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Compliance Will Not Save My Body
Chicago Police Officer Eric E. Stillman chased a boy down an alleyway. It was the early morning of March 29. In Minnesota, opening statements in the Derek Chauvin trial were coming in a few hours. Stillman had responded to reports of gunshots in Little Village, a predominantly Latino community on Chicago's West Side. "Stop right now!" the officer yelled at Adam Toledo, a 13-year-old seventh grade
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LATEST

Two Die in Fiery Tesla Wreck, Seemingly in Self-Driving Mode
A Tesla Model S crashed into a tree and burst into flames on Saturday evening in Spring, Texas, not far from Houston — but investigators of the wreck found neither of its occupants in the driver's seat. Following the fatal crash, two bodies were removed from the wreck, neither of which was actually behind the wheel. One person was in the front passenger seat, while the other body was found in the
3h
NASA's Mars Helicopter Achieves Flight on Red Planet
NASA's Mars helicopter has made history. Ingenuity , a small, four-pound rotorcraft that was dropped off by the agency's Perseverance rover earlier this year, became the first manmade object to achieve powered, controlled flight on the surface of another planet earlier this morning. It's a feat that could revolutionize the way we explore the surface of other planets, including Mars, in the medium
4h
The Interior Lives of Hoarders
Tomas Schuler / EyeEm / Getty I cannot remember whether I knew what compulsive hoarding was before 2009. Likely not. That year, the TV network A&E put the disorder on the cultural radar in an unparalleled way with its show Hoarders. The series introduced a public audience to a sometimes-private struggle—the obsessive need to acquire objects, coupled with the fear of letting them go—and offered it
5h
Are Outdoor Mask Mandates Still Necessary?
Last week, I covered my nose and mouth with close-fitting fabric like a good citizen and walked to a restaurant in Washington, D.C., where I de-masked at a patio table to greet a friend. I sat with my chair facing the entrance and watched dozens of people perform the same ritual, removing a mask they'd worn outside and alone. It seemed like the most normal thing in the world. Until, suddenly, it
6h
Research investigates radio galaxy 3C 84
An international team of astronomers has conducted a detailed kinematic study of a radio galaxy known as 3C 84. The research sheds more light on the properties of this source and its connection to gamma-ray emission. The study was detailed in a paper published April 7 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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NASA's New Horizons reaches a rare space milestone
In the weeks following its launch in early 2006, when NASA's New Horizons was still close to home, it took just minutes to transmit a command to the spacecraft, and hear back that the onboard computer received and was ready to carry out the instructions.
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'Like hunting for unicorns': Australians on the search for adequate, affordable mental healthcare
Countless inquiries have found the same problems afflicting the mental health system, but cost and access barriers still leave those seeking and providing care in despair 'The worst it's ever been': Guardian readers tell us about Australia's mental health system Many Australians experience the country's mental health system as inadequate, dangerous and financially punishing, saying they often fee
23h
Special Ops Soldier With Jetpack Boards Ship in Amazing Video
Special Jet Suit Ops In a new video released by jetpack maker Gravity Industries, a jetsuit-wearing special ops soldier from the Netherlands Maritime Special Operations Force can be seen boarding a ship — by flying there from a nearby pursuit vessel. It's a spectacular demonstration of Gravity Industries' flying technology. Rather than having to pursue and approach the ship in the tailing vessel,
2h
Nasa's Mars helicopter in first powered, controlled flight on another planet
Ingenuity successfully takes flight, hovering at height of about 3 metres before touching back down Nasa is celebrating the first powered, controlled flight on another planet after its Ingenuity helicopter rose into the Martian sky, hovered for a moment, and then gently returned to the dusty surface. The robotic craft climbed to an altitude of about 3 metres on its maiden flight on Monday morning
5h
Photos: The Culture Of Whales
Belugas play, a sperm whale nurses, and orcas teach their pups to hunt in a series of photographs from National Geographic photographer and explorer Brian Skerry. (Image credit: Brian Skerry/National Geographic)
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FAQ: America's New Promise On Climate
The U.S. is planning to rapidly reduce greenhouse gas emissions. This is America's return to the international climate stage. We break it down for you. (Image credit: Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images)
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UK Covid news: Boris Johnson cancels trip to India as pressure grows for it to be added to travel red list
Latest updates: PM's forthcoming trip to India cancelled as country's total cases reach 15m 'If we catch Covid, we die': UK shielders reflect on still feeling unsafe Oxford trial to study effect of immune system on reinfection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage 10.29am BST Matt Hancock, the health secretary, is making a statement to MPs on coronavirus at 3.30pm. Two maj
8h
Mars helicopter Ingenuity: Nasa about to try historic flight
If all goes to plan, craft will ascend to 10 feet above the surface of Mars, hover for 30 seconds, then rotate before descending Nasa on Monday will attempt to fly a miniature helicopter above the surface of Mars in what would be the first powered, controlled flight of an aircraft on another planet. If all goes to plan, the 1.8kg helicopter will slowly ascend to an altitude of three metres above
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Under-30s less compliant with Covid rules, UK data shows
While most followed restrictions, one in seven admitted to decreasing levels of compliance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People under 30 were less compliant with Covid rules over the past year, according to survey data from more than 50,000 adults in the UK. While the still to be peer-reviewed analysis suggests most people followed lockdown and social distancing ru
5h
Microbes are 'unknown unknowns' despite being vital to all life, says study
Understanding these tiny organisms could be crucial to tackling threats such as coronavirus, but new research shows how little we know A new study has highlighted how little is known about microbes – the hidden majority of life on Earth. Life on the planet relies on an enormous quantity of bacteria, fungi and other tiny organisms. They generate oxygen, keep soils healthy and regulate the climate.
