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Afghanistan Is Your Fault
Kabul has fallen. Americans will now exercise their usual partisan outrage for a few weeks, and then Afghanistan, like everything else in a nation with an attention span not much longer than a fast-food commercial, will be forgotten. In the meantime, American citizens will separate into their usual camps and identify all of the obvious causes and culprits except for one: themselves. Many American
12h

LATEST

The Taliban's Return Is Catastrophic for Women
One morning in the summer of 1999, Shukriya Barakzai woke up feeling dizzy and feverish. According to the Taliban's rules, she needed a Maharram, a male guardian, in order to leave home to visit the doctor. Her husband was at work, and she had no sons. So she shaved her 2-year-old daughter's head, dressed her in boys' clothing to pass her off as a guardian, and slipped on a burka. Its blue folds
8h
Biden Was Right
In 2017, I arrived at Kabul's Hamid Karzai Airport as part of a congressional staff delegation. Even though the U.S. embassy stood a mere four miles away, safety concerns necessitated our helicoptering from a recently constructed multimillion-dollar transit facility instead of traveling by road. As we flew over Kabul, I realized that the Afghan security forces, backed by thousands of U.S. personn
4h
New salts raise the bar for lithium ion battery technology
Lithium ion batteries are set to take a dominant role in electric vehicles and other applications in the near future—but the battery materials, currently in use, fall short in terms of safety and performance and are holding back the next generation of high-performance batteries.
9h
Saturn makes waves in its own rings
In the same way that earthquakes cause our planet to rumble, oscillations in the interior of Saturn make the gas giant jiggle around ever so slightly. Those motions, in turn, cause ripples in Saturn's rings.
6h
Fighting fungal infections: Giant leaps for smart nanotech
They're roughly the same size as a coronavirus particle, and 1000 times smaller than a human hair, yet newly engineered nanoparticles developed by scientists at the University of South Australia, are punching well above their weight when it comes to treating drug-resistant fungal infections.
10h
Recordings of the magnetic field from 9,000 years ago teach us about the magnetic field today
International research by Tel Aviv University, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Rome, and the University of California San Diego uncovered findings regarding the magnetic field that prevailed in the Middle East between approximately 10,000 and 8,000 years ago. Researchers examined pottery and burnt flints from archeological sites in Jordan, on which the magnetic field during tha
2h
I'm Not Afraid of COVID-19. I'm Afraid of School Shootings.
As my virtual junior year of high school came to an end this past June, my Fremont, California, district announced its plan to fully reopen schools in person for the coming academic year. My senior year will be filled with uncertainty, but there's one thing I'm sure about: I'm eager to get back to the classroom. Before COVID-19, I dreaded waking up at seven in the morning to drag myself into scho
12h
The 1 Thing That Could've Changed the War in Afghanistan
Had the United States caught and killed Osama bin Laden in December 2001, the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan would have faded away almost immediately afterward. I cannot prove that. It's only an opinion from my vantage point as one of President George W. Bush's speechwriters in 2001 and 2002. Yet I strongly believe it. The U.S. stayed for 20 years in Afghanistan because first Bush and then
22h
Bitter Jeff Bezos Sues NASA Over SpaceX Contract
The day has finally come. Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos' fight with NASA over its Moon program has come to a head, with Bezos is officially suing NASA over its decision to work exclusively with SpaceX on a lunar lander capable of sending astronauts to the lunar surface, The Verge reports . It's the escalation of many months of potshots, ridicule, and criticism. Ever since NASA announced that it
5h
Inventor Builds Auto-Aiming Bow That Never Misses
Auto-Aiming Bow YouTuber Shane Wighton from the channel "Stuff Made Here" has created a terrifying bow that aims itself and never misses. The bow is so sophisticated that Wighton doesn't even have to look at the target — he demonstrates with an apple perched on top of a Styrofoam apple — to hit a bullseye. It's an amazing invention, but perhaps also a sobering reminder of what technology is capab
3h
Astronauts Alarmed by Huge Fires on Surface of Earth
Earth in Flames It's no secret that our planet is literally and figuratively on fire right now. In fact, some wildfires are so large that they can now easily spotted from space — an unfortunate perspective of what may be our impending doom. During a recent call with Insider , NASA astronaut Megan McArthur described the grim experience of being stationed on board the International Space Station wh
5h
SpaceX Gets Huge Check From NASA for Moon Mission
Cash Injection SpaceX just got its first big round of funds from NASA to develop a lunar lander capable of sending the first astronauts to the surface of the Moon since the Apollo missions. The Elon Musk-led company received a $300 million payment on July 30, according to official open source data that was spotted by keen-eyed SpaceX enthusiasts on Reddit. It's the first payment SpaceX is owed si
7h
Parts of the US are getting dangerously hot. Yet Americans are moving the wrong way | David Sirota and Julia Rock
As the climate changes, census data shows that Americans are shifting from safer areas of the US to the regions most at risk of heating and flooding Science has provided America with a decent idea of which areas of our country will be most devastated by climate change, and which areas will be most insulated from the worst effects. Unfortunately, it seems that US population flows are going in the
11h
Pfizer Gang Is Pfinished
In April, Nicholas was stoked to have gotten Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine, the " status vaccine ," which was also the vaccine for "hot people," and the vaccine that got a person conditionless admission to the "Pfizer Gang." He made a new forum on Reddit—r/pfizergang, obviously—where people like him could engage in celebration and memes and funny jokes about how Pfizer was better than Moderna, but no
10h
What are England and Northern Ireland's new rules on self-isolation?
