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UK approves rollout of 'first of its kind' Covid antibody treatment
Ronapreve can be used to treat symptoms of acute infection after successful clinical trials Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The medicines regulator has approved use of the first treatment in the UK using artificial antibodies to prevent and fight Covid-19. The health secretary, Sajid Javid, said approval of the first drug designed specifically for coronavirus in the
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Jabbed adults infected with Delta 'can match virus levels of unvaccinated'
Researchers say implications for transmission remain unclear but reaching herd immunity even more challenging Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Fully vaccinated adults can harbour virus levels as high as unvaccinated people if infected with the Delta variant, according to a sweeping analysis of UK data, which supports the idea that hitting the threshold for herd immuni
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'Green steel': Swedish company ships first batch made without using coal
Hybrit sends steel made with hydrogen production process to Volvo, which plans to use it in prototype vehicles and components The world's first customer delivery of "green steel" produced without using coal is taking place in Sweden, according to its manufacturer. The Swedish venture Hybrit said it was delivering the steel to truck-maker Volvo AB as a trial run before full commercial production i
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Scientists discover crystal exhibiting exotic spiral magnetism
An exotic form of magnetism has been discovered and linked to an equally exotic type of electrons, according to scientists who analyzed a new crystal in which they appear at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The magnetism is created and protected by the crystal's unique electronic structure, offering a mechanism that might be exploited for fast, robust information storage
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Researchers solve 20-year-old paradox in solar physics
In 1998, the journal Nature published a seminal letter concluding that a mysterious signal, which had been discovered while analyzing the polarization of sunlight, implies that the solar chromosphere (an important layer of the solar atmosphere) is practically unmagnetised, in sharp contradiction with common wisdom. This paradox motivated laboratory experiments and theoretical investigations, which
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Geologists dig into Grand Canyon's mysterious gap in time
A new study led by the University of Colorado Boulder reveals the complex history behind one of the Grand Canyon's most well-known geologic features: A mysterious and missing gap of time in the canyon's rock record that covers hundreds of millions of years.
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Comet ATLAS may have been a blast from the past
It's suspected that about 5,000 years ago a comet may swept within 23 million miles of the Sun, closer than the innermost planet Mercury. The comet might have been a spectacular sight to civilizations across Eurasia and North Africa at the end of the Stone Age.
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What I Learned While Eavesdropping on the Taliban
When people ask me what I did in Afghanistan, I tell them that I hung out in planes and listened to the Taliban. My job was to provide "threat warning" to allied forces, and so I spent most of my time trying to discern the Taliban's plans. Before I started, I was cautioned that I would hear terrible things, and I most certainly did. But when you listen to people for hundreds of hours—even people
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Japan Tests Exploding Rocket Engine for the First Time in Space
Ring of Explosions Japan's space agency JAXA has announced that is has successfully demonstrated the operation of a "rotary detonation engine" in space, a world's first. Such an engine uses a series of controlled explosions that travel around a circular channel at its base. The result is a massive amount of thrust coming from a much smaller engine using significantly less fuel — a potential game
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French scientist who pushed unproven Covid drug may be forced from post
Didier Raoult, who promoted hydroxychloroquine treatment, may not be able to continue his research The French scientist who promoted the discredited hydroxychloroquine treatment for Covid-19 backed by Donald Trump faces being pushed out of the infectious diseases institute he founded, amid concerns from key members over its role in feeding conspiracy theories and an investigation by regulators in
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The Week the Left Stopped Caring About Human Rights
Back in April, The Nation magazine told readers that the withdrawal of American troops from Afghanistan would be " a welcome and long-overdue action ." The essay, by a scholar named Phyllis Bennis, sounded upbeat, even salubrious. It was the liberal case in full: We Americans were a wretched people to have gone there and a depraved people to have stayed for two decades. Some collateral damage upo
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This War Needed to End
Peter van Agtmael / Magnum A s a pastor, I have loved and ministered to many members of my church who have suffered grievous hurt in war. Some have suffered visible injuries to the body; others cannot be seen but are serious injuries to the mind and soul. Moral injury is real—and in our current wars, moral injury has been far more common than it was in some earlier wars. I have seen my church mem
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Hundreds of UK and EU cosmetics products contain ingredients tested on animals
New analysis finds chemicals tested on animals in moisturisers, lipsticks, hair conditioner and sunscreen, despite ban Hundreds of cosmetic products sold in the UK and Europe contain ingredients that have been tested on animals, despite bans that outlawed such testing years ago, a new analysis has shown. Banned tests were performed on ingredients used in products including moisturisers, lipsticks
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Val Kilmer Can't Speak — But His AI Voice Replacement Is Truly Uncanny
Speaking Up After actor "Top Gun" actor Val Kilmer was treated for throat cancer, he lost the ability to speak clearly. But now he can do so again — at least in the form of an AI algorithm that learned to mimic his voice with startling accuracy. Kilmer worked with the AI developer Sonantic to train an algorithm on old recordings of his voice to synthesize new speech, according to TheWrap . It's a
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Bats Love To Babble — Just Like Humans
New research finds that sac-winged bat pups — a species of bat found in Central and South America — like to "babble" in ways that are remarkably similar to human babies. (Image credit: B.G. Thomson/Science Source)
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Why You Might Want an mRNA Booster Shot, In One Simple Graphic
By late September, Americans who got an mRNA vaccine for COVID-19 — that means either Pfizer or Moderna — may be able to sign up for a third shot in order to boost their immune response to the coronavirus, according to an announcement from President Biden. Part of the rationale is preemptive, The Washington Post reports : There's preliminary evidence that a third shot will prevent vaccinated folk
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Psychopaths don't move their heads when talking
Researchers have long noted that psychopathic individuals display certain behaviors during nonverbal communication, including the so-called psychopathic stare. The study analyzed video interviews with 507 inmates, using tracking algorithms to measure head movements. Inmates who scored high in antisocial traits — a facet of psychopathy — tended to keep their heads still. Could you spot a psychopat
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Scientists 3D Print Living, Viable Brain Tumor, to Practice Killing It
A team of mad scientists successfully 3D-printed out a living, "viable" glioblastoma tumor — the deadliest kind of brain cancer — for the express purpose of learning how to kill it. The tumor, which is made of a brain-like material and artificial blood vessels, is likely the most realistic approximation of glioblastoma available for doctors to work with, according to research published in the jou
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How Big Data Carried Graph Theory Into New Dimensions
Graph theory isn't enough. The mathematical language for talking about connections, which usually depends on networks — vertices (dots) and edges (lines connecting them) — has been an invaluable way to model real-world phenomena since at least the 18th century. But a few decades ago, the emergence of giant data sets forced researchers to expand their toolboxes and, at the same time… Source
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SpaceX's Starlink Satellites Cause 1,600 Near-Crashes in Orbit Every Week
Road Rage Starlink, Elon Musk's still-growing constellation made up of thousands of SpaceX satellites whizzing around the planet, is turning out to be something of a space menace. Especially to other satellite operators. The satellites are responsible for half of the near-misses in orbit, according to research by Hugh Lewis, head of the University of Southampton's Astronautics Research Group. Nea
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'This Is Not Saigon. This Is Worse Than Saigon.'
Updated on August 19 at 12:45 p.m. ET The Afghans were not ready to leave. That was how President Joe Biden, in his address to the nation on Monday , tried to explain why his administration had not acted sooner, and faster, to evacuate America's allies from Afghanistan ahead of the Taliban's rapid march to Kabul. Many of the local partners who aided the U.S. military during its 20-year war—interp
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'No one wanted to read' his book on pandemic psychology – then Covid hit
Australian psychologist Steven Taylor published what would turn out to be a prophetic book, and it has become like a Lonely Planet guide to the pandemic In October 2019, a month or so before Covid-19 began to spread from the industrial Chinese city of Wuhan, Steven Taylor, an Australian psychologist at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, published what would turn out to be a remarkab
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I Spent 5 Months Trying to Coax a Cat From My Ceiling
On April 30, 2021, after four months in the ceiling, Eliza Schuyler Hamilton, a cat, spent what I thought would be her last night among the dust bunnies. At first, it had been strange to be haunted by a small, hairy ghost who loved to yowl right into the heating ducts. But soon it became almost routine. Some people have mice in their walls . I had a cat in my ceiling. Now I had laid a trap. I wou
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The Experiment Podcast: A Uyghur Teen's Life After Escaping Genocide
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Here in the United States, 19-year-old Aséna Tahir Izgil feels as though she's a "grandma." Aséna is Uyghur, an ethnic minority being imprisoned in labor camps by the Chinese government. The pain she witnessed before escaping in 2017 has aged her beyond her years, she says, making it hard to relate to American teenagers.
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The Social and Environmental Perils of Magical Thinking
Magical thinkers — people who accept the existence of a problem yet believe as a matter of course that everything will work out fine — are just as dangerous to the common good as science deniers. By leaving others to do the worry and the work, they hold society back and waste precious time.
