1h
African elephants' range is just 17% of what it could be, study finds
A study reported in the journal Current Biology on April 1 has both good news and bad news for the future of African elephants. While about 18 million square kilometers of Africa–an area bigger than the whole of Russia–still has suitable habitat for elephants, the actual range of African elephants has shrunk to just 17%of what it could be due to human pressure and the killing of elephants for iv
1h
Mysteries in Human RNA
Let's put this one in the category of "more things that we didn't know about human biology". We've known for some time now about ribozymes – catalytic enzyme-like structures made out of RNA instead of proteins. But they've been studied more in lower organisms overall. We know that the hammerhead ribozymes are widely distributed (and were found in human cells in 2010), and RNase P is an RNA that c
1h
Should You Take a Vitamin D Supplement?
Low vitamin D intake is still a public health concern. Despite adding it to certain foods in the U.S. and Canada, getting enough of the sunshine vitamin is still a challenge for many people. Some experts say more must be done.
1h
Towards a better understanding of natural hazard risk and economic losses in Europe
The "Science for Disaster Risk Management 2020: acting today, protecting tomorrow," the second of its series, has been produced with the collaboration of more than 300 experts in disaster risk management. The participants come from different disciplines and sectors to provide the reader with accurate and updated information on the consequences that disasters have on key assets of society (populati
1h
Low risk of researchers passing coronavirus to North American bats
The risk is low that scientists could pass coronavirus to North American bats during winter research, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientists find the overall risk to be 1 in 1,000 if no protective measures are taken, and the risk falls lower, to 1 in 3,333 or less, with proper use of personal protective equipment or if scientists test negative for COVID-19 before be
1h
Pollen season in Switzerland earlier and more intense due to climate change
Pollen from trees, grasses and weeds are causing seasonal allergies for approximately one fifth of the Swiss population every year. A study now found that due to climate change, the pollen season has shifted substantially over the past 30 years in onset, duration and intensity. "For at least four allergenic species, the tree pollen season now starts earlier than 30 years ago—sometimes even before
1h
Titanium dioxide stars in research at Cracow synchrotron
Few compounds are as important to industry and medicine today as titanium dioxide. Despite the variety and popularity of its applications, many issues related to the surface structure of materials made of this compound and the processes taking place therein remain unclear. Some of these secrets have just been revealed to scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sci
1h
Scientists observe role of cavitation in glass fracturing
Glassy materials play an integral role in the modern world, but inherent brittleness has long been the Achilles' heel that severely limits their usefulness. Due to the disordered amorphous structure of glassy materials, many mysteries remain. These include the fracture mechanisms of traditional glasses, such as silicate glasses, as well as the origin of the intriguing patterned fracture morphologi
1h
Evaluating HPV self-sampling
A study led by Queen Mary University of London researchers has compared the performance and acceptability of a urine test and four different vaginal self-sampling collection devices to detect high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV).
1h
The Atlantic Daily: The Vaccines Have Revived Small Talk
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Everyone's talking about vaccines—getting them, wanting them, waiting for them, comparing them, and feeling their side effects. The shots offer Americans life-saving immunity during the fourth sur
1h
The Championship Final | Street Outlaws: Mega Cash Days
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: Mega Cash Days: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-mega-cash-days Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-mega-cash-days Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: http
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Titanium dioxide stars in the first IFJ PAN research at the Cracow synchrotron
Few compounds are as important to industry and medicine today as titanium dioxide. Despite the variety and popularity of its applications, many issues related to the surface structure of materials made of this compound and the processes taking place therein remain unclear. Some of these secrets have just been revealed to scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sci
2h
3D design leads to first stable and strong self-assembling 1D nanographene wires
Nanographene is flexible, yet stronger than steel. With unique physical and electronic properties, the material consists of carbon molecules only one atom thick arranged in a honeycomb shape. Still early in technological development, current fabrication methods require the addition of substituents to obtain a uniform material. Additive-free methods result in flimsy, breakable fibers—until now.