Fully vaccinated people no longer have to self-isolate if they are close contacts of a positive Covid case Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage England and Northern Ireland have, from Monday, followed Scotland and Wales in relaxing rules so that people who are fully vaccinated no longer have to self-isolate if they are close contacts of people testing positive for Covid-1
10h
A Moment for Soul-Searching
My Afghanistan war lasted almost exactly two years, from the beginning of 2007 to the end of the Bush administration in January 2009. As counselor of the State Department, my job was to take on whatever portfolio Secretary Condoleezza Rice wanted an extra set of senior eyes on. From the first—in fact, before I was formally sworn in—Afghanistan was on her mind. And so, even before entering governm
11h
The Leisure Class Always Wins
This article contains spoilers through the Season 1 finale of The White Lotus. "This is a lot of pineapple. Not subtle with the theme." Midway through The White Lotus , Mike White's acerbic satire on HBO , the socialite mother of a guy on his honeymoon pays her son and new daughter-in-law a surprise visit. The drop-in is partly the result of her inability to stop meddling in her son's life. It is
3h
Radio source J2102+6015 investigated in detail
An international team of astronomers has conducted a detailed study of a high-redshift young radio source designated J2102+6015. Results of the research, presented in a paper published August 4 on arXiv pre-print repository, deliver more hints regarding the nature of this source.
8h
This Summer Was Destined for Failure
For a brief, glimmering moment this spring, as vaccination rates rose and states loosened stay-at-home restrictions, it seemed as if some Americans could look forward to a summer of unprecedented revelry and socializing. With vaccine cards clutched in hand, many of us started to make plans to do everything we'd spent more than a year avoiding. But even before the Delta variant spurred a new wave
11h
Next generation electronics: Expanding the possibilities with silver nanowires
Today's nanoscale technologies are sophisticated enough to be applied in an endless number of useful devices, from sensors in touch screen devices and household appliances to wearable biosensors that can monitor chemical levels in our blood, muscle movement, breathing and pulse rate. In addition, there are technologies for precision devices such as high-resolution scanning probe microscopes which
8h
How ions get their electrons back
What happens when ions are passing through solid materials? It is nearly impossible to observe this directly, but scientists at TU Wien found a way to overcome this problem.
8h
Is saving the panda a waste of time and money?
Pandas are natural born carnivores, yet two million years ago, they made the odd choice to become completely herbivorous, eating mostly bamboo. Conservation charities use "charismatic megafauna" like the panda because they make for good promotional material and are more likely to elicit donations. But focusing on cute creatures risks underfunding other important endangered animals and warping our
9h
How to talk to vaccine-hesitant people
Like millions of Americans, Ryan Steward was afraid of getting the covid-19 vaccine. "I'm generally distrusting of the government," he says. "I'm not the foil-hat-wearing type, but I'm the type of fellow that wants to verify facts. The vaccine came out quickly after the pandemic had started, too, and there was a lot of new language—'breakthrough cases' and 'mRNA vaccines'—that was unfamiliar to m
4h
The search for life on Mars expands to studying its moons
A pair of researchers at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has published a perspective piece in the journal Science outlining the efforts being conducted this decade to find out if Mars once hosted life. In their article, Ryuki Hyodo and Tomohiro Usui outline the three main efforts that are involved in looking for evidence of life on Mars over the next ten years, and explain why they a
7h
First genetic sequencing of Brazilian pit viper is completed
A group led by researchers at Butantan Institute and funded by São Paulo Research Foundation—FAPESP has completed the first sequencing of a Brazilian snake's genome. The study is reported in an article published in the journal PNAS. It suggests that the nine genes that encode toxins produced by the jararaca pit viper Bothrops jararaca probably originated in genes that had different functions in th
8h
The most famous popular science book ever written
In his book, Thomas Kuhn points out that science does not work the way we think it does, that is, through incremental advances. Instead, science leaps from one paradigm to another. Most scientists are not revolutionaries but cogs in a giant machine. When I bought a copy of the most famous modern book on the philosophy of science, I expected to hate it. The study of science as a sociological activ
7h
How Do New Organs Evolve? A Beetle Gland Shows the Way.
