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Have scientists at CERN found evidence of brand new physics?
When Cern's gargantuan accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), fired up ten years ago, hopes abounded that new particles would soon be discovered that could help us unravel physics' deepest mysteries. Dark matter, microscopic black holes and hidden dimensions were just some of the possibilities. But aside from the spectacular discovery of the Higgs boson, the project has failed to yield any
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LATEST

Scientists Just Found Evidence for Fifth Force of Nature
Researchers at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, or Fermilab, in Illinois, have found new evidence suggesting that a subatomic particle called a muon is not following the known laws of physics, as The New York Times reports . Muons are a lot like electrons but 207 times as massive. They also tend to decay extremely quickly into electrons and super-light particles called neutrinos. Expose
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Scientists discover two new species of ancient, burrowing mammal ancestors
Paleontologists have discovered two new species of mammal-like, burrowing animals that lived about 120 million years ago in what is now northeastern China. The new species, described today in the journal Nature, are distantly related but independently evolved traits to support their digging lifestyle. They represent the first "scratch-diggers" discovered in this ecosystem.
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In a comprehensive new test, the EmDrive fails to generate any thrust
The EmDrive is a hypothetical rocket that proponents claim can generate thrust with no exhaust. This would violate all known physics. In 2016, a team at NASA's Eagleworks lab claimed to measure thrust from an EmDrive device, the news of which caused quite a stir. The latest attempt to replicate the shocking results has resulted in a simple answer: The Eagleworks measurement was from heating of the
22h
How your daily coffee can help tropical forests grow back
When coffee is harvested, the skin and pulp surrounding the bean are often discarded. Costa Rica, which had much of its tropical forests chopped down for agricultural use, is testing coffee pulp as a way to help reforest the country. A new study finds that coffee pulp can help reforest land in just two years. The coffee beans that keep us going don't grow on the vine in bean form. They grow as co
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Entropy measurements reveal exotic effect in 'magic-angle' graphene
Most materials go from being solids to liquids when they are heated. One rare counter-example is helium-3, which can solidify upon heating. This counterintuitive and exotic effect, known as the Pomeranchuk effect, may now have found its electronic analog in a material known as magic-angle graphene, says a team of researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science led by Prof. Shahal Ilani, in coll
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There's a New Nirvana Song Out, and It Was Written by Google's AI
One of the primary capabilities separating human intelligence from artificial intelligence is our ability to be creative—to use nothing but the world around us, our experiences, and our brains to create art. At present, AI needs to be extensively trained on human-made works of art in order to produce new work, so we've still got a leg up. That said, neural networks like OpenAI's GPT-3 and Russian
20h
Improvements in reports of species redistribution under climate change are required
Studies have documented climate change–induced shifts in species distributions but uncertainties associated with data and methods are typically unexplored. We reviewed 240 reports of climate-related species-range shifts and classified them based on three criteria. We ask whether observed distributional shifts are compared against random expectations, whether multicausal factors are examined on eq
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Discovery of a natural cyan blue: A unique food-sourced anthocyanin could replace synthetic brilliant blue
The color of food is critical to the food and beverage industries, as it influences many properties beyond eye-pleasing visuals including flavor, safety, and nutritional value. Blue is one of the rarest colors in nature's food palette—especially a cyan blue—giving scientists few sources for natural blue food colorants. Finding a natural cyan blue dye equivalent to FD&C Blue No. 1 remains an indus
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Heavy water tastes sweet
Ordinary pure water has no distinct taste, but how about heavy water? Does it taste sweet, as anecdotal evidence going back to 1930s may have indicated? And if yes – why, when D2O is chemically practically identical to H2O? Researchers led by Pavel Jungwirth from IOCB Prague and Masha Niv from the Hebrew University show that, unlike ordinary water, heavy water tastes sweet to humans with this effe
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Thermochemical electronegativities of the elements
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22429-0 Pauling's electronegativity scale has a fundamental value and uses accessible thermochemical data, but fails at predicting the bonding behavior for several elements. The authors propose their thermochemical scale based on experimental dissociation energies that provides dimensionless values for the electronegat
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One in three survivors of severe Covid diagnosed with mental health condition
Study finds 34% developed psychiatric or neurological conditions after six months Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One in three people who were severely ill with coronavirus were subsequently diagnosed with a neurological or psychiatric condition within six months of infection, a study has found. The observational research, which is the largest of its kind, used elect
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What If Andrew Yang Wins?
Lauren Tamaki This article was published online on April 7, 2021. A ndrew Yang is in the Throgs Neck neighborhood of the Bronx, standing next to a lectern on an empty city street. He's just resumed his campaign for New York City mayor after taking two weeks off to recover from COVID-19. The strain of the illness shows. He's hard to hear through his two masks. He coughs occasionally. He seems tire
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Japan Says Sorry, But It Has to Dump This Radioactive Water Into the Ocean
Moving Ahead Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga says that the government has put off figuring out what to do with all of the contaminated water building up at the destroyed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant for long enough — and it's time to start dumping it into the ocean. Suga's hand is forced given that the plant will soon run out of space to store the contaminated groundwater seeping
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Under-30s in UK should be offered alternative Covid vaccine to AstraZeneca jab, says advisory body
Recommendation from government's vaccines advisory body follows concerns over blood clots Coronavirus – latest UK updates See all our coronavirus coverage Healthy adults under 30 should be offered an alternative vaccine to the AstraZeneca jab if there is one available in their area and they are not at high risk of Covid, following concerns over rare blood clots, the UK government's vaccination ad
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Scientists Claim to Discover "Unexpected" New Viruses in Wuhan
A team of researchers claims that it found evidence of multiple viruses — including several brand-new coronaviruses — in agricultural genomes from labs in Wuhan and other Chinese cities. Genetic sequences of crops like rice and cotton released between 2017 and 2020 contained the entire genetic sequences of new viruses that seem to be related to human diseases like MERS and SARS, according to rese
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A Third of COVID Patients Are Diagnosed With "Brain Disease"
A new study found that a shockingly high percentage of patients who catch COVID-19 are diagnosed with some sort of brain-related condition within six months. Roughly 34 percent of coronavirus patients included in the study were diagnosed with either a neurological or psychological condition, according to research published Tuesday in the prestigious medical journal The Lancet . Most common among
18h
Nuclear Reactors Shut Down by "Jellyfish-Like Organisms"
Salp Clog Small gelatinous marine organisms called sea salps are wreaking havoc on two nuclear reactors in South Korea, forcing them offline, Bloomberg reports . In a matter of just three weeks, the critters — which Bloomberg described, memorably, as "jellyfish-like organisms" — clogged up water intake valves used to cool down reactors at the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company's cooling units
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Boston Dynamics Robot Runs Out of Battery During Military Combat Drill, Needs to Be Carried
The French army's foremost military school, École Spéciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr, has shown off pictures of the latest addition to its team of combatants: a four-legged robotic dog called Spot, built by US firm Boston Dynamics. 21. Je déploie le robot pour reconnaitre OSCAR3. Retour en images sur l'exercice de recherche appliquée organisé les 30 et 31 mars par l'EMIA et le centre de recherche. R
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Ancient human migration into Europe revealed via genome analysis
Genetic sequencing dating back 45,000 years shows intermixing with Neanderthals more common than previously thought Genetic sequencing of human remains dating back 45,000 years has revealed a previously unknown migration into Europe and showed intermixing with Neanderthals in that period was more common than previously thought. The research is based on analysis of several ancient human remains –
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The World's First Hydrogen-Powered Cargo Vessel Is About to Set Sail
Hydrogen Vessel A French company is developing the world's first hydrogen-powered cargo transport vessel, which is scheduled to make its debut some time later this year, Renewable Energy Magazine reports . The boat, built by Compagnie Fluvial de Transport (CFT), is set to be deployed on the river Seine in Paris and will use compressed hydrogen produced from electrolysis as its sole power source.
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'Last Hope' Experiment Finds Evidence for Unknown Particles
Twenty years after an apparent anomaly in the behavior of elementary particles raised hopes of a major physics breakthrough, a new measurement has solidified them: Physicists at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago announced today that muons — elementary particles similar to electrons — wobbled more than expected while whipping around a magnetized ring. The widely anticipated new me
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Elon Musk, Who Refused to Take a COVID Vaccine, Now Says Vaccines Are Good
In a striking reversal, Tesla CEO Elon Musk has decided that vaccines are a good thing after all. Better late than never, I guess. After spreading misleading information about the COVID-19 pandemic last year, the billionaire seems to finally have considered the science. "To be clear, I do support vaccines in general and COVID vaccines specifically," Musk tweeted on Wednesday afternoon. "The scien
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AstraZeneca jab worry may play into hands of anti-vaxxers, say Tories
Iain Duncan Smith and second MP warn of eroded confidence in plan after 'messy' MHRA advice Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A decision to offer people under 30 an alternative vaccine to the AstraZeneca jab has prompted concern that some could shun the injection over fears about its safety. Iain Duncan Smith, the former Conservative leader, warned that the decision by
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A rogue 'pristine' comet reveals clues about the origins of our Solar System
Researchers released studies on the composition of the interstellar comet 2I/Borisov. The 'pristine' comet holds clues to the origins and evolution of the Solar System. The comet, discovered in 2019, is only the second interstellar object ever observed. One of the only interstellar visitors ever discovered traversing our Solar System, the rogue comet 2l/Borisov, is also one of the most "pristine"
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​Why the simulation hypothesis is pseudoscience
The simulation hypothesis posits that everything we experience was coded by an intelligent being, and we are part of that computer code. But we cannot accurately reproduce natural laws with computer simulations. Faith is fine, but science requires evidence and logic. [Note: The following is a transcript of the video embedded at the bottom of this article.] I quite like the idea that we live in a
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There's nowhere left on Earth free of space pollution
New research has found that the entire planet is covered by light pollution from space objects. Companies like SpaceX and Amazon plan to launch thousands of satellites into orbit this decade. Scientists fear this space traffic will impede their ability to stare into deep space. In December, we reported on the imminent clean-up of space junk . With an estimated 129 million pieces of debris current
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If you hate your job, blame the Agricultural Revolution
For the species Homo sapiens , the Agricultural Revolution was a good deal, allowing the population to grow and culture to advance. But was it a good deal for individuals? Hunter-gatherers likely led lives requiring far less daily work than farmers, leading one anthropologist to call them the "original affluent society." The transition from hunter-gatherers to farmers may have occurred as a kind
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A Common Chemical Is Causing a Huge Wave of Parkinson's Disease, Doctor Warns
Doctors have a difficult time tracing cases of Parkinson's Disease back to their root cause, in no small part because the degenerative neurological condition can be triggered by exposure to chemicals years before any symptoms emerge. But case numbers have increased drastically in the US over the course of the last decade, University of Rochester Medical Center neurologist Ray Dorsey warned The Gu
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A new natural blue for food coloring
A natural brilliant blue coloring has been discovered by an international team of researchers including chemists at the University of California, Davis. The new cyan blue, obtained from red cabbage, could be an alternative to synthetic blue food colorings such as the widely used FD&C Blue No. 1. The work is published April 7 in Science Advances.