2h
See whether Hgh Health supplements
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2h
Heart disease is killing young women at higher rates
Women younger than 65 are dying from heart disease at an increased rate compared with past years, according to a new study. That may not come as a surprise. It's no secret that women tend to put the health of others before their own, especially those who must care for children, manage a household, work full time, and shoulder other responsibilities. "Young women in the United States are becoming
2h
Optimized joining technology is opening the door to the safe use of hydrogen in the aviation industry
Eco-friendly flying is on the horizon. All over the world, researchers are developing new technologies to achieve this goal. One focus of developments is the idea of using hydrogen-powered engines for aircraft in the future. The aircraft companies, though, face the challenge of storing this energy source. Hydrogen turns liquid when cooled to minus 253 degrees Celsius, and only then can it be used
2h
The US Just Set Ambitious Offshore Wind Power Targets. What Will It Take to Meet Them?
The United States' offshore wind industry is tiny, with just seven wind turbines operating off Rhode Island and Virginia . The few attempts to build large-scale wind farms like Europe's have run into long delays, but that may be about to change. The Biden administration announced on March 29, 2021, that it would accelerate the federal review process for offshore wind projects and provide more fun
2h
Radio wave energy powers wearable devices
Researchers have figured out how to harvest energy from radio waves to power wearable devices. From microwave ovens to Wi-Fi connections, the radio waves in the environment are not just used signals of energy but also sources of energy themselves. Current energy sources for wearable health-monitoring devices have their place powering sensor devices, but each has its setbacks, says Huanyu "Larry"
2h
NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover Beams Back Stunning Selfie
NASA's shiny new Perseverance rover has been stealing the spotlight lately, but Curiosity is still on Mars, too. This aging robot is still young and hip enough to take a selfie — hell, Curiosity pioneered the rover selfie. The latest snapshot features the rover posing in front of a large rock outcrop the team has dubbed "Mont Mercou," after a French mountain. Mont Mercou is far from a mountain, b
2h
Gut microbiota in cesarean-born babies catches up
Infants born by cesarean section have a relatively meager array of bacteria in the gut. But by the age of three to five years they are broadly in line with their peers. This is shown by a study that also shows that it takes a remarkably long time for the mature intestinal microbiota to get established.
2h
Large study identified new genetic link to male infertility
Researchers from the University of Tartu (Estonia) and the Wellcome Sanger Institute (UK) carried out the largest and most exhaustive genetic study to date looking at Y-chromosome-linked infertility in men. Analysing the DNA of patients with spermatogenic impairment at the Andrology Centre of Tartu University Hospital, researchers found a previously undescribed subtype of the Y chromosome, which,
2h
cientists observe role of cavitation in glass fracturing
Dr. SHEN Laiquan, Prof. BAI Haiyang, Prof. SUN Baoan, and others from Prof. WANG Weihua's group at the Institute of Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have successfully observed the effect of cavitation on fracture behavior in glasses. They revealed that crack propagation is dominated by the self-organized nucleation, growth, and coalescence of nanocavities in metallic glasses.
2h
Multilingual people have an advantage over those fluent in only two languages
Multilingual people have trained their brains to learn languages, making it easier to acquire more new languages after mastering a second or third. In addition to demystifying the seemingly herculean genius of multilinguals, researchers say these results provide some of the first neuroscientific evidence that language skills are additive, a theory known as the cumulative?enhancement model of langu
2h
Poor judgment of autistic adults
Autistic adults can be wrongly perceived as deceptive and lacking credibility, Flinders University researchers say, with this working against many caught in the legal system. Ahead of World Autism Awareness Day (2 April 2021), a new paper in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders asked 1,410 civilians to respond to video recordings with 30 adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and
2h
HKBU-led research reveals hyocholic acids are promising agents for diabetes prediction and treatment
A series of studies led by researchers from Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have revealed that hyocholic acid and its derivatives (collectively known as HCAs), a component of bile acids that facilitate fat digestion, are a promising risk indicator of type 2 diabetes. The strong efficacy of HCAs in regulating blood glucose levels and protecting against diabetes has also been uncovered. The find
2h
Cohesive circuit protection for wearable electronics
Researchers from Osaka University achieved cohesive circuit protection for wearable electronics. Even bending a coated electrode 300 times over the course of an hour underwater doesn't hinder performance. This development will revolutionize use of flexible electronics in everyday and possibly medical applications.