The tiny rove beetle, no bigger than a grain of rice, looked dangerously exposed on the bottom of the glass dish in Joe Parker's laboratory — and that was even before its fellow prisoner, an ant three times as big, advanced on it. The ant's mandibles gaped open and prepared to seize the beetle. Suddenly, the beetle's abdomen curved up and something happened, something that sent the ant reeling…
7h
Swiss researchers calculate pi to new record of 62.8tn figures
Supercomputer calculation took 108 days and nine hours – almost 3.5 times as fast as previous record Swiss researchers have calculated the mathematical constant pi to a new world-record level of exactitude, hitting 62.8tn figures using a supercomputer. "The calculation took 108 days and nine hours," the Graubuenden University of Applied Sciences said in a statement. Continue reading…
40min
Table-top electron camera catches ultrafast dynamics of matter
Scientists at DESY have built a compact electron camera that can capture the inner, ultrafast dynamics of matter. The system shoots short bunches of electrons at a sample to take snapshots of its current inner structure. It is the first such electron diffractometer that uses Terahertz radiation for pulse compression. The developer team around DESY scientists Dongfang Zhang and Franz Kärtner from t
2h
US Gov Investigating Tesla Autopilot for Crashing Into Emergency Vehicles
Making It Official The US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has opened a formal investigation into Tesla's Autopilot assisted driving software according to a posting on its website — an inflection point that could signal the introduction of self-driving regulations. Explosively, the investigation appears to center on a series of accidents in which Teslas have smashed into eme
2h
Saturn's insides are sloshing around
With its massive rings stretching out 175,000 miles in diameter, Saturn is a one-of-a-kind planet in the solar system. Turns out its insides are pretty unique as well. A new study published in Nature Astronomy on Monday suggests the sixth planet from the sun has a "fuzzy" core that jiggles around. It's quite a surprising find. "The conventional picture for Saturn or Jupiter's interior structure i
6h
Death toll of powerful earthquake in Haiti soars to 1,297
The death toll from a 7.2-magnitude earthquake in Haiti climbed to 1,297 on Sunday, a day after the powerful temblor turned thousands of structures into rubble and set off franctic rescue efforts ahead of a potential deluge from an approaching storm.
14h
'My mum told me to': Bolton 16- and 17-year-olds get Covid vaccine
Government plans to offer jabs to all in this age group in England within the next week Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage For some teenagers, the promise of a Deliveroo discount was enough to tempt them to get the Covid vaccine. For others, staying in their parents' good books was far more important. "My mum told me to," said one 17-year-old after receiving her first v
5h
The billionaire space race reflects a colonial mindset that fails to imagine a different world
It was a time of political uncertainty, cultural conflict and social change. Private ventures exploited technological advances and natural resources, generating unprecedented fortunes while wreaking havoc on local communities and environments. The working poor crowded cities, spurring property-holders to develop increased surveillance and incarceration regimes. Rural areas lay desolate, buildings
9h
Will the real hottest month on record please stand up?
As anyone who follows the climate news is aware, July 2021 was the hottest month on record for our torrid little orb, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), with a combined temperature 1.67 degrees F higher than the 20th century average of 60.4 F. NOAA noted in a Friday press release that … Continue reading
1h
New study analyzes global environmental consequences of weakening US-China trade relationship
A new study has found that United States would face intensifying nitrogen and phosphorus pollution and increasing irrigation water usage in agricultural production as a result of persistent US-China trade tension, such as China's retaliatory tariffs on US agriculture. In fact, the impacts do not stay within the two countries but spill over to other countries through international trade, adding add
2h
Map of kidney disease genes could lead to new treatments
A new study provides one of the clearest pictures to date of the genetic underpinnings of chronic kidney disease. Researchers have identified 182 genes likely responsible for kidney function—many of which can be targeted with existing drugs—and 88 genes for hypertension. Additionally, the research team has mapped the key cell types and mechanisms that are linked to disease. Despite affecting an e
2h
Some starved bacteria may survive for 100,000 years
A study of bacteria populations under a prolonged period of starvation could help researchers answer questions pertaining to chronic infections, the functioning of bacteria in the environment, and the persistence of life itself. In a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers detail their study of about 100 populations of different bacteria in closed systems, which
2h
New technique surveys microbial spatial gene expression patterns
What do you do at different times in the day? What do you eat? How do you interact with your neighbors? These are some of the questions that biologists would love to ask communities of microbes, from those that live in extreme environments deep in the ocean to those that cause chronic infections in humans. Now, a new technique developed at Caltech can answer these questions by surveying gene expre
2h
Simulating nuclear cloud rise anywhere, anytime
For decades, understanding the behavior of a nuclear mushroom cloud was done with careful analysis of observations made during the testing era. Old photos, outdated film and incomplete weather data made precise calculations difficult. Now, with results published in Atmospheric Environment, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists are improving our understanding of nuclear cloud ris
2h
Ultrarapid detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA using a reverse transcription-free exponential amplification reaction, RTF-EXPAR [Applied Physical Sciences]
A rapid isothermal method for detecting severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus responsible for COVID-19, is reported. The procedure uses an unprecedented reverse transcription–free (RTF) approach for converting genomic RNA into DNA. This involves the formation of an RNA/DNA heteroduplex whose selective cleavage generates a short DNA…
3h
Correction for Laurent et al., Emergence of homochirality in large molecular systems [Corrections]
PHYSICS Correction for "Emergence of homochirality in large molecular systems," by Gabin Laurent, David Lacoste, and Pierre Gaspard, which published January 11, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2012741118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2012741118). The authors note that, due to a printer's error, parts of the legends for Figs. 3 and 4 appeared…
3h
Correction for Arien et al., Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning [Corrections]