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You Probably Have an Asymptomatic Infection Right Now
One of the most perplexing and enduring mysteries of the pandemic is also one of the most fundamental questions about viruses. How can the same virus that kills so many go entirely unnoticed in others? The mystery is hardly unique to COVID-19. SARS, MERS, influenza, Ebola, dengue, yellow fever, chikungunya, West Nile, Lassa, Japanese encephalitis, Epstein-Barr, and polio can all be deadly in one
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Designing selective membranes for batteries using a drug discovery toolbox
Membranes that allow certain molecules to quickly pass through while blocking others are key enablers for energy technologies from batteries and fuel cells to resource refinement and water purification. For example, membranes in a battery separating the two terminals help to prevent short circuits, while also allowing the transport of charged particles, or ions, needed to maintain the flow of elec
19h
NASA's Mars Rover Just Took a Selfie and It's Actually Beautiful
Selfie Stick NASA's Perseverance Mars rover has sent back a selfie. The stunningly crisp self-image of the six-wheeled rover's "head" was taken by Perseverance's WATSON (Wide Angle Topographic Sensor for Operations and eNgineering), a high resolution camera meant to take close-up pictures of rock textures. Honestly, our guy's not looking too bad. Portrait of the Artist as a Young Bot WATSON digit
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First images of cells exposed to COVID-19 vaccine reveal the production of native-like coronavirus spikes
New research has for the first time compared images of the protein spikes that develop on the surface of cells exposed to the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine to the protein spike of the SARS-CoV-19 coronavirus. The images show that the spikes are highly similar to those of the virus and support the modified adenovirus used in the vaccine as a leading platform to combat COVID-19.
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What you need to know about the Facebook data leak
The news: The personal data of 533 million Facebook users in more than 106 countries was found to be freely available online last weekend. The data trove, uncovered by security researcher Alon Gal , includes phone numbers, email addresses, hometowns, full names, and birth dates. Initially, Facebook claimed that the data leak was previously reported on in 2019 and that it had patched the vulnerabi
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The Pandemic Is Undoing Field Researchers' Oldest Assumption
In the rain forests of Borneo, Sahril Ramadani wakes before sunrise to the high-pitched shrieks of gibbons. Fumbling in the dark, he packs up his essentials for the day: hand sanitizer, iPad, GPS tracker, watch, materials for sample collection, and lunch. Securing an N95 mask over his face, he sets out on a solitary search for orangutans. Ramadani, 23, spends 20 days a month here at Cabang Panti,
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America Is About to Go Botox Wild
Over the past year, Americans have lamented, loudly and publicly, the loss of many of the communal aspects of pre-pandemic life: eating inside restaurants without worry. Going to packed concerts and sporting events. Celebrating holidays and birthdays with lots of loved ones. Often in a quieter voice, Americans have also lamented a slightly different, less communal loss, one that's trickier to mou
23h
UK Covid live news: MHRA should issue new guidance on AstraZeneca vaccine urgently, says health committee chair
Latest updates: call comes after trial of AstraZeneca vaccine on children aged six to 17 is paused amid concerns over links to very rare blood clots AstraZeneca jab: MHRA and EMA to give update on blood clot investigation AstraZeneca jab could have causal link to rare blood clots, say UK experts Third of survivors of severe Covid diagnosed with mental health condition Coronavirus – latest global
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Man Sentenced for Buying Chemical Weapons With Bitcoin
Bitcoin Bust A 48-year-old man from Missouri named Jason Siesser was sentenced to 12 years in prison on Tuesday after he repeatedly tried to buy a deadly chemical weapon over the internet with Bitcoin. The plan didn't work, according to CNBC , and Siesser was arrested after accepting a mock package he thought contained his order. But the story illustrates the troubling ease with which Bitcoin and
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Boston in the 1970s
Here's a collection of some of the sights and events taking place in and around Boston from 1970 to 1979. Below, images of the blizzard of 1978, a victory parade for the Bruins after they won the 1970 Stanley Cup, enforcement and opposition to school segregation by busing, a Celtics game in Boston Garden, urban renewals and restorations, a St. Patrick's Day parade in South Boston, anti-war protes
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Foetus in bishop's coffin was probably his grandson
Bishop Peder Winstrup died in 1679, and is one of the most well-preserved human bodies from the 1600s. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden may now have solved the mystery of why a fetus was hidden in his coffin in Lund Cathedral. DNA from the bishop and the fetus, along with kinship analyses, has shown that the child was probably the bishop's own grandson.
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COVID Vaccine: Where does freedom end and civic duty begin?
Now that the vaccine is becoming widely available, why do so many insist on not taking it? As different episodes in history have illustrated — including the building of an atomic bomb in the U.S. – true freedom is to choose to place the well-being of your family, community, and country above your own personal values. We shouldn't confuse the privilege of choice with a threat to personal freedom.
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The four moral judgments you make everyday
Moral psychology studies how we process moral questions and come to be moral beings. A new framework says there are four kinds of moral judgment we all make. Understanding how we evaluate moral or immoral actions can help us make better choices. Moral psychology is the study of how we process moral ideas in our minds, how we become moral creatures, and how our brains handle moral issues. Variatio
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The Crime Drama That Will Enthrall and Repel You
Writing about Titus Andronicus in 1948 , the scholar John Dover Wilson bemoaned how Shakespeare's bloodiest play "seems to jolt and bump along like some broken-down cart, laden with bleeding corpses from an Elizabethan scaffold, and driven by an executioner from Bedlam." You couldn't say the same for Gangs of London . AMC's newest British crime drama is replete with violence, slathering on the ca
23h
Mice could someday become venomous, suggests study on the evolution of oral venom systems
Although scientists have a good understanding of the composition of snake venom, little is understood about the evolutionary origins of oral venom systems. A new study identified a series of genes associated with venom production, and found that this system is also present in other animals, most of which produce saliva instead of venom. The results highlight the surprising similarities between sp
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Even in mathematics, who you know may matter more than your talent
In a recent study, researchers collected data on the backgrounds and academic genealogy of thousands of mathematicians. The results revealed that mathematicians of certain backgrounds—namely, from Western countries—are significantly more likely to join elite circles in mathematics. The researchers issued recommendations for how elite institutions could help the Fields Medal accomplish its origina
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Ant responses to social isolation resemble those of humans
Ants react to social isolation in a similar way as do humans and other social mammals. A study by an Israeli-German research team has revealed alterations to the social and hygienic behavior of ants that had been isolated from their group. The research team was particularly surprised by the fact that immune and stress genes were downregulated in the brains of the isolated ants. "This makes the imm
14h
The Guardian view on dark skies: we need them
Light pollution is killing insects and birds – and an ancient human connection with the heavenly bodies Severe light pollution in Britain appears to have fallen , according to the CPRE, the countryside charity. Across a week in February, the charity asked volunteers to look up and count the stars they could see. The results suggest that 51% of participants were experiencing severe light pollution
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Mysterious blobs found off the coast of Norway identified as squid egg sacs
An international team of researchers with assistance from citizen scientists has confirmed that the large, mysterious blobs occasionally seen in the Norwegian Sea are squid egg sacs. In their paper published in Scientific Reports, the group describes their effort to learn more about the gelatinous spheres and what they have learned so far.
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What Critics Don't Understand About NFTs
Long before cryptocurrency speculators got involved, art prices were capricious—as the British artist Banksy no doubt understands. Recently, the work "Game Changer," which he delivered unsolicited to an English hospital last year, earned it $23.2 million at auction—about $20 million more than experts had predicted. Banksy has famously mocked high-priced sales: In 2006's "Morons," he portrays an a
23h
Math explains polarization, and it's not just about politics
A new study shows that our polarized "us" vs. "them" view of the world can be modeled mathematically. Those who don't fit easily into either group tend to be disliked. The model is not limited to politics and could be used to explain many aspects of society. In most of the great debates, many possible stances get reduced to two options in a hurry. In American politics, we often frame all debates
11h
Sorry, the EmDrive doesn't work
The proposed EmDrive captured the public's imagination with the promise of super-fast space travel that broke the laws of physics. Some researchers have detected thrusts from the EmDrive that seemed to prove its validity as a technology. A new, authoritative study says, no, those results were just "false positives." When Roger Shawyer's EmDrive was first proposed in 2001, it seemed too good to be
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​This zero-energy 'daylight harvesting' device can send sunlight underground
The device consists of an acrylic ball that absorbs and concentrates sunlight. Under the ball is an optical fibre that transports the sunlight up to two stories underground. The study found that the device's luminous efficacy rating was more than double that of commercially available LED bulbs. As nations like Singapore continue to build sophisticated underground infrastructure , there's growing
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Do animals see the world the way we do?
Humans have the capacity for conscious awareness of our visual world. While all sighted animals respond to visual stimuli, we don't know if any of them consciously take note of what they're seeing in the way that we do. Researchers from Yale have devised experiments that suggest that rhesus monkeys share this ability. All day long, our brains are busy receiving sensory information: smells, sounds
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New biosensor makes control hormone auxin visible in cells
The hormone auxin is of central importance for the development of plants. Scientists at the University of Bayreuth and the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology in Tübingen have now developed a novel sensor that makes the spatial distribution of auxin in the cells of living plants visible in real time. The sensor opens up completely new insights into the inner workings of plants for resea
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Research finds that coral predators exert a much larger influence on young coral than expected
You might not think an animal made out of stone would have much to worry about in the way of predators, and that's largely what scientists had thought about coral. Although corallivores like parrotfish and pufferfish are well known to biologists, their impact on coral growth and survival was believed to be small compared to factors like heatwaves, ocean acidification and competition from algae.