12h
Covid: trial to study effect of immune system on reinfection
Oxford scientists will track whether participants are reinfected when re-exposed to coronavirus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The immune response needed to protect people against reinfection with the coronavirus will be explored in a new human challenge trial, researchers have revealed. Human challenge trials involve deliberately exposing healthy people to a diseas
17h
Is the 'new muon' really a great scientific discovery? For now, I'm cautious | Carlo Rovelli
Physicists are always looking for eureka moments – but we should be careful with headline-grabbing announcements There is something curious about the great experiments and discoveries in fundamental physics from the past few decades. They have covered black holes , gravitational waves , the Higgs particle and quantum entanglement . They have led to Nobel prizes, reached the front pages of newspap
10h
Most-Vaccinated Country on Earth Has "Pretty Much Eradicated" COVID
According to a new paper published in the journal Nature today, the evidence is overwhelming: COVID-19 vaccines work, and they work well. In fact, Israel's vaccination program — the most expansive on Earth — has been so successful that it has "pretty much eradicated COVID-19 from Israel, at least for the time being," Weizmann Institute researcher and co-author of the new paper Eran Segal wrote in
1h
Astronomers Surprised to Find That Stars Compete With Each Other
Gas Guzzlers In a new study, Japanese scientists found that a star's final size doesn't depend on how big its initial core was but rather how successful it was at competing with its neighbors for resources. That came as a shock, as the astronomy community long assumed that the mass of a newly-formed core or one collapsed from a dead star — both the seeds of new star formation — had a much larger
1h
The Two Memos With Enormous Constitutional Consequences
One conclusion is apparent following Donald Trump's four years in office: A sitting president is perhaps the only American who is not bound by criminal law, and thus not swayed by its disincentives. What's astonishing is that this immunity has no grounding in actual law. It's not in the Constitution or any federal statute, regulation, or judicial decision. It is not law at all. Instead, the ban o
5h
I'm Not Ready to Perform
Last October, before the second pandemic wave took off in New York City, I had one last band practice in my backyard in South Brooklyn. Five of us were working on songs from my new solo record. Normally we'd play in the basement, but it's pretty low-ceilinged, and we'd read Zeynep Tufekci's recent Atlantic article on viral spread, so we were all hyper-focused on air circulation. My bandmate Sara
6h
MIT Researcher: Sex Robots May Sell In-App Purchases During Intercourse
Superliminal Advertising As new robots are built to be increasingly social and designed to appeal to our need for emotional connections, a prominent AI ethicist warns that humanity may end up being exploited. MIT Media Lab researcher Kate Darling, an expert on tech ethics and the relationships and interactions between humans and robots, warned The Guardian that the way we talk and think about rob
29min
No, You're Crying About a Helicopter on Mars
NASA / JPL-Caltech / Jason Major For the first time in history, humankind has taken flight on another planet. Millions of miles from Earth, on an alien world with a wisp-thin atmosphere, a tiny helicopter rose into the air, hovered for 39 seconds , and then gently touched back down on the surface of Mars. Today's historic flight is a tremendous feat of engineering and a marvelous display of—as th
2h
Nations Need Ambassadors to Big Tech
Governments see that companies have country-like powers, but they can't figure out how to deal with their un-country-like structures. Diplomats could help.
5h
The Americans Who Still Can't Get Vaccinated
Like many Americans, Ariane Dvir is eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. Only, she doesn't live in America. From her home near Cologne, in western Germany, she has spent much of this year hearing about her loved ones back in the United States getting vaccinated. Her husband, an Israeli citizen, has heard about his family and friends in Israel doing the same. Though the couple had intended to wait the
6h
Inside the rise of police department real-time crime centers
At a conference in New Orleans in 2007, Jon Greiner, then the chief of police in Ogden, Utah, heard a presentation by the New York City Police Department about a sophisticated new data hub called a " real time crime center. " Reams of information rendered in red and green splotches, dotted lines, and tiny yellow icons appeared as overlays on an interactive map of New York City: Murders. Shootings
7h
SpaceX Awarded Lunar Lander Contract
I've been watching For All Mankind – a very interesting series that imagines an alternate history in which the Soviets beat the US to landing on the Moon, triggering an extended space race that puts us decades ahead of where we are now. By the 1980s we had a permanent lunar base and a reusable lunar lander, not to mention spacecraft with nuclear engines. Meanwhile, back in reality, we are approac
5h
DNA robots designed in minutes instead of days
Someday, scientists believe, tiny DNA-based robots and other nanodevices will deliver medicine inside our bodies, detect the presence of deadly pathogens, and help manufacture increasingly smaller electronics.
57min
How Fury Over Soccer Is Uniting Europe
When I was a teenager, my hometown football—soccer—team was bought by a local businessman who began his career as a safecracker, became friends with Donald Trump, and ended his days broke and in jail. George Reynolds, who died last week, lived an Englishman's version of the American dream: He got rich, bought a local institution, then went bankrupt. For a moment, his ownership sparked a kind of g
1h
New amphibious centipede species discovered in Okinawa and Taiwan
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and Hosei University have discovered a new species of large, tropical centipede of genus Scolopendra in Okinawa and Taiwan. It is only the third amphibious centipede identified in the world, and is the largest in the region, 20 cm long and nearly 2 cm thick. It is also the first new centipede to be identified in Japan in 143 years, testament to the in
5h
NASA has just flown a helicopter on Mars for the first time
The news: NASA has flown an aircraft on another planet for the first time. On Monday, April 19, Ingenuity, a 1.8-kilogram drone helicopter, took off from the surface of Mars, flew up about three meters, then swiveled and hovered for 40 seconds. The historic moment was livestreamed on YouTube , and Ingenuity captured the photo above with one of its two cameras. "We can now say that human beings ha
2h
Selective mRNA degradation via autophagy: A novel role for autophagy in gene regulation
Optimal cell function requires a fine balance between the synthesis and degradation of biomolecules. Autophagy is the process by which cells degrade and recycle their own components, helping to clean up and maintain the cell's internal environment and ensure the smooth functioning of cellular processes. Autophagy is strongly induced when cells are subjected to stresses like nutrient deprivation, a
5h
CRISPR: Can we control it?
CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) is a revolutionary technology that gives scientists the ability to alter DNA. On the one hand, this tool could mean the elimination of certain diseases. On the other, there are concerns (both ethical and practical) about its misuse and the yet-unknown consequences of such experimentation. "The technique could be misused in horribl
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Will Biden's Presidency Be One-and-Done?
Joe Biden spent the bulk of his adult life running for president or auditioning to be president. Now he is president, and yet the notion that he might walk away from the job while he still has a choice in the matter remains a source of undimmed speculation rare in the postwar era. No one seriously believed that Bill Clinton, George W. Bush, Barack Obama, Donald Trump, or any president over the pa
2h
Beetles that pee themselves to death could be tomorrow's pest control
Up to 25 percent of global food production is lost annually due to insects, primarily beetles. For the past 500 million years, beetles have successfully spread and adapted to life around the globe and now account for one of every five animal species on Earth. Yet as far back as ancient Egypt, these tough little bugs have invaded granaries and vexed us humans by destroying our crops.
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Can you solve it? Are you smarter than Britain's teenage brainiacs?
A colourful puzzle from the UK girls' maths olympiad Update: the solutions can now be read here. Today's puzzle celebrates the UK's outstanding performance at last week's European Girls' Mathematical Olympiad, which is the world's most prestigious female-only maths competition for pre-university students. Yuhka Machino and Jenni Voon, both aged 17, placed 6th and 7th overall, each earning gold me
10h
How the Yazoo Land Scandal changed American history
Few people today are familiar with the Yazoo Land Scandal, which broke in the mid-1790s. Yet it sent shockwaves through American public life, influencing politics, law, and even geography. Without it, Georgia could have been a "super state" — and the Trail of Tears might not have happened. Seven of the original 13 states had extensive territorial claims, mainly toward the west. Credit: Library of
4h
The Women Reinventing the Western
Illustration by John Gall; Searchlight Pictures This article was published online on April 19, 2021. I grew up in San Diego , which resembles the backdrop of High Noon or Unforgiven not at all but is extremely west , geographically speaking. Maybe this is what disposed me to feel that the Western as a film genre was trite and foolish, dangerously sentimental about horizons and stoicism and men sh
4h
SARS-CoV-2 variants from mink evade inhibition by antibodies
It has been known for about a year that minks can become infected with SARS-CoV-2. The virus had been transmitted from humans to farmed mink and mutated in infected animals. Mutations were acquired in the spike protein, which is crucial for the entry of the virus into host cells and represents the central point of attack for antibodies. These SARS-CoV-2 variants from mink were transmitted back to
4h
How to make online arguments productive
Researchers worked with almost 260 people to understand online disagreements and to develop potential design interventions that could make these discussions more productive and centered around relationship-building.
3h
Svenska nyhetsmedier i topp i internationell demokratistudie
Svenska nyhetsmedier står starka på digitala plattformar och fortsätter att prioritera granskande och undersökande journalistik, visar en internationell studie. Men i Sverige, liksom i övriga undersökta länder, är det sämre ställt med journalisters anställningstrygghet. Sverige tillhör, tillsammans med Danmark och Storbritannien, de länder där nyhetsmedierna bäst klarat de senaste årens digitala
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Cielo review – love letter to the desert's starry skies
Alison McAlpine's documentary draws out tales from locals and astronomers to evoke the magic and mystery of Chile's stargazing hotspot Cielo means "sky" in Spanish, and "heaven", too. And it's with a sense of humbled wonder at the immense mystery of it all that the Canadian film-maker Alison McAlpine casts her camera upwards in this beautiful documentary about the night sky. It's filmed at the st
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When stars get too close to each other, they cast out interstellar comets and asteroids
In October 2017, humanity caught its first-ever glimpse of an interstellar object—a visitor from beyond our solar system—passing nearby the sun. We named it "Oumuamua, and its unusual properties fascinated and confounded astronomers. Less than two years later, amateur astronomer Gennady Borisov found a second interstellar object: a comet-like body that began to disintegrate as it passed within 2 A
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Can a new type of glacier on Mars aid future astronauts?
On April 21, 1908, near Earth's North Pole, the Arctic explorer Frederick Albert Cook scrawled in his diary a memorable phrase: "We were the only pulsating creatures in a dead world of ice." These words may soon take on new significance for humankind in another dead world of hidden ice, submerged beneath the red sand of its frigid deserts. This dead world is Mars, and the desert is the planet's mi
2h
End of giant iceberg A-68
The mission to determine the impact of the giant A-68a iceberg on the important marine ecosystem of sub-Antarctic South Georgia is a success according to a team of researchers and engineers, from British Antarctic Survey (BAS) and National Oceanography Centre (NOC). This week (Monday 19 April) the U.S National Ice Center declared 'the end' of the A68 iceberg, because its fragments are now too smal
3h
Common plants and pollinators act as anchors for ecosystems
'Generalist' plants and pollinators play a crucial role in maintaining biodiversity and may also serve as buffers against some impacts of climate change, finds new research. The findings provide valuable insights for prioritizing the conservation of species that contribute to the strength of ecological communities.
4h
Honeywell Just Released Details About How Its Quantum Computer Works
Engineering giant Honeywell burst into the quantum computing race out of left field last year. Now the company has provided the first concrete details of how its device works in a peer-reviewed journal . Unlike its main rivals Google and IBM, who rely on superconducting qubits, Honeywell is using trapped ions to power its device. The technology has a long pedigree— most of the earliest quantum co
3h
SpaceX has given up trying to catch rocket fairings—fishing them out of the ocean is fine
If there is one driving force in the commercial space industry it is economics. The whole concept of reusable booster rocket emphasizes the importance of getting launch costs down. SpaceX, the company leading the charge in trying to bring launch costs down, doesn't just recover booster rockets however. It also recovers the rocket fairings that hold the payload during launch. SpaceX's original plan
4h
The future of particle accelerators is here
A new accelerator and detector will serve as a kind of camera, taking 3D images and movies of electrons colliding with polarized protons and ions. Like a CT scanner for atoms, the EIC will let scientists see how force-carrying gluon particles hold together quarks, the internal components of protons and neutrons. It will also offer insights into the spin of fundamental particles. Cutting-edge accel
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Roman Space Telescope will also find rogue black holes
In the past, we've reported about how the Roman Space Telescope is potentially going to be able to detect hundreds of thousands of exoplanets using a technique known as microlensing. Exoplanets won't be the only things it can find with this technique, though—it should be possible to find solitary black holes, as well.