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Here's a Therapeutic Video of Those Boston Dynamics Robots Busting Ass
Atlas Tripped There's something deeply unsettling about watching Atlas, the humanoid robot from the engineers at Boston Dynamics that's walked, run, jumped, and flipped in countless viral marketing videos over the years. It's easy to watch Atlas and other Boston Dynamics robots gyrate (the company just loves to call it "twerking" ) and think "well, here's how the robot revolution starts!" More li
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'Do Not Abandon the Afghans'
Veterans, journalists, human-rights groups, and ordinary Americans had for months urged President Joe Biden to develop and implement a serious plan to protect and relocate our allies before the United States withdrew its forces from Afghanistan. This summer, I wrote privately to members of his administration on this issue. Now the situation has reached a crucial juncture. In the coming hours and
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Site on Tibetan Plateau shows promise as a place for next-generation large telescope
A team of researchers affiliated with a host of institutions across China has found that a site on the Tibetan Plateau shows promise as a home for a next-generation large telescope. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the researchers describe features and attributes of the site that suggest it could provide a good setting for a next-generation telescope.
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The Internal Contradictions of Republicans' COVID-19 Politics
Governor Greg Abbott of Texas is not only fighting a COVID-19 infection—he's also on the front lines of a clash within conservatism. The Republican has declared his state "the Freedom Capital of America." He has consistently prioritized cutting regulations on business, and in a 2018 opinion column boasted , "Innovation and self-reliance are deeply rooted in the Lone Star State, and when freed fro
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Dementia risk lower for people in stimulating jobs, research suggests
Findings of large study support the idea mental stimulation could delay onset of symptoms, says lead author People with mentally stimulating jobs have a lower risk of dementia in later years than those who have non-stimulating work, research has suggested. Scientists looked at more than 100,000 participants across studies from the UK, Europe and the US focused on links between work-related factor
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Pharmacist Busted for Selling Real COVID Vaccine Cards to Anti-Vaxxers
On Wednesday, Chicago pharmacist Tangtang Zhao was arrested for selling 125 authentic COVID-19 vaccine cards to anti-vaxxers who either wanted to enter public spaces without getting a shot themselves or then resold the cards to others. Zhao walked away with $1,277.43 total from 12 different buyers, Ars Technica reports . It's a number so low that it's hard not to wonder what in the world he was t
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'Devastating career event': scientists caught out by change to Australian Research Council fine print
Researchers say a ban on preprint material citations in funding applications is a 'remarkably stupid own-goal for Australian science' Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Researchers have been deemed ineligible for critical career grants by the Australian Research Council as the result of a rule change that has been described as punitive, "extraordinary" and out of keeping with
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Stunning 3D Images Show How the Coronavirus Infects Our Cells
A stunning, ultra-detailed set of 3D images showing human respiratory cells infected by SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, shines new light on how infections take hold, and how doctors might be able to battle them. In order to actually see the cells and the tiny structures that coat their surfaces, the Utrecht University scientists had to quickly make some improvements to a microscopy te
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Study suggests hydraulic fracturing can impact surface water quality
Tens of thousands of hydraulic fracturing wells drilled over the past few years from Pennsylvania to Texas to North Dakota have made unconventional oil and gas production part of everyday life for many Americans. This raises questions about the impacts to local communities and human health. While some studies document that hydraulic fracturing can contaminate groundwater, new evidence shows the pr
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A peculiar state of matter in layers of semiconductors
Scientists around the world are developing new hardware for quantum computers, a new type of device that could accelerate drug design, financial modeling, and weather prediction. These computers rely on qubits, bits of matter that can represent some combination of 1 and 0 simultaneously. The problem is that qubits are fickle, degrading into regular bits when interactions with surrounding matter in
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The Atlantic Daily: 3 Signs the Vaccines Are Doing Their Job
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Getty / The Atlantic The United States government is all in on COVID-19 boosters . Most people will need one, and soon, officials said today, based on evidence that protection can start to falter
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History Won't Help Us Now
As a medical historian, I have never been busier. Over the past 20 months, journalists and policy makers have reached out in an effort to understand what past infectious diseases might teach us about this one. These exchanges almost always end with questions about how this pandemic is similar to the influenza pandemic of 1918–19, which, until COVID-19, was the worst pandemic in human history. The
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How Are These Horrible Vaccine TikToks Fooling So Many People?
TikTok's hottest new trend? Dangerous COVID-19 misinformation. It's not a surprise that misinformation is spreading so rampantly on the social media platform, which promotes a rapid-fire onslaught of video so unrelenting it's amazing anyone can walk away with any semblance of an attention span intact. It's also unsurprising to anyone who's studied media or misinformation that COVID-19 and the vac
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Fake Forgiveness Is Toxic for Relationships
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. I n Robert M. Pirsig's 1974 book , Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance , the author describes a device he calls "the old South Indian Monkey Trap." It consists of a hollowed-out coconut with some rice inside, chained to a stake. The coconut has a hole in the top just large enough for a
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Absence of fans at European elite soccer 'ghost games' significantly decreases home advantage: study
When some European elite football leagues returned to action last year amidst the pandemic, athletes played largely without crowds. These so-called ghost games offered researchers a rare opportunity to get into the heads of referees. What they found was that football officials—no longer pressured by fans—penalized only the home team with more yellow cards after fouls, with the apparent knock-on ef
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The Pop Star Who's Redefining the Word Basic
Ever since people started slinging around the word basic as an insult, delights as disparate as pumpkin-spice lattes, the music of Lizzo, and sunsets have gotten a bad rap. The diss refers to pleasure—simple pleasures, normal pleasures, things that everyone can enjoy. What makes you happy, the notion of "basic" says, can also make you boring. Lorde has allegedly become basic. The New Zealand song
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The problem of other minds: a disturbing world of polite, smiling zombies
The problem of other minds asks how it is that we can be sure that other people have mental lives when we can only infer that this is the case from behavior and testimony. John Stuart Mill argued that we know others' minds by analogy, but is this a strong argument? With artificial intelligence and animated movies, what grounds do we really have for ascribing mindedness to sentient-looking beings?
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Solar panels are a pain to recycle. These companies are trying to fix that.
Millions of solar panels have been installed in the last two decades—and since they typically last between 25 and 30 years, many will soon be ready for retirement and probably headed to a landfill. But new efforts to recycle these panels could reduce both the amount of waste and the new material that needs to be mined. Only about 10% of panels in the US are recycled—it isn't mandated by federal r
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Are Covid booster jabs necessary?
Evidence about efficacy of additional dose of vaccine is unclear as some raise moral argument Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Many rich countries are considering offering people an additional coronavirus vaccine dose. But are these booster shots necessary? Continue reading…
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Yes, the maximum life span will increase this century, but not by more than 10 years
When Jeanne Calment of France died in 1997 at the age of 122 years and 164 days, she set a record for oldest human. That record still stands. As statisticians who study demography , we expect that record will be broken by 2100. We study the maximum human life span using a data-driven approach. Our peer-reviewed study , published in June 2021, models and combines two key components: how the risk o
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The Terrible Cost of Wellness
The defining motif of Nine Perfect Strangers , David E. Kelley's new miniseries on Hulu, is an image of fruit being pulverized into gloop, which is also how my brain felt after watching the first six episodes. Like HBO's Big Little Lies , the show is adapted from a novel by Liane Moriarty, and its setup—a self-help and wellness retreat goes very wrong—seems irresistible. But stylistically, someth
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Remote sensing and machine learning reveal Archaic shell rings
Deep in the dense coastal forests and marshes of the American Southeast lie shell rings and shell mounds left by Indigenous people 3,000 to 5,000 years ago. Now an international team of researchers, using deep machine learning to assess remote sensing data, has located previously undiscovered shell rings. The researchers hope this will lead to a better understanding of how people lived in that are
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New CRISPR-based technology to speed identification of genes involved in health and disease
Zebrafish—small, fast-growing creatures who share many of the same genes as humans—are instrumental to many biologists, who find them uniquely well suited for studying a wide range of questions, from how organisms develop to how the nervous system drives behavior. Now, with a new technology developed by University of Utah Health scientists called MIC-Drop, the fish will be even more powerful for l
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Nutrient-rich human waste poised to sustain agriculture, improve economies
The future connection between human waste, sanitation technology and sustainable agriculture is becoming more evident. According to research directed by University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign civil and environmental engineering professor Jeremy Guest, countries could be moving closer to using human waste as fertilizer, closing the loop to more circular, sustainable economies.
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Rivers are largest global source of mercury in oceans
The presence of mercury in the world's oceans has ramifications for human health and wildlife, especially in coastal areas where the majority of fishing takes place. But while models evaluating sources of mercury in the oceans have focused on mercury deposited directly from the atmosphere, a new study led by Peter Raymond, professor of ecosystem ecology at the Yale School of the Environment and pu
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Female and young walruses depend on disappearing Arctic sea ice for food sources
A new study shows that disappearing sea ice is a significant element of the food web supporting female walruses and their dependent young in the Arctic's Chukchi Sea. Researchers were able to trace biomarkers that are unique to algae growing within sea ice to connect marine mammals with a food source that is rapidly diminishing in the face of climate change.