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The Dark Side of Box Tops for Education
For many young adults and their parents, the words box tops evoke fond memories of cutting out cardboard rectangles and stuffing them into Ziploc bags to carry to school. The Box Tops for Education program, founded in 1996, is a General Mills initiative that allows families to redeem labels from eligible food and household products for 10-cent contributions to their schools. Over the past 25 year
16h
Caught speeding: Clocking the fastest-spinning brown dwarfs
Astronomers at Western University have discovered the most rapidly rotating brown dwarfs known. They found three brown dwarfs that each complete a full rotation roughly once every hour. That rate is so extreme that if these 'failed stars' rotated any faster, they could come close to tearing themselves apart. Identified by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, the brown dwarfs were then studied by ground
16h
Gate-controlled ground state crossover in a two-dimensional superconductor
In the paired fermion systems, the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) superfluidity and Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) are two extreme limits of the ground state. In a new report in Science, Yuji Nakagawa and a team of scientists in applied physics, quantum electronics, emergent matter science and materials research in Japan, reported crossover behavior from the BCS limit to the BEC limit by varyin
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Nanoconfinement concept improves safety of diagnostic contrast agent
More than seven years ago Albert J. Sinusas, MD, a professor of medicine, radiology, and biomedical engineering, was working with a team of engineers for development of an imageable polymer for prevention of adverse remodeling after a heart attack when they inadvertently discovered that when iodine, a contrast agent used for X-ray imaging, is packed in a nanoparticle there is greater absorption of
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Lunar Gateway will maintain its orbit with a 6 kW ion engine
When NASA sends astronauts back to the moon as part of the Artemis Program, they will be taking the long view. Rather than being another "footprints and flags" program, the goal is to create a lasting infrastructure that will ensure a "sustained program of lunar exploration." A major element in this plan is the Lunar Gateway, an orbital habitat that astronauts will use to venture to and from the s
21h
A protein with a dual role: Both repair and mutation
Using a specialized protein, all bacteria are capable of rapidly and effectively repairing damage to their DNA from UV. However, this mutation frequency decline (Mfd) protein plays another role and causes mutations. A team1 involving scientists from CNRS, ENS-PSL and supported by Inserm has demonstrated and described this phenomenon. Better understanding of mutations opens up prospects in the figh
22h
The Sexual Identity That Emerged on TikTok
B ack in February , Kyle Royce, a 20-year-old in British Columbia, Canada, created a video that proved far more controversial and influential than he had imagined it would be when he uploaded it to TikTok. He had built up a small following poking gentle fun at "Karen" behavior. Occasionally, he would also do live-streams, during which some participants would ask about his background—he's a straig
23h
The Futility of Vaccine Passports
While much of the world remains in the throes of the pandemic, Ayelet Baram-Tsabari's life has mostly returned to normal. In the weeks since Israel implemented its "green pass" system, reopening much of the country's economy to its vaccinated population, she has returned to work, been to the movies, and even planned a staycation with her family. "It's wonderful," she told me from her home in Tel
23h
Terrawatch: cities that change the shape of the planet
The weight of buildings in dense urban areas can lead to subsidence, with effects particularly marked by the coast It's well known that ice sheets are heavy enough to bend the underlying rocks, but what about cities? Are some cities capable of reshaping the bit of planet they sit on? By 2050 around 70% of Earth's population are projected to live in cities. This set Tom Parsons, a geophysicist wit
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Covid-19: how does it cause heart damage?
Cardiovascular problems aren't just a risk factor for Covid-19, but can also be a complication of having the disease . A growing number of studies are showing that many of those who have been hospitalised for Covid-19, as well as people who managed the initial infection at home, are being left with heart injuries including inflammation, blood clots and abnormal heart rhythms. Nicola Davis speaks
6h
Yawn contagion in lions found to also play a role in social behavior
A trio of researchers from the University of Pisa has found that lions, like many other animals, engage in contagious yawning. In their paper published in the journal Animal Behavior, Grazia Casetta, Andrea Paolo Nolfo and Elisabetta Palagi describe their study of lions living in the wild in Africa and what they learned about their yawning practices.
20h
Losing weight through exercise
Worldwide 39 percent of the adults were overweight in 2016, according to statistics of the World Health Organization. Concurrently millions of people want to lose weight. One way to do this is exercising. But what influence does sport have on (direct) eating habits?
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AstraZeneca vaccine: reaction to advice on jabs for under 30s
Vaccine centre volunteer, 26, and student, 19, respond to MHRA review of this Covid-19 injection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK government's vaccination advisory body, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Authority, recommended that healthy adults under 30 should be offered an alternative vaccine to AstraZeneca if available and they are not at hig
15h
Probing for life in the icy crusts of ocean worlds
Long before NASA's Perseverance rover touched down on the Red Planet on Feb. 18, one of its highest-level mission goals was already established: to seek out signs of ancient life on the Martian surface. In fact, the techniques used by one of the science instruments aboard the rover could have applications on Saturn's moons Enceladus and Titan as well Jupiter's moon Europa.
14h
Curb climate change the easy way: Don't cut down big trees
Protecting forests is an essential strategy in the fight against climate change that has not received the attention it deserves. Trees capture and store massive amounts of carbon. And unlike some strategies for cooling the climate, they don't require costly and complicated technology.
21h
For some, the pandemic eased mental health distress
While COVID-19 physically affects adults more than children, mental health distress has increased across all age groups. Children between 5 and 17 sought help for mental health issues at much higher rates in 2020. However, a new study found children with pre-existing mental health issues experienced reduced symptoms when lockdowns began. While the physical effects of COVID-19 have dominated headl
11h
Carbon dioxide levels reflect COVID-19 risk
Tracking carbon dioxide levels indoors is an inexpensive and powerful way to monitor the risk of people getting COVID-19, according to new research. In any given indoor environment, when excess carbon dioxide levels double, the risk of transmission also roughly doubles, scientists report.
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The Atlantic Daily: Our Post-vaccination Behavior Is Slipping
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. It turns out that vaccine purgatory is rife with temptation. With every degree warmer, every vaccine dose put into an arm, the pull of our glorious, better summer grows. Americans, ever eager for
16h
Neanderthal ancestry identifies oldest modern human genome
Researchers analyzed the genome of an almost complete skull first discovered in Czechia in the early 1950s and now stored in the National Museum in Prague. The segments of Neanderthal DNA in its genome were longer than those of the Ust'-Ishim individual from Siberia, the previous oldest modern human sequenced, suggesting modern humans lived in the heart of Europe more than 45,000 years ago.
18h
An amyloid link between Parkinson's disease and melanoma
On the surface, Parkinson's disease and melanoma do not appear to have much in common. However, for nearly 50 years, doctors have recognized that Parkinson's disease patients are more likely to develop melanoma than the general population. Now, scientists report a molecular link between the two diseases in the form of protein aggregates known as amyloids.
21h
New proposal for the management of low back pain with a proprioceptive approach
Low back pain in the elderly is the result of poor 'proprioception,' or the body's ability to perceive its own position in space, caused by a deterioration of sensory receptors in their muscles called proprioceptors. In a new study, researchers demonstrate a protocol for the management of low back pain by diagnosing and activating impaired proprioceptors with localized vibratory stimulations, crow
18h
ISS Astronauts Move Crew Dragon to a New Docking Port
The Dragon 2 capsule autonomously docking at the ISS in March 2019. Having multiple spacecraft going to and from the International Space Station (ISS) is great for scientific progress, but it can cause the occasional traffic jam. Astronauts have executed the first-ever Dragon port relocation maneuver at the ISS, moving one Dragon to a new port , leaving space for the next few capsules to dock at
21h
You don't get an invite to these weddings unless you're vaccinated or have a negative covid test
On March 20, Kyle Niemer and Mallory Raven-Ellen Backstrom had the wedding of their dreams: intimate (around 40 guests), in a spacious venue with a dance floor, great food — and PCR tests on demand to check unvaccinated guests, administered by a doctor and nurse in the bridal party. For two weeks, the couple was on edge. Niemer said he had "CNN dreams, where we were that wedding party with a covi
32min
Novel hydrogel carriers for anti-cancer drugs offer new hope for cancer treatment
Hydrogels are often used as drug delivery systems, but to be effective carriers for anti-cancer drugs, they need to be responsive to varied stimuli in the tumor microenvironment. Now, scientists have developed novel hydrogels to effectively deliver drugs to tumor sites in response to temperature and pH changes in the tumor microenvironment. These multi-stimuli-responsive hydrogels can eliminate re
12h
Getting Vaccinated
So as I mentioned on Twitter yesterday, I've now had my first coronavirus vaccine dose (Pfizer/BioNTech). Since I've been writing about the mRNA vaccines for months here and cheering on the vaccine efforts in general, I can tell you that I'm very, very happy to be able to follow through and actually take one. So far, the only signs are a sore upper arm – we'll see later this month what the effect
20h
Go ahead and consult 'Dr. Google' about your medical symptoms
Credit: bongkarn via Adobe Stock Conventional wisdom in healthcare holds that searching Google for medical information often leads to anxiety and false diagnoses. However, a recent study found that searching Google helped participants more accurately diagnose medical conditions in hypothetical cases. The results didn't show massive differences in accuracy, but they suggest searching Google for me
11h
Too many bears and penguins: Cartoons forget indigenous fauna when they warn of the risks of climate change
Sara Moreno, Tatiana Pina and Martí Domínguez, researchers at the University of Valencia, have shown the over-representation of iconic animals of climate change, such as polar bears and penguins, in cartoons that address the climate emergency. In a scientific article, for which they have reviewed 1,022 of these illustrations, they conclude that, regardless of their geographical origin, cartoonists
21h
Junctions between three cells serve as gateways for the transport of substances
Within multicellular organisms, cells build connections with each other forming cell layers that cover the surfaces of tissues and organs and separate structures in the body. For example, the skin forms a mantle around the entire organism, and the layer of cells lining the blood vessels creates a boundary between the bloodstream and tissues.
14h
Researcher charged with abusing his wife has third paper retracted
A researcher in Canada whose once-brilliant career in kinesiology went from plaudits from his peers to criminal charges of horrific abuse of his wife has notched his third retraction. As we reported in 2018, Abdeel Safdar, formerly of McMaster University and Harvard, where he was a postdoc, was the subject of an institutional investigation over … Continue reading
22h
NASA's Lucy stretches its wings in successful solar panel deployment test
NASA's Lucy spacecraft has successfully completed thermal vacuum testing of both solar panels, the final step in checking out these critical spacecraft components in preparation for launch this fall. Once the Lucy spacecraft's solar panels are attached and fully extended, they could cover a five-story building.
20h
The muon's magnetic moment fits just fine
A new estimation of the strength of the magnetic field around the muon — a sub-atomic particle similar to, but heavier than, an electron — closes the gap between theory and experimental measurements, bringing it in line with the standard model that has guided particle physics for decades.
18h
Prof Jean Bousquet's Sauerkraut Therapy
For some reason, Christian Drosten is the most famous COVID-19 scientist of the Charité Berlin medical school. Meanwhile, Professors Jean Bousquet and Torsten Zuberbier found and tested the pandemic cure, and it's Brassica oleracea!
