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Vaccine Cheat Days Are Adding Up
A few weeks ago, my partially vaccinated partner and my wholly unvaccinated self got an invitation to a group dinner, held unmasked and indoors. There'd be Thai food for 10, we were promised, and two über-immunized hosts, more than two weeks out from their last Moderna doses. And what about everyone else? I asked. Would they be fully vaccinated, too? Well , came the response. Not really. Some wou
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The Brexit elite cannot hope to fool us for much longer | William Keegan
Exiting the EU was not good for Britain. Greed did not bring us the vaccine. Johnson's narratives will not stand the light of day There can be few people who have not at some stage in their lives felt that they had been "taken for a ride" or conned. Yet that, I think, will be the dawning realisation of a fair proportion of the 37% of the electorate who – without, in most cases, having the faintes
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From housing to vaccine passports, politicians act as if young people don't exist | Zoe Williams
The UK's young have become the pigeons of the public realm, only remarked upon when they leave litter in the park House prices were having a mini-boom by last July, buoyed up by what felt like the windfall of a stamp duty holiday and the pent-up demand of the first lockdown. By the autumn, prices were still climbing, but not to worry, said the experts: they'll crash again when people start to los
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I don't blame colleagues for leaving the NHS: the government has betrayed them | Samantha Batt-Rawden
I thought this crisis had shown who the key workers of the UK were. So why are things now getting worse for us? Dr Samantha Batt-Rawden is president of the Doctors' Association UK and a senior registrar in intensive care medicine. It's 4am and resus looks like a bomb has hit it. We have had to open almost every piece of kit available to keep the patient in front of us alive. Wearily, I register t
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New Russian Weapon Is Designed to Unleash "Radioactive Tsunamis"
Testing Grounds Russia appears to have developed a nuclear weapon capable of sneaking along the bottom of the sea and detonating along the coastline to flood the area with what one official described as "radioactive tsunamis." The nuclear weapon, called the Poseidon 2M39 torpedo, has experts concerned, CNN reports , as the radioactive waves could potentially devastate coastal cities and render hu
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Hubble spots double quasars in merging galaxies
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope is "seeing double." Peering back 10 billion years into the universe's past, Hubble astronomers found a pair of quasars that are so close to each other they look like a single object in ground-based telescopic photos, but not in Hubble's crisp view.
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Model reveals surprising disconnect between physical characteristics and genetic ancestry in certain populations
A new study by Stanford University biologists finds an explanation for the idea that physical characteristics such as skin pigmentation are "only skin deep." Using genetic modeling, the team has found that when two populations with distinct traits combine over generations, traits of individuals within the resulting "admixed" population come to reveal very little about individuals' ancestry. Their
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A diversity of wildlife is good for our health
A growing body of evidence suggests that biodiversity loss increases our exposure to both new and established zoonotic pathogens. Restoring and protecting nature is essential to preventing future pandemics. So reports a new Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) paper that synthesizes current understanding about how biodiversity affects human health and provides recommendations for
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Female sheep found to prefer less dominant males when mating
A team of researchers from Universidad Autónoma del Estrado de Morelos and Universidad de la República, has found that given the choice, female sheep prefer to mate with less domineering males. In their paper published in the journal Applied Animal Behavior Science, the group describe experiments they conducted with male and female sheep and what they learned from them.
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Humans were apex predators for two million years
Researchers at Tel Aviv University were able to reconstruct the nutrition of stone age humans. In a paper published in the Yearbook of the American Physical Anthropology Association, Dr. Miki Ben-Dor and Prof. Ran Barkai of the Jacob M. Alkov Department of Archaeology at Tel Aviv University, together with Raphael Sirtoli of Portugal, show that humans were an apex predator for about two million yea
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Dark Energy Survey physicists open new window into dark energy
The universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, and while no one is sure why, researchers with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) at least had a strategy for figuring it out: They would combine measurements of the distribution of matter, galaxies and galaxy clusters to better understand what's going on.
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Structural biology opens new perspectives for treating psychiatric disorders
Glycine is the smallest amino acid—one of the building blocks of proteins. It acts also as a neurotransmitter in the brain, enabling neurons to communicate with each other and modulating neuronal activity. Many researchers have focused on increasing glycine levels in synapses to find an effective treatment for schizophrenia. This could be done using inhibitors targeting Glycine Transporter 1 (GlyT
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What if 70% of the universe isn't dark energy after all?
Researchers have tested a model that suggests the universe's expansion is due to a dark substance with a kind of magnetic force, not dark energy. Until now, researchers have believed that dark energy accounted for nearly 70% of the ever-accelerating, expanding universe. For many years, this mechanism has been associated with the so-called cosmological constant, which Einstein developed in 1917, w
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Impacts of biodiversity and biodiversity loss on zoonotic diseases [Ecology]
Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases of humans caused by pathogens that are shared between humans and other vertebrate animals. Previously, pristine natural areas with high biodiversity were seen as likely sources of new zoonotic pathogens, suggesting that biodiversity could have negative impacts on human health. At the same time, biodiversity…
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Ranking the risk of animal-to-human spillover for newly discovered viruses [Applied Biological Sciences]
The death toll and economic loss resulting from the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic are stark reminders that we are vulnerable to zoonotic viral threats. Strategies are needed to identify and characterize animal viruses that pose the greatest risk of spillover and spread in humans and inform…
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'Impossible' EmDrive Actually Is Impossible, Comprehensive Test Shows
Humanity has come a long way in understanding the universe. We've got a physical framework that mostly matches our observations, and new technologies have allowed us to analyze the Big Bang and take photos of black holes. But the hypothetical EmDrive rocket engine threatened to upend what we knew about physics… if it worked. After the latest round of testing, we can say with a high degree of cert
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Understanding how cancer can relapse
In the fight against cancers, activating mutations in the RAS family of genes stand in the way of finding viable treatment options. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri and Yale University have discovered that one of these mutations — oncogenic RAS or RASV12 — is also responsible for the regrowth of cancer cells following genotoxic therapy treatment, or drugs that cause damage to a canc
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4E-BP2-dependent translation in parvalbumin neurons controls epileptic seizure threshold [Neuroscience]
The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates multiple signals to regulate critical cellular processes such as mRNA translation, lipid biogenesis, and autophagy. Germline and somatic mutations in mTOR and genes upstream of mTORC1, such as PTEN, TSC1/2, AKT3, PIK3CA, and components of GATOR1 and KICSTOR complexes, are associated…
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Humans were apex predators for two million years, study finds
In a new study, researchers were able to reconstruct the nutrition of stone-age humans. The study's authors collected about 25 lines of evidence from about 400 scientific papers from different scientific disciplines, dealing with the focal question: Were stone-age humans specialized carnivores or were they generalist omnivores?
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NASA Releases Breathtaking Rover Photo of "Rainbow" on Mars
Update 4/6/2021: NASA got back to us with an explanation for the image — we've updated the post below, and you can also read our new story about the agency's explanation right here . There shouldn't be any rainbows on Mars. To get rainbows on Earth, you need both sunlight and raindrops in the sky. The thin Martian atmosphere, however, is far dryer than Earth's, to say the least. That's why a new
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The Urgency of Vaccinating Kids
Kim Hagood hates needles. But as a middle-aged adult with chronic conditions, she got vaccinated against COVID-19 without delay. "I never thought I'd be so excited to get a shot," she told me, giddily, hours before her appointment. A single mother in Trussville, Alabama, Hagood is less certain about vaccinating her 10-year-old son when the time comes. The fact that the mRNA technology in Pfizer's
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World's Deepest Shipwreck Dive Reaches Sunken WWII US Battleship
Four Miles Under The Sea An American exploration team has completed the world's deepest shipwreck dive to a nearly 80-year-old US navy destroyer sunk in WWII. Caladan Oceanic, an undersea tech company based in Texas, has completed two eight-hour dives almost 6,500 meters into the Pacific Ocean off the coast of the Philippines to reach the wreckage of the 115-meter-long battleship the USS Johnson,
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America Never Wanted the Tired, Poor, Huddled Masses
Lucas Dörre This article was published online on April 5, 2021. W hen David Dorado Romo was a boy growing up in El Paso, Texas, his great-aunt Adela told him about the day the U.S. Border Patrol melted her favorite shoes. Romo's aunt was Mexican and had a visa that allowed her to commute into South Texas for her job as a maid. Every week she had to report to a Border Patrol station, in accordance
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Florida Declares State of Emergency Due to Potential Radioactive Material Leak
Imminent And Uncontrolled Florida has declared a state of emergency in Manatee County after officials announced a wastewater pond containing radioactive material is at risk of collapsing. Governor Ron DeSantis issued the state of emergency for the region on Saturday, according to CBS News . Officials at the Manatee County Public Safety Department declared a mandatory evacuation notice for the are
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Research Proves It: There's No Such Thing as Noblesse Oblige
P aul Piff just landed on Park Place. I own it. "Shit," he says. I also own three railroads, a couple of high-rent monopolies, and a smattering of random properties. Piff is low on cash. He's toast. We're playing Monopoly on a sunny pre-pandemic afternoon in Piff's modest office at UC Irvine. The 39-year-old psychology professor is an expert on how differences in wealth and status affect people's
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Blood clot cases 'could dent faith of young women in AstraZeneca'
Experts urge public to go for inoculations as benefits far outweigh potential complications Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health officials are becoming increasingly worried that younger people will reject Covid jabs as concerns about the AstraZeneca vaccine continue to grow. A total of 30 cases of rare blood clots have been linked to the jab in the UK, resulting in
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New Facebook Leak Was So Huge It Included Mark Zuckerberg's Personal Data
Indiscriminate Hacking Back in 2019, hackers stole the personal information of over 533 million Facebook users from around the world. Now that information is available online, according to Insider , and it turns out that it's so expansive that it even includes Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg's personal data . The leaked data appeared on a hacking forum on Saturday. First spotted by Alon
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NASA's Mars Helicopter Is Online and Just Sent Back a Photo
First Color Snap NASA's Mars helicopter, dubbed Ingenuity, is online and just snapped its first color photo over the weekend. The agency's Perseverance rover recently lowered the four-pound rotocopter to fend for itself on the rugged Martian surface. Since then, it's weathered its first chilly night alone in the surrounding Jezero Crater, where temperatures can drop down to -130 degrees Fahrenhei
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Mathematicians Settle Erdős Coloring Conjecture
In the fall of 1972, Vance Faber was a new professor at the University of Colorado. When two influential mathematicians, Paul Erdős and László Lovász, came for a visit, Faber decided to host a tea party. Erdős in particular had an international reputation as an eccentric and energetic researcher, and Faber's colleagues were eager to meet him. "While we were there, like at so many of these tea par
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Could Index Funds Be 'Worse Than Marxism'?