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for "Omega-3 deficiency impairs honey bee learning," by Yael Arien, Arnon Dag, Shlomi Zarchin, Tania Masci, and Sharoni Shafir, which was first published December 7, 2015; 10.1073/pnas.1517375112 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 112, 15761–15766). The authors note that the following statement should be added to…
3h
Correction to Supporting Information for Smyllie et al., Temporally chimeric mice reveal flexibility of circadian period-setting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus [SI Correction]
NEUROSCIENCE Correction to Supporting Information for "Temporally chimeric mice reveal flexibility of circadian period-setting in the suprachiasmatic nucleus," by Nicola J. Smyllie, Johanna E. Chesham, Ryan Hamnett, Elizabeth S. Maywood, and Michael H. Hastings, which was first published March 10, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1511351113 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 113, 3657–3662). The…
3h
Squirrel parkour: How leaping squirrels could inspire more nimble robots
Tree squirrels are the Olympic divers of the rodent world, leaping gracefully among branches and structures high above the ground. And as with human divers, a squirrel's success in this competition requires both physical strength and mental adaptability. The Jacobs lab studies cognition in free-ranging fox squirrels on the Berkeley campus. Two species – the eastern gray squirrel ( Sciurus carolin
3h
History of the spread of pepper (C. annuum) is an early example of global trade
Genebanks collect vast collections of plants and detailed passport information, with the aim of preserving genetic diversity for conservation and breeding. Genetic characterisation of such collections has also the potential to elucidate the genetic histories of important crops, use marker-trait associations to identify loci controlling traits of interest, search for loci undergoing selection, and
3h
Study of structural variants in cacao genomes yields clues about plant diversity
Molecular geneticists have known for about a decade that genomic structural variants can play important roles in the adaptation and speciation of both plants and animals, but their overall influence on the fitness of plant populations is poorly understood. That's partly because accurate population-level identification of structural variants requires analysis of multiple high-quality genome assembl
3h
Cities are making mammals bigger
While climate change is causing some animals to shrink, a new study shows urbanization is causing many mammal species to grow both bigger and longer, possibly because of readily available food in places packed with people.
3h
Good listeners may protect you against cognitive decline
Researchers have found a link between having someone you can count on to listen to you when you need to talk and improved cognitive resilience. Supportive social interactions in adulthood are important for your ability to stave off cognitive decline despite brain aging or neuropathological changes such as those in Alzheimer's disease, the new study finds. Cognitive resilience is a measure of your
3h
Development and evolution of dolphin, whale blowholes
New research is shedding light on how the nasal passage of dolphins and whales shifts during embryonic development from emerging at the tip of the snout to emerging at the top of the head as a blowhole. The findings are an integrative model for this developmental transition for cetaceans.
3h
Likes and shares train you to get angry online
Social media platforms like Twitter amplify expressions of moral outrage over time because users learn such language gets rewarded with an increased number of "likes" and "shares," a new study shows. And these rewards had the greatest influence on users connected with politically moderate networks. "Social media's incentives are changing the tone of our political conversations online," says Willi
4h
Neurohacking: how to upgrade your mental abilities
We can improve our minds using scientifically based techniques. One person used a technique to enhance his memory, and it resulted him becoming (for a time) the highest single-day earner on the quiz show Jeopardy! Another neurohacker, together with his doctor, discovered the cause of his "brain fog" and was able to treat it using highly personalized medicine. The following is an excerpt from the
4h
Study reveals how genes influence leaf architecture
A recent study, published in Nature Plants, by researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has shed light on how simple leaves—one of the two basic forms of leaves—develop in a plant. The team included researchers from the Department of Microbiology and Cell Biology (MCB) and their collaborators from Shodhaka Life Sciences, Bengaluru.
4h
Heavily enriched: An energy-efficient way of enriching hydrogen isotopes in silicon
Deuterium, a heavier but less abundant version of the hydrogen atom, has many practical applications. Unfortunately, producing deuterium and using it to protect silicon-based semiconductors requires a lot of energy and very expensive deuterium gas. Now, scientists from Japan have discovered an energy-efficient exchange reaction to swap hydrogen atoms for deuterium on the surface of nanocrystalline
4h
What robots can learn from fish and fancy math
Today's submersible robots and drones tend to be optimized for traveling through water at a single speed. Fish speed up and slow down by adjusting the rigidity of their tails, and researchers have cracked the formula for doing this. An experimental robot tuna is the first robot that can dart through water or float along slowly. Underwater robots are useful for examining objects in the deep sea, f
5h
US Launches Investigation of Tesla Autopilot Following Emergency Vehicle Crashes
Tesla's autopilot system sets it apart from the other big automakers, but the electric vehicle firm's focus on self-driving technology has spurred a federal investigation. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is looking into Tesla Autopilot in the wake of a series of crashes involving Tesla vehicles and emergency vehicles, the AP reports . If the NHTSA finds Tesla is at faul
5h
Dry, warm air boosts nighttime wildfire activity
Drier, warmer night air is making some Western wildfires more active at night, researchers report. Firefighters report that Western wildfires are starting earlier in the morning and dying down later at night, hampering their ability to recover and regroup before the next day's flareup. The new study shows why: The drying power of nighttime air over much of the Western US has increased dramaticall
5h
A new age of data means embracing the edge
Artificial intelligence holds an enormous promise, but to be effective, it must learn from massive sets of data—and the more diverse the better. By learning patterns, AI tools can uncover insights and help decision-making not just in technology, but also pharmaceuticals, medicine, manufacturing, and more. However, data can't always be shared—whether it's personally identifiable, holds proprietary
6h
Scientists develop faster COVID-19 test
Scientists have developed a new sample preparation method to detect SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The method bypasses extraction of the virus' genetic RNA material, simplifying sample purification and potentially reducing test time and cost.