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A drug that can stop tumors from growing
Scientists detail new work on NLRP3, an intracellular complex that has been found to participate in melanoma-mediated inflammation, leading to tumor growth and progression. By inhibiting NLRP3, the researchers found, they can reduce inflammation and the resultant tumor expansion.
12h
Mounting hope for new physics
Today, the Muon g-2 Collaboration finally published the highly anticipated first result from its measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a precision quantity that offers physicists one of the most promising means to test predictions of the actual Standard Model of particle physics. The measured value, which is more precise than all values before, strengthens evidence for the emer
15h
Scientists develop eco-friendly pollen sponge to tackle water contaminants
Scientists have created a reusable, biodegradable sponge that can readily soak up oil and other organic solvents from contaminated water sources, making it a promising alternative for tackling marine oil spills. Made of sunflower pollen, the sponge is hydrophobic thanks to its coat of natural fatty acid. In lab experiments, the scientists showed the sponge's ability to absorb oil contaminants of v
18h
Aquatic ecosystems source of half of global methane emissions
Methane emissions from aquatic ecosystems are potentially a larger source of methane than direct anthropogenic methane sources, such as agriculture or fossil fuel combustion. Aquatic ecosystems and wetlands contribute at least as much as half of the total methane emissions budget.
20h
Scientists harness chaos to protect devices from hackers
Researchers have found a way to use chaos to help develop digital fingerprints for electronic devices that may be unique enough to foil even the most sophisticated hackers. Just how unique are these fingerprints? The researchers believe it would take longer than the lifetime of the universe to test for every possible combination available.
21h
Developing a large carbon dioxide conversion system, a core carbon neutrality technology
Studies on electrochemical CO2 conversion systems that can be used to obtain useful chemicals through conventional petrochemical processes while eliminating CO2, without polluting the environment, are essential for creating a carbon-neutral society. While significant progress has been made through a number of relevant studies, they have only been laboratory-scale in size so far. In fact, there are
22h
Adoption of green infrastructure tracked
Researchers examined green infrastructure (GI) adoption in Tucson, Arizona, an interesting case study where grassroots efforts have driven policy change in a growing urban area surrounded by water-constrained desert. GI is slowly transitioning from a fringe activity to an important part of how municipalities deal with water and climate change. Tucson provides a peek into the future of GI in the So
15h
Study tracks the adoption of green infrastructure, from water conservation to policy
In a new paper published in the Journal of Environmental Policy & Planning, the University of Maryland teamed up with local researchers to examine green infrastructure adoption and leadership in Tucson, Arizona, an interesting case study where grassroots efforts have helped to drive policy change in a growing urban area surrounded by water-constrained desert. Green infrastructure (any installation
15h
On Wanting to Change review – an inspiring vision of psychoanalysis
Conversation rather than conversion is vital in the consulting room – is that the same for politics? Those who find writing a chore are better off not knowing about the literary method of Adam Phillips . Every Wednesday he walks to his office in Notting Hill. On this brief journey some idea begins to take shape, usually related to his day job (Phillips is a Freudian psychoanalyst who spends the r
1h
Retrain your brain for long-term thinking
Roman Krznaric, philosopher and author of the book "The Good Ancestor: A Radical Prescription for Long-Term Thinking," says that there are two parts of the human brain that are driving our decisions and ultimately determining what kind of legacy we leave behind for future generations. Short-term thinking happens in the marshmallow brain (named after the famous Stanford marshmallow test), while lo
11h
Clinical trial completion rates decline during COVID-19 pandemic
Social distancing and lockdowns may have affected clinical researchers' ability to finish trials, researchers report. Study completion rates dropped worldwide between 13 percent and 23 percent, depending on the type of research sponsor and geographic location, between April and October 2020.
11h
U. S. socio-economic effects of harmful algal blooms
Harmful algal blooms (HABs) occur in all 50 U.S. states and many produce toxins that cause illness or death in humans and commercially important species. However, attempts to place a more exact dollar value on the full range of these impacts often vary widely in their methods and level of detail, which hinders understanding of the scale of their socio-economic effects.
12h
A bacterial toxin that acts as a mediator rather than a killer
Traditionally, bacterial toxins have been seen as killers of target cells. But is there more than meets the eye? Umeå University Professor Teresa Frisan and her team have discovered that toxin-host interactions are more complex and that bacterial toxins can act as modulators of the host immune response to avoid bacteria detection and long-term infection. The study has been published in the journal
22h
New method advances single-cell transcriptomic technologies
Single-cell transcriptomic methods allow scientists to study thousands of individual cells from living organisms, one-by-one, and sequence each cell's genetic material. Genes are activated differently in each cell type, giving rise to cell types such as neurons, skin cells and muscle cells.
2h
Chain length determines molecular color
Researchers have developed fluorescent polymers whose color can be easily tuned. Depending on their length, the polymers emit a different color. Potential applications include biomedicine, security printing and solar energy.
12h
Coral predators exert a much larger influence on young coral than expected
You might not think an animal made out of stone would have much to worry about in the way of predators, and that's largely what scientists had thought about coral. Although corallivores like parrotfish and pufferfish are well known to biologists, their impact on coral growth and survival was believed to be small compared to factors like heatwaves, ocean acidification and competition from algae.
15h
Chain length determines molecular color, allowing color-tuning for medical imaging
Around the world, a huge amount of research and development work is currently being done on carbon-containing, or organic, molecules that emit colored light after appropriate excitation. This research field is driven by the display industry and the development of biomedical imaging techniques. While precise color tuning in organic fluorescent dyes has so far usually been achieved by mixing differe
16h
Polypeptide self-assembly directed by the addition of cosolvents
Very different nanostructures are formed through the self-assembly of a polypeptide depending on which of two cosolvents is added to the reaction mixture, three RIKEN chemists have shown. This discovery is of fundamental interest—offering fresh insights into the ways that nature guides the self-assembly of complex structures such as proteins. It could also have practical applications—suggesting ne
20h
Sweden's light-touch pandemic strategy increases inequalities
The Swedish corona strategy means that some sections of society are unequally affected by the pandemic. A shutdown or possibly tougher restrictions could have provided better opportunities for different occupational groups, says Nazem Tahvilzadeh, a researcher at Malmö University.
21h
Do We Have Free Will? Maybe It Doesn't Matter – Facts So Romantic
It's hard to change people's beliefs about free will. So, it can feel like a relief to realize that even when you can change people's beliefs, it seems to make no moral difference anyway. Illustration by Triff / Shutterstock Belief is a special kind of human power. Agustin Fuentes, an anthropologist at the University of Notre Dame, eloquently claims as much in his recent book Why We Believe: Evol
8h
Carnegie Mellon/Yale PNA-based technique an essential part of the gene editing toolkit
In an article published in the April 8 issue of Nature, the National Institutes of Health's Somatic Cell Gene Editing Consortium provided a detailed update on the progress of their nationwide effort to develop safer and more effective methods to edit the genomes of disease-relevant somatic cells and reduce the burden of disease caused by genetic changes.
14h
Genome sequencing reveals a new species of bumblebee
While studying genetic diversity in bumblebees in the Rocky Mountains, U.S., researchers from Uppsala University discovered a new species. They named it Bombus incognitus and present their findings in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.
14h
Entropy measurements reveal exotic effect in "magic-angle" graphene
Most materials go from being solids to liquids when they are heated. One rare counter-example is helium-3, which can solidify upon heating. This counterintuitive and exotic effect, known as the Pomeranchuk effect, may now have found its electronic analogue in a material known as magic-angle graphene, says a team of researchers from the Weizmann Institute of Science led by Prof. Shahal Ilani, in co
17h
Fetus in bishop's coffin was probably his grandson
Bishop Peder Winstrup died in 1679, and is one of the most well-preserved human bodies from the 1600s. Researchers may now have solved the mystery of why a fetus was hidden in his coffin in Lund Cathedral. DNA from the bishop and the fetus, along with kinship analyses, has shown that the child was probably the bishop's own grandson.
17h
Mosel vineyards are preparing for climate change by sharing their soil with aromatic plants
The landscape of sloping vineyards on the banks of the Mosel River in Germany is a characteristic symbol of a region which cannot be understood without its wine: the Mosel wine region. Tourists from all over the world, especially from the neighboring countries of Belgium, Luxembourg, and The Netherlands visit the area in search of mountains and wine. However, the lack of new generations and the in
17h
This company wants to 'mine' garbage to find metals for EV batteries
The rising number of electric vehicles in both the consumer and industrial sectors means electric vehicle battery companies are going to need an increasing amount of valuable metals. Geologists Rob Bergmann and Brian Lentz think they have found an answer by extracting cobalt, copper and nickel from industrial waste streams.
19h
Parts of U.S.'s southernmost states will 'tropicalize' as climate changes
As climate change reduces the frequency and intensity of killing freezes, tropical plants and animals that once could survive in only a few subtropical parts of the U.S. are expanding their ranges northward, according to a new study led by the U.S. Geological Survey. This change is likely to result in some temperate zone plant and animal communities found today across the southern U.S. being repla
1d
Modular synthesis of chiral 1,2-dihydropyridines via Mannich/Wittig/cycloisomerization sequence that internally reuses waste
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22374-y 1,2-Dihydropyridines are valuable precursors for the synthesis of biologically relevant piperidines and pyridines, but the methods for their synthesis are underdeveloped. Here, the authors report a modular organocatalytic Mannich/Wittig/cycloisomerization sequence to access chiral 1,2-dihydropyridines from N-Bo
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ATP6V0A1 encoding the a1-subunit of the V0 domain of vacuolar H+-ATPases is essential for brain development in humans and mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22389-5 A member of the vacuolar H+-ATPase family, ATP6V0A1 is involved in lysosomal activity. Here, the authors report that ATP6V0A1 variants identified in individuals with developmental and epileptic encephalopathy are associated with impairment of lysosomal acidification, autophagy and mTORC1 signaling, suggesting a
now
Symbiotic polyamine metabolism regulates epithelial proliferation and macrophage differentiation in the colon
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22212-1 Polyamines produced by intestinal bacteria are thought to have beneficial effects on the host. Here the authors show that these polyamines increase regulatory macrophage abundance and are taken up by colonic epithelial cells to enhance colonic barrier function and immunity in mice.
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Smc5/6 functions with Sgs1-Top3-Rmi1 to complete chromosome replication at natural pause sites
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22217-w Smc5/6, part of the structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) family, plays roles in genome structural integrity. Here the authors reveal that Smc5/6 acts jointly with Top3 within the STR complex to mediate DNA replication completion at genomic natural pausing sites (NPSs).