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Ny studie: Risk för 60 procent svårare pollensäsonger i framtiden
Framtida klimatförändringar riskerar att påverka pollenallergiker negativt. Det visar en ny internationell studie där forskarna tittat på hur gräs reagerar på förhöjda koldioxidnivåer. – Det är inte glädjande om fler behöver leva med dessa frågor i framtiden, säger Kristina Ljungros, generalsekreterare på Astma- och allergiförbundet.
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Nasa helicopter makes historic flight on Mars – video
Nasa's Ingenuity Mars helicopter has completed the first powered, controlled flight on another planet, the space agency has announced. The small helicopter successfully took flight on the red planet on Monday morning, hovering in the air at about 3 metres (10ft), before descending and touching back down on the Martian surface Nasa's Mars helicopter makes first powered, controlled flight on anothe
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Energy implications of the 21st century agrarian transition
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22581-7 The global agrarian transition is characterized by a rise in large-scale land acquisitions (LSLAs), whose energy impacts are unknown. Here, the authors assess how LSLAs change land use, finding that they necessitate greater investment in energy to meet demands, and greater greenhouse gas emissions.
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How scientists are 'looking' inside asteroids
Asteroids can pose a threat to life on Earth but are also a valuable source of resources to make fuel or water to aid deep space exploration. Devoid of geological and atmospheric processes, these space rocks provide a window onto the evolution of the solar system. But to really understand their secrets, scientists must know what's inside them.
1h
Why 'Zoom fatigue' is worse for women
Women report feeling more exhausted than men do after video calls, according to the first large-scale study on Zoom fatigue. The researchers say the "self-view" display may be to blame for that exhausted feeling after a day of back-to-back online meetings. The research shows that overall, one in seven women —13.8%—compared with one in 20 men —5.5%—reported feeling "very" to "extremely" fatigued a
4h
A new project to track and value climate innovation in the built world
Carbon is a universal building block of life—it's in almost every product we make and use, from the cement we walk on to the plastic packaging used for shipping products and the tires on cars and trucks. And while some products are more durable than others, at the end of the product's life cycle, the carbon stored in them is released into our air and oceans as carbon dioxide. Greenhouse gas emissi
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3D biomaterial used as 'sponge' for stem cell therapy to reverse arthritis
A 3D biomaterial scaffold design to slowly release stem cells ensures that implanted stem cells stick around to relieve pain and reverse arthritis in mice knee joints. This reduces the use of stem cells by 90%, thus avoiding the challenge of redness, swelling and scar tissue that can arise from large doses of such stem cells, and potentially opening a path to reversal of osteoarthritis in humans f
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A time-domain phase diagram of metastable states in a charge ordered quantum material
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22646-7 Tracking the evolution of non-equilibrium phases requires measurements over a wide range of timescales. Here, using a combination of femtosecond spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy, the authors map out a temporal phase diagram of metastable states in a charge-ordered material 1T-TaS2.
7h
Kommunikationshandbok för vaccin mot covid-19
Hur kommunicerar man bäst fakta om covid19-vaccin? Forskarna bakom Handbok i debunkning 2020 har presenterat ännu en handbok som översatts till svenska under ledning av Lotten Kalenius. Kommunikationshandbok för vaccin … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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What does the study of domesticated birds tell us about the evolution of human language?
Language is one of the most notable abilities humans have. It allows us to express complex meanings and transmit knowledge from generation to generation. An important question in human biology is how this ability ended up being developed, and researchers from the universities of Barcelona, Cologne and Tokyo have treated this issue in a recent article.
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How oxygen-producing cyanobacteria facilitated complex life
The "Great Oxygenation Event" (GOE), the process whereby the Earth's atmosphere was continuously enriched with oxygen, a waste product of photosynthesis, began ~2.43 billion years ago. The source, according to science, was photosynthesizing cyanobacteria. But why did this all-important turnaround occur so late? Cyanobacterial life existed, as rock samples show, at least 300 million years before th
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Phenological shifts in lake stratification under climate change
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22657-4 Stratification has a considerable influence on lake ecology, but there is little understanding of past or future changes in its seasonality. Here, the authors use modelling and empirical data to determine that between 1901–2099, climate change causes stratification to start earlier and end later.
7h
Cutting the cost of Covid tests for travellers | Letters
Mike Whittaker has a suggestion to reduce test costs for those wishing to travel abroad, while Catherine Dunn says that if the government invested in public health infrastructure, we would have a more effective testing system Your article ( Airlines warn the cost of Covid tests will stop people going abroad , 9 April) considers the cost of Covid tests for a family, calculated as the cost of a sin
23h
Pandemic led to profound changes in multiple sclerosis clinical practice
A survey of U.S. multiple sclerosis, or MS, specialist clinicians reveals the COVID-19 pandemic has created major changes in how they deliver care. More than 95% of survey respondents reported using telehealth platforms to provide care for their patients. Approximately one half of the respondents were MS specialist neurologists, four out of five of whom indicated that COVID-19 had changed how they
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Without major changes, gender parity in orthopaedic surgery will take two centuries
At the current rate of change, it will take more than 200 years for the proportion of women in orthopaedic surgery to reach parity with the overall medical profession, according to a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
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In-ambulance consults cut down on critical treatment time for stroke patients
By changing EMS workflows and incorporating telemedicine techniques, physicians at MUSC Health have significantly shortened the time between a patient's stroke symptom onset and their treatment, as recently reported in the Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases. Before the telestroke program, stroke patients would be brought directly to the closest hospital, where they would begin their ex
46min
Once-a-week insulin treatment could be game-changing for patients with diabetes
Treating people with Type 2 diabetes with a new once-a-week injectable insulin therapy proved to be safe and as effective as daily insulin injections, according to the results of two international clinical trials published online today in Diabetes Care. The studies suggest that the once-weekly treatment could provide a convenient alternative to the burden of daily insulin shots for diabetes patien
46min
Green hydrogen: 'Rust' as a photoanode and its limits
Hydrogen will be needed in large quantities as an energy carrier and raw material in the energy system of the future. To achieve this, however, hydrogen must be produced in a climate-neutral way, for example through so-called photoelectrolysis, by using sunlight to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. As photoelectrodes, semiconducting materials are needed that convert sunlight into electricity a
57min
Who is selling and trafficking Africa's wild meat?