T he stock market has had quite a year. Plenty of cash is sloshing around, the pandemic recession notwithstanding, thanks to loose monetary policy, rampant inequality, crypto-speculation, and helicopter drops of cash. Plenty of bored people are reading market rumors on the internet, pumping and dumping penny stocks, riding GameStop to the moon, and bidding up the price of esoteric currencies and
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Facebook Lets Chinese Government Run Genocide-Denying Ads
Misinformation Platform Facebook employees are raising concerns internally about the company's role in enabling the Chinese government to further persecute its Muslim Uyghur population. The Chinese government has been committing acts of genocide against Uyghurs, forcing them into camps in its Xinjiang region and forcibly sterilizing them — all while paying for ads on Facebook saying that people i
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Your Diet Is Cooking the Planet
What's for dinner? On a planet wracked by rising seas, expanding deserts, withering biodiversity, and hotter temperatures, that's a fraught question to answer. Food production accounts for roughly a quarter of the world's greenhouse-gas emissions, and scientists have found that limiting global warming will be impossible without significant changes to how the world eats . At the same time, climate
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The Forgotten History of the Western Klan
The Ku Klux Klan was on the rise in the spring of 1869. Vigilantes could measure their success that season by the carnage they left behind: marauded homesteads, assaulted politicians, a church burned to the ground. According to a local report, insurance companies considered canceling their policies, "owing to the Ku Klux threats." A school serving students of color was supposedly next on the Klan
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Global rollout of vaccines is no longer a guarantee of victory over Covid-19 | Susan Michie, Chris Bullen, et al
New variants of concern have changed the game, spreading worldwide and threatening to derail pandemic control efforts At the end of 2020, there was a strong hope that high levels of vaccination would see humanity finally gain the upper hand over Sars-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19. In an ideal scenario, the virus would then be contained at very low levels without further societal disruptio
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Report claims watchdog looking into use of AstraZeneca jab for under-30s
Channel 4 News cites sources saying issue being considered, but regulator says no decision made Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK's medicines regulatory body has said that no decision has been made on any regulatory action relating to the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine following reports it is considering restricting use of the vaccine in younger people. Channel 4 Ne
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NASA's Mars Helicopter Survives First Night On Its Own
Bitter Cold NASA's Mars helicopter Ingenuity has officially survived its first night alone after being deployed by the agency's Perseverance rover. It was a bitterly cold night: temperatures can drop to -130 degrees Fahrenheit (-90 Celsius) in the surrounding Jezero Crater, according to NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory — so the fact that the Marscopter has survived its first night is a promising
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Gaming technology recreates 16th-century music in Scottish chapel
Researchers capture how choral music would have sounded in birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots The sounds of an Easter concert performed for James IV in a Scottish chapel have been recreated using gaming technology alongside groundbreaking recording techniques that allow specialists to model how acoustics would have been affected by long-destroyed interior details, such as the curve of an alabaster
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Let Us Now Praise Tiny Ants
Even in the densest human habitations, there are orders of magnitude more ants than there are of us, doing the hard work of making our crumbs disappear.
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Paleontologists Discover Dinosaur With Super Hearing
The One Who Causes Fear Paleontologists have discovered a new dinosaur species in Patagonia that likely had superior hearing abilities over its fellow dinosaurs. Researchers in Argentina dubbed the new species "Llukalkan aliocranianus," according to a press release from the paleontologists . Llukalkan comes from the Mapuche word for "the one who causes fear," while aliocranianus is Latin for "unu
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Perseverance Drops Off Ingenuity Helicopter On Martian Surface
The Final Drop The Ingenuity helicopter has been dropped off on the surface of Mars by the Perseverance rover. NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab announced on Twitter that Ingenuity has successfully touched down on the Martian surface on Saturday, according to CNET . It was the culmination of nearly a week of deployment procedures — not to mention 293 million miles and about seven months of travel from Ea
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Scientists create online games to show risks of AI emotion recognition
Public can try pulling faces to trick the technology, while critics highlight human rights concerns It is a technology that has been frowned upon by ethicists: now researchers are hoping to unmask the reality of emotion recognition systems in an effort to boost public debate. Technology designed to identify human emotions using machine learning algorithms is a huge industry , with claims it could
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My rock'n'roll friendship with Lindy Morrison
She was in the Go-Betweens, Tracey Thorn was in the Marine Girls, their 30-year friendship enhanced both their lives On 31 March 1983, she burst into my dressing room, asking at the top of her voice, " Has anyone here got a lipstick I can borrow? " I looked up to see a tall woman in a Lurex dress, with a mass of blonde hair. Our two bands, Marine Girls and the Go-Betweens , were on the same bill
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Undermining the AstraZeneca jab is a dangerous act of political folly | Robin McKie
Spreading fears over the Oxford vaccine undercuts science and public health It has been a disquieting week for those concerned about the lifting of Covid restrictions. Numbers of cases and deaths may be declining but the news that the AstraZeneca vaccine has been linked to cases of rare blood clots and has been suspended for use in younger people in Germany and the Netherlands is a disturbing dev
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Americanized Diets Linked to "Neurocognitive Dysfunction," Doctors Warn
In some unfortunate medical news, it turns out that eating lots of delicious calorie- or sugar-rich snacks and junk foods can likely lead to neurological and cognitive impairments later in life. A massive literature review by University of Southern California, Los Angeles scientists pulled the results from dozens of mouse studies found that a high-calorie, high-fat diet — dubbed the "Western diet
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Navy Official: Mysterious Drones Are Also Swarming Other Countries' Ships
Drone Swarms Reports of mysterious swarms of drones buzzing US Navy ships in July 2019 have top military officials puzzled. A series of lights appeared to "swarm" a fleet of American destroyers off the coast of Southern California, The Drive reported at the time. The Navy still has no idea what could be behind the lights, which were traveling far too fast to be consumer drones. "No, we have not,"
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Scientists About to Start Testing a Universal Coronavirus Vaccine in Humans
Imagine how differently the past year of our lives would have gone if we already had a vaccine that prevented SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. That's what scientists want to be the case next time a dangerous coronavirus rolls around. Multiple teams of researchers from various institutions are working on universal coronavirus vaccines, New Scientist reports , and clinical experime
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'Woke Capital' Doesn't Exist
Republicans are ready to take on "woke capital." After losing elections for president and U.S. Senate, Georgia Republicans passed a series of restrictions that specifically targets the voting methods used disproportionately by Democratic constituencies during the unusual circumstances of the pandemic. Whether those restrictions will have the desired effect of either placating the conservative bas
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NASA: That's Not a Rainbow We Photographed on Mars
A new image taken by NASA's Perseverance Mars rover shows what appears to be a rainbow . But since there are no rain droplets in the dry Martian atmosphere, it couldn't have been a rainbow as we experience them back on Earth — so what was it? After the image went viral , netizens offered up several possible explanations: it either could have been a "dustbow" caused by dust particles in the air, o
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Researchers develop materials for oral delivery of insulin medication
A revolutionary technology developed within the Trabolsi Research Group at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) could dramatically improve the wellbeing of diabetic patients: an insulin oral delivery system that could replace traditional subcutaneous injections without the side effects caused by frequent injections.
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You Won't Remember the Pandemic the Way You Think You Will
Illustrations by Chloe Scheffe This article was published online on April 6, 2021. M y plague year began on the evening of Wednesday, March 11, 2020, when I was compelled to cancel the Atlanta-to-Denver plane tickets my husband and I had purchased for the next day, for a long visit with our oldest son, daughter-in-law, and small grandson. I was all packed. For the first half of the week, I'd trie
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James Mcallister was a much-loved family man. Did the Christmas mixing confusion cause his death?
In the run-up to Christmas, the government dithered and made last-minute rule changes that left many people baffled. A surge in coronavirus cases soon followed All through the spring of 2020, and into the summer, Michelle Mcallister carefully shielded her husband, James Mcallister. Michelle, 39, who lives in the Wednesfield area of Wolverhampton, was a full-time carer to James, 52. A former used
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NIST demo adds key capability to atom-based radio communications
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and collaborators have demonstrated an atom-based sensor that can determine the direction of an incoming radio signal, another key part for a potential atomic communications system that could be smaller and work better in noisy environments than conventional technology.
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Watch NASA Astronauts Take SpaceX Spacecraft for a Joyride
Port Relocation Four current crew members on the International Space Station took SpaceX's Crew Dragon spacecraft, nicknamed Resilience, for a spin early Monday morning. The team, comprised of NASA astronauts Mike Hopkins, Victor Glover, and Shannon Walker and JAXA astronaut Soichi Noguchi, departed from one docking port of the ISS to relocate to a different dock to prepare for an upcoming new cr
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Hand signals improve video meeting success
Using a simple set of hand signals can improve the experience of online meetings, make groups feel closer to each other and that they are learning and communicating better, finds a new study by UCL researchers.
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The Surprising Comedic Genius of Daniel Kaluuya
Who's afraid of Daniel Kaluuya? According to the actor, that would be the British monarchy. "I'm Black and I'm British," he explained in his opening monologue during last night's Saturday Night Live . "Basically I'm what the Royal Family was worried the baby would look like." That dig at the royals comes just a few weeks after Prince Harry and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex, told Oprah Winfrey that th
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UK's Covid traffic light travel plan too simplistic, say scientists
Idea raises concerns among some scientists who say it could fail to stop new variants entering country Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Potential plans to introduce a traffic light scheme for travel abroad have prompted concerns among scientists that the approach is too simplistic and could fail to prevent new variants from entering the UK. At present, it is illegal t
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'A life-changer': NHS England rolls out five-minute breast cancer treatment
New 'quicker and kinder' treatment combining drugs cuts length of time some patients have to spend in hospital A new breast cancer treatment will cut the amount of time some patients have to spend in hospital from two and a half hours to five minutes. The treatment, called Phesgo, is being rolled out across England by the NHS and will be offered to breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.
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Scientists Race To Develop Next Generation Of COVID Vaccines
The three vaccines available in the U.S. are safe and effective, but not ideal. Now, work is underway to create more convenient and potent vaccines, including a tablet and nasal spray. (Image credit: Government Pharmaceutical Organization of Thailand via Agence France-Presse/Getty Images)
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This High Tech COVID Mask Was Designed by SpaceX's Spacesuit Creator
William "Will.i.am" Adams, rapper and founder of the Black Eyed Peas, is back with another gadget that may or may not be way ahead of its time. His newest creation is a smart facemask. But it isn't just any mask. The " Xupermask ," a collaboration with N95 face mask manufacturer Honeywell, is a mask that arguably has more bells and whistles than sense. It costs $299 and is partly made of silicon
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Canada's Vaccine Mess
By the time you read this, at least a quarter of Americans will have received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. It's a stunning turnaround for a country where a bungled early response, inadequate financial support to keep people home, and a mishmash of mask requirements have led to more than 30 million infections and more than 554,000 deaths. Just north of the border, Canadians—usually so
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Research team discovers use of elasticity to position microplates on curved 2D fluids
A team of polymer science and engineering researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst has demonstrated for the first time that the positions of tiny, flat, solid objects integrated in nanometrically thin membranes—resembling those of biological cells—can be controlled by mechanically varying the elastic forces in the membrane itself. This research milestone is a significant step toward
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Elon Musk Reveals Why Last Starship Prototype Exploded Before Landing
SpaceX's Starship prototype SN11 wasn't long for this world. During its fateful launch last week, the massive spacecraft took off inside a cloud of heavy fog at the company's facilities in Boca Chica, Texas, obscuring its ascent to roughly ten kilometers completely. Several minutes into the flight, SpaceX's official video feeds cut out. Shortly after, a massive explosion could be heard on various
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The Biggest Party of 2021 Is About to Start
A lot can change in 17 years. The last time the cicadas were here, the virus behind the SARS outbreak had finally retreated. George W. Bush was campaigning for his second presidential term, and Myspace had commenced its meteoric rise . Tobey Maguire was still the reigning Spider-Man. The year was 2004, and a roaring mass of red-eyed, black-bodied insects had just mated and died—and left behind bi
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Keir Starmer considers whether to back ministers over Covid certificates
Labour leader must decide if he will support plan some Tory MPs have called 'divisive and discriminatory' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Keir Starmer is weighing up whether to support Covid status certificates in a vote within weeks for which he could lend the government crucial support to pass one of its most controversial coronavirus policies. The Labour leader ha
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A Swiss army knife for genomic data
A good way to find out what a cell is doing—whether it is growing out of control as in cancers, or is under the control of an invading virus, or is simply going about the routine business of a healthy cell—is to look at its gene expression. Though a vast majority of cells in an organism all contain the same genes, how those genes are expressed is what gives rise to different cell types—the differe
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The 'elite controllers' who can naturally suppress HIV
Research into how some HIV-positive people keep the virus at bay promises to yield new treatment possibilities, from vaccines to gene therapies The year was 1998 when Joel Blankson encountered a patient he would never forget. Blankson was working in the HIV clinic at John Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, when an HIV-positive woman in her mid-40s arrived for some routine tests. Blankson gave
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Empathy, compassion, personality, attitudes: can people change?