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Primate ventral striatum maintains neural representations of the value of previously rewarded objects for habitual seeking
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22335-5 Ventral striatum is known to be involved in the value update for habit learning. Here, the authors report neural and behavioural correlates for the long-term maintenance of value memory for previously rewarded objects in the ventral striatum of humans and monkeys.
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The anatomy of past abrupt warmings recorded in Greenland ice
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22241-w Palaeodata resolution and dating limit the study of the sequence of changes across Earth during past abrupt warmings. Here, the authors show tight decadal-scale coupling between Greenland climate, North Atlantic sea ice and atmospheric circulation during these past events using two highly resolved ice-core reco
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Exploiting pyocyanin to treat mitochondrial disease due to respiratory complex III dysfunction
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22062-x Mitochondrial diseases, including those caused by defects in complex III of the respiratory chain, lack curative treatments. Here the authors report that the small molecule pyocyanin has beneficial effects in cells derived from patients with complex III-deficiency as well as in fly and zebrafish genetic models
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Fostret i biskop Peder Winstrups kista kan ha fått sin förklaring
Forskare kan ha löst gåtan om varför ett foster låg i biskop Peder Winstrups kista i domkyrkan i Lund. DNA från biskopen och fostret har, tillsammans med en utredning av släktskapsförhållandena, visat att fostret troligen var biskopens barnbarn. Något framträder mellan biskopen Peder Winstrups bägge underben. Att döma av röntgenbilden är det frågan om små ben. Är det ett djur, en råtta? När bilde
50min
Fler oroar sig för gängbrott – kan påverka valet 2022
Oron för organiserad brottslighet har ökat under de senaste åren och får nu en toppnotering i den nya SOM-undersökningen från Göteborgs universitet, som genomfördes från den 7 september till den 21 december år 2020. Hela 60 procent av det svenska folket tycker att gängbrottsligheten är mycket oroande, och den hamnar därmed högst upp i rangordningen – följt av ökad narkotikaanvändning, miljöförstör
2h
Gut bacteria 'talk' to horse's cells to improve their athletic performance
A horse's gut microbiome communicates with its host by sending chemical signals to its cells, which has the effect of helping the horse to extend its energy output, finds a new study published in Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences. This exciting discovery paves the way for dietary supplements that could enhance equine athletic performance.
2h
Structural racism & anti-LGBTQ policies lead to worse health in Black sexual minority men
Eliminating racist and anti-LGBTQ policies is essential to improving the health of Black gay, bisexual and other sexual minority men, according to a Rutgers-led research team. The study, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, examined the impact that U.S. state-level structural racism and anti-LGBTQ policies have on the psychological and behavioral health of Black and white sexu
5h
Gut bacteria "talk" to horse's cells to improve their athletic performance
A horse's gut bacteria communicate with the mitochondria, the components in the cells that generate and regulate energy, finds a new study. It reveals the chemical signals, in the form of metabolites produced by the bacteria breaking down food for growth and energy, have the effect of "turning on" specific genes that help the horse to extend its energy output. This study paves the way for dietary
5h
Gaia, the Scientist – Issue 99: Universality
There exists a social hierarchy within science that strikes people who are not mixed up in it as ridiculous. It goes like this: Mathematicians are superior to Physicists, who are, in turn, superior to Chemists, who are of course, superior to Biologists. There's also a pecking order within each of these disciplines. Take biology, for example: Geneticists are superior to Biochemists, who are superi
8h
How to Conquer COVID-19 Amid a Confederacy of Dunces – Issue 99: Universality
Robert Burioni is a virologist at the San Raffaele University in Milan, Italy, and a serious scientist. But in 2016, something happened that changed his course. He was on television with two anti-vaxxers—a famous actress and a former DJ—who were taking on vaccines, reported Science magazine.1 At the last moment, he was given a chance to respond on camera. He said, "The earth is round, gasoline is
8h
The Vast Viral World: What We Know (and Don't Know) – Issue 99: Universality
Slightly ovoid in shape and somewhat blurred at the edges, the black splotches were scattered across a mottled gray background, looking much like a postmodern painting. At a meeting of the Medical Society of Berlin in 1938, Helmut Ruska, a German physician and biologist, was presenting the first images ever seen of virus particles. The splotches were members of the poxvirus family, specifically e
8h
NIH-funded researchers develop language test for people with Down syndrome
Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health have developed a test to evaluate the expressive language skills of people with Down syndrome, a condition resulting from an extra copy or piece of chromosome 21. Expressive language is the use of words to convey meaning to others. Language delays are common in people with Down syndrome, and the study authors believe their test provides a mor
9h
A genetic link between your face and brain shape
Studies have revealed a relationship between the shapes of the brain and face, but the nature of this relationship has remained poorly understood. In a recent study, researchers used 3D facial images, genetic data, and MRIs to identify genetic regions responsible for shaping both the brain and face. The results revealed a much more complex face-brain relationship than previously understood, thoug
11h
Early indicators of magma viscosity could help forecast a volcano's eruption style
The properties of the magma inside a volcano affect how an eruption will play out. In particular, the viscosity of this molten rock is a major factor in influencing how hazardous an eruption could be for nearby communities. But it usually only quantified well after an eruption. New work identifies an indicator of magma viscosity that can be measured before an eruption. This could help scientists a
11h
This Full-Service Digital Financial Advisor Helps You Manage Your Cash Like a Billionaire
There are more online investing platforms to choose from than ever before. Unfortunately, while these platforms are all driven by advanced analytics, most of them are DIY services that give you very little input from actual human beings. And that's pretty crazy when you stop and think about it. With all the different investing options available, planning for your financial future is as complicate
12h
The case for embedding equity into incident command
In a new editorial published in AJPH, Clark and Goralnick, both from the Brigham, and their co-author Richard Serino, NREMT-P, from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, make the case for why a structural change is needed in the national HICS guidelines to ensure inclusion of an Equity Officer and subject matter experts in health care equity on Incident Command boards.
13h
Race Replay: Ryan vs Big Chief | Street Outlaws
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/StreetOutlaws We're on Instagram! ht
14h
Epigenetic reprogramming of tumor cell-intrinsic STING function sculpts antigenicity and T cell recognition of melanoma [Immunology and Inflammation]
Lack or loss of tumor antigenicity represents one of the key mechanisms of immune escape and resistance to T cell–based immunotherapies. Evidence suggests that activation of stimulator of interferon genes (STING) signaling in tumor cells can augment their antigenicity by triggering a type I IFN-mediated sequence of autocrine and paracrine…
14h
The giant axolotl genome uncovers the evolution, scaling, and transcriptional control of complex gene loci [Developmental Biology]
Vertebrates harbor recognizably orthologous gene complements but vary 100-fold in genome size. How chromosomal organization scales with genome expansion is unclear, and how acute changes in gene regulation, as during axolotl limb regeneration, occur in the context of a vast genome has remained a riddle. Here, we describe the chromosome-scale…
14h
BMP heterodimers signal via distinct type I receptor class functions [Developmental Biology]
Heterodimeric TGF-β ligands outperform homodimers in a variety of developmental, cell culture, and therapeutic contexts; however, the mechanisms underlying this increased potency remain uncharacterized. Here, we use dorsal–ventral axial patterning of the zebrafish embryo to interrogate the BMP2/7 heterodimer signaling mechanism. We demonstrate that differential interactions with BMP antagonists do
14h
Learning the molecular grammar of protein condensates from sequence determinants and embeddings [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Intracellular phase separation of proteins into biomolecular condensates is increasingly recognized as a process with a key role in cellular compartmentalization and regulation. Different hypotheses about the parameters that determine the tendency of proteins to form condensates have been proposed, with some of them probed experimentally through the use of…
14h
Dead clades walking are a pervasive macroevolutionary pattern [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
D. Jablonski [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8139–8144 (2002)] coined the term "dead clades walking" (DCWs) to describe marine fossil orders that experience significant drops in genus richness during mass extinction events and never rediversify to previous levels. This phenomenon is generally interpreted as further evidence that the macroevolutionary…
14h
Cotranscriptional R-loop formation by Mfd involves topological partitioning of DNA [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
R-loops are nucleic acid hybrids which form when an RNA invades duplex DNA to pair with its template sequence. Although they are implicated in a growing number of gene regulatory processes, their mechanistic origins remain unclear. We here report real-time observations of cotranscriptional R-loop formation at single-molecule resolution and propose…
14h
Functional connectome fingerprinting using shallow feedforward neural networks [Neuroscience]
Although individual subjects can be identified with high accuracy using correlation matrices computed from resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) data, the performance significantly degrades as the scan duration is decreased. Recurrent neural networks can achieve high accuracy with short-duration (72 s) data segments but are designed to use temporal features not…
14h
BABEL enables cross-modality translation between multiomic profiles at single-cell resolution [Genetics]
Simultaneous profiling of multiomic modalities within a single cell is a grand challenge for single-cell biology. While there have been impressive technical innovations demonstrating feasibility—for example, generating paired measurements of single-cell transcriptome (single-cell RNA sequencing [scRNA-seq]) and chromatin accessibility (single-cell assay for transposase-accessible chromatin using s
14h
Genomic stability through time despite decades of exploitation in cod on both sides of the Atlantic [Population Biology]
The mode and extent of rapid evolution and genomic change in response to human harvesting are key conservation issues. Although experiments and models have shown a high potential for both genetic and phenotypic change in response to fishing, empirical examples of genetic responses in wild populations are rare. Here, we…
14h
Riboflavin instability is a key factor underlying the requirement of a gut microbiota for mosquito development [Developmental Biology]
We previously determined that several diets used to rear Aedes aegypti and other mosquito species support the development of larvae with a gut microbiota but do not support the development of axenic larvae. In contrast, axenic larvae have been shown to develop when fed other diets. To understand the mechanisms…
14h
Melanocortin 3 receptor-expressing neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus promote glucose disposal [Neuroscience]
The ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is a critical neural node that senses blood glucose and promotes glucose utilization or mobilization during hypoglycemia. The VMH neurons that control these distinct physiologic processes are largely unknown. Here, we show that melanocortin 3 receptor (Mc3R)-expressing VMH neurons (VMHMC3R) sense glucose changes both directly and…
14h
Editorial Expression of Concern: Visualizing active viral infection reveals diverse cell fates in synchronized algal bloom demise [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY PNAS is publishing an Editorial Expression of Concern regarding the following article: "Visualizing active viral infection reveals diverse cell fates in synchronized algal bloom demise," by Flora Vincent, Uri Sheyn, Ziv Porat, Daniella Schatz, and Assaf Vardi, which was first published March 11, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2021586118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci….