A new study classifies different types of wildlife traffickers and sellers in two of Central Africa's growing urban centers, providing new insight into the poorly understood urban illegal wildlife trade. The findings can help conservation and law enforcement authorities prioritize their efforts on professional criminals, identify patterns among repeat offenders, and determine if wildlife offenders
57min
Northern Red Sea corals live close to the threshold of resistance to cold temperatures
Coral reefs are one of the most biologically diverse ecosystems on earth. In the northern Red Sea and Gulf of Aqaba corals also have exceptionally high tolerance to increasing seawater temperatures, now occurring as a consequence of global warming. This characteristic led coral reef scientists to designate this region as a potential coral reef refuge in the face of climate change—a reef where cora
1h
Researchers use laser paintbrush to create miniature masterpieces
Researchers are blurring the lines between science and art by showing how a laser can be used to create artistic masterpieces in a way that mirrors classical paints and brushes. The new technique not only creates paint-like strokes of color on metal but also offers a way to change or erase colors.
1h
Ocean currents modulate oxygen content at the equator
Due to global warming, not only the temperatures in the atmosphere and in the ocean are rising, but also winds and ocean currents as well as the oxygen distribution in the ocean are changing. For example, the oxygen content in the ocean has decreased globally by about 2% in the last 60 years, particularly strong in the tropical oceans. However, these regions are characterized by a complex system o
1h
Sustainable chemical synthesis with platinum
Researchers used platinum and aluminum compounds to create a catalyst which enables certain chemical reactions to occur more efficiently than ever before. The catalyst could significantly reduce energy usage in various industrial and pharmaceutical processes. It also allows for a wider range of sustainable sources to feed the processes, which could reduce the demand for fossil fuels required by th
1h
Model predicts Texas COVID infection rates weeks in advance
A new model has proved successful in predicting COVID-19 infection rates two to three weeks in advance, researchers report. The new model could help public health officials and other organizations get accurate, reliable short-term projections of daily COVID-19 cases. The researchers used a method based on the SEIR (susceptible, exposed, infected, and recovered states) framework to project COVID-1
1h
MicroMESH: A microscopic polymeric network to attack glioblastoma multiforme
A micro-sized polymeric net wrapping around brain tumors, just like a fishing net around a shoal of fish: this is microMESH, a new nanomedicine device capable of conforming around the surface of tumor masses and efficiently delivering drugs. It has been described by the researchers of the IIT—Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (Italian Institute of Technology) in Nature Nanotechnology. The new biomed
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The challenge of presenting novel nanostructural bimetallic composite for catalysis
Solid-matrix catalysts called heterogeneous catalysts are among the most widespread industrial applications in reducing toxic gases, unburned fuel, and particulate matter in the exhaust stream from the combustion chamber. They are also used in energy, chemical, and pharmaceutical sectors, i.e., production of biodiesel, polymers, biomass/waste conversion into valuable products, and many others proc
1h
Green hydrogen: "Rust" as a photoanode and its limits
A team at HZB, together with partners from Ben Gurion University and the Technion, Israel, has now analysed the optoelectronic properties of rust (haematite) and other metal oxides in unprecedented detail. Their results show that the maximum achievable efficiency of haematite electrodes is significantly lower than previously assumed. The study demonstrates ways to assess new photoelectrode materia
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Mayo researchers, collaborators identify 'instigator' gene associated with Alzheimer's disease
In a new paper published in Nature Communications, Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators report the protein-coding gene SERPINA5 may worsen tau protein tangles, which are characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, and advance disease. By combining clinical expertise, brain tissue samples, pathology expertise and artificial intelligence, the team clarified and validated the relevance of the gene to
1h
New Horizons Reaches Deep-Space Milestone, Snaps Photo
The New Horizons probe scanned Pluto in 2015, but it wasn't designed to remain in Orbiter of the dwarf planet. NASA's New Horizons probe has already made history a few times since its 2006 launch. At the time, Pluto was a planet, but it had become a dwarf planet when New Horizons beamed back the first close-up photos of it in 2015. After that, the probe flew deeper into the Kuiper Belt and delive
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Sleep disorders and surgery: Anesthesia & Analgesia marks first decade of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine
An estimated 50 million people undergo surgery each year in the United States, and a significant proportion of them have undiagnosed or untreated sleep disorders (SD) or sleep-disordered breathing (SDB). Issues at the intersection of anesthesiology and sleep medicine are the focus of the Society of Anesthesia and Sleep Medicine (SASM) whose 10th anniversary is commemorated in the special theme May
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Stone Age black bears didn't just defecate in the woods – they did it in a cave too
Scientists have sequenced ancient DNA from soil for the first time and the advance will transform what is known about everything from evolution to climate change. The findings have been described as the 'moon landings' of genomics because researchers will no longer have to rely on finding and testing fossils to determine genetic ancestry, links and discoveries – and it is thanks to Stone Age black
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NYU Abu Dhabi researchers develop Micro-Fluidic Probe to isolate cancer spreading cells
A team of researchers led by Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering and Principal Investigator at the NYU Abu Dhabi Mohammad A. Qasaimeh, have developed a new microfluidic system, called the Herringbone Microfluidic Probe (HB-MFP), that effectively isolates both CTCs and clusters of CTCs from blood samples of cancer patients for easier and more insightful analysis.