There is plenty of evidence that empathy can be taught in childhood, but it gets more complicated when it comes to adults, especially when it is forced Can people change? That's the question behind the multibillion-dollar self-help industry , the proliferation of blogs and podcasts that promise to make you a better human, and the ubiquitous and vacuous "inspo" memes. Continue reading…
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Ancient atmospheric oxygen sleuthing with ocean chromium
Found in jewelry, car parts, pigments, and industrial chemical reactions, the metal chromium and its compounds are often employed for their color, finish, and anti-corrosive and catalytic properties. Currently, geoscientists and paleoceanographers from MIT and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) are looking to add another use to that list: as a way to examine chemical shifts in ancient
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UK star count shows drop in light pollution under lockdown
Highest proportion of participants since 2013 saw 30 or more stars in Orion constellation The number of stars visible in the skies above Britain increased in this year's annual count, indicating a lessening of light pollution in lockdown. CPRE, the countryside charity, said 51% of people taking part in its citizen science count in February noted 10 or fewer stars in the Orion constellation , indi
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April Blooms: Spring Is on the Way
Spring started about two weeks ago, and the Northern Hemisphere has begun to warm, with flowers and trees in bloom. Gathered here today, a small collection of images from the past few weeks from North America, Asia, and Europe, of tulips, sunshine, and cherry blossoms—surely signs of warmer days to come.
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New 'quantum' approach helps solve an old problem in materials science
One of the most important classes of problems that all scientists and mathematicians aspire to solve, due to their relevance in both science and real life, are optimization problems. From esoteric computer science puzzles to the more realistic problems of vehicle routing, investment portfolio design, and digital marketing—at the heart of it all lies an optimization problem that needs to be solved.
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Study: Turns Out People Are Sexist To Female Robots Too
"Alexa, what is gender bias?" Researchers have discovered evidence that users are biased towards female AI, believing them to be "more human" than male AI. In a study published in Psychology & Marketing , researchers found that consumers tend to perceive female robots as having more positive human traits such as warmth and emotion than male robots, according to The Academic Times . The researcher
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Amazon Admits It Was Fibbing About the Pee Thing
Sorry Not Sorry Amazon has issued a rare public apology related to its whole creating-a-harmful-and-oppressive-work-environment-that-forces-employees-to-urinate-in-bottles problem — but it wasn't aimed at its workers. After the tech company was caught lying to Rep. Mark Pocan and denying that Amazon workers don't pee in bottles because of how oppressive working conditions are, they admitted that
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Chronic pain sufferers should take exercise, not analgesics, says Nice
Medicines watchdog recommends physical and psychological therapies when treating pain with no known cause People suffering from chronic pain that has no known cause should not be prescribed painkillers, the medicines watchdog has announced, recommending such patients be offered exercise, talking therapies and acupuncture instead. In a major change of pain treatment policy, the National Institute
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NASA's first weather report from Jezero Crater on Mars
The weather often plays a role in our daily plans. You might put on a light jacket when the forecast calls for a cool breeze or delay your travel plans because of an impending storm. NASA engineers use weather data to inform their plans, too, which is why they're analyzing the conditions millions of miles away on Mars.
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An international study reveals how the 'guardian' of the genome works
Scientists from the Genomic Integrity and Structural Biology Group led by Rafael Fernández-Leiro at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have discovered how certain proteins ensure the repair of errors introduced into the DNA during its replication. Using cryo-electron microscopy, they made the MutS protein, also known as the guardian of our genome, visible. That enabled them to desc
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An Unexpected Boon to America's Vaccine Towns
At 8 a.m. on February 14, the very minute New York made me eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine, I fired up my laptop and started looking for a shot. Over the course of five torturous minutes, I blasted my way through a laggy eligibility screener, waited for the confirmation page to unfreeze, and finally landed on the portal listing the state's mass-vaccination sites. "Appointments available," promise
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Scientists Want to Replace Seeing Eye Dogs With Robodogs
Workplace Automation Artificial intelligence technology threatens to automate yet another job into nonexistence. This time, it's coming for seeing-eye dogs that help visually impaired people safely navigate the world . A team of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley have developed a four-legged robodog that they say can autonomously steer people around obstacles, New Scientist re
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This Huge Hologram-Like 3D Display Is Made of Thousands of Tiny LED Lights
Though we don't quite have the technology to make three-dimensional holograms a reality yet, companies like PORTL and Microsoft are working on it. But a third company decided to forego the traditional approach and came up with a whole new way to create 3D shapes made of light. LED Pulse uses thousands of strings of LED lights to make volumetric displays that, while not technically holograms, look
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Astronomer publishes survey of young stars
An international research group led by a postdoctoral fellow in the University of Virginia's Department of Astronomy identified a rich organic chemistry in young disks surrounding 50 newly formed stars.
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Iceland's Eruptions Reveal the Hot History of Mars
After 15 months of increasingly intense and disruptive earthquakes on Iceland's Reykjanes Peninsula, the region finally let off some pressure. On March 19, lava roared out of the ground in the uninhabited valley of Geldingadalur, marking the first time in 800 years that this southwesterly strip of land has been rocked by an eruption. Volcanologists are thrilled, but this spectacle isn't just an o
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The future of work is uniquely human
The disruptive shifts of 2020, including covid-19 shutdowns that led to millions of workers working remotely, forced organizations to radically rethink everything from worker well-being, business models and operations to investments in cloud-based collaboration and communication tools. Across every industry, last year's best-laid plans were turned upside down. So it's not surprising that technolo
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First US trachea transplant offers hope to Covid patients with windpipe damage
Social worker, 56, treated at Mt Sinai hospital in New York Some patients left with serious damage from ventilators Surgeons in New York City have performed the first windpipe transplant in the US, giving a woman who suffered severe asthma a new trachea, the tube that transports air from the mouth to the lungs. Doctors say such operations could help Covid-19 patients left with serious windpipe da
12h
An Interstellar Visitor Had a Sad Story to Tell
In 2019, Gennady Borisov, an amateur astronomer in Crimea, discovered his seventh comet. This icy object wasn't like the others Borisov had found, or like any of the other comets in the solar system. This one wasn't orbiting the sun. Instead, it had been drifting alone in interstellar space, following its own path, until one day, it entered our solar system and grazed past the sun. Warmed by the
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Curbing coronavirus spread in enclosed spaces means better masks, adequate ventilation
With research increasingly showing the COVID-19 virus is transmissible via smaller droplets suspended in air, there is a growing concern current public health guidelines of mask wearing and social distancing are insufficient in combating its spread in indoor environments, like prisons, hospitals, and meatpacking plants, where people tend to be in close quarters.
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Fire on Australia's Antarctic resupply vessel leaves expeditioners shaken
Australian Antarctic Division says 109 people on board were uninjured, but the incident was 'potentially traumatic' for some An engine room fire that destroyed two vessels on board Australia's Antarctic resupply ship has left expeditioners shaken as they begin their journey home. The vessel, the MPV Everest, was in the middle of the Southern Ocean, four days into a two-week journey, when the ship
20h
The CDC's $1.75 billion sequencing boom may be throwing money at the wrong problem
Shortly after President Biden was inaugurated, the man who was being given command of his coronavirus response had a message about what America needed to do. "We're 43rd in the world in genomic sequencing," said Jeff Zients at a press conference in January . "Totally unacceptable." The answer, he suggested, was to "do the appropriate amount of genomic sequencing, which will allow us to spot varia
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New method expands the world of small RNAs
A team led by a biomedical scientist at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a new RNA-sequencing method— "Panoramic RNA Display by Overcoming RNA Modification Aborted Sequencing," or PANDORA-seq—that can help discover numerous modified small RNAs that were previously undetectable.
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New web app ranks spillover risk for newly detected viruses
SARS-CoV-2 showed the world with devastating clarity the threat undetected viruses can pose to global public health. SpillOver, a new web application developed by scientists at the University of California, Davis, and contributed to by experts from all over the world, ranks the risk of wildlife-to-human spillover for newly-discovered viruses.
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Study reveals uncertainty in how much carbon the ocean absorbs over time
The ocean's "biological pump" describes the many marine processes that work to take up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and transport it deep into the ocean, where it can remain sequestered for centuries. This ocean pump is a powerful regulator of atmospheric carbon dioxide and an essential ingredient in any global climate forecast.
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Scientists Finally Explain Mysterious "Spiders" Spotted on Mars
Creepy Crawlies For decades, scientists have been baffled by bizarre formations on Mars' south pole that look like gigantic spiders. That's not to say that astronomers were concerned that future Martian outposts would be attacked by giant alien arthropods, but the unusual geologic formations still eluded explanation for years, Live Science reports . Now, a team of scientists from the UK seems to
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CRISPR-SNP-chip enables amplification-free electronic detection of single point mutations
Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) Assistant Professor and University of California, Berkeley Visiting Scientist Dr. Kiana Aran first introduced the CRISPR-Chip technology in 2019. Now just two years later, she has expanded on its application to develop CRISPR-SNP-Chip, which enables detection of single point mutations without amplification in Sickle Cell Disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
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Covid Put Remote Abortion to the Test. Supporters Say It Passed.
For years, federal regulations have limited telemedicine abortion services in the U.S., despite evidence of their safety. But for six months during the Covid-19 pandemic, fully remote abortion access was available in some states — and advocates say they don't want to go back. "The genie is out of the bottle."