14h
Race and poverty appear to guide heart muscle DNA methylation in heart-failure patients
End-stage heart-failure patients have a bimodal distribution for DNA CpG-methylation of the heart, and race is the sole variable that explains the difference. Census tracts where the patients lived show that the African-American patients lived in neighborhoods with more racial diversity and poverty than Caucasians, suggesting that the underlying variable may be socioeconomic. DNA methylation diffe
15h
Statement From Atlantic Media on Unauthorized Access of Its Servers
On March 1, 2021, Atlantic Media, a minority shareholder and former corporate owner of The Atlantic, became aware that a serious issue was affecting its systems. Upon deeper investigation, it was discovered that an unauthorized actor had accessed its servers. Atlantic Media immediately engaged external forensics experts to lead an in-depth investigation into the situation and took measures to saf
15h
Fungi are present in your lungs
Even healthy adults harbour a diverse fungal environment in their lungs, as shown in a new study from researchers at the University of Bergen, Norway (UiB) published in PLOS ONE. The prevalence and severity of fungal infections have increased in recent years, and the Norwegian scientists have been examining fungi in both healthy and people with lung diseases
15h
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
A new study published in Science Translational Medicine by EPFL professor Johan Auwerx and scientist from EPFL start-up Amazentis highlight the effectiveness of mitophagy-stimulating molecule Urolithin A in mice to cure a disease similar to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. And points to a possible treatment for affected boys.
15h
Ultrasensitive, rapid diagnostic detects Ebola earlier than gold standard test
An interdisciplinary team of scientists at Duke University has developed a highly sensitive and rapid diagnostic test for Ebola virus (EBOV) infection. In monkeys infected with EBOV, this diagnostic, called the D4-assay, proved to be 1000 times more sensitive than the currently approved rapid diagnostic test for Ebola, and capable of detecting the virus a full day earlier than the gold standard po
15h
Bioinspired tough gel sheath for robust and versatile surface functionalization
Sutures pervade surgeries, but their performance is limited by the mechanical mismatch with tissues and the lack of advanced functionality. Existing modification strategies result in either deterioration of suture's bulk properties or a weak coating susceptible to rupture or delamination. Inspired by tendon endotenon sheath, we report a versatile strategy to functionalize fiber-based devices such
16h
Intercellular bridges coordinate the transition from pluripotency to meiosis in mouse fetal oocytes
Meiosis is critical to generating oocytes and ensuring female fertility; however, the mechanisms regulating the switch from mitotic primordial germ cells to meiotic germ cells are poorly understood. Here, we implicate intercellular bridges (ICBs) in this state transition. We used three-dimensional in toto imaging to map meiotic initiation in the mouse fetal ovary and revealed a radial geometry of
16h
Continuous color tuning of single-fluorophore emission via polymerization-mediated through-space charge transfer
Tuning emission color of molecular fluorophores is of fundamental interest as it directly reflects the manipulation of excited states at the quantum mechanical level. Despite recent progress in molecular design and engineering on single fluorophores, a systematic methodology to obtain multicolor emission in aggregated or solid states, which gives rise to practical implications, remains scarce. In
16h
Structure of TFIIK for phosphorylation of CTD of RNA polymerase II
During transcription initiation, the general transcription factor TFIIH marks RNA polymerase II by phosphorylating Ser5 of the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1, which is followed by extensive modifications coupled to transcription elongation, mRNA processing, and histone dynamics. We have determined a 3.5-Å resolution cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the TFIIH kinase module (
16h
Intracellular action potential recordings from cardiomyocytes by ultrafast pulsed laser irradiation of fuzzy graphene microelectrodes
Graphene with its unique electrical properties is a promising candidate for carbon-based biosensors such as microelectrodes and field effect transistors. Recently, graphene biosensors were successfully used for extracellular recording of action potentials in electrogenic cells; however, intracellular recordings remain beyond their current capabilities because of the lack of an efficient cell pora
16h
How usefulness shapes neural representations during goal-directed behavior
Value is often associated with reward, emphasizing its hedonic aspects. However, when circumstances change, value must also change (a compass outvalues gold, if you are lost). How are value representations in the brain reshaped under different behavioral goals? To answer this question, we devised a new task that decouples usefulness from its hedonic attributes, allowing us to study flexible goal-
16h
Truncated bimodal latitudinal diversity gradient in early Paleozoic phytoplankton
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG)—the decline in species richness from the equator to the poles—is classically considered as the most pervasive macroecological pattern on Earth, but the timing of its establishment, its ubiquity in the geological past, and explanatory mechanisms remain uncertain. By combining empirical and modeling approaches, we show that the first representatives of marin
16h
NanoSINC-seq dissects the isoform diversity in subcellular compartments of single cells
Alternative mRNA isoforms play a key role in generating diverse protein isoforms. To dissect isoform usage in the subcellular compartments of single cells, we introduced an novel approach, nanopore sequencing coupled with single-cell integrated nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA sequencing, that couples microfluidic fractionation, which separates cytoplasmic RNA from nuclear RNA, with full-length comple
16h
Posttranslational regulation of FOXA1 by Polycomb and BUB3/USP7 deubiquitin complex in prostate cancer
Forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1) is essential for androgen-dependent prostate cancer (PCa) growth. However, how FOXA1 levels are regulated remains elusive and its therapeutic targeting proven challenging. Here, we report FOXA1 as a nonhistone substrate of enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), which methylates FOXA1 at lysine-295. This methylation is recognized by WD40 repeat protein BUB3, which subs
16h
Extraction of organic chemistry grammar from unsupervised learning of chemical reactions
Humans use different domain languages to represent, explore, and communicate scientific concepts. During the last few hundred years, chemists compiled the language of chemical synthesis inferring a series of "reaction rules" from knowing how atoms rearrange during a chemical transformation, a process called atom-mapping. Atom-mapping is a laborious experimental task and, when tackled with computa
16h
Phospholipase A2 inhibitor-loaded micellar nanoparticles attenuate inflammation and mitigate osteoarthritis progression
Treating osteoarthritis (OA) remains a major clinical challenge. Despite recent advances in drug discovery and development, no disease-modifying drug for knee OA has emerged with any notable clinical success, in part, due to the lack of valid and responsive therapeutic targets and poor drug delivery within knee joints. In this work, we show that the amount of secretory phospholipase A 2 (sPLA 2 )
16h
Direct visualization of anionic electrons in an electride reveals inhomogeneities
Electrides are an unusual family of materials that feature loosely bonded electrons that occupy special interstitial sites and serve as anions. They are attracting increasing attention because of their wide range of exotic physical and chemical properties. Despite the critical role of the anionic electrons in inducing these properties, their presence has not been directly observed experimentally.
16h
Astrocytes and neurons share region-specific transcriptional signatures that confer regional identity to neuronal reprogramming
Neural cell diversity is essential to endow distinct brain regions with specific functions. During development, progenitors within these regions are characterized by specific gene expression programs, contributing to the generation of diversity in postmitotic neurons and astrocytes. While the region-specific molecular diversity of neurons and astrocytes is increasingly understood, whether these c
16h
GABA transporter sustains IL-1{beta} production in macrophages
Accumulating evidence shows that nervous system governs host immune responses; however, how -aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic system shapes the function of innate immune cells is poorly defined. Here, we demonstrate that GABA transporter (GAT2) modulates the macrophage function. GAT2 deficiency lowers the production of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in proinflammatory macrophages. Mechanistically, GAT2 defi
16h
Holographic metasurface gas sensors for instantaneous visual alarms
The rapid detection of biological and chemical substances in real time is particularly important for public health and environmental monitoring and in the military sector. If the process of substance detection to visual reporting can be implemented into a single miniaturized sensor, there could be a profound impact on practical applications. Here, we propose a compact sensor platform that integra
16h
Cues conditioned to withdrawal and negative reinforcement: Neglected but key motivational elements driving opioid addiction
Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a debilitating disorder that affects millions of people. Neutral cues can acquire motivational properties when paired with the positive emotional effects of drug intoxication to stimulate relapse. However, much less research has been devoted to cues that become conditioned to the aversive effects of opioid withdrawal. We argue that environmental stimuli promote motiva
16h
A cross-species neural integration of gravity for motor optimization
Recent kinematic results, combined with model simulations, have provided support for the hypothesis that the human brain shapes motor patterns that use gravity effects to minimize muscle effort. Because many different muscular activation patterns can give rise to the same trajectory, here, we specifically investigate gravity-related movement properties by analyzing muscular activation patterns du
16h
Electrical tunability of terahertz nonlinearity in graphene
Graphene is conceivably the most nonlinear optoelectronic material we know. Its nonlinear optical coefficients in the terahertz frequency range surpass those of other materials by many orders of magnitude. Here, we show that the terahertz nonlinearity of graphene, both for ultrashort single-cycle and quasi-monochromatic multicycle input terahertz signals, can be efficiently controlled using elect
16h
AMPK/ULK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin ACT domain mediates an early step in mitophagy
The serine/threonine kinase ULK1 mediates autophagy initiation in response to various cellular stresses, and genetic deletion of ULK1 leads to accumulation of damaged mitochondria. Here we identify Parkin, the core ubiquitin ligase in mitophagy, and PARK2 gene product mutated in familial Parkinson's disease, as a ULK1 substrate. Recent studies uncovered a nine residue ("ACT") domain important for
16h
Unraveling the mysteries of sleep disorders in multiple system atrophy
Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease with multiple debilitating symptoms. One of them is sleep disorders; however, owing to limited research, little is known about why only some patients are affected, how sleep disorders influence MSA severity, or even how sleep disorders vary across different MSA subtypes. Now researchers at West China Hospital of Sichuan University have u
16h
Crunching on coral
You might not think an animal made out of stone would have much to worry about in the way of predators, and that's largely what scientists had thought about coral. Although corallivores like parrotfish and pufferfish are well known to biologists, their impact on coral growth and survival was believed to be small compared to factors like heatwaves, ocean acidification and competition from algae.