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The new alchemy in carbon neutrality: Turning water into ammonia with only renewable energy
The Korea Institute of Machinery and Materials (KIMM), an institution under the jurisdiction of the Ministry of Science and ICT, has developed an innovative process that uses renewable energy to produce ammonia at room temperature and normal pressure. This technology is expected to dramatically contribute to achieving carbon neutrality in the future, through the development of an ammonia productio
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Accessing high spins in an artificial atom
Scientists from SANKEN at Osaka University demonstrated the readout of spin-polarized multielectron states composed of three or four electrons on a semiconductor quantum dot. By making use of the spin filtering caused by the quantum Hall effect, the researchers were able to improve upon previous methods that could only easily resolve two electrons. This work may lead to quantum computers based on
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Chinese astronomers want to build an observatory in the Tibetan Plateau
The world's best astronomical observatories are mainly located in the Western Hemisphere, in high-altitude places like the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, La Palma in the Canary Islands, and the Cerro Paranal summit in the Atacama Desert in Chile. But there are pristine locations with clear views of the sky in the East, too. And a team of Chinese astronomers are now making the case for building an
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AI analysis helps to identify ancient insect mimicry
Animals have evolved several strategies in prey-predator interactions due to selective pressures, such as mimicry and camouflage. Both mimicry and camouflage enable animals to effectively reduce the probability of detection by prey and predators.
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Study: unintended consequences of affirmative action
A new study finds an affirmative action program in Brazil harms some of the people it is supposed to help. The assumptions and mechanisms that previously worked are now in the way. The key findings can be applied to many market design problems. Public policy is difficult. Policymakers must identify problems, prioritize them, and then figure out how to address them without making other problems wo
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What is RSV?
In healthy children and adults, the virus typically causes mild, cold-like symptoms; but it can cause more serious disease in infants and the elderly.
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Tailoring wearable technology and telehealth in treating Parkinson's disease
Wearable health technologies are vastly popular with people wanting to improve their physical and mental health. Everything from exercise, sleep patterns, calories consumed and heart rhythms can be tracked by a wearable device. But timely and accurate data is also especially valuable for doctors treating patients with complicated health conditions using virtual care.
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How a Simple Crystal Could Help Pave the Way to Full-Scale Quantum Computing
Vaccine and drug development, artificial intelligence, transport and logistics, climate science—these are all areas that stand to be transformed by the development of a full-scale quantum computer. And there has been explosive growth in quantum computing investment over the past decade. Yet current quantum processors are relatively small in scale, with fewer than 100 qubits — the basic building b
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Key mechanisms behind synapse degeneration in Alzheimer's brain discovered
Neurobiologists have uncovered the long-sought-after mechanisms behind the maintenance and decline of key synapses implicated in brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. The researchers identified the main components driving amyloid beta-associated synapse degeneration, which is found in the brains of people with Alzheimer's. The findings suggest an alternative approach to addressing neurodege
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Digested week: I emerge from my soundproof box to more news of idiots | Lucy Mangan
This week ticketless Bravehearts 'seize' Edinburgh Castle and scientists grow a Raab replacement in the lab Today I disappeared into a lightless, windowless, soundproofed room, four or five feet square, with nothing but myself and a book for company for three days. This would be a lifetime's ambition fulfilled were it not for the fact that the book is one I wrote and I am in this foam-lined oubli
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Demography Is Not Destiny
In the more racist corners of the mainstream right, the 2020 census findings that the white American population has declined are cause for panic. "Democrats are intentionally accelerating demographic change in this country for political advantage," the Fox News host Tucker Carlson insisted on Friday , treating the results as confirmation of this conspiracy theory. "Rather than convince people to
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The Taliban's Biggest Threat Isn't an Armed Group
The average Afghan is 18 years old . Nearly two-thirds of the country is under 25 . For these young people, the 2001 American invasion and the Taliban reign that preceded it aren't memories, but history. Theirs is a generation that has known Afghanistan only under the protection of NATO forces. Twenty years later, the Taliban has returned to power in a country unlike the one it previously control
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Afghanistan's looming cash crisis threatens to worsen a humanitarian disaster
Afghanistan's banking system is in a state of collapse, and people throughout the country are running out money. And this cash crisis—partly due to the international community's efforts to starve the Taliban of resources—is having an outsized effect on everyday Afghan citizens, leaving many without access to important services as the UN warns of a growing humanitarian disaster . Asef Khademi, who
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Epigenetic control of melanoma cell invasiveness by the stem cell factor SALL4
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25326-8 Melanoma cells can switch between proliferative and invasive phenotypes. Here the authors show that the embryonic stem cell factor Sall4 is a negative regulator of melanoma phenotype switching where its loss leads to the acquisition of an invasive phenotype, due to derepression of invasiveness genes.
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Molecular recognition of an acyl-peptide hormone and activation of ghrelin receptor
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25364-2 Ghrelin is a gastric peptide hormone and its acylation is required for binding to and activation of the ghrelin receptor in the brain, which initiates appetite. Here, the authors present cryo-EM structures of the Gq-coupled ghrelin receptor bound to ghrelin and the synthetic agonist GHRP-6 and they describe ho
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Multi-omics integration analysis identifies novel genes for alcoholism with potential overlap with neurodegenerative diseases
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25392-y Alcohol use disorder and drinks per week both have been studied genetically and have different correlations with psychiatric diseases. Here the authors integrate multi-omics data to identify unique and shared variants, genes and pathways for alcohol use disorder and drinks per week.
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O-GlcNAcylated p53 in the liver modulates hepatic glucose production
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25390-0 p53 regulates signalling pathways involved in metabolic homeostasis. Here the authors show that O-GlcNAcylation of p53 in the liver plays a key role in the physiological regulation of glucose homeostasis, potentially via controlling the expression of the gluconeogenic enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase.
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Histone H4 lysine 20 mono-methylation directly facilitates chromatin openness and promotes transcription of housekeeping genes
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25051-2 The effect of histone H4 lysine 20 methylation (H4K20me) on chromatin accessibility are not well established. Here the authors show how H4K20 methylation regulates chromatin structure and accessibility to ensure precise transcriptional outputs through the cell cycle using genome-wide approaches, in vitro bioph
41min
Detection and characterization of lung cancer using cell-free DNA fragmentomes
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24994-w DNA from tumour cells can be detected in the blood of cancer patients. Here, the authors show that cell free DNA fragmentation patterns can identify lung cancer patients and when this information is further interrogated it can be used to predict lung cancer histological subtype.
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PODCAST: Tabte containere truer havmiljø og lystsejlere
Fragtmarkedet gløder, og fragtskibene læsses i op til til dæk af containere. Det øger risikoen for, at de ryger i havet i voldsomt vejr, for sikringen af containerne er ikke fulgt med de voksende laster. Ugens Transformator handler også om klimasikringen af de danske kyster, som ikke tager højde …
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Could we replace lawyers with robots? In some cases, yes
Imagine what a lawyer does on a given day: researching cases, drafting briefs, advising clients. While technology has been nibbling around the edges of the legal profession for some time, it's hard to imagine those complex tasks being done by a robot. And it is those complicated, personalized tasks that have led technologists to include lawyers in a broader category of jobs that are considered pr
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Nobelprisad mikroskopiteknik avslöjar mekanismer bakom bakteriers antibiotikaresistens
Bakterier utvecklar ständigt nya resistensmekanismer för att motverka effekterna av antibiotika. För att utveckla nya antibiotika är det viktigt att förstå hur resistensen fungerar. Med hjälp av så kallad kryo-elektronmikroskopi (kryo-EM) har forskare upptäckt molekylära detaljer i en viktig mekanism bakom antibiotikaresistens. Upptäckten är ett första steg mot att utveckla nya antibiotika som kan
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Online product displays can shape your buying behavior
One of the biggest marketing trends in the online shopping industry is personalization through curated product recommendations; however, it can change whether people buy a product they had been considering, according to new University of California San Diego research.
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I relish a good Freudian slip – that revealing giveaway of the tongue | Hannah Jane Parkinson
It has become a term for a general gaffe, but the true joy is in its original form Sigmund Freud has his fans and his detractors. My take? A lot of his work was pioneering and has relevance to this day; a lot of it was nonsense. One of Freud's greatest legacies (no, not the scatology obsession) is the one that bears his name: the Freudian slip. (Or parapraxis, to give it its other name.) When Fre
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Schneider Shorts 20.08.2021 – The Virus' Achilles Heel!