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UK restaurants and pubs see spike in bookings for planned reopening
Venues prepare to be busy from 12 April if coronavirus data allows outdoor hospitality to reopen Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Restaurants and bars with outdoor seating say bookings are at unprecedentedly high levels before a possible reopening next Monday, with people eager not to miss their first chance to eat out since lockdown was imposed. Some venues have inve
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Two new vaccines on the way – with more to follow this year
Half of UK adults have had a first jab, and future supplies of millions of doses look assured Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Two very different jabs have been responsible for inoculating Britain's strikingly high number of vaccine recipients – with more than half of the country's adult population having now received a first dose and several million people having rec
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Things To Do At Home
This week, whip up a drink while learning about art, meditate with the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco or listen to an audio play.
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AstraZeneca Covid vaccine: weighing up the risks and rewards
Despite scientific advice to continue getting the jab, answers about fatal blood clots are urgently needed Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Vaccines have side-effects, as do all medicines. Most often, jabs cause sore arms, a headache or a bit of nausea – none of which would be very significant when weighed against the toll of a serious virus such as Covid-19. But some
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Check Out This Deadly Robot Arm With an Actual Chainsaw
Stay Back It's like something straight out of a sci-fi horror movie. YouTube tinkerer Shane Wighton, behind the channel Stuff Made Here, built a giant chainsaw-wielding robotic arm that can chisel a dog shape out of bits of foam board. Wighton's original plan was to use his invention to create a bear cut out of a piece of wood, like the ones you see at the entrances to state parks. But several it
6h
Great tits change their traditions for the better
Researchers at the University of Konstanz and Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior in Germany have found that birds are able to change their culture to become more efficient. Populations of great tits were able to switch from one behavior to a better alternative when their group members were slowly replaced with new birds. Published today as open access in the journal Current Biology, this res
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Starship Exploding in the Fog Looks Amazing in Slow Motion
Now in Slow Motion On March 30, SpaceX's Starship SN11 prototype blew up in a massive cloud of orange light — a side effect of the space company having launched the full-scale spacecraft inside a thick layer of dense fog. Livestreams of the event didn't catch much of the explosion, except for massive pieces of debris raining down from the skies, wreaking havoc with the remotely controlled cameras
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A novel form of cellular logistics
Biophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have shown that a phenomenon known as diffusiophoresis, which can lead to a directed particle transport, can occur in biological systems.
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The Guardian view on the pandemic: a universal crisis is revealing our divisions | Editorial
The UK must tread carefully. While some countries seem to be emerging from the shadows, no one is safe when Covid spreads so freely The pandemic has transformed the lives of billions around the globe, but beyond that common experience, it has highlighted and deepened divides rather than closed them. On Tuesday, the International Monetary Fund warned that inequality both within and between countri
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Americans are super-spreaders of COVID-19 misinformation: study
Misinformation about COVID-19 is spreading from the United States into Canada, undermining efforts to mitigate the pandemic. A study led by McGill University shows that Canadians who use social media are more likely to consume this misinformation, embrace false beliefs about COVID-19, and subsequently spread them.
10h
Stimulation of tiny areas on cellular surfaces with free radicals using a microfluidic probe
Could there be a way to chemically manipulate small, confined areas on cellular surfaces? Scientists have developed a microfluidic probe to send a flow of free radicals on live cells and track the outcome using fluorescence imaging. As outlined in the journal Angewandte Chemie, this approach makes it possible for the first time to generate a reaction zone of free radicals with controlled size and
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Researchers reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
Mitochondria, known as the powerhouses within human cells, generate the energy needed for cell survival. However, as a byproduct of this process, mitochondria also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). At high enough concentrations, ROS cause oxidative damage and can even kill cells. An overabundance of ROS has been connected to various health issues, including cancers, neurological disorders, an
10h
How Scientists Grew Human Muscles in Pig Embryos, and Why It Matters for Organ Transplants
The little pigs bouncing around the lab looked exceedingly normal. Yet their adorable exterior hid a remarkable secret: each piglet carried two different sets of genes. For now, both sets came from their own species. But one day, one of those sets may be human. The piglets are chimeras—creatures with intermingled sets of genes, as if multiple entities were seamlessly mashed together. Named after
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A safer way to deploy bacteria as environmental sensors
In recent years, scientists have developed many strains of engineered bacteria that can be used as sensors to detect environmental contaminants such as heavy metals. If deployed in the natural environment, these sensors could help scientists track how pollutant levels change over time, over a wide geographic area.
14h
How baked bat guano helped archaeologists understand our ancient past
In an experiment to understand better how ancient artifacts are altered by the sediment in which they are buried for thousands of years, Australian archaeological scientists buried bones, stones, charcoal and other items in bat guano, cooked it, and analyzed how this affected the different items.
15h
Democrats Are Short on Votes and Long on Irony
Call it a catch-535: Democrats in Congress are trying to pass a huge slate of voting-related reforms, under the name of the For the People Act, or H.R. 1, that could aggressively reshape U.S. elections, change the way Americans vote, and also go a long way toward alleviating the Democratic Party's structural electoral disadvantages. But the Democrats have to pass this bill with the tight margins
16h
The Biggest Problem for America's Schools
B rian Woods has seen a lot in his nearly 30 years as an educator in the Northside Independent School District, in San Antonio. Tornadoes and storms have damaged buildings and left area campuses without power for weeks. Hurricanes have sent an unexpected surge of students into the district. In hindsight, each of those disruptions seems temporary—minor, even—compared with what he's seen over the p
17h
UK Covid live news: Labour hardens opposition to 'digital ID card' Covid passports plan
Latest updates: Labour scepticism over Covid-status certificates intensifies, meaning government may lose vote in Commons on issue Keir Starmer likely to oppose Covid status certificates if put to vote What are Covid-status certificates and how might they work? Boris Johnson confirms easing of England lockdown next week Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage 10.23am BST Las
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Bat catchers fight the next pandemic – in pictures
Researchers at the University of the Philippines Los Baños aim to catch thousands of bats to develop a Japanese-funded simulation model over the next three years that they believe could help avert potential pandemics. They hope the bats will help in predicting the dynamics of a coronavirus outbreak by analysing factors such as climate, temperature and ease of spread Continue reading…
21h
Why has the African elephant been split into two species? – podcast
Recently, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) assessed the African elephant as two separate species – the forest elephant and savannah elephant. The move has increased these animals' ' red list ' categorisation to endangered for savannah elephants and critically endangered for forest elephants. In an Age of Extinction extra for Science Weekly, Patrick Greenfield asks why
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The CEO of Apple Thinks People Will Use Augmented Reality for Something Absolutely Hilarious
During a chat with Kara Swisher for The New York Times today, Apple CEO Tim Cook sang the praises of the company's upcoming augmented reality glasses. Basically, he suggested that AR is going to turn regular conversations into Powerpoint presentations — complete with "graphs" that'll pop up while you're talking to illustrate the point you're trying to make. "Well, I can't talk about anything that
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Medical tests promoted in media with no mention of potential harm, Australian study finds
Stories all reported potential benefits of tests, some using smartphone or watch, but 60% failed to mention limitations Medical tests often offered through smartphones and watches and designed to detect the early signs of disease are being promoted by media without mention of their potential harms, an Australian study published in the leading US medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine has found. R
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Under the radar: Searching for stealthy supersymmetry
The standard model of particle physics encapsulates our current knowledge of elementary particles and their interactions. The standard model is not complete; for example, it does not describe observations such as gravity, has no prediction for dark matter, which makes up most of the matter in the universe, or that neutrinos have mass.
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If astronomers see isoprene in the atmosphere of an alien world, there's a good chance there's life there
It is no exaggeration to say that the study of extrasolar planets has exploded in recent decades. To date, 4,375 exoplanets have been confirmed in 3,247 systems, with another 5,856 candidates awaiting confirmation. In recent years, exoplanet studies have started to transition from the process of discovery to one of characterization. This process is expected to accelerate once next-generation teles
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How the pandemic is fueling the tech industry's union push
The last votes for one of the most closely watched unionization drives in modern history came in on Monday, March 29, and results could be announced shortly. The vote among almost 6,000 workers at an Amazon fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama, on whether to join the Retail Warehouse and Department Store Union, or RWDSU, drew reaction from every corner, from the National Football Players Playe
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Starwatch: look out for Leo the Lion
The constellation is beautifully placed for evening observation in the northern hemisphere At this time of year in the northern hemisphere, the constellation of Leo, the Lion, is beautifully placed for observation in the evenings. Continue reading…
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Research reveals why redheads may have different pain thresholds
Humans and mice with red hair have a different tolerance for pain because their skin's pigment-producing cells lack the function of a certain receptor. Lack of this receptor function causes changes that tip the balance between pain sensitivity and pain tolerance. The findings may be helpful for designing new treatments for pain.
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Lack of Covid help puts medical research at risk, UK charities warn
Institutions dismayed at ministers' failure to protect research worth hundreds of millions of pounds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Medical charities have expressed dismay at the UK government's failure to act over hundreds of millions of pounds of research that is at risk because of the catastrophic impact of Covid on fundraising. With charity shops closed and fund
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Births among endangered right whales highest since 2015
North Atlantic right whales gave birth over the winter in greater numbers than scientists have seen since 2015, an encouraging sign for researchers who became alarmed three years ago when the critically endangered species produced no known offspring at all.
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Biodiversity's healthy byproduct—nutrient-rich seafood
High levels of biodiversity in aquatic settings offers a wide range of vitamins, minerals, and fatty acids crucial for human health, a range of nutrients that are lacking in ecosystems where the number of species have been reduced by overfishing, pollution, or climate change, researchers report April 5 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Simulation Shows This Fusion Reactor Doing Something Amazing
Simulation Theory A team of scientists may have cracked the code for self-sustaining nuclear fusion reactors that actually produce more electricity than they consume — an amazing accomplishment, at least in theory. In a series of simulations, the team from the Oak Ridge and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories and the private company General Atomics demonstrated how a tiny tokamak reactor cou
10h
Nearly 40,000 kids who lost a parent to COVID-19 need immediate support
Approximately 40,000 children in the United States may have lost a parent to COVID-19 since February 2020, according to a statistical model created by a team of researchers. The researchers anticipate that without immediate interventions, the trauma from losing a parent could cast a shadow of mental health and economic problems well into the future for this vulnerable population.
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In Mauritius, Locals United to Keep an Oil Spill at Bay
In July 2020, a cargo-ship ran aground in the pristine waters off the island of Mauritius. To protect the coast and the economy the from the resulting oil spill, hundreds of locals made DIY booms from any absorbent material they could find, eventually removing 75 percent of the oil from the coastline.
17h
How preprints accelerated science communication during the pandemic
During the early phase of the pandemic, approximately 40% of the COVID-19 literature was shared as preprints—freely available manuscripts that are shared prior to peer-review. In a new study publishing in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers led by Dr. Jonathon Coates (Queen Mary University of London), Dr. Nicholas Fraser (Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, Germany) and Dr. Lia
8h
New batteries give jolt to renewables, energy storage
Researchers have been exploring the use of low-cost materials to create rechargeable batteries that will make energy storage more affordable. Now, they have shown that a new technique incorporating aluminum results in rechargeable batteries that offer up to 10,000 error-free cycles.