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3D deep neural network precisely reconstructs freely-behaving animal's movements
Following the unveiling of CAPTURE in a December 2020 study, researchers led by Duke University and Harvard University present DANNCE (3-Dimensional Aligned Neural Network for Computational Ethology), an automated tool that can readily capture behavior of freely behaving animals and precisely reconstruct their three dimensional (3D) pose from a single video camera and without markers.
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Tracking topological conditions in graphene
Scientists have been able to demonstrate that graphene nanostructures can be generated by annealing of a nanostructured silicon carbide crystal for a few years. "These two-dimensional, spatially strongly restricted carbon bands exhibit a vanishingly small electrical resistance even at room temperature. They are thus ballistic," explains Prof. Dr. Christoph Tegenkamp, Head of the Professorship of S
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Brain mapping: explained
Brain mapping is an attempt to identify the location of everything in the brain. An accurate map of the brain would immeasurably enhance our ability to understand how it works. The project is massive, involving multiple fields of biomedical research and expensive cutting-edge technology. Brain mapping is one of the hottest current areas of research. The brain is nothing short of amazing. Billions
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Patients who are obese or overweight are at risk for a more severe course of COVID-19
COVID-19 patients who are overweight or obese are more likely to develop a more severe infection than patients of healthy weight, and they require oxygen and invasive mechanical ventilation more often. There is no increased risk of death . These conclusions, for which more than 7,000 patients were studied, appear from international research in eleven countries, including the Netherlands (Radboud u
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MIPT and Harvard researchers grow stem cells to cure glaucoma
A joint research carried out by MIPT scientists and Harvard researchers have presented retinal cells that can integrate into the retina. This is the first successful attempt to transplant ganglion cells (retinal neurons that are destroyed by glaucoma) derived from stem cells in a lab setting. Scientists tested the technology in mice and established that the cells successfully integrated and surviv
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Can we learn to talk to sperm whales? | David Gruber
Animals are communicating — but what are they saying? And can we talk back? Marine biologist David Gruber introduces Project CETI: a team of scientists, linguists and AI specialists hoping to decode sperm whale language. Using noninvasive robots and a machine-learning algorithm to collect and analyze millions of sperm whale vocalizations known as coda, the team aims to demystify the communication
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Smallest stegosaur footprint ever came from cat-sized dino
Researchers have discovered a single footprint left by a cat-sized dinosaur around 100 million years ago in China. "This footprint was made by a herbivorous, armored dinosaur known broadly as a stegosaur—the family of dinosaurs that includes the famed stegosaurus," says Anthony Romilio, a researcher from the University of Queensland who was part of the team that investigated the track. "Like the
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New Electron Tricks in Synthetic Chemistry
One of specialties of Phil Baran's group at Scripps the last few years has been electrosynthesis, which has a traditional hmm-interesting-turn-the-page reputation among most synthetic chemists that they're trying to change . Photochemistry was in roughly the same category at one time, and has become much more mainstream (although it always had an advantage with lower barrier to entry). That field
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Ämnesomsättning och sömn kopplat till ALS
ALS-patienter har sjukdomsförändringar i de hjärnceller som tillverkar ämnen som reglerar ämnesomsättning och sömn. Det visar en grupp forskare i Lund och Australien. Fynden ger ökad kunskap om sjukdomens bakomliggande orsaker och kan förhoppningsvis på sikt bidra till nya behandlingar. Vanliga symtom vid ALS, amyotrofisk lateral skleros, är en smygande muskelsvaghet som sprider sig till olika de
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Cotton wool proves effective in separating single-wall carbon nanotubes
Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are a family of 1D nanostructures with numerous verified applications, made possible due to their excellent mechanical, optical and conductive properties. However, application of CNTs is hampered by the presence of species with various structures in the raw production mixture, which obscures unique properties of individual species.
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Modeling collisions between argon nuclei and neutrinos from a supernova
Massive stars end their lives in explosions called core-collapse supernovae. These explosions produce very large numbers of weakly interacting particles called neutrinos. Scientists working on the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, hosted by Fermilab, are seeking to perform a detailed measurement of supernova neutrinos. This effort could lead to groundbreaking discoveries in particle physics an
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Evidence for glaciation predating MIS-6 in southeastern Tibet
Southeastern Tibet is one of the most glaciated regions on the Tibetan Plateau both at present and during the Quaternary. Numerical dating of glacial deposits has allowed the establishment of a provisional chronology of Quaternary glacial fluctuations in this region, with the oldest glaciation (Guxiang Glaciation) occurring in marine oxygen isotope stage 6 (MIS-6). However, glaciations predating M
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Where's my horse-sized rabbit?
Next to cat videos, watching small and cuddly rabbits is probably one of the most popular internet pastimes. Plus they appear in literature as well as in traditional folklore spanning numerous cultures, thanks likely to the fact that rabbits reside on every continent except Antarctica.
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Where are the women on the Spanish-language Wikipedia site?
With its more than 40 million articles in 301 different languages, Wikipedia is one of the largest human collaboration efforts in history. One of the main pillars on which this wish to bring together the sum of all knowledge is based is the achievement of a neutral space. However, several studies suggest that the site suffers from a persistent gender bias as regards both content and the compositio
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To forget or to do not forget?
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a form of progressive dementia interfering with daily living. It is caused by the decline in the number of brain cells resulting in the deterioration of our mental abilities. One of the main reasons for the worsening brain cells condition and even the brain shrinkage are molecules having a specific structure called β-amyloids. They are peptides that tend to agglomerate
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Ice cap study promises new prospects for accurate local climate projections
New, detailed study of the Renland Ice Cap offers the possibility of modelling other smaller ice caps and glaciers with much greater accuracy than hitherto. The study combined airborne radar data to determine the thickness of the ice cap with on-site measurements of the thickness of the ice cap and satellite data. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute – University of Copenhagen gathered data f
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New model describes the (scaling) laws of the jungle
A forest looks like a hotbed of randomness, with trees and plants scattered in wild and capricious diversity. But appearances can be deceiving, say a trio of complexity researchers at the Santa Fe Institute (SFI). Underneath that apparent messiness lurk extraordinary regularities, governed by the biological mechanisms that drive universal forces of growth, death, and competition.