Schneider Shorts 20.082021: with lasers and radio frequencies, WHO COVID-19 investigators admitting to be pathetic wusses, a German antivaxxer nurse causing major damage, a German child psychiatrist causing even more damage, a dirty old man in Marseille facing forced retirement, Einstein reincarnated to save the world from the pandemic, twice, and the real science of anti-aging revealed by Aubrey
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China to launch uncrewed cargo ship to Tiangong station
Long March 7 rocket will carry Tianzhou 3 into orbit in mid to late September China is preparing to launch an uncrewed cargo ship to its Tiangong "Heavenly palace" space station in preparation for the arrival of its second human crew this autumn. The Long March 7 rocket was delivered to the Wenchang space launch site in Hainan on 16 August, where it will undergo final assembly and testing. It wil
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Lægemiddelstyrelsens nye direktør: Vi skal skabe de bedste rammer for danskernes sundhed
I denne uge havde Lars Bo Nielsen første arbejdsdag i spidsen for Lægemiddelstyrelsen. Det er hans vision, at styrelsen skal sikre de bedste rammer for, at danskerne kan udleve deres ambitioner og drømme, og så vil han have personlig medicin og big data højere op på dagsordenen. Dagens Medicin mødte Lars Bo Nielsen før sommerferien til en snak om hans konkrete ambitioner forud for sin tiltrædelse
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Boganmeldelse: At balancere mellem nærvær og fravær
Den nye bog 'Akutlægens dagbog' er et så virkelighedsnært portræt af akutlægelivet, at man får gåsehud, tårer i øjenkrogene og en følelse af at være så tæt på, at man kan mærke og sanse akutlægens levede liv under COVID-19-pandemien. Bogen er ikke kun for akutlæger, men også for kolleger fra andre specialer og politikere, der vil have større indsigt i akutlivet og dets udfordringer.
6h
Sådan får ME-patienter tillid til sundhedssystemet
I Danmark har vi stort set valgt at gå enegang i forhold til synet på ME, også kaldet kronisk træthedssyndrom. Mens vores nabolande og mange andre følger WHO's kriterier, fastholder Sundhedsstyrelsen, at ME er en funktionel lidelse, hvilket har store konsekvenser for patienter og pårørende.
6h
Den niende folkesygdom
De fleste kender de otte folkesygdomme, som er karakteriseret ved, at de har stor udbredelse i befolkningen og er forbundet med væsentlig sygdomsbyrde og risiko for forkortet levetid. Måske vi burde tilføje multisygdom som den niende folkesygdom?
6h
Aclasta kan ikke forhindre tab af knoglemineral ved pause fra Prolia
Danske læger har undersøgt muligheden for at erstatte behandling med Prolia med Aclasta til patienter med knogleskørhed. Desværre ser det ikke ud til, at Aclasta kan forhindre tab af knoglemineral, når behandlingen erstatter behandling med Prolia, men forsøget har dog alligevel ført til behandlingsændring for nogle patienter på AUH.
6h
Vinder: Tværfaglig systematik gør igen Aalborg bedst til behandling af depression
Struktur er et nøgleord for PS Klinik Syd Sengeafdeling i Aalborg, der for tredje gang i træk er bedst til at behandle depression i Dagens Medicins kåring af Danmarks Bedste Hospitaler. På afdelingen holder de løbende øje med data under behandlingsforløbet og går nogle gange længere end databasens krav, siger specialeansvarlig overlæge Odeta Jankuviené. Og så har COVID-19 ændret en afdeling til d
7h
New Diabetes Treatment Involves a Robot "Docked" Inside Your Guts
Down the road, diabetes patients might do away with regular injections or infection-prone insulin pumps and might instead supply a robotic docking station in their guts with regular shipments of insulin pills. A team of engineers developed a small robot that can be implanted into the small intestine that pulls magnetic pills full of insulin toward them, extracts the medicine, and distributes it t
12h
Do you think eye regeneration will be possible in 5 years?
I mean being able to regenerate the eye in the same vein as regenerating limbs. I know that scientists figured out how to get hair to grow again and will do human trials soon. Scientists have also grown optic nerves again with in a research trial with some patients' eyes even adding additional nerves. There was also a successful study where scientists were able to grow 3D corneas for a transplant
13h
Went to McDonalds today and was shocked to find it entirely cashierless
Last time I physically stepped foot into a fast food restaurant was when I was a little kid. I always just do drive through to save myself a little hassle. Today the drive through line at this McDonald's by my house was incredibly long, so I decided to park and go inside. I was shocked by how different the inside of McDonald's was. First, there was not a single cashier to be found. There was one
13h
How can one prepare for the future economy of the world where people don't work?
Hello, I've been doing a lot of research and it seems like most jobs will be automated by 2050 – a very select group of people will have jobs and the rest will be on a universal basic income. According to Jeff Bezos at his Blue Origin presentation he basically said this will be a major time of creativity and innovation. I guess my question is, how can someone in their 20s or 30s prepare for this?
13h
This Real Estate Platform Lets Investors Save Time and Money Like Never Before
Everyone knows that real estate can be a great investment, if you can afford it. It's a relatively reliable hedge against a sometimes volatile economy, and single family units are an especially enticing way to get in on the action. But where such investments have historically been complicated and even tedious, Roofstock has made the process as simple and easy as possible, so you can focus on enjo
13h
Blue Origin Lawsuit Could Be Massive Setback to Starship Development
More Delays Blue Origin has won a "stay" after the Jeff Bezos-led space company sued NASA over losing the agency's Human Landing Systems (HLS) contract to competitor SpaceX, according to recent tweets Washington Post space reporter Christian Davenport — a decision that could result in months of delays. That means SpaceX and NASA's work on its lunar lander Starship variant is yet again being put o
13h
Red Alert: It Rained in Greenland's Ice Sheet for the First Time in Recorded History
Storm Clouds Ahead For the first time in recorded history, it rained at Greenland Summit Camp, a research outpost in the island's (usually) frozen ice shelf. And it wasn't just a little slush. A torrential downpour containing 7 billion tons of rain washed away a horrifying amount of Greenland's ice last week, Earther reports , in a massive melt event that impacted 337,000 square miles — about hal
13h
Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors: Next big thing in blood flow measurement
In order to function properly, the brain requires a steady flow of blood through the cerebral arteries and veins, which deliver oxygen and nutrients and also remove metabolic byproducts. Therefore, cerebral blood flow is considered a vital and sensitive marker of cerebrovascular function. Optical methods offer a noninvasive approach for measuring cerebral blood flow. Diffuse correlation spectrosco
14h
Study identifies patterns in bird-plane collisions
Worldwide, the cost of bird collisions with planes has been estimated at $1.2 billion per year. But information on bird movements throughout the year can help avoid damage to aircraft and risk to passengers. Scientists from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and partners have been looking for patterns in bird strike data from three New York City area airports. Their findings were published today in th
14h
Urban heat even affects small cities. Biddeford is doing something about it
By Priyanka Runwal , data and science reporter, Climate Central and Lori Valigra , Bangor Daily News A man crosses the street in downtown Biddeford on a scorching Thursday, Aug. 12, 2021. Credit: Troy R. Bennett / BDN This segment and story were produced through a partnership between Climate Central and Bangor Daily News . BIDDEFORD, Maine — Duane Dennison knows more than most about the effects o
15h
Snakes on a Plain
Researchers discover that rattlesnakes change their rattling frequency when a perceived threat approaches–tricking humans into thinking the snake is closer than it really is.
15h
Researchers develop steerable catheter for brain surgery
A team of engineers and physicians has developed a steerable catheter that will give neurosurgeons the ability to steer the device in any direction they want while navigating the brain's arteries and blood vessels. The device was inspired by nature, specifically insect legs and flagella — tail-like structures that allow microscopic organisms such as bacteria to swim.
15h
New method to detect and visualize sperm cells recovered from forensic evidence
One of the most valuable forms of forensic evidence in cases of male-perpetrated sexual assault is the presence of semen, either in the form of stains left behind on items or on swabs collected from victims after an offense. To confirm that semen is present, suspected stains are examined under a microscope to see if any sperm cells are visible.