16h
Novel "hydrogel" carriers for anti-cancer drugs offer new hope for cancer treatment
Hydrogels are often used as drug delivery systems, but to be effective carriers for anti-cancer drugs, they need to be responsive to varied stimuli in the tumor microenvironment. Now, scientists from Japan have developed novel hydrogels to effectively deliver drugs to tumor sites in response to temperature and pH changes in the tumor microenvironment. These multi-stimuli-responsive hydrogels can e
16h
This quick morning task sparks leadership vibes
To be more effective at work, start your day by thinking about what kind of leader you want to be, research suggests. "It's as simple as taking a few moments in the morning while you're drinking your coffee to reflect on who you want to be as a leader ," says Remy Jennings, a doctoral student in the University of Florida's Warrington College of Business. When study participants took that step, th
17h
UMD tracks the adoption of green infrastructure, from water conservation to policy
The University of Maryland teamed up with local researchers to examine green infrastructure (GI) adoption in Tucson, Arizona, an interesting case study where grassroots efforts have driven policy change in a growing urban area surrounded by water-constrained desert. GI is slowly transitioning from a fringe activity to an important part of how municipalities deal with water and climate change. Tucs
17h
Late night snacks cost you the next day at work
Unhealthy eating behaviors at night can make people less helpful and more withdrawn the next day at work, according to a new study. "For the first time, we have shown that healthy eating immediately affects our workplace behaviors and performance," says Seonghee "Sophia" Cho, an assistant professor of psychology at North Carolina State University and corresponding author of a paper on the finding
17h
Many people don't wear a mask when visiting friends
While nearly all Americans wear a mask at some point each week, very few consistently wear one during many common potentially risky activities. That's true even among adults whose older age or preexisting health conditions put them at higher risk for severe complications from COVID-19, according to a new study. Researchers based their findings, published in JAMA Network Open , on a national surve
17h
Anticoagulation and cerebral small vessel disease
Researchers from the University College London and the Inselspital, University Hospital Bern have clarified the role of anticoagulation in intracerebral haemorrhages in two coupled studies. The team of David Werring and David Seiffge succeeded in establishing cerebral small vessel disease as the most probable cause. Prevention of cerebral haemorrhages to focus on detection and treatment of small v
17h
The opportunities and risks of digitalization for sustainable development
Digitalisation can support transitions towards a more sustainable society if technologies and processes are designed in line with suitable criteria. This requires a systemic focus on the risks and benefits of digital technologies across the three dimensions of sustainable development: the environment, society, and the economy. This is the conclusion of a study prepared by a team of researchers at
17h
The science of turning milk into cheese
The global production of sheep's milk is on the rise, and in the vast majority of cases used to produce cheese. However, a relatively large amount of milk is needed to produce it, so science is looking for ways to increase its yield; that is, to obtain more cheese using less milk.
17h
Particle physics: Will muons lead us towards a new physics?
Muons, particles akin to electrons, have kepts physicists' heads spinning for more than a decade, because an experimental measurement of their magnetic properties disagrees with theory. Could this be caused by unknown particles or forces? A new theoretical calculation of this parameter, involving CNRS physicists and published in the journal Nature, has reduced the discrepancy with the experimental
17h
Mobiliscope: Hourly population and social mixing in French and Canadian cities
Is this neighborhood more frequented during the day by white or blue collars? By women or men? Which mode of transport is most used to get to the city center during the day? What are the most appropriate public service opening hours for these potential clients? By mapping the demographic and social characteristics of the population on an hour-by-hour basis, the Mobiliscope geovisualisation platfor
18h
'Patchwork' tumors prevalent across multiple cancer types
Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute, as part of an international collaboration of scientists through the Pan-Cancer Analysis of Whole Genomes Consortium, have analysed the whole genomes of tumour samples from over 2,600 patients with different types of cancer. They identified a high prevalence of genetic diversity within individual tumours, which they further characterised. Their findings c
18h
The structure and function of cortical brain cells modulated by attention
To effectively perform any daily task, the human brain needs to process information from the outside world using various cognitive functions. This cognitive processing passes through a dense interconnected network of cells whose physiology is specialized. The interconnected cell network needs to perform this processing of information efficiently and interact cooperatively to provide us, in real ti
18h
Digital twin can protect physical systems and train new users
It is more complicated than copy and paste, but digital twins could be way of future manufacturing according to researchers from the University of Kentucky. They developed a virtual environment based on human-robot interactions that can mirror the physical set up of a welder and their project. Called a digital twin, the prototype has implications for evolving manufacturing systems and training nov
18h
People systematically overlook subtractive changes
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03380-y Observational and experimental studies of people seeking to improve objects, ideas or situations demonstrate that people default to searching for solutions that add new components rather than for solutions that remove existing components.
18h
Isospin Pomeranchuk effect in twisted bilayer graphene
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03409-2 An electronic analogue of the Pomeranchuk effect is present in twisted bilayer graphene, shown by the stability of entropy in a ferromagnetic phase compared to an unpolarized Fermi liquid phase at certain high temperatures.
18h
Cell-programmed nutrient partitioning in the tumour microenvironment
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03442-1 Positron emission tomography measurements of nutrient uptake in cells of the tumour microenvironment reveal cell-intrinsic partitioning in which glucose uptake is higher in myeloid cells, whereas glutamine is preferentially acquired by cancer cells.
18h
Fossoriality and evolutionary development in two Cretaceous mammaliamorphs
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03433-2 Fossiomanus sinensis and Jueconodon cheni, a newly described Early Cretaceous tritylodontid and eutriconodotan, respectively, show convergence on a fossorial body plan and provide insights into the evolution of the axial skeleton in mammaliamorphs.
18h
Type III-A CRISPR immunity promotes mutagenesis of staphylococci
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03440-3 In Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, non-specific DNase activity of the type III-A CRISPR–Cas system increases the rate of mutations in the host and accelerates the evolution of resistance to antibiotics and to phage.
18h
Demonstration of the trapped-ion quantum CCD computer architecture
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03318-4 The quantum charge-coupled device architecture is demonstrated, with its various elements integrated into a programmable trapped-ion quantum computer and performing simple quantum operations with state-of-the-art levels of error.
18h
The NIH Somatic Cell Genome Editing program
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03191-1 This Perspective discusses how the Somatic Cell Genome Editing Consortium aims to accelerate the implementation of safe and effective genome-editing therapies in the clinic.
18h
Astrocytes close a motor circuit critical period
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03441-2 The duration of a critical period of plasticity in the developing Drosophila motor circuit, during which motor neurons display activity-dependent refinement of neurite structure and connectivity, is dependent on astrocyte to motor neuron Neuroligin–Neurexin signalling.
18h
Genome-wide enhancer maps link risk variants to disease genes
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03446-x Mapping enhancer regulation across human cell types and tissues illuminates genome function and provides a resource to connect risk variants for common diseases to their molecular and cellular functions.
18h
A biosensor for the direct visualization of auxin
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03425-2 A genetically encoded sensor for the quantitative visualization of auxin distribution in plants enables real-time monitoring of its uptake and clearance by individual cells and within cellular compartments.
18h
A critical period that shapes neuronal motor circuits
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00680-1 A mechanism has been found in fruit flies that enables cells called astrocytes to signal to neurons, closing a developmental window during which locomotor behaviour is shaped.
18h
Heating freezes electrons in twisted bilayer graphene
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00843-0 Electrons usually move more freely at higher temperatures. But they have now been observed to 'freeze' as the temperature rises, in a system consisting of two stacked, but slightly misaligned, graphene sheets.
18h
Adding is favoured over subtracting in problem solving
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00592-0 A series of problem-solving experiments reveal that people are more likely to consider solutions that add features than solutions that remove them, even when removing features is more efficient.
18h
Quantum computer based on shuttling trapped ions
Nature, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00844-z A microchip-based quantum computer has been built incorporating an architecture in which calculations are carried out by shuttling atomic ions. The device exhibits excellent performance and potential for scaling up.
18h
Ny metod förutsäger hur svår pollensäsongen blir
Den som är pollenallergisk behöver känna till halterna av pollen i luften för att kunna lindra sina besvär i tid. En ny metod kan ge prognos för hela pollensäsongen – och säga hur svår den blir. Våren är äntligen här och med den kommer sol, värme och – pollen. För runt var fjärde svensk innebär vårens och sommarens ankomst inte bara utekaféer och fågelkvitter utan även kliande ögon, rinnsnuva och
18h
Vad finns egentligen i sprutan?
Aborterade foster, kylarvätska och kvicksilver… Eller bara salt och socker? Missuppfattningarna om vaccininnehållet är många. Vad är det egentligen som sprutas in i armen? Vaccin brukar beskrivas som den medicinska uppfinning som har räddat flest liv. Idag har de flesta vacciner en sak gemensamt: De ska ges till friska människor. Därmed blir toleransen mot att vacciner kan ge biverkningar extremt
18h
Using AI to diagnose neurological diseases based on motor impairment
The observation and analysis of movement patterns is part of basic research and one of the most important instruments for non-invasive diagnostics of neurological diseases in clinical applications. Researchers led by computer scientist Prof. Dr Björn Ommer of Heidelberg University have developed a new computer-based approach in this context which uses artificial intelligence to recognise motor imp
18h
Reversing a genetic cause of poor stress responses in mice
Deactivating a gene called Ophn1 in mice causes a helpless, "depression-like" behavior in the face of repeated stress. CSHL Professor Linda Van Aelst uncovered a feedback loop in the brain regulated by Ophn1 and discovered several methods to reverse the effects of the inactive gene. A rare human genetic disease involving the deactivation of an analogous gene also causes patients to handle stress p
18h
Paranoia therapy app SlowMo helps people 'slow down' and manage their fears
* SlowMo is a pioneering treatment for paranoia which uses interactive technology – via a smartphone app and web platform – for visualising paranoid thoughts and thinking habits.* Trial participants being treated for paranoia reported significant improvements in paranoia, wellbeing and quality of life over six months.* On-screen bubbles are used to help people visualise their thoughts and "slow do
18h
State immigrant policies and preterm births
What The Study Did: In this observational study of 3.4 million live births in 2018, criminalizing immigrant policies were associated with higher rates of preterm birth for Black women born outside the U.S., while inclusive immigrant policies were associated with lower preterm birth for all women born outside the U.S., particularly White women born outside the U.S.
18h
Study revises understanding of cancer metabolism
Tumors consume glucose at high rates, but a team of Vanderbilt researchers has discovered that cancer cells themselves are not the culprit, upending models of cancer metabolism that have been developed and refined over the last 100 years. Instead, non-cancer cells in a tumor — primarily immune cells called macrophages — have the highest glucose uptake, the group reported April 7 in the journal N
18h
Prioritizing who gets COVID-19 vaccines saves lives
Prioritizing who receives the limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines available saves lives and reduces spread of infection, a new study shows. While there is mostly universal agreement that older people should get priority, debates are currently underway about prioritizing COVID-19 vaccines for a variety of other groups. Still others argue against targeting at all. "Prioritization has benefits becau
19h
Myositis-specific autoreactive T cells are pathogenic for dermatomyositis
University of Tsukuba researchers discovered a causative mechanism for dermatomyositis, an autoimmune myositis. Immunization with transcriptional intermediary factor 1γ (TIF1γ), a dermatomyositis-specific autoantigen, led to myositis in normal mice, but caused less severe disease in mice lacking β2-microglobulin, perforin, or type I interferon receptor. Adoptive transfer of CD8+ T cells, but not a
19h
Wild barley from Jordan holds key to stem rust resistance
Stem rust is a devastating disease of cereal crops, including barley, one of the first domesticated crops in agriculture and the fourth most widely grown crop in the world. Barley is unique because it is one of only a few crops that can be cultivated in almost any climate and across a range of elevations, making it economically and nutritionally important.