6h
The Arctic Ocean's deep past provides clues to its imminent future
As the Arctic Ocean warms and sea ice shrinks, will the newly exposed sea surface see a plankton population boom and a burgeoning ecosystem in the open Arctic Ocean? Not likely, say a team of scientists who have examined the history and supply rate of nitrogen, a key nutrient. Stratification of the open Arctic waters, especially in the areas fed by the Pacific Ocean via the Bering Strait, will pre
6h
Polymers 'click' together using green chemistry
A multi-institutional team of chemists harnessed the power of a dangerous gas called SOF4 to create new modifiable polymers useful for drug discovery and material science. The team used a type of rapid and reliable chemistry known as click chemistry to 'click' these molecules together without producing toxic byproducts.
6h
Foster parents fledge scarlet macaw chicks
A foster system can successfully fledge scarlet macaw chicks that would normally die, an experiment shows. Gabriela Vigo-Trauco, a postdoctoral research associate at the Texas A&M University Collge of Veterinary Medicine& Biomedical Sciences and co-director of The Macaw Society , has spent the past decade studying scarlet macaws' nesting behavior and refining a new system for introducing chicks t
6h
Pandemic and digitalization set stage for revival of a cast-off idea: Personal carbon allowances
Researchers say the time may be right for many industrialized nations to resurrect an idea once thought to be unfeasible: personal carbon allowances (PCAs). The concept, they report, has stronger possibilities due to a worsening climate crisis, changes in personal behavior due to the COVID-19 crisis and advances in artificial intelligence and information and communications technologies.
6h
Night shift work is linked to increased risk of heart problems
Using data from over 283,600 people in UK Biobank, researchers have found that people who work night shifts are at increased risk of developing an irregular and often abnormally fast heart rhythm called atrial fibrillation, and they are also at an increased risk of heart disease. Women and people who don't exercise regularly are most at risk.
6h
Stora utsläpp när sjögrässängar går förlorade
Förluster av viktiga ålgräsängar i södra Bohuslän sedan 1980-talet har lett till avsevärd bottenerosion och frisättning av kol och kväve, ämnen som bidrar till ökande klimatförändringar och övergödning. Konsekvenserna av att havsängar går förlorade, visas i en ny studie av forskare vid Göteborg universitet, Stockholms universitet, Åbo Akademi och Syddanskt universitet. F örluster av ålgräs ger up
7h
Scans show the physical marks of poverty on kid brains
Researchers have discovered a link between poverty and smaller, slower growing brain regions. Children in poverty are more likely to have cognitive and behavioral difficulties than their better-off peers. Plenty of past research has looked into the physical effects of childhood poverty, or documented mental health disparities between socioeconomic classes. "If we can prevent poverty, we can help
7h
A New Antibody-Dependent Enhancement Hypothesis
Here's another post that I will regret writing, but a great many people have asked me about a new preprint that brings up the possibility of antibody-dependent enhancement with the current vaccines and the Delta variant. To be frank, some of the people promoting this seem to be rooting for the virus, just so long as it humiliates their enemies and proves their own positions to be correct, but the
7h
Herbicide resistance no longer a black box for scientists
When agricultural weeds evolve resistance to herbicides, they do it in one of two ways. In target-site resistance, a tiny mutation in the plant's genetic code means the chemical no longer fits in the protein it's designed to attack. In non-target-site resistance, the plant deploys a whole slew of enzymes that detoxify the chemical before it can cause harm.
7h
How the malaria parasite defends itself from fever
A gene called PfAP2-HS allows the malaria parasite to defend itself from adverse conditions in the host, including febrile temperatures, according to a new study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), an institution supported by "la Caixa" Foundation. The study, published in Nature Microbiology, resolves a long-standing question on how the parasite responds to changes in its
7h
A new theory of life's multiple origins
The history of life on Earth has often been likened to a four-billion-year-old torch relay. One flame, lit at the beginning of the chain, continues to pass on life in the same form all the way down. But what if life is better understood on the analogy of the eye, a convergent organ that evolved from independent origins? What if life evolved not just once, but multiple times independently?
7h
The Arctic Ocean's deep past provides clues to its imminent future
As the North Pole, the Arctic Ocean, and the surrounding Arctic land warm rapidly, scientists are racing to understand the warming's effects on Arctic ecosystems. With shrinking sea ice, more light reaches the surface of the Arctic Ocean. Some have predicted that this will lead to more plankton, which in turn would support fish and other animals.
7h
Climate change hits sushi supply chain amid California water war
If you've eaten sushi anywhere in the U.S., chances are the rice came from California's Sacramento Valley. Fritz Durst, a sixth-generation farmer, has grown the grain and other crops there for more than four decades. But this year, amid a historic drought, Durst is planting only half as many acres of rice as usual.