15h
Morphological cell profiling of SARS-CoV-2 infection identifies drug repurposing candidates for COVID-19 [Medical Sciences]
The global spread of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the associated disease COVID-19, requires therapeutic interventions that can be rapidly identified and translated to clinical care. Traditional drug discovery methods have a >90% failure rate and can take 10 to 15 y from target identification to…
15h
Incentives can spur COVID-19 vaccination uptake [Political Sciences]
Recent evidence suggests that vaccination hesitancy is too high in many countries to sustainably contain COVID-19. Using a factorial survey experiment administered to 20,500 online respondents in Germany, we assess the effectiveness of three strategies to increase vaccine uptake, namely, providing freedoms, financial remuneration, and vaccination at local doctors. Our…
15h
{alpha}-Synuclein kinetically regulates the nascent fusion pore dynamics [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
α-Synuclein (α-synFL) is central to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), in which its nonfunctional oligomers accumulate and result in abnormal neurotransmission. The normal physiological function of this intrinsically disordered protein is still unclear. Although several previous studies demonstrated α-synFL's role in various membrane fusion steps, they produced conflicting outcomes…
15h
Control of low flow regions in the cortical vasculature determines optimal arterio-venous ratios [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The energy demands of neurons are met by a constant supply of glucose and oxygen via the cerebral vasculature. The cerebral cortex is perfused by dense, parallel arterioles and venules, consistently in imbalanced ratios. Whether and how arteriole–venule arrangement and ratio affect the efficiency of energy delivery to the cortex…
15h
An outer-pore gate modulates the pharmacology of the TMEM16A channel [Pharmacology]
TMEM16A Ca2+-activated chloride channels are involved in multiple cellular functions and are proposed targets for diseases such as hypertension, stroke, and cystic fibrosis. This therapeutic endeavor, however, suffers from paucity of selective and potent modulators. Here, exploiting a synthetic small molecule with a biphasic effect on the TMEM16A channel, anthracene-9-carboxylic…
15h
Genealogical structure changes as range expansions transition from pushed to pulled [Evolution]
Range expansions accelerate evolution through multiple mechanisms, including gene surfing and genetic drift. The inference and control of these evolutionary processes ultimately rely on the information contained in genealogical trees. Currently, there are two opposing views on how range expansions shape genealogies. In invasion biology, expansions are typically approximated by…
15h
Nonlocal topological insulators: Deterministic aperiodic arrays supporting localized topological states protected by nonlocal symmetries [Physics]
The properties of topological systems are inherently tied to their dimensionality. Indeed, higher-dimensional periodic systems exhibit topological phases not shared by their lower-dimensional counterparts. On the other hand, aperiodic arrays in lower-dimensional systems (e.g., the Harper model) have been successfully employed to emulate higher-dimensional physics. This raises a general question…
15h
The Fermi-Dirac distribution provides a calibrated probabilistic output for binary classifiers [Engineering]
Binary classification is one of the central problems in machine-learning research and, as such, investigations of its general statistical properties are of interest. We studied the ranking statistics of items in binary classification problems and observed that there is a formal and surprising relationship between the probability of a sample…
15h
Folding and misfolding of potassium channel monomers during assembly and tetramerization [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The dynamics and folding of potassium channel pore domain monomers are connected to the kinetics of tetramer assembly. In all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of Kv1.2 and KcsA channels, monomers adopt multiple nonnative conformations while the three helices remain folded. Consistent with this picture, NMR studies also find the monomers to…
15h
Genome-wide screen identifies curli amyloid fibril as a bacterial component promoting host neurodegeneration [Neuroscience]
Growing evidence indicates that gut microbiota play a critical role in regulating the progression of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease. The molecular mechanism underlying such microbe–host interaction is unclear. In this study, by feeding Caenorhabditis elegans expressing human α-syn with Escherichia coli knockout mutants, we conducted a genome-wide screen…
15h
Vanishing nematic order beyond the pseudogap phase in overdoped cuprate superconductors [Physics]
During the last decade, translational and rotational symmetry-breaking phases—density wave order and electronic nematicity—have been established as generic and distinct features of many correlated electron systems, including pnictide and cuprate superconductors. However, in cuprates, the relationship between these electronic symmetry-breaking phases and the enigmatic pseudogap phase remains unclea
15h
TET2 as a tumor suppressor and therapeutic target in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [Genetics]
Pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy resulting from overproduction of immature T-cells in the thymus and is typified by widespread alterations in DNA methylation. As survival rates for relapsed T-ALL remain dismal (10 to 25%), development of targeted therapies to prevent relapse is key to improving…
15h
Velocity transformation for compressible wall-bounded turbulent flows with and without heat transfer [Engineering]
In this work, a transformation, which maps the mean velocity profiles of compressible wall-bounded turbulent flows to the incompressible law of the wall, is proposed. Unlike existing approaches, the proposed transformation successfully collapses, without specific tuning, numerical simulation data from fully developed channel and pipe flows, and boundary layers with…
15h
Bacterial translation machinery for deliberate mistranslation of the genetic code [Biochemistry]
Inaccurate expression of the genetic code, also known as mistranslation, is an emerging paradigm in microbial studies. Growing evidence suggests that many microbial pathogens can deliberately mistranslate their genetic code to help invade a host or evade host immune responses. However, discovering different capacities for deliberate mistranslation remains a challenge…
15h
Rattlesnake rattles trick human ears
Rattlesnakes increase their rattling rate as potential threats approach, and this abrupt switch to a high-frequency mode makes listeners, including humans, think they're closer than they actually are, researchers report.
15h
Baby bats babble like human infants
Nature, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02258-3 Repeated vocalizations could help young bats to practise the sounds they will need as adults.
16h
Glaciohydrology of the Himalaya-Karakoram
Understanding the response of Himalayan-Karakoram (HK) rivers to climate change is crucial for ~1 billion people who partly depend on these water resources. Policy-makers tasked with sustainable water resources management require an assessment of the rivers' current status and potential future changes. We show that glacier and snow melt are important components of HK rivers, with greater hydrolog
16h
A DNA repair pathway can regulate transcriptional noise to promote cell fate transitions
Stochastic fluctuations in gene expression ("noise") are often considered detrimental, but fluctuations can also be exploited for benefit (e.g., dither). We show here that DNA base excision repair amplifies transcriptional noise to facilitate cellular reprogramming. Specifically, the DNA repair protein Apex1, which recognizes both naturally occurring and unnatural base modifications, amplifies ex
16h
Accurate prediction of protein structures and interactions using a three-track neural network
DeepMind presented notably accurate predictions at the recent 14th Critical Assessment of Structure Prediction (CASP14) conference. We explored network architectures that incorporate related ideas and obtained the best performance with a three-track network in which information at the one-dimensional (1D) sequence level, the 2D distance map level, and the 3D coordinate level is successively trans
16h
Mechanisms that ensure speed and fidelity in eukaryotic translation termination
Translation termination, which liberates a nascent polypeptide from the ribosome specifically at stop codons, must occur accurately and rapidly. We established single-molecule fluorescence assays to track the dynamics of ribosomes and two requisite release factors (eRF1 and eRF3) throughout termination using an in vitro–reconstituted yeast translation system. We found that the two eukaryotic rele
16h
Mammalian retrovirus-like protein PEG10 packages its own mRNA and can be pseudotyped for mRNA delivery
Eukaryotic genomes contain domesticated genes from integrating viruses and mobile genetic elements. Among these are homologs of the capsid protein (known as Gag) of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons and retroviruses. We identified several mammalian Gag homologs that form virus-like particles and one LTR retrotransposon homolog, PEG10, that preferentially binds and facilitates vesicular
16h
Spatiotemporal invasion dynamics of SARS-CoV-2 lineage B.1.1.7 emergence
Understanding the causes and consequences of the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) variants of concern is crucial to pandemic control yet difficult to achieve because they arise in the context of variable human behavior and immunity. We investigated the spatial invasion dynamics of lineage B.1.1.7 by jointly analyzing UK human mobility, virus genomes, and c
16h
Large-sample evidence on the impact of unconventional oil and gas development on surface waters
The impact of unconventional oil and gas development on water quality is a major environmental concern. We built a large geocoded database that combines surface water measurements with horizontally drilled wells stimulated by hydraulic fracturing (HF) for several shales to examine whether temporal and spatial well variation is associated with anomalous salt concentrations in United States watersh
16h
Stabilizing perovskite-substrate interfaces for high-performance perovskite modules
The interfaces of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are important in determining their efficiency and stability, but the morphology and stability of imbedded perovskite-substrate interfaces have received less attention than have top interfaces. We found that dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), which is a liquid additive broadly applied to enhance perovskite film morphology, was trapped during film formation a
16h
Spatiotemporal characterization of the field-induced insulator-to-metal transition
Many correlated systems feature an insulator-to-metal transition that can be triggered by an electric field. Although it is known that metallization takes place through filament formation, the details of how this process initiates and evolves remain elusive. We use in-operando optical reflectivity to capture the growth dynamics of the metallic phase with space and time resolution. We demonstrate
16h
Hierarchical crack buffering triples ductility in eutectic herringbone high-entropy alloys
In human-made malleable materials, microdamage such as cracking usually limits material lifetime. Some biological composites, such as bone, have hierarchical microstructures that tolerate cracks but cannot withstand high elongation. We demonstrate a directionally solidified eutectic high-entropy alloy (EHEA) that successfully reconciles crack tolerance and high elongation. The solidified alloy ha
16h
Rare variant MX1 alleles increase human susceptibility to zoonotic H7N9 influenza virus
Zoonotic avian influenza A virus (IAV) infections are rare. Sustained transmission of these IAVs between humans has not been observed, suggesting a role for host genes. We used whole-genome sequencing to compare avian IAV H7N9 patients with healthy controls and observed a strong association between H7N9 infection and rare, heterozygous single-nucleotide variants in the MX1 gene. MX1 codes for myx
16h
Babbling in a vocal learning bat resembles human infant babbling
Babbling is a production milestone in infant speech development. Evidence for babbling in nonhuman mammals is scarce, which has prevented cross-species comparisons. In this study, we investigated the conspicuous babbling behavior of Saccopteryx bilineata , a bat capable of vocal production learning. We analyzed the babbling of 20 bat pups in the field during their 3-month ontogeny and compared it
16h
Malaria infection and severe disease risks in Africa
The relationship between community prevalence of Plasmodium falciparum and the burden of severe, life-threatening disease remains poorly defined. To examine the three most common severe malaria phenotypes from catchment populations across East Africa, we assembled a dataset of 6506 hospital admissions for malaria in children aged 3 months to 9 years from 2006 to 2020. Admissions were paired with
16h
Masitinib is a broad coronavirus 3CL inhibitor that blocks replication of SARS-CoV-2
There is an urgent need for antiviral agents that treat severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. We screened a library of 1900 clinically safe drugs against OC43, a human beta coronavirus that causes the common cold, and evaluated the top hits against SARS-CoV-2. Twenty drugs significantly inhibited replication of both viruses in cultured human cells. Eight of these
16h
Home-grown semiconductors for faster, smaller electronics
'Growing' electronic components directly onto a semiconductor block avoids messy, noisy oxidation scattering that slows and impedes electronic operation. A new study shows that the resulting high-mobility components are ideal candidates for high-frequency, ultra-small electronic devices, quantum dots, and for qubit applications in quantum computing.