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Investigating the interplay of topology and non-Hermitian physics with nonlinear effects
An international team of researchers has investigated the interplay of topology and non-Hermitian physics with nonlinear effects. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes contructing an optical waveguide lattice using a biased photorefractive crystal and experiments introducing nonlinear effects. Piotr Roztocki and Roberto Morandotti with INRS-Énergie, Matériaux et Télé
14h
NASA's InSight Lander Detects Major Marsquakes
The NASA InSight lander. Mars is shaking, and we'd never know were it not for the trailblazing InSight lander. This mission touched down on the red planet in 2018, making history by deploying the first and only seismometer on another planet. NASA has been listening for rumbles ever since, and it just heard some big ones . NASA reports that InSight detected two strong quakes, originating in a regi
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Potential ecological impacts of climate intervention by reflecting sunlight to cool Earth [Environmental Sciences]
As the effects of anthropogenic climate change become more severe, several approaches for deliberate climate intervention to reduce or stabilize Earth's surface temperature have been proposed. Solar radiation modification (SRM) is one potential approach to partially counteract anthropogenic warming by reflecting a small proportion of the incoming solar radiation to…
10h
Homeroom: My Daughter Is Lying to Me About School
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, I'm writing about my daughter, a seventh grader whom I'll call Z. Her school has been fully remote since last spring. Z used to love school, but after a year of remote classes, she is totally unmotivated. I'm
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9 Pieces of Advice to Help You See Relationships More Clearly
Editor's Note: With Lori Gottlieb on book leave, Rebecca J. Rosen, the editor of "Dear Therapist," begins another month as The Atlantic 's "Dear Therapist" archivist , pointing readers to some of Lori's most beloved columns. For this month's look-back at Dear Therapist columns, I've decided to turn not to a specific theme, but to a handful of columns that have been reader favorites over the years
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Watching mRNA Do Its Thing, In Living Cells
This is a nice chemical biology paper that hits on a hot topic of the day: the uptake and function of mRNA when administered to cells. You can always look for downstream effects to show that you achieved both those goals, but it would be very useful to get images of this process in real time. Here's a heavily cited paper from 2013 that was able to do this for siRNA species, but the colloidal gold
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Outside factors may help children develop internal control
The ability to control your own behavior, known as executive function, might not exist all in your head. A new theory proposes it develops with many influences from outside the mind. It draws on dynamic systems theory which has been used to describe complex organizing phenomena like cloud formation. Now, researchers are applying it to executive function, which affects everything from children's re
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New blueprint of brain connections reveals extensive reach of central regulator
Researchers have generated a new map of connectivity from a part of the brain called the basal ganglia, a hub for regulating motor and behavior functions. The breadth of connections revealed could potentially open avenues for intervention of Parkinson's disease and other disorders such as Tourette's syndrome, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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Making cleaner, greener plastics from waste fish parts
Polyurethanes are nearly everywhere, but these highly versatile materials can have a major downside. Derived from crude oil, toxic to synthesize, and slow to break down, conventional polyurethanes are not environmentally friendly. Now, researchers discuss devising what they say should be a safer, biodegradable alternative derived from fish waste — heads, bones, skin and guts — that would otherwi
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Study finds psychiatric disorders persist 15 years after youth are detained
Research shows nearly two-thirds of males and more than one-third of females with one or more existing psychiatric disorders when they entered detention, still had a disorder 15 years later. The findings are significant because mental health struggles add to the existing racial, ethnic and economic disparities as well as academic challenges from missed school, making a successful transition to adu
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Paleopharmaceuticals from Baltic amber might fight drug-resistant infections
For centuries, people in Baltic nations have used ancient amber for medicinal purposes. Even today, infants are given amber necklaces that they chew to relieve teething pain, and people put pulverized amber in elixirs and ointments for its purported beneficial properties. Now, scientists have pinpointed compounds that help explain Baltic amber's therapeutic effects and that could lead to new medic
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The Awful Wisdom of the Hostage
Gérard DuBois This article was published online on April 5, 2021. I n October 2012 , in the second year of the Syrian civil war, a 44-year-old freelance journalist named Theo Padnos crossed from Turkey into Syria with two young men he thought were his friends. Padnos made friends easily and indiscriminately: In 2006, he was in Yemen researching a book about foreign converts on the path of jihad,
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Global warming is causing a more pronounced dip in marine species richness around the equator [Ecology]
The latitudinal gradient in species richness, with more species in the tropics and richness declining with latitude, is widely known and has been assumed to be stable over recent centuries. We analyzed data on 48,661 marine animal species since 1955, accounting for sampling variation, to assess whether the global latitudinal…
10h
Bättre återhämtning för vältränade efter kirurgi
Personer som är fysiskt aktiva återhämtar sig bättre efter att de opererats för tjock- eller ändtarmscancer. Men att börja träna när diagnosen är ett faktum hjälper inte. I sin avhandling har Aron Onerup, disputerad i kirurgi vid Sahlgrenska akademin, studerat patienter diagnosticerade med tjock- eller ändtarmscancer. De deltagare som varit fysiskt inaktiva visade sig ha högre risk att inte känna
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Doping by athletes could become tougher to hide with new detection method
As the world awaits the upcoming Olympic games, a new method for detecting doping compounds in urine samples could level the playing field for those trying to keep athletics clean. Now, scientists report an approach using ion mobility-mass spectrometry to help regulatory agencies detect existing dopants and future 'designer compounds.
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Fireflies have a potential—protective 'musical armor' against bats
A new study at Tel Aviv University reveals a possible defense mechanism developed by fireflies for protection against bats that might prey on them. According to the study, fireflies produce strong ultrasonic sounds—soundwaves that the human ear, and more importantly the fireflies themselves, cannot detect. The researchers hypothesize that these sounds are meant for the ears of bats, keeping them a
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Toward a better understanding of 'fake news'
Duncan Watts, a Penn Integrates Knowledge Professor and computational social scientist with appointments in the Annenberg School for Communication, School of Engineering and Applied Science and the Wharton School, has published a new framework for studying media bias and misinformation. Publishing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences and co-authored by colleagues at Mic
15h
Key brain molecule may play role in many brain disorders
Scientists have identified a molecule called microRNA-29 as a powerful controller of brain maturation in mammals. Deleting microRNA-29 in mice caused problems very similar to those seen in autism, epilepsy, and other neurodevelopmental conditions. The results, published in Cell Reports, illuminate an important process in the normal maturation of the brain and point to the possibility that disrupti
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As From a Quiver of Arrows
Carl Phillips, the former chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, has often described poetry as a way to wrestle with ambiguity—to attempt to contain it . "Poetry is a form of control," he once said . So Phillips chooses subjects—love, power, freedom, grief—that are particularly hard to grasp. In "," Phillips wrestles with death in a series of questions that progresses from the specific to t
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School integration isn't a panacea for Black students
Integrating American classroom has not produced all the benefits ascribed to it, report researchers. Integrating schools has long been a goal of many who seek to eradicate racial discrimination. But the new paper from four economists suggests Black students do not always benefit from attending racially balanced schools. Instead, Black adults who attended racially balanced high schools in the mid-
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Is Coffee Good for You or Not?
Confused by the dizzying array of studies that seem contradictory at times? You've come to the right place. Here's what to know about coffee's — mostly beneficial — health impacts.
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Womens' pain not taken as seriously as mens' pain
Researchers found that when male and female patients expressed the same amount of pain, observers viewed female patients' pain as less intense and more likely to benefit from psychotherapy versus medication as compared to men's pain, exposing a significant patient gender bias that could lead to disparities in treatments.
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Ordsallad
Ett verkligt symptom Personer diagnostiserade med vissa mentala hälsoproblem, som till exempel Schizofreni, kan ibland uppvisa ett symtom som kallas schizofasi. Det innebär att de formulerar grammatiskt korrekta meningar, men … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Deep learning networks prefer the human voice — just like us
A study proves that AI systems might reach higher levels of performance if they are programmed with sound files of human language rather than with numerical data labels. The researchers discovered that in a side-by-side comparison, a neural network whose 'training labels' consisted of sound files reached higher levels of performance in identifying objects in images, compared to another network tha
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Seven barred from research after plagiarism, duplications in eleven papers
A retired Nepali professor and six others have been barred from research after plagiarism and duplicated images were found in 11 of their papers. Parashuram Mishra, a retired crystallographer at Tribhuvan University, in Nepal, is the lead author on all the studies. Most of the papers contain image duplications; the same figures were reused across … Continue reading
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The Atlantic Daily: Index Funds Could Hurt the Economy
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. While meme stocks and NFTs draw headlines, a group of economists and Wall Street experts worries that a much more traditional style of investing is stifling the economy, our staff writer Annie Low
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Lessons from the past: Protecting women and girls from violence during COVID-19
COVID-19 has impacted women and girls around the globe in adverse ways. However, little attention has been paid to women and girls in humanitarian settings, those whose safety has already been reduced due to conflict, natural disaster or displacement. For these women and girls, COVID-19 has made them particularly vulnerable to increases in gender-based violence.
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Impact of prenatal maternal cytokine exposure on sex differences in brain circuitry regulating stress in offspring 45 years later [Neuroscience]
Stress is associated with numerous chronic diseases, beginning in fetal development with in utero exposures (prenatal stress) impacting offspring's risk for disorders later in life. In previous studies, we demonstrated adverse maternal in utero immune activity on sex differences in offspring neurodevelopment at age seven and adult risk for major…
10h
Maddening itch of liver disease comes from a surprising source
A devastating itching of the skin driven by severe liver disease turns out to have a surprising cause. Its discovery points toward possible new therapies for itching, and shows that the outer layer of the skin is so much more than insulation. The finding indicates that the keratinocyte cells of the skin surface are acting as 'pre-neurons.'
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Screening for skin disease on your laptop
A biomedical engineer is reporting a new deep neural network architecture – to be used on a standard laptop – that provides early diagnosis of systemic sclerosis (SSc), a rare autoimmune disease marked by hardened or fibrous skin and internal organs.
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Watch as NASA Drops a Spacecraft Into a Huge Dunk Tank
Dunk Tank On Tuesday afternoon, NASA Dropped a 14,000-pound model of its Orion spacecraft into a gigantic swimming pool. The test, which looked like a scaled-up version of a carnival dunk tank — minus the stuffed animal prize — seems silly at first glance. In video footage , the mock Orion fell a few feet before floating to the side while various NASA techs murmured their approval. But as Gizmodo
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Musk Blames Starship SN11 Failure on Methane Fuel Leak
We've been treated to a series of spectacular rocket tests lately, courtesy of SpaceX and the Starship development process. Of course, most of these rockets are exploding, but that only makes the tests more dramatic for outside observers. The most recent Starship rocket blew up in mid-air while beginning its landing burn. Now, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has announced a cause: a leaky pipe. We've all be
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Aquatic biodiversity enhances multiple nutritional benefits to humans [Sustainability Science]
Humanity depends on biodiversity for health, well-being, and a stable environment. As biodiversity change accelerates, we are still discovering the full range of consequences for human health and well-being. Here, we test the hypothesis—derived from biodiversity–ecosystem functioning theory—that species richness and ecological functional diversity allow seafood diets to fulfill multiple…
10h
Microbial production of a natural red colorant carminic acid
A research group at KAIST has engineered a bacterium capable of producing a natural red colorant, carminic acid, which is widely used for food and cosmetics. The research team reported the complete biosynthesis of carminic acid from glucose in engineered Escherichia coli. The strategies will be useful for the design and construction of biosynthetic pathways involving unknown enzymes and consequent
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Finding gene neighbors leads to new protein functions
Access to sequenced genomes was a watershed moment in life science research. Genome sequences spell out an organism's DNA, the genetic code for how the organism develops, reproduces, and functions. As new technologies have developed, the availability of these gene sequences has grown exponentially. Unfortunately, scientists' ability to decipher the functions encoded in these sequences has not kept
15h
COVID-19 pandemic threatens to reverse gains made on Sustainable Development Goal 1 and 2
A new study analyzing bean production and food security across 11 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, found COVID-19 pandemic-related restrictions to significantly impact bean production. Border controls and high transport costs have led to drops in production of the key food security crop, threatening to reverse gains made in achieving Sustainable Development Goals 1 and 2, towards no poverty and ze
20h
Atom-based radio communications for noisy environments
Researchers have demonstrated an atom-based sensor that can determine the direction of an incoming radio signal, another key part for a potential atomic communications system that could be smaller and work better in noisy environments than conventional technology.