7h
Scientists realize noiseless photon-echo protocol
Prof. LI Chuanfeng and Prof. Zhou Zongquan from University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) innovatively raised and realized noiseless photon echo (NLPE) protocol. The research of entire originality reduced the noise by 670 times compared with previous strategies and achieved solid quantum memory with high fidelity. The results were published in Na
7h
Climate scientist on UN report: Just as bad as we expected
In a major United Nations report released last Monday, the more than 230 scientists who make up the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change described "unprecedented" climate change over the past century and warned in similarly unambiguous language that the world will descend further into catastrophic warming absent rapid and aggressive action to cut emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-tra
7h
The mechanisms of enhanced evaporation flux through nanochannels
Confined mass transfer mainly focuses on the dynamic behavior of water, ion, gas and other media confined in nanochannels. Scientists recently show increasing interest in confined mass transfer due to its wide application in energy, environment, health and other fields. However, the interface effect is dominant at the nanoscale, and the confined liquid has different structure and transport charact
7h
New theory of life's multiple origins
What if life evolved not just once, but multiple times independently? Researchers now argue that in order to recognize life's full range of forms, we must develop a new theoretical frame that permits 'multiple paths' to life.
7h
Quercetin from tartary buckwheat extract promotes the degradation of harmful protein aggregates in cells
Seeds like quinoa, amaranth, and buckwheat that have been used for centuries in traditional cuisine are having a trendy moment in culinary circles as alternatives to wheat and other grains. Now, researchers from Japan have found that a traditional liquor made from buckwheat could even be used medicinally.
8h
From coral reef to goat ranch: Uncovering the botanical history of the Guadalupe Mountains
Botanists at Texas Tech University recently tested a new genetic resource on plants from the Guadalupe Mountains, a region that boasts some of the most diverse ecosystems in Texas. Called Angiosperms353, the resource has the potential to help unravel the 500-million-year history of land plants while also providing a conservation roadmap to protect vulnerable species into the future.
8h
Storsatsning på snabbare vaccin
Covid-19 -vaccinerna var ett undantag, i vanliga fall tar det mer än tio år att få fram ett nytt vaccin. EU och läkemedelsindustrin storsatsar nu på att snabba på framtagningen även av andra nya vaccin – bland annat mot sexuellt överförbara sjukdomar. – Mot covid-19 kunde effektiva RNA-vacciner tas fram med rekordfart, baserat på många års grundforskning och framsteg inom vaccinplattformstekniker
8h
Mouse moms teach future pup caretakers how to parent
The best way to become a good mother just might be learning from an experienced one, a new study with mice suggests. Researchers filmed thousands of hours of interaction between female mice and found that mouse mothers are outstanding tutors. "This provides scientific evidence for the benefits observed from parenting classes in humans…" "We discovered never-before-seen behavior in which new mouse
8h
Microbial sieving effects on vertical differentiation of nutrient availability along forest succession
Along forest succession stages, soil nutrient status always presents vertical stratification along soil horizons. Researchers have suggested that the microbiomes play a pivotal role in the allocation of decomposed organic matter across the top organic matter layer and subsoil horizons in forest ecosystems.
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Metal pollution: If it's in the air—and our iPhones—it'll end up in our bones
In our increasingly industrialized world, what we produce "out there" has a direct impact on what happens in here, inside our bodies. A new study by Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) reveals the link between rates of metal production and toxic lead exposure in humans. The research team closely examined human remains from a burial ground in central Italy that was in consecutive use for 12,000 yea
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Ice lenses may cause many Arctic landslides
Climate change is driving periods of unusually high temperature across large swaths of the planet. These heat waves are especially detrimental in the Arctic, where they can push surface temperatures in regions of significant permafrost past the melting point of ice lenses. Melting ice injects liquid water into the soil, reducing its strength and increasing the likelihood of landslides. In populate
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3D-bild avslöjar fotosyntesens innersta hos backtrav
Tack var en unik 3D-struktur av molekylkomplexet fotosystem II har Umeåforskare fått en unik inblick i det inre av backtravens fotosyntesmaskin. Forskare har för första gången lyckats ta fram en högupplöst bild av fotosystem II – fotosyntesens centrala komplex – i modellväxten backtrav. Det enorma komplexet ansvarar för den livsviktiga syrgasproduktionen i fotosyntesen som en gång möjliggjorde li
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Diver vs Diver! Who Gets More Gold? | Bering Sea Gold
Stream Bering Sea Gold on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/bering-sea-gold About Bering Sea Gold: In Nome, Alaska, the gold rush is on. Driven by gold fever and sometimes desperate need, miners pilot their ragtag dredges and dive with hoses to suck up gold from the bottom of the frigid, unpredictable Bering Sea. #BeringSeaGold #Discovery #Gold Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/
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The long-term effect of wildfires in Canada: Q and A
The most harmful air pollutant worldwide is fine particular matter. In Canada, the biggest natural source of this pollutant is wildfires. Winds can spread wildfire smoke over a wide area, affecting areas hundreds of kilometers downwind. Professor Rebecca Saari, who studies the consequences of climate change and climate policy on human health and environmental inequality, examines what causes these
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Scientists Just Laid Out a Game Plan for Building a Clean Hydrogen Economy
Batteries and renewable energy are helping to decarboni z e large swathes of the modern world, but they look less likely to help in areas like industrial heating, long-haul heavy transportation, and long-duration energy storage. Some are touting hydrogen as a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that could fill the gap. The Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act , which passed the Senate l
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Var det inte vatten under sydpolen på Mars?