16h
Teens who use cannabis frequently more likely to have premature baby
Teenagers who use cannabis frequently may be more likely to have children born preterm, when they become parents up to twenty years later, finds a new study. The research repeatedly assessed 665 participants in a general population cohort on their tobacco and cannabis use between ages 14 to 29 years, before pregnancy.
16h
Wind turbine night noise
With wind generation one of the fastest-growing renewable energy sectors in the world, experts are using machine learning and other signal processing techniques to characterize annoying noise features from wind farms. Two new publications from the ongoing Wind Farm Noise Study take another step towards improving wind turbine noise assessment methods, guidelines and wind turbine design to make wind
16h
Scientists dig deep to understand the effects of population pressure on violence levels
A continuous rise in global population has led to fears that conflicts and war will become more frequent as resources dwindle. But this widespread belief has not been quantified based on actual Japanese archaeological data, until now. Researchers have now examined the skeletal remains of people living in the Middle Yayoi period of Japan to set the record straight on the relationship between popula
16h
Expert: Fall learning needs to build on mental well-being
As millions of kids head back to the classroom, an expert has advice for how schools can support mental and emotional well-being. After more than a year of remote learning, many students are hoping for a return to normalcy this school year. Yet children will likely face lingering mental health challenges from the pandemic. In one recent survey , 46% of students reported that feelings of depressio
16h
Fritillary butterflies preserve genetic diversity through interbreeding
The formation of hybrids—organisms obtained after crossing genetically different forms—is more widespread in nature previously thought. Usually, only closely related species can hybridize. For example, hybrids occur in some populations of Daphnia – crustaceans from plankton. They significantly complicate the definition of the boundaries between different species. However, some cases are known when
16h
Varying immune cell levels in canine brain tumors could provide therapeutic targets
A new study reveals that high-grade gliomas, or brain tumors, in dogs contained more immune cells associated with suppressing immune response than low-grade gliomas. The work, which is the most extensive examination of immune cell infiltration in canine glioma to date, adds to the body of evidence that these brain tumors might recruit cells that aid in immunosuppression. The findings could have im
16h
Elektronen lyfter droppen
En droppe svävar i ett elektriskt fält med hjälp av en laser. Om en enda elektron absorberas av droppen hoppar droppen en bit, och ändringen kan mätas med linjal. I denna uppdaterade version av ett klassiskt experiment har ett forskarlag i Göteborg gjort det möjligt att med blotta ögat se påverkan av en enda elektron. Källa: Nature
17h
Crime-Fighting AI Put a Guy in Jail for a Year With Little Evidence
Police departments across the country are increasingly relying on systems that use sensors and artificial intelligence to keep track of gunshots in certain neighborhoods. In fact, according to a shocking new investigative report by the Associated Press , 65-year-old Michael Williams was falsely accused of murder last August, and spent a whole year in jail — specifically because of one of these cr
18h
I'm Stuck in the Woods with the Devil | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
18h
How research can encourage us to cycle more
How do you get to work in the mornings? Transport currently accounts for 25 per cent of GHG emissions in European cities. If we are to achieve our emissions targets, one of the things we need to do is change how we get to and from work. An EU project now hopes to influence these choices through nudging.
18h
Developing better nanopore technology
At the simplest of levels, nanopores are (nanometre-sized) holes in an insulating membrane. The hole allows ions to pass through the membrane when a voltage is applied, resulting in a measurable current. When a molecule passes through a nanopore it causes a change in the current, this can be used to characterize and even identify individual molecules. Nanopores are extremely powerful single-molecu
18h
Flawed quality control in the brain
Proteins are the 'tools' of our cells – they are essential to all vital tasks. However, they are only able to do their jobs if they fold correctly and adopt their respective, very specific 3D structure. To ensure that nothing goes wrong with the folding process, it is strictly monitored in the cell. The consequences of a flawed quality control can be seen, for example, in the deposition of misfold
19h
Common solar tech can power smart devices indoors
Any time you turn on a light at home or in the office, you are expending electrical energy. But what if flipping the light switch meant providing other useful energy too? We usually think of solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells fixed to roofs, converting sunlight into electricity, but bringing that technology indoors could further boost the energy efficiency of buildings and energize swaths of wirel
19h
Authors crop estimate that was off by a factor of 60 — or $3 trillion
A paper that tried to estimate the cost of invasive species to farming in Africa has been corrected because the researchers made a pair of errors that dramatically inflated their calculations. One mistake led the group, from Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Ghana and Kenya, to overstate the cost to African agricultural of invasive vegetation by … Continue reading
19h
Increased snowfall will offset sea level rise from melting Antarctic ice sheet
A new study predicts that any sea level rise in the world's most southern continent will be countered by an increase in snowfall, associated with a warmer Polar atmosphere. Using modern methods to calculate projected changes to sea levels, researchers discovered that the two ice sheets of Greenland and Antarctica respond differently, reflecting their very distinct local climates.
19h
Too much time on a computer, watching TV or other sedentary activities raises stroke risk
Adults younger than age 60 who spent eight or more hours a day during their free time using a computer, watching TV or reading and participated in little physical activity had an increased risk of stroke. Boosting physical activity may reduce or eliminate the increased stroke risk from prolonged sedentary time. Public health efforts to increase physical activity and reduce sedentary time in adults
19h
Two-dimensional supersolid quantum gas produced in lab
Quantum matter can be solid and fluid at the same time — a situation known as supersolidity. Researchers have now created this fascinating property along two dimensions. They now report on the creation of supersolidity along two axes of an ultracold quantum gas. The experiment offers many possibilities for further investigation of this exotic state of matter.
19h
Microscopic vibrational circular dichroism enables supramolecular chirality mapping
Insect wings are interesting and attractive as unique examples of bioinspired and biomimetic materials. They exhibit multi-functional features and provide a natural model for developing a functional device based on organic polymers. Although there are many studies on the structures of insect wings using spectroscopic or morphological methods, only a few focused on their chiral properties.
19h
Literally Nobody Asked for Facebook's Dumb VR Meeting Feature
Facebook has hit the nail on the head on the exact thing — that absolutely nobody ever asked for. Instead of meaningfully tackling the rampant, dangerous misinformation being spread on its platform and revolutionizing the way data is shared, the company released a brand new virtual reality feature called Horizon Workrooms. The software suite, designed to work with the company's own Oculus Quest 2
19h
LSU Chemical Engineering unveils new distillation columns
The LSU Cain Department of Chemical Engineering recently completed a journey of several years with the installation of its new distillation columns. The towering structure consumes two floors of Patrick F. Taylor Hall and offers students the opportunity to work on a true commercial analog of the same equipment they will be expected to operate when they enter the workforce as chemical engineers.