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Scientists unlock the secrets of glacier-fed streams, from Greenland to Switzerland
The field scientists working on the Vanishing Glaciers project aren't afraid of heights. They climb to the icy peaks of mountain ranges from the Himalayas to the Alps, equipped with vials, pipettes, thermometers and liquid-nitrogen cylinders (which they've nicknamed Dido and Fido). Their goal is to collect samples of the microorganisms living in glacier-fed streams and bring them back to EPFL for
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Nonlinear wave mixing facilitates subwavelength imaging
The diffraction limit, also known as the Abbe diffraction limit in optics, poses a great challenge in many systems that involve wave dynamics, such as imaging, astronomy, and photolithography. For example, the best optical microscope only possesses resolution around 200 nm, but the physical size of the photolithography process with an excimer laser is around tens of nanometers. Meanwhile, physical
1d
Combat stress in a small-scale society suggests divergent evolutionary roots for posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms [Anthropology]
Military personnel in industrialized societies often develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during combat. It is unclear whether combat-related PTSD is a universal evolutionary response to danger or a culture-specific syndrome of industrialized societies. We interviewed 218 Turkana pastoralist warriors in Kenya, who engage in lethal cattle raids, about their combat…
10h
For 80% of Americans with resolved drug problem, significant personal achievements
This study is the first to report the national prevalence of personal, civic and economic achievements among people in addiction recovery. The majority of Americans who have resolved an alcohol or other drug problem report achievements related to self-improvement, family engagement, and civic and economic participation since resolving their addiction. It appears these achievements accumulate with
1d
Certain high blood pressure medications may alter heart risk in people with HIV
Some blood pressure medications altered the likelihood of subsequent heart disease, stroke or heart failure in a study of veterans who have HIV (human immunodeficiency virus).Patients with HIV prescribed beta-blockers were more likely to develop cardiovascular disease compared to patients taking other blood pressure medications, even if their blood pressure was well controlled. All other classes o
1d
A new, positive approach could be the key to next-generation, transparent electronics
A new study could pave the way to revolutionary, transparent electronics for potential integration in glass, flexible displays and smart contact lenses — bringing to life futuristic 'scifi-like' devices. A decades-long search for electronics based on semiconducting oxides could also find use in power electronics and communications, reducing the carbon footprint of our utility networks. The introd
1d
New report shows high levels of arsenic and uranium in some wells
A new U.S. Geological Survey study provides an updated, statewide estimate of high levels of naturally occurring arsenic and uranium in private well water across Connecticut. This research builds on a USGS report published in 2017, with the new study including additional groundwater samples and focusing on previously underrepresented areas.
8h
'Brain glue' helps repair circuitry in severe TBI
In a new study, researchers have demonstrated the long-term benefits of a hydrogel, which they call 'brain glue,' for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. The gel protects against loss of brain tissue after a severe injury and might aid in functional neural repair.
9h
COVID-19: Tsunami of chronic health conditions expected, research and health care disrupted
Cardiometabolic diseases including heart disease, obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes, are at the crest of an impending tsunami of chronic health conditions as a result of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic that will affect society for decades. Interventions and universal health care are recommended to focus on prevention of cardiometabolic diseases, including programs that support healthy lifestyle be
11h
What are thoughts? Where do they come from – and where do they go?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts What are thoughts? Where do they come from, and where do they go when they disappear? Are they "filed" somewhere, a bit like memories, where we can find them again, or once a thought has gone is that it? Sue Christian, Oswestr
16h
Team uses mass spectrometry to study composition of meteorites
Scientists from Russia and Germany studied the molecular composition of carbonaceous chondrites—the insoluble organic matter of the Murchison and Allende meteorites—in an attempt to identify their origin. Ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry revealed a wide diversity of chemical compositions and unexpected similarities between meteorites from different groups. The research was published in Scie
1d
Going deep: Artificial intelligence improves accuracy of breast ultrasound diagnoses
Ultrasound is widely used to detect breast cancer early, but misdiagnosis of benign lesions as malignant tumors sometimes leads to unnecessary biopsies. To tackle this problem, scientists conducted a large multi-center study involving 13 hospitals in China to train deep learning models to accurately classify breast masses. Their results, published in Chinese Medical Journal, showcase how artificia
1d
Being top baboon costs males their longevity
A male baboon's social dominance requires constant physical defense and leaves its mark on his genes. Tracing the activity of 500 methylation sites on the baboon genome, a team of researchers working with the famous Amboseli baboon troop has found that the dominant males trade longevity for fecundity. The dominant males get more babies, but they have fewer years. If a male drops in social status,
10h
Separating beer waste into proteins for foods, and fiber for biofuels
All brewers experience the same result of the beer-making process: leftover grain. Once all the flavor has been extracted from grains, what's left is a protein- and fiber-rich powder that is used in cattle feed or put in landfills. Scientists now report a new way to extract the protein and fiber and use it to create new types of protein sources, biofuels and more.
13h
The Great Oxygenation Events
The deep history of the Earth is fascinating, and while we have learned much about the distant past there are still many puzzle pieces missing. A new study tweaks our understanding of one of the biggest events in Earth's history – the Great Oxygenation Event, and also helps better align the other big events in the past. The Earth as we know it formed about 4.5 billion years ago. Earth is actually
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Newly identified protein enables cells to sense surroundings and anchor in the right places
A combined team of researchers from the University of Geneva and the University of Tampere has identified a protein that plays a major role in enabling cells to perceive their environment and also to anchor in the right places. In their paper published in the journal Communications Biology, the group describes experiments they conducted that involved combining photoactivation, FA isolation and mol
14h
Fossil discovery deepens snakefly mystery
The recent discovery of four new species of ancient insects are leading scientists to question the evolutionary history of the snakefly. The fossils, discovered in British Columbia and Washington State, are estimated to be 52 million years old and were unearthed in a region once thought uninhabitable.
6h
Leptin puts the brakes on eating via novel neurocircuit
A new study in mice describes novel neurocircuitry between midbrain structures that control feeding behaviors that are under modulatory control by leptin, a hormone made by body fat. Since the discovery of leptin in the 1990s, researchers have wondered how leptin can suppress appetite.
9h
Scientists reveal elusive inner workings of antioxidant enzyme with therapeutic potential
The enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) plays a critical role in maintaining human health by keeping the amount of harmful reactive oxygen molecules in cells under control. By using neutron scattering, researchers have now obtained a complete atomic portrait of the enzyme, revealing key information about its catalytic mechanism. The work could help experts develop MnSOD-based treatments
9h
Tattoo made of gold nanoparticles revolutionizes medical diagnostics
Scientists have developed a novel type of implantable sensor that continuously transmits information on vital values and concentrations of substances or drugs in the body and can be operated in the body for several months. The sensor is based on color-stable gold nanoparticles that are modified with receptors for specific molecules.
14h
Molybdenum titanium carbide viable in additive manufacturing
Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientists proved molybdenum titanium carbide, a refractory metal alloy that can withstand extreme temperature environments, can also be crack free and dense when produced with electron beam powder bed fusion. Their finding indicates the material's viability in additive manufacturing.
15h
The Deep-time Digital Earth program: Data-driven discovery in geosciences
Humans have long explored three big scientific questions: the evolution of the universe, the evolution of Earth, and the evolution of life. Geoscientists have embraced the mission of elucidating the evolution of Earth and life, which are preserved in the information-rich but incomplete geological record that spans more than 4.5 billion years of Earth history. Delving into Earth's deep-time history
15h
Elasticity to position microplates on curved 2D fluids
A team of polymer science and engineering researchers has demonstrated for the first time that the positions of tiny, flat, solid objects integrated in nanometrically thin membranes – resembling those of biological cells – can be controlled by mechanically varying the elastic forces in the membrane itself. This research milestone is a significant step toward the goal of creating ultrathin flexible
1d
Streamlining the process of materials discovery
Developing new materials and novel processes has continued to change the world. The M3I3 Initiative at KAIST has led to new insights into advancing materials development by implementing breakthroughs in materials imaging that have created a paradigm shift in the discovery of materials. The Initiative features the multiscale modeling and imaging of structure and property relationships and materials
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Actor in a supporting role: Substrate effects on 2D layers
Atomically thin layers are of great technological interest because of potentially useful electronic properties that emerge as the layer thickness approaches the 2D limit. Such materials tend to form weak bonds outside the layer and are thus generally assumed to be unaffected by substrates that provide physical support.
1d
Scientists develop a safe, cheap technology for disinfection of packed eggs
Russian researchers have developed an inexpensive, safe, and reliable surface disinfection technology for packed eggs. This technology helps to kill bacteria, including salmonella, on eggshells. Also, it allows growing broiler chickens with strong immunity to viral diseases. Packed eggs are disinfected with an electron beam for 50 nanoseconds (one-billionth of a second). Disinfection takes place i
1d
Ammonia decomposition for hydrogen economy, improvement in hydrogen extraction efficiency
For the implementation of an effective hydrogen economy in the forthcoming years, hydrogen produced from sources like coal and petroleum must be transported from its production sites to the end user, often over long distances and to achieve successful hydrogen trade between countries. Drs. Hyuntae Sohn and Changwon Yoon and their team at the Center for Hydrogen-fuel Cell Research of the Korea Inst
10h
At the crossroads of cell survival and death
National University of Singapore researchers discovered that a protein, known as MOAP-1, plays a crucial role in facilitating autophagy, a cellular "self-eating" process that recycles non-essential components during starvation.
1d
Raindrops also keep fallin' on exoplanets
Researchers found that raindrops are remarkably similar across different planetary environments, even planets as drastically different as Earth and Jupiter. Understanding the behavior of raindrops on other planets is key to not only revealing the ancient climate on planets like Mars but identifying potentially habitable planets outside our solar system.
14h
What can we learn from vanishing wildlife species: The case of the Pyrenean Ibex
Likely the first extinction event of the 2000s in Europe, the sad history of the Pyrenean Ibex (Capra pyrenaica pyrenaica) is a powerful example of the ever-increasing species loss worldwide due to causes related to human activity. It can, however, give us valuable information on what should be done (or avoided) to halt this extinction vortex.