2h
Wildfire's devastation can linger long after the smoke has cleared
In a paper published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers at UC Berkeley and UC Hastings describe some of these long-term and often overlooked effects of wildfires, which can range from housing shortages and unemployment to mental health conditions that don't surface until months or years after the final flames are extinguished. The study's findings were compiled from interviews with 21 health and
2h
Did racism kill Jackie Robinson?
Baseball great Jackie Robinson was a living, breathing example of athleticism and apparent good health, playing four sports at UCLA and becoming the first Black man to play in major league baseball.
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Connecting history with the present moment through public seminar series
In spring 2020, as people all over the world confronted the daily reality of living through the COVID-19 pandemic, many wondered how previous generations of humans navigated similar crises. At MIT, an interdisciplinary team of humanistic faculty decided to explore this question in a course that broke ground as a live, free MIT class, held in an open public webinar format so that anyone who wanted
2h
Endangered vultures in southeastern Europe largely threatened due to human activity
Contrary to popular belief, the number of Egyptian vultures dying in Eastern Europe and the Middle East is greater than in sub-Saharan Africa; and half of these disappear due to threats of human origin: electrocution, collision with energy infrastructures, direct persecution or poisoning. This is shown in an article published in the Journal of Animal Ecology with the participation of the Cavanille
3h
Immunsvaret vid covid-19 – vad vet vi?
En del märker knappt att de haft sjukdomen, andra får märkliga symtom. Ytterligare en del blir så svårt sjuka att de måste få intensivvård – och en del avlider. Varför slår covid-19 så olika och vad händer i kroppen när vi infekteras av viruset?
3h
Plasma jets stabilize water to splash less
A study by KAIST researchers revealed that an ionized gas jet blowing onto water, also known as a 'plasma jet," produces a more stable interaction with the water's surface compared to a neutral gas jet. This finding reported in the April 1 issue of Nature will help improve the scientific understanding of plasma-liquid interactions and their practical applications in a wide range of industrial fiel
3h
Seen from space, Iceland's new volcano lights up the island at night
You've probably seen stunning images of the night side of the Earth from space. Most people have seen the veritable constellations of city lights scattered familiarly across the continents, separated by wide oceans of darkness. You very well may have seen some stunning videos from the ISS showing the dynamic and mesmerizing ribbons of the polar aurorae and the even more frenetic flashes of nightti
3h
Learning from below: A micro-ethnographic account of children's self-determination
At a West Coast-based after-school making/tinkering program, educators gathered participating kindergarten-5th grade students together at the beginning of each session, gave them instructions for the day's work, and then let them work independently or in small groups to complete science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM) activities.
3h
Inclusion improves life for people with dementia in assisted living
Assisted living communities can improve the quality of life for people with dementia when they treat them as individuals and try to include everyone in activities, according to a new study. Typical "activity programming" at many assisted living residences can leave people with dementia on the sidelines, the study finds. The researchers report that keys to improving quality of life for residents w
3h
Researchers pave the way for calculating circular dichroism spectra more efficiently
Members of the CEST group published a recent paper introducing a novel method to calculate CD spectra in the open source GPAW code. The publication shows that the implemented approach is more efficient than the commonly used linear-response method and can easily calculate CD spectra of nanoscale systems, such as hybrid silver clusters composed of over 1000 atoms.
4h
New Los Alamos technology detects thermal neutrons in aircraft
A new technology developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and Honeywell is providing needed atmospheric environment information to the aerospace industry. The device, called TinMan, has quantified the number of thermal neutrons, particles created by natural solar radiation—giving the aerospace industry a standard by which it can evaluate its semiconductor parts.