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Corals go hungry long before they bleach
The results of coral beaching are obvious—stark underwater forests of white coral skeletons—yet the physiological processes of bleaching are not well understood. Now, KAUST researchers show that, long before signs of bleaching appear, prolonged spells of warm water cause heat stress that disrupts the nutrient cycling of the coral and its symbiotic algae.
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Scientists find Galapagos volcano could help forecast future eruptions
The Galápagos Islands have played a historic role since Charles Darwin's visit onboard the HMS Beagle in 1835. Today, a team of scientists, including from the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, studied a large eruption in the archipelago to get new insights into how volcanoes behave and could help forecast future events.
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1 dead, 100,000 displaced as typhoon blows near Philippines
An approaching powerful typhoon has left at least one person dead, another missing and prompted the evacuation of more than 100,000 people as a precaution in the eastern and central Philippines, although the unusual summer storm is not expected to blow into land, officials said Monday.
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Första flygningen på Mars
Helikopterdrönaren Ingenuity ("sinnrikhet") lyfte för egen kraft den 19 april, steg tre meter över marken, och hovrade i en halv minut innan den landade igen. Hela syftet med Ingenuity är att testa flygning i en annan atmosfär. Luften på Mars är tunn, bara en procent av luftens täthet på jorden, och därför måste rotorbladen snurra mycket fortare än på motsvarande farkost i jordatmosfären. Å andra
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Whitest paint ever made is also the coolest
In an effort to curb global warming, engineers have created the whitest paint ever made. Coating buildings with this paint may one day cool them off enough to reduce the need for air conditioning, the researchers say. In October, the team created an ultra-white paint that pushed limits on how white paint can be. Now they've outdone that. Not only is the new paint whiter, it can also can keep surf
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Robotic infrastructure elements proposed to bolster performance of infectious hospitals
In December 2019, a new viral infection was detected in Wuhan, China. On January 30, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a public health emergency of international concern, and on March 11, the COVID-19 pandemic. In light of the danger that the infection poses to human personnel, the idea to utilize automation in hospitals is one of the natural solutions in healthcare.
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Intellectual disability is rarely inherited — risk for younger siblings is low
Intellectual disability is most often caused by changes to the genome that take place in early fetal development and are not found in the parents' DNA. This is why the risk of recurrence in the next sibling of the family is very small, as indicated by a study conducted at the University of Helsinki. Furthermore, Finns do not have a higher risk of inherited developmental disorders compared to other
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Supplement treats schizophrenia in mice, restores healthy "dance" and structure of neurons
A simple dietary supplement reduces behavioral symptoms in mice with a genetic mutation that causes schizophrenia. After additional experiments, including visualizing the fluorescently stained dancing edge of immature brain cells (video included), researchers concluded that the supplement likely protects proteins that build neurons' cellular skeletons. The supplement, betaine, is already used clin
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New factor in the development of psoriasis discovered
Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin condition. The skin inflammation is usually triggered by external factors such as infections or stress. A research team at the Institute of Cancer Research of the Medical University of Vienna has now managed to identify a new factor in signal transmission of the immune system that plays a major role in the development of a psoriatic episode.
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Daily briefing: 2.5 billion Tyrannosaurus rex roamed Earth
Nature, Published online: 16 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01041-8 Researchers estimate the T. rex population over the 2 million or so years they existed. Plus, the first monkey–human embryos reignite the chimaera debate, and how to curb the spread of COVID-19 vaccine disinformation.
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Tarmens ytskikt ändrar storlek vid bakterieangrepp
Varje år drabbas flera hundra miljoner människor av en bakterieinfektion i tarmen. Nya fynd, som visar hur tarmen själv kan skilja på bra och dåliga mikrober, kan få betydelse i utvecklingen av behandlingar. Tarmens slemhinna har en stor yta för att maximera upptag av näringsämnen och föda från kosten. Det gör den också sårbar för angrepp från aggressiva tarmmikrober. En studie från forskare vid
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SMART breakthrough to enhance travel behavior research with artificial neural networks
Researchers from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology developed a synthetic framework known as theory-based residual neural network (TB-ResNet) to improve individual decision-making analysis used in travel behaviour research. The research explains that data-driven and theory-driven models, which are generally used as separate methods that are conflicting, are actually highly comp
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Evidence for glaciation predating MIS-6 in the eastern Nyainqêntanglha, southeastern Tibet
Southeastern Tibet is one of the most glaciated region on the Tibetan Plateau both at present and during the Quaternary. Existing numerical ages of glacial deposits in this region suggest that the oldest glaciation (Guxiang Glaciation) occurred during marine oxygen isotope stage 6 (MIS-6). In this study evidence is presented for an earlier glaciation, Nitong Glaciation, which was dated using elect
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Mirror, mirror…viewing your own face, even subconsciously, is rewarding
Researchers from Osaka University have found that the subliminal presentation of images of one's own face activates a central component of the dopamine reward pathway, thus illuminating the mechanisms behind our powerful ability to automatically prioritize processing of our own face. These findings have important implications for understanding the neural processes involved in automatic self-advant
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World's fastest photo-exfoliation
Researchers discovered, while exploring the photomechanical properties of diarylethene, that under irradiation with UV light the crystal of the compound peels off into micrometer-sized crystals at a world's fastest speed of 260 microseconds. As the material returns to its former molecular structure when exposed to visible light, the exfoliation method positions itself as a candidate for photoactua
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Study finds shifting mindset increases managers' willingness to invest in new technology
Forget the 30,000-foot, big-picture view. When faced with a cutting-edge technological idea, business leaders who approach the idea in more concrete "how" terms—rather than in abstract "why" terms—are less likely to be deterred by its novelty and more likely to recognize its utility, which increases their propensity to invest, according to new research from the Olin Business School at Washington U
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Run, process, run!