19h
Your food choices may add or cut minutes of healthy life
Eating a hot dog could cost you 36 minutes of healthy life, while choosing to eat a serving of nuts instead could help you gain 26 minutes of healthy time alive, according to new study. The study in the journal Nature Food evaluates more than 5,800 foods, ranking them by their nutritional disease burden to humans and their impact on the environment. It found that substituting 10% of daily caloric
19h
Artificial photosynthesis technology emerging
Korean researchers are striving to turn artificial photosynthesis technology into reality to achieve carbon neutrality or accomplish a net carbon emission value of zero. Artificial photosynthesis is a technology that mimics natural photosynthesis by using the received sunlight energy to convert carbon dioxide into high-value compounds such as ethylene, methanol, and ethanol. However, economic and
20h
Comparing cryogenic structures with room-temperature samples can help identify errors in computational models
About 95% of all crystal structures obtained for various proteins and deposited in public databases are captured using cryogenic technology. This technology requires frozen conditions. Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital compared cryogenic structures with those observed at room temperature. The findings, published today in Chemical Science, indicate that freezing can introduce erro
20h
Alder Lake Extravaganza: Intel Unloads Details on its Next-Gen CPU
This week, Intel shared significant details on its Alder Lake CPU family with far more information than we've previously had regarding the CPUs core design, performance, and expected power efficiency. This is a critical launch for Intel. The manufacturer's desktop CPUs have been stuck on 14nm for over six years now, and the cracks in that process node have been showing for at least two. Rocket La
20h
High-throughput fast full-color Fourier ptychographic microscopy is promising in digital pathology
In biomedicine, accurate and efficient observation of pathologic slices is crucial in cell morphology detection, pathologic analysis, and disease diagnosis, which acts as the bridge between fundamental research and clinical applications. On the one hand, pathologic slices are usually stained for specific recognition, given the fact that humans are sensitive to color information and capable of clas
20h
Development of 'cellular membrane-FET (lipid-FET)' for sensitivity of biosensor
A Korean research team successfully developed a proprietary biosensor technology with significantly enhanced molecular sensitivity using the artificial lipid membrane that mimics cellular membrane. The research team led by Dr. Yong-Sang Ryu from the Brain Science Institute and Dr. Chul Ki Kim from the Sensor System Research Center, in collaboration with the research team led by Professor Dong June
20h
Groundbreaking visualization of atomic movements
In recent years, a group of leading electron microscopy and catalysis researchers have been working to determine the three-dimensional arrangements of atoms in nanoparticle catalysts in chemical processes. Their work has combined experimental measurements with mathematical modeling.
20h
Sårbarhet i hjärnan bakom tvångsmässigt alkoholintag
En liten grupp nervceller i hjärnan styr om en individ fortsätter att förse sig med alkohol trots att det får negativa konsekvenser. Det visar en studie på råttor vid Linköpings universitet. Mekanismen kan förklara varför vissa blir alkoholberoende och andra inte. Vid beroendeutveckling väljer man alkohol framför naturliga belöningar. Man fortsätter dricka trots att man vet att man blir sjuk och
20h
No significant benefit of convalescent plasma for COVID-19 outpatients with early symptoms, study shows
The final results of the Clinical Trial of COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma in Outpatients (C3PO) demonstrate that COVID-19 convalescent plasma did not prevent disease progression in a high-risk group of outpatients with COVID-19, when administered within the first week of their symptoms. The trial was stopped in February 2021 due to lack of efficacy based on a planned interim analysis.
20h
Researchers bioprint an entire active glioblastoma tumor using a 3D printer
The 3D print of glioblastoma — the deadliest type of brain cancer — is printed from human glioblastoma tissues containing all components of the malignant tumor. Researchers say the breakthrough will enable much faster prediction of best treatments for patients, accelerate the development of new drugs and discovery of new druggable targets.
20h
How fructose in the diet contributes to obesity
Eating fructose appears to alter cells in the digestive tract in a way that enables it to take in more nutrients, according to a preclinical study. These changes could help to explain the well-known link between rising fructose consumption around the world and increased rates of obesity and certain cancers.
20h
Guy friends help male chimps find mates and become dads
Male chimpanzees that build strong bonds with the alpha male of the group, or with a large network of other males, are more successful at fathering offspring, a new study shows. The findings in the journal iScience stem from an examination of why male chimpanzees form close relationships with each other. "One big question that biologists have had for a long time is why you see so many friendly be
20h
We throw away a third of the food we grow: What to do about waste
The COVID pandemic has shown the fragility of our global food supply chains, with many supermarkets and restaurants in almost every country having experienced food shortages. Millions of people in the UK alone have experienced severe food insecurity during COVID-19, according to a recent report by the country's Foods Standards Agency. But food shortages were prevalent long before the pandemic.
20h
Finding green solvents for printed electronics
The emerging field of printed electronics promises to radically change the way we view and use electronics through energy- and cost-efficient printing of electronic inks onto everyday surfaces such as paper and textiles. However, a severe problem from a sustainability perspective is that many current inks used during the printing include solvents that are unsafe and damaging for both workers and t
21h
Sensor that detects hydrogen peroxide in living plant cells
Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is commonly known as a bleaching and disinfecting agent. However, it is also constantly produced in living cells. Often as a byproduct of biological processes, sometimes intentionally, for example to kill pathogens. It is also thought that H2O2 plays an important role as a signaling molecule. To investigate this biological function, research teams from TU Kaiserslautern (T
21h
Optical imaging system can capture an unprecedented number of cells in a single image
Scientists from the Transdimensional Life Imaging Division of the Institute for Open and Transdisciplinary Research Initiatives (OTRI) at Osaka University created an optical imaging system that can capture an unprecedented number of cells in a single image. By combining an ultra-high pixel camera and a huge lens, the team was able to easily observe exceedingly rare, "one-in-a-million" situations.
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Deficiencies in models used for chemical safety assessment identified
A research project affiliated with the University of Helsinki's Institute for Atmospheric and Earth System Research (INAR) has identified serious deficiencies in the Stoffenmanager and Advanced REACH Tool occupational exposure models used for assessing chemical safety and calls for the discontinuation of their use in statutory chemical safety assessment.
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Millions more people exposed to floods since 2000
The proportion of the population exposed to floods has grown by 24% globally since the turn of the century, find researchers. That's 10 times more than scientists previously thought, and it's due to both increased flooding and population migration. This marks an increase of the population inside flood-prone regions to as many as 86 million people. The study in Nature used direct satellite observa
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Developing enhanced fish vaccines with nanocellulose
Scientists are developing new fish vaccines using nanocellulose produced from Maine's wood pulp industry. Nanocellulose poses no known harmful effects to fish tissue and is unlikely to cause cellular damage. Fish vaccines made with nanocellulose may also be more effective and less expensive to produce than current vaccines made with adjuvants that are water and oil based, according to researchers.
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Can virtual reality save the planet?
On Aug. 9, the U.N. released a dire climate report, the first since 2018, that warned of accelerated warming of the planet and splashed code red alert headlines across the world. To bring the Earth back from the brink will demand powerful collective action, the authors of the report wrote. But while the urgency of the message is growing in the public sphere, scientists, journalists, artists and cr
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Challenges of encouraging skepticism in financial statement auditors
Good financial statement audits are essential to protect investors, and skeptical auditors are essential to good audits. A recent study finds that skepticism is being discouraged in auditors—and that there are unexpected challenges and opportunities for fostering skepticism in auditors moving forward.
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Nearing A Fusion Milestone
I have been covering research into fusion power for years , so I like to give updates when a significant advance is made. A recent announcement from the National Ignition Facility warrants such coverage. Fusion is the process of combing light elements into heavier elements. It's the process that fuels all suns, beginning by fusing hydrogen into helium. Protons of hydrogen are positively charged,
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Build Better Products With 88% Off This Product Design eBook Bundle
Design is much more than just pleasing to the eye; it can make the difference between an ethical and unethical product . If you're looking to learn more about how design works, the Fundamentals of Product Design eBook Bundle by O'Reilly has five books that shows you how to build better, from how to collect the data to the final touches. Listed at $178, it's on sale now for just $19.99. Design By
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Research aims to enhance justice experience of sexual violence victims
Deakin University criminologist Dr. Mary Iliadis has uncovered more meaningful ways to include sexual violence victims in criminal justice systems. Her research has been extensively consulted in the lead-up to the development of policy reforms in Northern Ireland. (Content Warning: discussions of sexual violence in court proceedings and criminal justice systems generally.)
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New research may help scientists grow more complex and mature heart tissue in the lab
A team led by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) has generated premature cells that support early heart development but vanish soon after birth. The investigators hope that the advance, which is described in Nature Communications, will help bring them closer to achieving their goal of using patients' cells to generate functioning heart tissue that could be transplanted, similar to
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Daily briefing: Where biodiversity is flourishing
Nature, Published online: 18 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02271-6 There is a biodiversity crisis — but not everywhere. Plus, how to handle the next pandemic better and a researcher is haunted by the memory of a teaching skeleton.
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Redox-enabled direct stereoconvergent heteroarylation of simple alcohols
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25268-1 Synthesizing complex structures of high enantiomeric excess from racemic feedstock is an enduring challenge. Here, the authors couple racemic secondary alcohols with pyrroles to form enantioenriched 2-substituted heteroarenes, via a borrowing hydrogen mechanism using the combination of an iridium catalyst and
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Methyl groups as widespread Lewis bases in noncovalent interactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25314-y Tetrel bonds are noncovalent interactions between electron donors and group 14 elements; in these situations, C(sp3) atoms can act as Lewis acids, accepting electron density. Here, the authors show that methyl groups, when bound to atoms less electronegative than carbon, can participate in noncovalent interact
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Professional actors demonstrate variability, not stereotypical expressions, when portraying emotional states in photographs
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25352-6 It has long been hypothesized that certain emotional states are universally expressed with specific facial movements. Here the authors provide evidence that facial expressions of those emotional states are, in fact, varied among individuals rather than stereotyped.