19h
Visionary bone damage study
A novel way to pinpoint and illuminate bone damage promises to make X-rays more efficient at diagnosing bone and other injuries, Flinders University researchers say. The new technique, looking at potential biomedical applications of an ancient inorganic salt-based aggregation induced emission (AIE) radio-luminescence material, could open new frontiers in medicine including X-ray dosimetry, bioimag
19h
Nanoparticles reveal their location via mirror SELFI
Can a mirror turn an orange into a doughnut? The answer is definitely no in the real (macro) world. But at the nanoscale, a mirror can turn an 'orange' shaped pattern into a 'doughnut' shaped pattern by overlapping the 'orange' with its reflected mirror image.
19h
This Impeccably Designed Outdoor Sofa Stays Clean and Dry in Any Weather
Conventional wisdom says that the good furniture goes inside, and the not-as-good stuff goes outside. It's not hard to understand the reasoning behind this: the furniture you put outside is going to be rained, hailed, and snowed on, not to mention all the dirt and grime it will be exposed to out there. But with Outer furniture, it doesn't necessarily follow that your outdoor furniture isn't good
20h
An online pilot study for affective stimuli because of coronavirus
Hello everyone, We decided to conduct an online pilot study before the main study. So, I assume that some of you are experienced in online studies regarding affective stimuli. We have some pictorial affective stimuli (pictures), our online participants will be exposed to these stimuli but we need a scale/questionnaire to detect before exposure and after exposure mood/emotional state, so we will c
20h
How Much Is Known about the Exact Steps That Lead to Numbers and Counting?
I've found some materials that, maybe, could help me to guide myself to further sources, but I will also explain why these are not exactly dealing with the issue I'm looking for. A couple of links: https://6000generations.wordpress.com/2012/11/11/what-led-humans-to-counting-and-when/ https://theconversation.com/when-did-humans-first-learn-to-count-97511 Now, through those web articles – and of co
20h
Past climate change affected mountain building in the Andes
Climate change can affect the tectonic processes that deform Earth's surface to build mountains. For instance, in actively deforming mountain ranges such as the North Patagonian Andes, erosion caused by increased rainfall or glaciers might alter the structure of the mountains to such an extent that internal stresses and strains shift and reconfigure, changing how the terrain is molded.
20h
Seismic data might be a useful indicator of human activity in cities, study suggests
Seismic data could be used under certain conditions as a proxy to monitor the level of human activity in urban environments, providing similar details to those offered by other common mobility indicators, according to a new study made by researchers from Geosciences Barcelona—CSIC. Seismologist Jordi Díaz is the leading author of the study that has been published recently in the journal Solid Eart
20h
Research shows physical appearance affects career success in economics
Since the beginning of her career, Economics Professor Galina Hale has pursued questions about who is represented within the field and who is left out. Some of her prior research has explored the role of gender in the economics profession. And most recently, she's been studying how physical appearance affects long-term career success for economists.
20h
Black hole pairs found in distant merging galaxies
Astronomers have found two close pairs of quasars in the distant Universe. Follow-up observations with Gemini North spectroscopically resolved one of the distant quasar pairs, after their discovery with the Hubble Space Telescope and Gaia spacecraft. These quasars are closer together than any pair of quasars found so far away, providing strong evidence for the existence of supermassive black hole
20h
Plan to boost pre-K may have widened racial disparities
A report finds that lower-quality preschools continue to result in disadvantages for young children from low-income New York City families—many of them Black and Latinx. That's despite an ambitious program by Mayor Bill de Blasio to close racial disparities in early learning, the new study finds. Early childhood education centers enrolling larger shares of white or Asian American children continu
21h
Why domestic abuse is such a difficult subject for churches
Churches can be a refuge for women fleeing domestic abuse. But sometimes they can help perpetuate abuse by failing to offer support when needed. There can be many reasons for this. Sometimes it's because church leaders simply don't understand—or are not willing to accept—that domestic abuse occurs within their congregations.
21h
Trust and transparency in artificial intelligence
(AI) are hotly debated themes and central to the responsible governance of this expanding technology field. The Ethics and Society Subproject of the Human Brain Project (HBP) has developed an Opinion to further the debate on key ethical and social issues that arise from the use of AI. It draws on findings from social science and humanities research, including a series of consultancies, webinars
22h
Plant a pollinator garden to supply food sources after freeze
Pollinators serve a great purpose in helping pollinate plants and vegetables alike during many months of the year. Although wildflowers returned post-freeze, and many plants are beginning to show life again, most flowering was set back several weeks meaning food sources for pollinators are not available. Planting a few already-flowering plants or fast-growing seeds in your pollinator garden will h
22h
Heavy water tastes sweet to people, but not to mice
Ordinary pure water has no distinct taste, but how about heavy water? Does it taste sweet, as anecdotal evidence going back to 1930s may have indicated? Why would this be the case when D2O is nearly identical chemically to H2O, of which it is a stable, naturally occurring isotope? These questions arose shortly after heavy water was isolated almost 100 years ago, but they had not been satisfactoril
22h
Dårlig astmakontrol plager almen praksis
Langt størstedelen af de astmapatienter, som har dårlig kontrol med deres sygdom, bliver fulgt i almen praksis, viser ny kortlægning. Problemet er komplekst og kræver flere undersøgelser, før det kan løses, siger forsker bag studiet.
22h
Turn Your Emails, Articles, And More Into Podcasts With Elocance
Human communication is reliant on text, to the point where we should probably not send that email, for multiple reasons . Still, between emails, transcripts, meeting notes, and interesting or relevant articles to our interests or careers, we have a lot of text to wade through in a given day. Elocance , which has a 4.1 star rating on the App Store, helps by taking all that text and turning it into
23h
A conversation on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on junior researchers' careers with funders and university leaders
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22040-3 The various restrictions applied across the globe to contain the COVID-19 pandemic have been impacting the way we knew how to work. Dr. Matthews (a scientific program manager at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke—NINDS), Dr. David del Álamo Rodriguez (head of the European Molecular Biol
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A conversation on the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on academic careers with junior researchers
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22039-w The various restrictions applied across the globe to contain the COVID-19 pandemic have been impacting the way we knew how to work. Ms. Wilson (a PhD student in Earth System Science at Stanford University), Dr. Xin (a glia biologist and postdoctoral fellow at University of California San Francisco), and Dr. Sai
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Skilful predictions of the Asian summer monsoon one year ahead
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22299-6 Long-range predictions of the Asian summer monsoon remain challenging due to its complex atmosphere–land–ocean interactions. Here, the authors show that a large ensemble of model simulations can predict the Asian summer monsoon and associated summer tropical cyclone activity more than one year ahead.
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Genetic substructure and complex demographic history of South African Bantu speakers
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22207-y Despite linguistic and geographic diversity in South Eastern Bantu-speaking (SEB) groups of South Africa, genetic variation in these groups has not been investigated in depth. Here, the authors analyse genome-wide data from 5056 individuals, providing insights into demographic history across SEB groups.
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Getting Sick for the Sake of Medical Research
Human challenge trial participants have willingly contracted malaria, typhoid, and other diseases for the sake of medical research. Now, as a controversial Covid-19 challenge trial has begun in the U.K., past participants in other such studies reflect on their experiences — and the ethical stakes.
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The future of biodiversity collections
Events such as the COVID-19 pandemic have highlighted the crucial role played by biodiversity collections in enabling rapid responses to crises and in facilitating ongoing research across numerous fields. Despite the recognized value of this infrastructure, the community nevertheless has further opportunities to maximize its value to the scientific enterprise.
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Organic composts may help farmers prevent foodborne disease outbreaks
Foodborne disease outbreaks linked to the consumption of fresh produce have caused farmers to re-evaluate their practices. A recent analysis of a 27-year experiment comparing organic and conventional soil management indicates that animal-based composts do not promote pathogen survival and may even promote bacterial communities that suppress pathogens.
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How has the COVID-19 pandemic impacted peoples' interactions with nature?
The COVID-19 pandemic and the global response to it have changed many of the interactions that humans have with nature, in both positive and negative ways. A perspective article published in People and Nature considers these changes, discusses the potential long-term consequences, and provides recommendations for further research.
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South Korea data helps create framework to identify COVID-19 vulnerable areas worldwide
The U.S. and South Korea recorded their first official COVID-19 case on the same day, but there were notable differences in how each country addressed the world's most severe pandemic since 1918. A group of researchers recently conducted a study in which they applied data taken from South Korea's response to COVID-19 to develop a methodological framework for identifying pockets of COVID-19-vulnera
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Development of a large CO2 conversion system, a core carbon neutrality technology
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST), announced that a research team of Clean Energy Research Center, led by Dr. Hyung-Suk Oh, Dr. Yoon-Jung Hwang, and Dr. Woong-Hui Lee, has developed a sea urchin-shaped nano copper catalyst for a high-efficiency electrochemical CO2 conversion system that yields ethylene and ethanol, as well as a related system for mass production of the catalyst.
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New insights on cause of anaphylaxis following COVID-19 vaccination
On the first day of the UK campaign for COVID-19 vaccination, there were reports of two cases of anaphylaxis—a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction—within minutes of administration of the Pfizer/BioNTech mRNA vaccine. Subsequently further cases of suspected anaphylaxis to the Pfizer vaccine were reported. A new report published in Clinical & Experimental Allergy reveals that an a
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What are the risk factors for experiencing side effects from childhood cancer treatments?
Steroids are essential for treating children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, a type of cancer of the blood and bone marrow, but they can cause severe side effects such as psychological reactions and sleep problems. An analysis published in Psycho-Oncology of all relevant studies published to date indicates that there's insufficient high-quality research investigating the risk factors for these
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Program may help patients with rheumatic diseases quit smoking
Smoking increases symptoms and health risks for patients with rheumatic diseases, but interventions to help patients quit are rarely available at rheumatology clinics. A study published in Arthritis Care & Research has found that Quit Connect–a protocol involving electronic health record prompts for nurses and medical assistants in rheumatology clinics–can increase electronic referrals to free,
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