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Speedy evolution: Sustained fast rates of evolution explain how tetrapods evolved from fish
One of the biggest questions in evolution is when and how major groups of animals first evolved. The rise of tetrapods (all limbed vertebrates) from their fish relatives marks one of the most important evolutionary events in the history of life. This "fish-to-tetrapod" transition took place somewhere between the Middle and Late Devonian (~400-360 million years ago) and represents the onset of a ma
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LATEST

Scientists Splice Human Gene Into Potatoes to Make Them Grow Huge
Bulking Season A team of scientists found an unusual trick for growing bigger, heartier crops: inserting a human gene related to obesity and fat mass into plants to supersize their harvest. Splicing potatoes with the human gene that encodes a fat-regulating protein called FTO, which essentially alters the genetic code to rapidly mass-produce proteins, made otherwise identical potato plants grow c
4h
Sniffing out which plant-based burgers smell the most like real beef
For many meat eaters, summer barbecues wouldn't be the same without the mouthwatering aroma of burgers cooking on the grill. But many people are now open to trying plant-based alternatives, as long as they closely resemble the taste, odor, appearance and texture of real beef. Now, researchers report that the aromas of a couple of plant-based burgers come close to the real deal when they are cookin
12h
Layered graphene with a twist displays unique quantum confinement in 2D
Scientists studying two different configurations of bilayer graphene—the two-dimensional (2D), atom-thin form of carbon—have detected electronic and optical interlayer resonances. In these resonant states, electrons bounce back and forth between the two atomic planes in the 2D interface at the same frequency. By characterizing these states, they found that twisting one of the graphene layers by 30
9h
Watch this slow but deadly tortoise hunt a baby bird
A predator doesn't need to have the quickest speed or reflexes to catch a bird. In a paper publishing August 23 in the journal Current Biology, researchers report the first documented evidence of a tortoise going in for the kill: biting the head of, killing, and eating a tern chick. This is the first time such behavior has been captured on camera, and it's likely not the only case of tortoise bird
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Scientists Develop "Metafabric" To Help us Survive Extreme Heat
Zoomer Fashion The world as we know it is going to keep getting hotter, thanks to the largely unchecked progression of climate change around the world. So it's time that we actually start dressing for it, according to a team of scientists. Researchers from a variety of Chinese universities have created what they call "metafabric," which Wired reports is a textile woven with nanoparticles that ref
5h
I'll Tell You the Secret of Cancer
Are you someone who enjoys the unsolicited opinions of strangers and acquaintances? If so, I can't recommend cancer highly enough. You won't even have the first pathology report in your hands before the advice comes pouring in. Laugh and the world laughs with you; get cancer and the world can't shut its trap. Stop eating sugar; keep up your weight with milkshakes. Listen to a recent story on NPR;
10h
This School Year Is Going to Be a Mess—Again
Since early summer, three pandemic clocks have been ticking. The first pertains to the coronavirus's Delta variant, which has sent daily case numbers soaring more than tenfold since June. The second clock is more predictable: The school year starts, as it always does, in late August or early September. The third clock counts down to the authorization of vaccines for children under 12 , which was
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Why is Australia at odds over the Doherty report and what does it say about opening up the country?
PM repeatedly cites the institute's modelling of 70-80% Covid vaccination rates as Australia's path to freedom. But what do those numbers really mean? Latest NSW restrictions ; NSW hotspots ; border restrictions Victoria's restrictions ; Victorian hotspots Vaccine rollout tracker ; get our free news app ; our morning email briefing Anyone watching the regular news updates during this Delta outbre
13h
A Superhero Movie That's Worth Seeing for the Villain Alone
The opening scenes of Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings paint a rich portrait not of the film's titular hero but of its villain. Played by the Hong Kong superstar Tony Leung, Wenwu (a.k.a. the Mandarin) is the owner of the magical Ten Rings. As such, he's an immortal man burdened with, as the saying goes, the great responsibility that comes with great power. He wields his abilities brutal
5h
Americans Never Understood Afghanistan Like the Taliban Did
T he United States never understood Afghanistan. American planners thought they knew what the country needed, which was not quite the same as what its people wanted. American policy was guided by fantasies; chief among them was the idea that the Taliban could be eliminated and that an entire culture could be transformed in the process. In an ideal world, the Taliban wouldn't exist. But it does ex
5h
This Physicist Discovered an Escape From Hawking's Black Hole Paradox
In 1974, Stephen Hawking calculated that black holes' secrets die with them. Random quantum jitter on the spherical outer boundary, or "event horizon," of a black hole will cause the hole to radiate particles and slowly shrink to nothing. Any record of the star whose violent contraction formed the black hole — and whatever else got swallowed up after — then seemed to be permanently lost. Hawking'
6h
Escape From Afghanistan
F or the past 10 days, thousands of private citizens have been working around the clock, through informal networks of friends and colleagues, to organize evacuation flights from Afghanistan to countries like Albania and Kyrgyzstan, and to help Afghans get their name on passenger manifests and safely reach the Kabul airport. This effort, which is largely taking place on WhatsApp and Signal, has be