20h
Understanding fruit fly behavior may be next step toward autonomous vehicles
With over 70% of respondents to a AAA annual survey on autonomous driving reporting they would fear being in a fully self-driving car, makers like Tesla may be back to the drawing board before rolling out fully autonomous self-driving systems. But new research shows us we may be better off putting fruit flies behind the wheel instead of robots.
9h
Radical attack on live cells
Is there a way to chemically manipulate small, confined areas on cellular surfaces? Scientists have developed a microfluidic probe to send a flow of free radicals on live cells and track the outcome using fluorescence imaging. This approach makes it possible for the first time to generate a reaction zone of free radicals with controlled size and concentration for subcellular research.
10h
First air quality profile of two sub-Saharan African cities finds troubling news
Ambient air pollution is a global public health crisis, causing more than 4.9 million premature deaths per year around the world. In Africa, it has surpassed AIDS as the leading cause of premature death. According to one study, air pollution—specifically, fine particulate matter (PM2.5)—may cause at least as many as 780,000 premature deaths annually in Africa and worsen a significant number of dis
10h
Tibetan Plateau will warm faster than expected
The Tibetan Plateau, known as 'the roof of the world,' has warmed more rapidly than global average in the past decades. The observed warming of the Tibetan Plateau since 1960s can be attributed to human activities, particularly greenhouse gas emissions. Moreover, the Plateau may warm faster in the future than climate models projected, according to a study recently published in Environmental Resear
10h
Mapping North Carolina's ghost forests from 430 miles up
Throughout the U.S. East Coast, trees are dying off as rising seas and higher storm surges push saltwater farther inland. While these 'ghost forests' are becoming more common in North Carolina's coastal plain, scientists had only a rough idea of their extent. A new study mining 35 years of satellite images of a 245,000-acre area in the state's Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula shows that, between 1985 a
10h
A sun reflector for earth?
Every month since September 2019 the Climate Intervention Biology Working Group, a team of internationally recognized experts in climate science and ecology, has gathered remotely to bring science to bear on that question and the consequences of geoengineering a cooler Earth by reflecting a portion of the sun's radiation away from the planet — a climate intervention strategy known as solar radiat
1d
Not all face mask materials give you the same protection
Wearing a face mask can protect you and others from COVID-19, but the type of material and how many fabric layers used can significantly affect exposure risk, according to a new study. Researchers measured the filtration efficiency of submicron particles passing through a variety of different materials. For comparison, a human hair is about 50 microns in diameter while 1 millimeter is 1,000 micro
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Development of source technology for the use of wearable devices without recharging
Despite the continued development and commercialization of various wearable electronic devices, such as smart bands, progress with these devices has been curbed by one major limitation, as they regularly need to be recharged. However, a new technology developed by a South Korean research team has become a hot topic, as it shows significant potential to overcome this limitation for wearable electro
1d
Anti-Asian American violence in the US: The deeper history behind the current crisis
A string of murders and violent attacks against Asian Americans has jolted the U.S. over the last year. As shocking as these incidents are, they are not novel. Asian Americans and Asian immigrants have long had to contend with physical attacks and discrimination, something evident in the research of Emma Teng, the T.T. and Wei Fong Chao Professor of Asian Civilizations at MIT, and author of the 20
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The Lancet Psychiatry: Largest study to date suggests link between COVID-19 infection and subsequent mental health and neurological conditions
One in three COVID-19 survivors received a neurological or psychiatric diagnosis within six months of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, an observational study of more than 230,000 patient health records published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal estimates. The study looked at 14 neurological and mental health disorders [1].
4h
Secure type: Consumers say compact logos signal product safety
Compact logos can encourage favorable brand evaluations by signaling product safety, according to a new study by researchers at Boston College's Carroll School of Management and Indian Institute of Management Udaipur, who reviewed the opinions of 17,000 consumers and conducted additional experiments with a variety of logos.
7h
REPORT | Future Flood Risk: Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway
Climate Central used its public and proprietary tools to assess the current and future coastal flood risk to the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Byway. The Byway is a 125-mile, self-guided, scenic tour, originating along Maryland's Eastern Shore and ending in Philadelphia. The 45 sites along the Byway include the Harriet Tubman Underground Railroad Visitor Center, historic sites connected to
7h
Gained in translation: Subgenome fractionation determines hybrid vigor in maize
The adage goes, "Two is better than one." Well, that might be true for endeavors involving human heads, but when it comes to ears, hybrid maize tends to have a superior advantage over the parental stocks in most cases. This phenomenon, called hybrid vigor or "heterosis," has been used by agriculturalists across ages to create higher-yielding, more resistant varieties of maize all over the world.
7h
This Ultra High Tech Head and Eye Tracker Is the Future of Gaming
A lot of the predictions about the future depicted in Back to the Future Part II never came true. We never got flying cars, or hoverboards, or those tiny freeze-dried pizzas that can be rehydrated and ready to eat in just five seconds. However, there were some predictions in that movie that did come true. The Cubs really did win the World Series, for example, albeit one year late. We also have fl
7h
New firefly species turns up in Singapore swamp forest
Researchers have discovered a new species of firefly in Singapore's last remaining freshwater swamp forest. It's the first time since 1909 that anyone has discovered a new species of luminous firefly in the city-state. The research on the newly identified Singapore firefly ( Luciola singapura ) appears in the journal Animals . "When we first encountered this species, we knew it was interesting be
8h
No pain, no gain in exercise for peripheral artery disease
No pain means no gain when it comes to reaping exercise benefits for people with peripheral artery disease, reports a new study. In people with peripheral artery disease, walking for exercise at an intensity that induces ischemic leg pain (caused by restricted blood flow) improves walking performance — distance and length of time walking — the study found. Walking at a slow pace that does not in
8h
Higher income makes people feel more confident
Earning a higher income makes people feel more contented, confident, and have a greater sense of self-pride, researchers report. The new study also found that current income can predict the types of emotions people may feel over the long-term. Financial wealth predicts better psychological health, with past studies revealing that income shapes the way people think about their lives. However, it w
8h
Researchers find a connection between Trump's tweets and the exchange rate of the rouble
Tweets about Russia by Donald Trump during his presidency caused short but noticeable depreciations of the rouble. Meanwhile, the introduction of new sanctions, upon which the president did not comment, had no such effect. This was the finding of a group of researchers, which included Elena Fedorova, Professor of the Faculty of Economic Sciences of HSE University. The group published their finding
9h
Opioid prescribing for analgesia after common otolaryngology operations
The American Academy of Otolaryngology?Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Opioid Prescribing for Analgesia After Common Otolaryngology Operations today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. This specialty-specific guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on postoperative management for pain in common otolaryngologic procedures, with a focus on o
9h
40K kids in the US may have lost a parent to COVID-19
Approximately 40,000 children in the United States may have lost a parent to COVID-19 since February 2020, according to a statistical model. The researchers anticipate that without immediate interventions, the trauma from losing a parent could cast a shadow of mental health and economic problems well into the future for this vulnerable population. In the researchers' model, for approximately ever
9h
The sea urchin microbiome
Sea urchins receive a lot of attention in California. Red urchins support a thriving fishery, while their purple cousins are often blamed for mowing down kelp forests to create urchin barrens. Yet for all the notice we pay them, we know surprisingly little about the microbiomes that support these spiny species.
9h
Team maps effects of human activity on marine species over time
Researchers have created the first global assessment of cumulative human impacts to at-risk marine species over time. Despite the fact that our planet is mostly ocean and human maritime activity is more intense than ever, we know remarkably little about the state of the ocean's biodiversity—the variety and balance of species that support healthy and productive ecosystems. And it's no surprise—mar
10h
Measuring voluntary and policy-induced social distancing behavior during the COVID-19 pandemic [Environmental Sciences]
Staying home and avoiding unnecessary contact is an important part of the effort to contain COVID-19 and limit deaths. Every state in the United States enacted policies to encourage distancing and some mandated staying home. Understanding how these policies interact with individuals' voluntary responses to the COVID-19 epidemic is a…
10h
(Mis)informed about what? What it means to be a science-literate citizen in a digital world [Colloquium Paper]
Science literacy is often held up as crucial for avoiding science-related misinformation and enabling more informed individual and collective decision-making. But research has not yet examined whether science literacy actually enables this, nor what skills it would need to encompass to do so. In this report, we address three questions…
10h
Identification of a micropeptide and multiple secondary cell genes that modulate Drosophila male reproductive success [Genetics]
Even in well-characterized genomes, many transcripts are considered noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) simply due to the absence of large open reading frames (ORFs). However, it is now becoming clear that many small ORFs (smORFs) produce peptides with important biological functions. In the process of characterizing the ribosome-bound transcriptome of an important…
10h
Integrins protect sensory neurons in models of paclitaxel-induced peripheral sensory neuropathy [Neuroscience]
Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a major side effect from cancer treatment with no known method for prevention or cure in clinics. CIPN often affects unmyelinated nociceptive sensory terminals. Despite the high prevalence, molecular and cellular mechanisms that lead to CIPN are still poorly understood. Here, we used a genetically…
10h
The pentatricopeptide repeat protein Rmd9 recognizes the dodecameric element in the 3'-UTRs of yeast mitochondrial mRNAs [Cell Biology]
Stabilization of messenger RNA is an important step in posttranscriptional gene regulation. In the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells it is generally achieved by 5′ capping and 3′ polyadenylation, whereas additional mechanisms exist in bacteria and organelles. The mitochondrial mRNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae comprise a dodecamer sequence…
10h
A neural circuit for competing approach and defense underlying prey capture [Neuroscience]
Predators must frequently balance competing approach and defensive behaviors elicited by a moving and potentially dangerous prey. Several brain circuits supporting predation have recently been localized. However, the mechanisms by which these circuits balance the conflict between approach and defense responses remain unknown. Laboratory mice initially show alternating approach and…
10h
Primate phageomes are structured by superhost phylogeny and environment [Evolution]
Humans harbor diverse communities of microorganisms, the majority of which are bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract. These gut bacterial communities in turn host diverse bacteriophage (hereafter phage) communities that have a major impact on their structure, function, and, ultimately, human health. However, the evolutionary and ecological origins of these human-associated…
10h
Confidence intervals for policy evaluation in adaptive experiments [Economic Sciences]
Adaptive experimental designs can dramatically improve efficiency in randomized trials. But with adaptively collected data, common estimators based on sample means and inverse propensity-weighted means can be biased or heavy-tailed. This poses statistical challenges, in particular when the experimenter would like to test hypotheses about parameters that were not targeted…
10h
Alternative splicing redefines landscape of commonly mutated genes in acute myeloid leukemia [Genetics]
Most genes associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are mutated in less than 10% of patients, suggesting that alternative mechanisms of gene disruption contribute to this disease. Here, we find a set of splicing events that alter the expression of a subset of AML-associated genes independent of known somatic mutations….