Om det finns flytande vatten på Mars har det stor betydelse, bland annat för frågan om det funnits liv på planeten och för möjligheterna att anlägga framtida bosättningar för människor. Därför väckte det viss uppmärksamhet 2018 när ett radarinstrument på den europeiska kretsaren Mars Express fångade upp ett kraftigt eko som kunde tolkas som en 20 kilometer stor flytande vattensamling djupt under y
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Målade celler i jakten på medicin mot corona
Genom att färglägga olika delar av cellen kan forskare följa vad som händer i cellen, när ett virus tagit sig in. På samma vis går det att testa vilka substanser – redan godkända mediciner eller hittills oprövade substanser – som biter på coronaviruset i cellen. Den nuvarande covid-19-pandemin har belyst behovet av metoder för att identifiera nya eller återanvända befintliga läkemedel som antivir
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250 preschool kids get suspended or expelled each day: Five questions answered
When parents think of a child getting kicked out of school, they might imagine drugs found stashed in a locker, a classroom that's been vandalized, or some kind of sexual or other violent assault. But the fact is that it's not uncommon for students to be suspended or expelled for much less egregious behavior before they even enter kindergarten.
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Lemurs that live close to humans harbor drug-resistant bacteria
Researchers have found evidence for antibiotic resistance in the microbiome of lemurs living close to humans. And the closer the contact, the more antibiotic resistance they found. For the new study in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Duke University graduate student Sally Bornbusch and Christine Drea, professor of evolutionary anthropology, sampled the dung of ring-tailed lemurs an
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Why trauma-sensitive teaching matters even more in 2021
This month, students and teachers across the country are returning to classrooms amid an ongoing pandemic. Many have spent the past year dealing with illness, economic hardship, virtual and disrupted learning, racial unrest and more. Some have lost parents, caregivers or loved ones.
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Improving soil carbon measurements empowers African farmers
The amount of carbon in farm soils is important to farmers. Soils with high carbon contents tend to provide better yields. They also tend to have more resilience to weather-related crop failure. But measuring the amount of carbon in soil can be expensive and involve several steps. That can make it hard to collect this critical information in regions like sub-Saharan Africa.
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Social Media Outrage
A new study from Yale psychology researchers is the first to provide hard evidence that social media use magnifies expressions of outrage. This is likely not surprising to anyone familiar with social media, but we cannot take our anecdotal experience for granted, and so objective evidence is welcome. The researchers used AI to analyze 12.7 million tweets from 7,331 Twitter users. The AI operation
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Boast a whiter smile in just 9 minutes a day with Snow
Every time you smile, you're sharing a little slice of happiness with the world — but you're also telling the world the story of your teeth. Maybe you had braces as a teenager. Maybe you're a coffee fiend who requires a fresh cup of joe to kick off your day. And maybe, at some point, you tried the whole teeth strip whitening trend years ago, and you just gave up on the whole thing: it just wasn't
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Ubiquitin protein helps cells to recover from stress
Nature, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02197-z In stressed cells, proteins and RNA molecules cluster together to form stress granules. It emerges that the small protein modifier ubiquitin is needed to disassemble stress granules in recovering cells.
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WHO COVID-19 library contains hundreds of papers from hijacked journals
A World Health Organization (WHO) database of papers about COVID-19 contains hundreds of articles published in hijacked journals whose publishers have stolen titles and legitimacy from the original publications. That's what I found when I analyzed the WHO's "COVID-19 Global literature on coronavirus disease," which as of August 1 included more than 318,000 papers sourced … Continue reading
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Varmare vintrar ökar risken för djurspridd sjukdom
Vintrarna i norr har blivit blötare vilket har lett till ökad spridning av sorkfebervirus. Viruset kan orsaka en blödarfeber hos människor. Vintrarna i norr har blivit blötare och detta har lett till ökad spridning av sorkfebervirus bland gnagare, som orsakar sjukdomen sorkfeber hos människor (läs mer om sorkfeber längre ner). Särskilt viktigt för antalet sorkfeberfall är mängden regn som faller
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Robothunden Spot utforskar underjorden – och rymden
Nästa generations autonoma robotar kan användas till både räddningsaktioner och utforskning av planeter. – Vi laddar roboten med ett uppdrag som den sedan utför, utan pilot eller människa som styr, säger George Nikolakopoulos, professor i robotik och artificiell intelligens vid Luleå tekniska universitet. Hans forskargrupp är en av de första i världen som kunnat visa upp AI-baserad navigering av
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Technology and Great Customer Service
Putting the focus back on human interaction. Suscipit taciti primis tempor sagittis euismod libero facilisi aptent elementum felis blandit cursus gravida sociis eleifend lectus nullam dapibus netus feugiat curae curabitur. Curae fringilla porttitor quam sollicitudin iaculis aptent leo ligula euismod dictumst penatibus mauris eros etiam praesent volutpat posuere. Metus fringilla ullamcorper odio a
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The Latest Trends in Design and Color
Accessibility is influencing what we design. Suscipit taciti primis tempor sagittis euismod libero facilisi aptent elementum felis blandit cursus gravida sociis eleifend lectus nullam dapibus netus feugiat curae curabitur. Curae fringilla porttitor quam sollicitudin iaculis aptent leo ligula euismod dictumst penatibus mauris eros etiam praesent volutpat posuere. Metus fringilla ullamcorper odio a