Solid-matrix catalysts called heterogeneous catalysts are among the most widespread industrial applications in reducing toxic gases, unburned fuel, and particulate matter in the exhaust stream from the combustion chamber. They are also used in energy, chemical, and pharmaceutical sectors, i.e., production of biodiesel, polymers, biomass/waste conversion into valuable products, and many others proc
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Biomarker for COVID-19 risk
Varying severity of COVID-19 symptoms in patients is reflected by levels of a chemical biomarker in their body which scientists say could be used to better manage treatments and other interventions, including vaccinations. In a new paper in International Journal of Infectious Diseases, medical experts in Italy and Australia examined levels of a chemical called serum amyloid A (SAA), a protein synt
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Global street drug supply and its effects on high-risk groups for COVID-19
The objective of this research is to bring to the attention of public health officials, addiction medicine specialists, treatment officials, therapists, and the general public the alarming increase of dangerous toxic adulterants being added to street drugs and their potentially lethal synergistic effects. Also, to provide insights into how these new formulations can have serious pathophysiological
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Research sheds new light on pancreatic cancer metastasis
A team of researchers at the OU College of Medicine has published a new study in the journal Gastroenterology, the world's leading publication on GI tract disease, that sheds new light on the ability of pancreatic cancer cells to spread throughout the body. Understanding why metastasis occurs is crucial for developing a therapeutic strategy to stop the spread.
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Reportage fra USA: COVID-19 er snart lagt bag os
Mens mange i sydstaterne for længst har smidt mundbindet, har USA brugt milliarder af dollar på et vaccineprogram, der formentlig snart vil efterlade COVID-19 i den amerikanske fortid. Tag med på tur fra Florida Keys, over Alabama, til Nashville, Tennessee, og få et indblik i, hvordan den menige amerikaner tænker og handler i en tid domineret af COVID-19.
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Charting ice from above
Nature, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01030-x Instrument engineer Cristina Sans Coll flies the polar skies to help measure climate change.
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Scientists discover a new gene regulation mechanism
A team of scientists from Russia studied the role of double-stranded fragments of the maturing RNA and showed that the interaction between distant parts of the RNA can regulate gene expression. The research was published in Nature Communications.
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Scientists now able to map defects in 2D crystals in liquid
Monolayer crystals, often being referred as 2D crystals or 2D materials, possess the unique characteristic of having a single layer of regular atomic structure. And the more regular the structure is, the higher quality the crystal. In some cases, the atomic structure is repeated to perfection, but most of the time—as is usually the case in nature—there are some flaws.
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World's fastest exfoliation of material has potential use for photoactuator production
Researchers discovered, while exploring the photomechanical properties of diarylethene, that under irradiation with UV light the crystal of the compound peels off into micrometer sized crystals at a world's fastest speed of 260 microseconds. As the material returns to its former molecular structure when exposed to visible light, the exfoliation method positions itself as a candidate for photoactua
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Webcast: How to do a great peer review
Nature, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01044-5 Mind your language; take your time; practice makes perfect. Three experts share their advice.
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Researchers: 2.5 Billion Tyrannosaurus Rexes Walked the Earth
Credit: Scott Robert Anselmo/Wikimedia Commons All that remains of the Tyrannosaurus rex today is a handful of fossils, but how many of these iconic dinosaurs roamed the Earth? A new analysis from the University of California Berkeley estimates that there were about 20,000 adult Tyrannosaurs at any given time during the Cretaceous period. Add that up over millions of years, and there could easily
5h
Tyrkiet forbyder kryptovaluta
Tyrkiet vil forbyde betalinger med kryptovaluta efter en stigende global bekymring om betalingsformen. Flere mener, at valutaen er med til at fremme kriminalitet.
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Use AI To Bring Your Photography To The Next Level With Luminar 4
We tend to associate AI with science and math, yet it's coming into the art world as well. Photography, in particular, has been a focus of machine learning from the beginning, and for experts and aspiring artists alike, it's achieved some breathtaking results on tiny budgets. This Luminar 4 bundle not only brings award-winning AI to the light table to edit your photos, it includes a suite of add-
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A central circadian oscillator confers defense heterosis in hybrids without growth vigor costs
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22268-z There is frequently a trade-off between plant immunity and growth. Here the authors show that the epigenetic control of CCA1, encoding a core component of the circadian oscillator, simultaneously promotes heterosis for both defense and growth in hybrids under pathogen invasion.
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Cytoplasmic condensation induced by membrane damage is associated with antibiotic lethality
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22485-6 The detailed mechanisms of action of bactericidal antibiotics remain unclear. Here, Wong et al. show that these antibiotics induce cytoplasmic condensation through membrane damage and outflow of cytoplasmic contents, as well as accumulation of reactive metabolic by-products and lipid peroxidation, as part of th
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STING enhances cell death through regulation of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22572-8 The endoplasmic reticulum-localized adaptor STING regulates the innate immune response through its ability to sense DNA damage. Here the authors reveal that STING functions as a regulator of cellular ROS homeostasis and tumor cell susceptibility to reactive oxygen dependent, DNA damaging agents.
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Transcriptomic analysis to identify genes associated with selective hippocampal vulnerability in Alzheimer's disease
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 April 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-22399-3 Alzheimer's disease (AD) is typically associated with hippocampal and cortical pathology, although hippocampal sparing and limbic predominant forms exist. The authors use transcriptomic analysis and neuropathology to identify genes associated with selective hippocampal vulnerability in AD.
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A Year Into Covid, States Debate Public Health Shutdown Powers
Some lawmakers have long argued that public health measures intended to combat Covid-19 — such as mask mandates and business closures — were overwrought and misguided infringements on personal liberties. GOP legislators in several states are now aiming to curb or refine the power to issue such measures.
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