10h
Biological structure and function emerge from scaling unsupervised learning to 250 million protein sequences [Computer Sciences]
In the field of artificial intelligence, a combination of scale in data and model capacity enabled by unsupervised learning has led to major advances in representation learning and statistical generation. In the life sciences, the anticipated growth of sequencing promises unprecedented data on natural sequence diversity. Protein language modeling at…
10h
The contributions of individual countries and regions to the global radiative forcing [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Knowing the historical relative contribution of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and short-lived climate forcers (SLCFs) to global radiative forcing (RF) at the regional level can help understand how future GHGs emission reductions and associated or independent reductions in SLCFs will affect the ultimate purpose of the Paris Agreement. In this study,…
10h
Modular complement assemblies for mitigating inflammatory conditions [Applied Biological Sciences]
Complement protein C3dg, a key linkage between innate and adaptive immunity, is capable of stimulating both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, leading to considerable interest in its use as a molecular adjuvant. However, the potential of C3dg as an adjuvant is limited without ways of controllably assembling multiple copies of…
10h
Immune cells fold and damage fungal hyphae [Immunology and Inflammation]
Innate immunity provides essential protection against life-threatening fungal infections. However, the outcomes of individual skirmishes between immune cells and fungal pathogens are not a foregone conclusion because some pathogens have evolved mechanisms to evade phagocytic recognition, engulfment, and killing. For example, Candida albicans can escape phagocytosis by activating cellular morphogen
10h
Heritable variation in telomere length predicts mortality in Soay sheep [Evolution]
Telomere length (TL) is considered an important biomarker of whole-organism health and aging. Across humans and other vertebrates, short telomeres are associated with increased subsequent mortality risk, but the processes responsible for this correlation remain uncertain. A key unanswered question is whether TL–mortality associations arise due to positive effects of…
10h
Human hand as a powerless and multiplexed infrared light source for information decryption and complex signal generation [Engineering]
With the increasing pursuit of intelligent systems, the integration of human components into functional systems provides a promising route to the ultimate human-compatible intelligent systems. In this work, we explored the integration of the human hand as the powerless and multiplexed infrared (IR) light source in different functional systems. With…
10h
Accurate modeling of DNA conformational flexibility by a multivariate Ising model [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The sequence-dependent structure and deformability of DNA play a major role for binding of proteins and regulation of gene expression. So far, most efforts to model DNA flexibility are based on unimodal harmonic stiffness models at base-pair resolution. However, multimodal behavior due to distinct conformational substates also contributes significantly to…
10h
Myristoylation alone is sufficient for PKA catalytic subunits to associate with the plasma membrane to regulate neuronal functions [Cell Biology]
Myristoylation is a posttranslational modification that plays diverse functional roles in many protein species. The myristate moiety is considered insufficient for protein–membrane associations unless additional membrane-affinity motifs, such as a stretch of positively charged residues, are present. Here, we report that the electrically neutral N-terminal fragment of the protein kinase…
10h
Mechanics of two filaments in tight orthogonal contact [Engineering]
Networks of flexible filaments often involve regions of tight contact. Predictively understanding the equilibrium configurations of these systems is challenging due to intricate couplings between topology, geometry, large nonlinear deformations, and friction. Here, we perform an in-depth study of a simple, yet canonical, problem that captures the essence of contact…
10h
Structural basis for GTP-induced dimerization and antiviral function of guanylate-binding proteins [Microbiology]
Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) form a family of dynamin-related large GTPases which mediate important innate immune functions. They were proposed to form oligomers upon GTP binding/hydrolysis, but the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Here, we present crystal structures of C-terminally truncated human GBP5 (hGBP51–486), comprising the large GTPase (LG) and middle (MD)…
10h
Architecture of the mycobacterial succinate dehydrogenase with a membrane-embedded Rieske FeS cluster [Biochemistry]
Complex II, also known as succinate dehydrogenase (SQR) or fumarate reductase (QFR), is an enzyme involved in both the Krebs cycle and oxidative phosphorylation. Mycobacterial Sdh1 has recently been identified as a new class of respiratory complex II (type F) but with an unknown electron transfer mechanism. Here, using cryoelectron…
10h
Direct coordination of pterin to FeII enables neurotransmitter biosynthesis in the pterin-dependent hydroxylases [Biochemistry]
The pterin-dependent nonheme iron enzymes hydroxylate aromatic amino acids to perform the biosynthesis of neurotransmitters to maintain proper brain function. These enzymes activate oxygen using a pterin cofactor and an aromatic amino acid substrate bound to the FeII active site to form a highly reactive FeIV = O species that…
10h
Conditional destabilization of the TPLATE complex impairs endocytic internalization [Plant Biology]
In plants, endocytosis is essential for many developmental and physiological processes, including regulation of growth and development, hormone perception, nutrient uptake, and defense against pathogens. Our toolbox to modulate this process is, however, rather limited. Here, we report a conditional tool to impair endocytosis. We generated a partially functional TPLATE…
10h
Size dependence of hydrophobic hydration at electrified gold/water interfaces [Chemistry]
Hydrophobic hydration at metal/water interfaces actively contributes to the energetics of electrochemical reactions, e.g. CO2 and N2 reduction, where small hydrophobic molecules are involved. In this work, constant applied potential molecular dynamics is employed to study hydrophobic hydration at a gold/water interface. We propose an adaptation of the Lum–Chandler–Weeks (LCW)…
10h
Topological defects produce kinks in biopolymer filament bundles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Bundles of stiff filaments are ubiquitous in the living world, found both in the cytoskeleton and in the extracellular medium. These bundles are typically held together by smaller cross-linking molecules. We demonstrate, analytically, numerically, and experimentally, that such bundles can be kinked, that is, have localized regions of high curvature…
10h
Mechanosensitive remodeling of the bacterial flagellar motor is independent of direction of rotation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Motility is important for the survival and dispersal of many bacteria, and it often plays a role during infections. Regulation of bacterial motility by chemical stimuli is well studied, but recent work has added a new dimension to the problem of motility control. The bidirectional flagellar motor of the bacterium…
10h
Structural basis for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin targeting of claudins at tight junctions in mammalian gut [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The bacterium Clostridium perfringens causes severe, sometimes lethal gastrointestinal disorders in humans, including enteritis and enterotoxemia. Type F strains produce an enterotoxin (CpE) that causes the third most common foodborne illness in the United States. CpE induces gut breakdown by disrupting barriers at cell–cell contacts called tight junctions (TJs), which…
10h
An incorrect wetness-based correction method for deuterium offset [Biological Sciences]
Isotope-based plant–soil water tracing assumes that the isotope signal in the plant xylem does not fractionate (1). However, this assumption has been questioned increasingly in recent years with numerous reports for different plants of deuterium depletion in xylem water, particularly for halophyte and xerophytes (2). Chen et al. (3) go…
10h
Capture and metabolomic analysis of the human endometrial epithelial organoid secretome [Cell Biology]
Suboptimal uterine fluid (UF) composition can lead to pregnancy loss and likely contributes to offspring susceptibility to chronic adult-onset disorders. However, our understanding of the biochemical composition and mechanisms underpinning UF formation and regulation remain elusive, particularly in humans. To address this challenge, we developed a high-throughput method for intraorganoid…
10h
Reply to Zhao: The demonstrated magnitude of artifact during stem water extraction signals a clear need for deuterium correction [Biological Sciences]
Zhao (1) considers our examination (2) of the relationship between deuterium offset (hereafter "Δ") and stem gravimetric water content (hereafter "W") across all the study species to be misleading, and instead suggest that data should be analyzed by individual habitat type based on a vague argument that "different habitats/species will…
10h
Inherited deficiency of stress granule ZNFX1 in patients with monocytosis and mycobacterial disease [Genetics]
Human inborn errors of IFN-γ underlie mycobacterial disease, due to insufficient IFN-γ production by lymphoid cells, impaired myeloid cell responses to this cytokine, or both. We report four patients from two unrelated kindreds with intermittent monocytosis and mycobacterial disease, including bacillus Calmette–Guérin-osis and disseminated tuberculosis, and without any known inborn…
10h
Exploring comet thermal history: Burnt-out comet covered with talcum powder
The world's first ground-based observations of the bare nucleus of a comet nearing the end of its active life revealed that the nucleus has a diameter of 800 meters and is covered with large grains of phyllosilicate; on Earth large grains of phyllosilicate are commonly available as talcum powder. This discovery provides clues to piece together the history of how this comet evolved into its current
10h
How the fly selects its reproductive male
A team has discovered an RNA coding for a micro-peptide – a very small protein – that plays a crucial role in the competition between spermatozoa from different males of the Drosophila with which the female mates. In addition to shedding new light on this biological mechanism, this work highlights the importance of small peptides, a class of proteins that is now emerging as a key player in complex
10h
Rising Sika deer populations linked to bovine TB infections
New research suggests Ireland's increasing populations of Sika deer may be linked to local outbreaks of TB infection in cattle. Although TB infection rates have decreased in general in recent decades, county-level data shows a correlation between higher Sika numbers and higher local TB infections – with County Wicklow a particular hotspot.
10h
Aquatic invasive species cause billions of dollars in damage
The global movement of goods and people, in its modern form, has many unwanted side effects. One of these is that animal and plant species travel around the world with it. Often they fail to establish themselves in the ecosystems of the destination areas. Sometimes, however, due to a lack of effective management, they multiply to such an extent in the new environment that they become a threat to t
10h
AGA recommends intragastric balloons as an additional weight loss strategy for obese patients
After a detailed review of available literature, the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) has released new clinical guidelines recommending the use of intragastric balloons (IGB) for patients with obesity who have not been able to lose weight with traditional weight-loss strategies. This treatment is most successful with accompanying therapy, such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacol
10h
People with HIV at high risk for intimate partner violence
New CDC data show that people with HIV who experienced IPV in the past 12 months were more likely to engage in behaviors associated with elevated HIV transmission risk, were less likely to be engaged in routine HIV care and more likely to seek emergency care services and have poor HIV clinical outcomes. The findings are reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, published by Elsevier
10h
New wasp species discovered in Norway
Cuckoo wasps—also called emerald wasps—are some of the most beautiful insects we have, with colorful exteriors that shine like jewels. However, these beauties have also created a lot of headaches.
10h
Study analyzes the effect of sexual orientation on wages in Spain
Spain is among the five countries in the world with the highest levels of social acceptance of LGBTIQ+ people and rights, and was the third country in the world to legalize same-sex marriages, in 2005. In 2019, 3.1% of marriages were between same-sex couples (INE 2020). In this context, it would seem consistent that sexual orientation should not determine wage inequalities. But is this really so?
10h
How do lakes affect energy, heat, and carbon exchange processes in mountainous areas?
Lakes act as an important part of the Earth system. They have special functions in regulating regional climate and maintaining regional ecological balance. More than 39.2% of the lakes in China are distributed in the plateau. The topography around the plateau lake area is complex and diverse. It leads to a complex and unique local circulation characterized by the superposition of lake-land breeze
10h
Genetic link between face and brain shape
Researchers have identified 76 overlapping genetic locations that shape both our face and our brain. What the researchers didn't find is evidence that this genetic overlap also predicts someone's behavioral-cognitive traits or risk of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. This means that the findings help to debunk several persistent pseudoscientific claims about what our face reveals about us.
10h