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Adapting and Planning for Next Year
It's not too early to plan for next year. Suscipit taciti primis tempor sagittis euismod libero facilisi aptent elementum felis blandit cursus gravida sociis eleifend lectus nullam dapibus netus feugiat curae curabitur. Curae fringilla porttitor quam sollicitudin iaculis aptent leo ligula euismod dictumst penatibus mauris eros etiam praesent volutpat posuere. Metus fringilla ullamcorper odio aliq
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Stick with the Tools that Work Best
Productivity tools can be counter productive. Suscipit taciti primis tempor sagittis euismod libero facilisi aptent elementum felis blandit cursus gravida sociis eleifend lectus nullam dapibus netus feugiat curae curabitur. Curae fringilla porttitor quam sollicitudin iaculis aptent leo ligula euismod dictumst penatibus mauris eros etiam praesent volutpat posuere. Metus fringilla ullamcorper odio
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Time to Launch Your Online Course
Now is the perfect time to share your knowledge. Suscipit taciti primis tempor sagittis euismod libero facilisi aptent elementum felis blandit cursus gravida sociis eleifend lectus nullam dapibus netus feugiat curae curabitur. Curae fringilla porttitor quam sollicitudin iaculis aptent leo ligula euismod dictumst penatibus mauris eros etiam praesent volutpat posuere. Metus fringilla ullamcorper od
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Against the Legacy of Redlining, New Shades of Green
Recently, research on health and environmental disparities has focused on the specific legacy of redlining, and the way racist policy continues to shape the landscapes of U.S. cities. In communities like Richmond, California, residents are living with the long-term impacts — and making moves to reverse them.
13h
How the glucocorticoid receptor contributes to platinum-based therapy resistance in solid cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24847-6 Synthetic glucocorticoids serve as co-medication against solid malignant tumors. However, glucocorticoid receptor activation may promote unsolicited cancer resistance to chemotherapy. The Kang team elucidated a glucocorticoid receptor-centred chemotherapy-resistance mechanism to cisplatin and characterized ave
13h
Directed synthesis of a hybrid improper magnetoelectric multiferroic material
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25098-1 Fabricating materials with simultaneously spontaneous magnetic and electrical polarisations is challenging due to contradictory electronic features. Here, the authors report a synthesis path toward a perovskite MnSrTa2O7 by performing low-temperature cation-exchange reactions on Li2SrTa2O7.
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Tunable exciton-polaritons emerging from WS2 monolayer excitons in a photonic lattice at room temperature
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24925-9 Excitons in atomically thin crystals couple strongly with light. Here, the authors observe lattice polaritons in a tunable open optical cavity at room temperature, with an imprinted photonic lattice strongly coupled to excitons in a WS2 monolayer.
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Biomimetic approach to the catalytic enantioselective synthesis of tetracyclic isochroman
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25198-y General and stereoselective synthesis of tetracyclic isochroman-containing polyketide oligomers is challenging. Here, the authors report on an Au(I)/chiral Sc(III) bimetallic catalyst for a biomimetic asymmetric hetero-Diels–Alder reaction for in-situ generation of isochromene and ortho-quinonemethide.
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LineageOT is a unified framework for lineage tracing and trajectory inference
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25133-1 Lineage tracing and snapshots of transcriptional state at the single-cell level are powerful, complementary tools for studying development. Here, the authors propose a mathematical method combining lineage tracing with trajectory inference to improve our understanding of development.
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Toward scalable biocatalytic conversion of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural by galactose oxidase using coordinated reaction and enzyme engineering
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25034-3 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) can be transformed to a range of industrially useful derivatives, such as 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF), but the reactions needed for efficient industrial production are hindered by several issues. Here, the authors perform reaction and enzyme engineering resulting in a galactose oxidas
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EXPLAINER: Why are earthquakes so devastating in Haiti?
The powerful earthquake that hit Haiti on Saturday killed hundreds and injured thousands more. The destruction comes just 11 years after a temblor killed tens of thousands of people, if not hundreds of thousands. Some 100,000 buildings were destroyed in the 2010 quake.
14h
Are vaccines driving the emergence of "escape mutant" variants of COVID-19?
Geert Vanden Bossche is back, and this time he's blaming COVID-19 vaccines for driving the evolution of more dangerous "escape variants" of SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes the disease, that are capable of evading vaccine-induced immunity. As antivaxxers making this argument always do, unfortunately, he ignores the much larger problem in which free circulation of the virus is a far more po
15h
Samband mellan stress och blindtarmsinflammation
Blindtarmsinflammation är en vanlig sjukdom bland barn och ungdomar och utgör den vanligaste orsaken till akut bukoperation i världen. Nu har forskare vid Lunds universitet och Skånes universitetssjukhus undersökt om ökad stress påverkar risken för blindtarmsinflammation och bidrar till ett mer komplicerat sjukdomsförlopp.
15h
Rapa Nui – Påsköns undergång
Maoi-staty, Rapa Nui. Bild: Emil A Eklund, beskuren Exploa­tering till döds Rapa Nui (eller Påskön) används ofta som en metafor för den moderna människans benägenhet att skövla sina begränsade naturtillgångar … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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