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Creating synthetic spaces for higher-order topological sound transport
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25305-z The authors create synthetic dimensions in acoustic crystals composed of cavity arrays, strongly coupled through modulated channels. They provide evidence for 1D and 2D dynamic topological pumping, and show that the higher-order topological sound transport is robust against the geometrical imperfections.
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Sumoylation regulates the assembly and activity of the SMN complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25272-5 Sumoylation is important for the assembly and function of the SMN complex, which plays a central role in RNA processing. Here the authors show that loss of this posttranslational modification impairs the ability of SMN to correct selective deficits in the sensory-motor circuit of animal models of spinal muscul
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Dynamics of moisture diffusion and adsorption in plant cuticles including the role of cellulose
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25225-y The plant cuticle provides a barrier between internal leaf tissues and the environment. Here the authors develop a mathematical model of water movement through the cuticle and describe a prominent role for cellulose in controlling the dynamics of moisture diffusion and adsorption.
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DMRT1-mediated reprogramming drives development of cancer resembling human germ cell tumors with features of totipotency
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25249-4 The mechanisms by which in vivo expression of the Yamanaka transcription factors (OSKM) renders somatic cells permissive for differentiation remain unclear. Here, the authors show that in vivo reprogramming using OSKM generates germ cell tumors and drives acquisition of totipotency-like features in somatic cel
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Bin behöver fler träd
Blommor är livsviktiga för bin. Men det går lika bra med träd, visar en studie. Och helst pollen från en ek om biet själv får välja. Medvetenheten o m att pollinerande insekter behöver blommor rika på pollen och nektar ökar. I en ny studie visar det sig att träd kan vara minst lika viktiga för överlevnaden, som blommor åtminstone för det röda murarbiet, men troligtvis även för andra vildbin. Ett
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Nio av tio med högt blodtryck behöver mer behandling
Nio av tio patienter med högt blodtryck får otillräcklig behandling, och har därmed ökad risk för hjärt-kärlsjukdom och förtida död, enligt forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Högt blodtryck, hypertoni, är den främsta behandlingsbara orsaken till sjukdom och död i världen. Mer än en miljard människor har hypertoni, vilket definieras som ett blodtryck där övertrycket är 140 mmHg eller högre, ell
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Fires harming California's efforts to curb climate change
Record-setting blazes raging across Northern California are wiping out forests central to plans to reduce carbon emissions and testing projects designed to protect communities, the state's top fire official said Wednesday, hours before a fast-moving new blaze erupted.
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23rd SpaceX commercial resupply mission launches bone, plant, and materials studies to ISS
The 23rd SpaceX cargo resupply services mission carrying scientific research and technology demonstrations to the International Space Station is targeted to launch in late August from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Experiments aboard include an investigation into protecting bone health with botanical byproducts, testing a way to monitor crew eye health, demonstrating improved dexterity of
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Flera sinnen spökade hos mannen
"När jag vikarierade som underläkare på Öron-, näs- och halsavdelningen kom det in en man i 45-årsåldern till akuten med kraftigt nedsatt hörsel på vänster öra och tinnitus. Fyra dagar tidigare hade han varit på Ålandskryssning och då vaknat vid midnatt och kräkts två gånger. Under dagarna efter fortsätter illamåendet, men inga andra i sällskapet insjuknar. Dagen innan han tar sig till akuten får
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From the archive: the secret, sonic lives of narwhals
Narwhals may be shy and elusive, but they are certainly not quiet. Nicola Davis speaks to geophysicist Dr Evgeny Podolskiy about capturing the vocalisations of narwhals in an arctic fjord, and what this sonic world could tell us about the lives of these mysterious creatures. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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This NFT Painting Is a Work of Art – Issue 104: Harmony
On March 11, 2021, the auction house Christie's sold a work by an American graphic designer, Michael Winkelmann, a.k.a. Beeple, for a colossal $69 million, making it the third most expensive work ever sold by a living artist. The work, Everydays: The First 5000 Days , is a nonfungible token, or NFT. It's a computer file that cannot be exchanged, copied, or destroyed, which gives the purchaser pro
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The Transcendence of Tantric Sex – Issue 104: Harmony
Humans have always strived to develop technologies that give us some control, or at least the feelings of control, over the challenges that life throws at us. Psychologists like me devote our professional lives to figuring out why people think and feel what they do, and, in cases where those thoughts or actions are undesirable, to helping people change. We conduct experiments to see whether a cer
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The Beauty of Crossed Brain Wires – Issue 104: Harmony
When I was about 6, my mind did something wondrous, although it felt perfectly natural at the time. When I encountered the name of any day of the week, I automatically associated it with a color or a pattern, always the same one, as if the word embodied the shade. Sunday was dark maroon, Wednesday a sunshiny golden yellow, and Friday a deep green. Saturday was interestingly different. That day ev
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'Shadow waveguide' casts complex acoustic patterns to control particles
Engineers have devised a new approach to using sound waves to conduct complex manipulations of tiny particles suspended in liquid. Dubbed a 'shadow waveguide,' the technique uses only two sound sources to create a tightly confined, spatially complex acoustic field inside a chamber without requiring any interior structure. The technology offers acoustic tweezers abilities with applications in field
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Emberometer could gauge threat of wildfire-spreading embers
As wildfire fronts advance through landscapes or communities on the ground, they also attack from above, launching volleys of glowing embers into the air. Also known as firebrands, these specks of burning debris can glide for up to 40 kilometers (approximately 24 miles) before landing and can cause up to 90% of home and business fires during wildfires.
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Transformation in the particle zoo
An international study has found evidence of a long-sought effect in accelerator data. The so-called 'triangle singularity' describes how particles can change their identities by exchanging quarks, thereby mimicking a new particle. The mechanism also provides new insights into a mystery that has long puzzled particle physicists: Protons, neutrons and many other particles are much heavier than one
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Sharing the love helps male acorn woodpeckers father more chicks
A new long-term study finds that male acorn woodpeckers breeding polygamously in duos or trios of males actually fathered more offspring than males breeding alone with a single female, contrary to conventional thinking among biologists that monogamous males necessarily produce more offspring than those in polygamous groups. For females, polygamy is less of a slam dunk but co-breeding duos left beh
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Cancer therapy breakthrough in vitro using self-assembled drugs
A team of scientists has discovered chemical systems that self-assemble into molecular capsules which are highly toxic towards human cancer cells of a range of different tumor types, and which have demonstrated unprecedented cancer selectivity in the laboratory that in some cases are many thousands of times more toxic to the cancer cells compared to healthy, normal cells.
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Combining perovskite with silicon, solar cells convert more energy from sun
To fully harness the potential of sunlight, scientists have been trying to maximize the amount of energy that can be extracted from the sun. Researchers now describe how pairing metal halide perovskites with conventional silicon leads to a more powerful solar cell that overcomes the 26% practical efficiency limit of using silicon cells alone. Perovskites fulfill all the optoelectronic requirements
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Cooperation under pressure: Lessons from the COVID-19 swab crisis
A major crisis that accompanied the rise of the pandemic was lack of availability of the nasopharyngeal swab — necessary for testing for COVID-19, which in turn, was necessary to get a grip on the pandemic. An account of how one group addressed that crisis is published this week Journal of Clinical Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.
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Mechanisms of resistance to drug for triple-negative breast cancer identified
Triple-negative breast cancer cells exposed to the antibody-drug conjugate sacituzumab govitecan may develop resistance to this powerful drug through alterations in both the target of the antibody and the target of the toxic payload. The findings illustrate how uncovering such mechanisms will critically inform strategies to overcome resistance to sacituzumab govitecan.
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Do Not Attempt To Imitate This Video of a Tesla Forging Floodwaters
Swimming Tesla Yet another Tesla driver has attempted to take their vehicle for a swim. In a video shared by the Twitter account Tesla Owners of Silicon Valley, a Tesla can be seen wading through several feet of flood waters. Another Tesla forging through a flooded area @elonmusk pic.twitter.com/Kc1Tu6TJ6Z — Tesla Owners of Silicon Valley (@teslaownersSV) August 18, 2021 The Tesla easily shrugged
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Humans managed shellfish and their predators for millennia, study finds
Due to their protected status, sea otter populations have rebounded across the Pacific Northwest Coast following their near elimination during the historic maritime fur trade. But the recovery of these shellfish predators and the federal laws now protecting them challenge local Indigenous communities who hold constitutionally protected rights to harvest those same shellfish but who are legally una
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New research analyzes investor reaction to robo-advisors: Some investors miss opportunities
Believe it nor not, more and more lending companies are turning to human-robot interaction to help with investment advice. But how do people react and what's the result of an investment decision when robots use algorithms to make suggestions? New research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research finds that investors who could benefit most from robo-advisors (RAs) aren't using them. And
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Smartphone cameras offer smallholder farmers promising new access to soil health knowledge
The lack of adequate access to effective soil fertility testing in India, and much of the subtropical and tropical world, has led a group of scientists to explore how a smartphone camera might be transformed into a powerful and readily available alternative. Recently published in the Elsevier journal Biosystems Engineering, the research team describes important advances in the area of image-based
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