4h
EM Drive Failure
There are many times as a skeptic that I wish I were wrong. I really want to detect an alien artifact, and would love free energy, cold fusion, and a cure for cancer. I completely understand why these ideas have endless allure and the temptation to engage in a small bit of motivated reasoning to see the science from a particular, if odd, angle. But science does not progress this way. It progresse
4h
New insights into the formation of bulk metallic glasses
With the ability to produce metallic glass in bulk quantities, the distinct mechanical behavior of these materials has opened up new application opportunities. However, the poor room temperature plasticity of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) impedes many engineering applications. Because of that, it's critical to better understand their plastic deformation and flow mechanism.
4h
Get a Lifetime Subscription to the World's Top-Reviewed Language App for 60% Off
While our devices are getting smarter about translating between languages, even using our voices , learning a language still has profound benefits for your mind, career, and personal growth. It's never been a better time to learn a new language, and a lifetime subscription to top-rated language learning app Babbel is just $199, 60% off the MSRP. First arriving in 2007, Babbel has consistently bee
5h
Tarmfloran hos barn födda med kejsarsnitt mognar med tiden
Barn som föds med kejsarsnitt har en torftigare uppsättning bakterier i tarmen, men vid 3-5 års ålder är de i stort sett i kapp sina jämnåriga. Det framgår av en studie som också visar att det tar påfallande lång tid att etablera en mogen tarmmikrobiota. Forskarna har tidigare påvisat att sammansättningen av barns tarmmikrobiota påverkas av hur de föds, och vad de äter. I den aktuella studien har
6h
Nickel isotopes link Siberian Traps aerosol particles to the end-Permian mass extinction
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22066-7 The end-Permian mass extinction was the most severe extinction event in the past 540 million years, and the Siberian Traps large igneous province is widely hypothesized to have been the primary trigger for the environmental catastrophe. In this study, Ni isotopes provide the link between Siberian Traps magmatis
6h
Low-temperature nucleation anomaly in silicate glasses shown to be artifact in a 5BaO·8SiO2 glass
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22161-9 The breakdown of classical nucleation theory at low temperatures for silicate glasses has been a puzzle for decades. Here, Xia et al. show with a long-term experiment for the specific case of a barium-silicate glass that this anomaly is in fact an artifact arising from insufficient heating time.
6h
Long- and short-ranged chiral interactions in DNA-assembled plasmonic chains
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22289-8 Here, the authors experimentally demonstrate chiral transfer over large distances up to 100 nm. They realise the coupling with an achiral nanosphere situated between a pair of distant gold nanorods arranged in a chiral fashion using DNA origami, and observe enhanced circular dichroism signals.
6h
Loss of microglial SIRPα promotes synaptic pruning in preclinical models of neurodegeneration
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22301-1 Microglial SIRPα regulates synaptic pruning during development. Its role in neurodegeneration is unclear. Here, the authors show microglial SIRPα declines in the model of Alzheimer's disease, leading to excessive microglia mediated synapse elimination as well as impaired cognitive function.
6h
Detecting local genetic correlations with scan statistics
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22334-6 Genetic correlation analyses give insight on complex disease, yet are limited by oversimplification. Here, the authors present LOGODetect, a method using summary statistics from genome-wide association studies to identify genomic regions with correlation signals across multiple phenotypes.
6h
High-throughput fitness screening and transcriptomics identify a role for a type IV secretion system in the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease-associated Escherichia coli
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22306-w Adherent-invasive E. coli (AIEC) are frequently isolated from Crohn's disease (CD) patients. Here, Elhenawy et al. conduct a genome-wide screen to identify AIEC genes required for in vivo intestinal colonization, and show that a type IV secretion system contributes to AIEC persistence in the gut and is enriched
6h
A polymer controlled nucleation route towards the generalized growth of organic-inorganic perovskite single crystals
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22193-1 Research into single crystal organic-inorganic halide perovskites have gained momentum due to the potential applications, yet the growth is still a challenge. Here, the authors demonstrate a universal method based on polymer controlled nucleation process to achieve large-size and high-quality perovskite single
6h

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