5h
Electric Vehicle Chargers Are Shockingly Vulnerable to Hacking
EV Vulnerabilities Electric car charging stations and smart home chargers are extremely vulnerable to cyberattacks, according to new research by security consulting firm Pen Test Partners . The researchers tested six brands of home chargers as well several publicly available charging networks and found some glaring flaws in most of them — symptomatic of a serious gap in consumer protection regula
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Russian Cosmonaut Shares Incredible View From New ISS Module
Amazing View Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy has shared an amazing video taken on board the International Space Station's latest addition, Russia's Multipurpose Laboratory Module known as "Nauka." It's a rare glimpse of the module's interior following an extremely fraught launch and docking with the orbital outpost. Another short video of how we opened the window of the #Nauka Multipurpose Labor
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The Man in Joe Biden's Way
The biggest roadblock to President Joe Biden's domestic agenda at the moment isn't centrist Senator Joe Manchin or a progressive like Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez—it's a third-term New Jersey Democrat who most Americans have never heard of: Representative Josh Gottheimer. For Democrats to have any hope of passing their transformative, $3.5 trillion economic package—a proposal that woul
12h
Astronaut Suffers Medical Incident on Space Station
Sick Day According to NASA, Mark Vande Hei, an current crew member on board the International Space Station, has suffered a "minor medical issue." A scheduled extravehicular activity (EVA) or space walk had to be delayed as a result, CNN reports . NASA has also said that the issue "is not a medical emergency." Walk It Off The EVA was originally planned for Tuesday, but will now have to be resched
2h
Fastest orbiting asteroid discovered
Using the powerful 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera (DECam) in Chile, astronomers just ten days ago discovered an asteroid with the shortest orbital period of any known asteroid in the Solar System. The orbit of the approximately 1-kilometer-diameter asteroid takes it as close as 20 million kilometers (12 million miles or 0.13 au), from the Sun every 113 days. Asteroid 2021 PH27, revealed in image
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The $3.5 trillion budget bill could transform the US power sector—and slash climate pollution
In the coming weeks, Congress may pass one of the most important climate policies in US history. The $3.5 trillion budget plan includes a provision known as the Clean Electricity Payment Program, which would use payments and penalties to encourage utilities to increase the share of electricity they sell from carbon-free sources each year. If it works as hoped, the legislation would ensure that th
12h
Recovery From an ICU Stay Is Tough. Could More Protein Help?
Scientists are investigating whether increased protein intake could be an important and overlooked component in helping ICU patients avoid long-term disability — which many say is caused by severely reduced muscle mass. But some question whether simply adding more protein to patients' diets will be enough.
12h
Marriage lotteries and a bachelors' tax: The strange past of fighting declining birthrates
There's growing awareness – and concern – about declining birthrates in the U.S. and other countries around the world. Falling birth rates are usually seen as a sign of societal decline, a nation's diminishing power, and the eclipse of marriage and family values. Rarely are they put into any kind of historical context. But birthrates are cyclical and have gone up and down throughout history . Whi
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The Army Gene-Hacked Disease-Spreading Mosquitoes To Make Them Infertile
Pest Control Scientists working for the US Army Research Laboratory found a new way to genetically alter the mosquito Aedes aegypti in a way that can decimate wild populations, hopefully keeping diseases like Zika or dengue from spreading. Not only did the genetic alteration render males infertile, but those male mosquitoes could actually transfer that infertility to the female population by mati
1h
The Death Toll of Delay
T his morning, the FDA granted full approval to the Pfizer vaccine for use in people 16 and older. Although "the vaccine approval was the fastest in the agency's history," as The Washington Post noted , serious side effects have proved extremely rare. Nevertheless, anti-vaccine activists—and the politicians and pundits pandering to them—have criticized the accelerated approval process as rushed.
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Unveiling a century-old mystery: Where the Milky Way's cosmic rays come from
Astronomers have succeeded for the first time in quantifying the proton and electron components of cosmic rays in a supernova remnant. At least 70% of the very-high-energy gamma rays emitted from cosmic rays are due to relativistic protons, according to the novel imaging analysis of radio, X-ray, and gamma-ray radiation. The acceleration site of protons, the main components of cosmic rays, has bee
9h
The Taliban, not the West, won Afghanistan's technological war
Despite their terrible human costs—or perhaps because of them—wars are often times of technological innovation. The Napoleonic Wars brought us canned goods; the American Civil War drove the development of submarines. The Second World War, meanwhile, began with biplanes, cavalry charges, and horse-drawn wagons but ended with radar, V2 rockets, jet fighters, and atomic bombs. (Perhaps most fundamen
3h
To solve space traffic woes, look to the high seas
Thanks mainly to the rise of satellite megaconstellation projects like OneWeb and SpaceX's Starlink, the American Astronomical Society suggests , it's possible we may see more than 100,000 satellites orbiting Earth by 2030—a number that would simply overwhelm our ability to track them all. Experts have repeatedly called for a better framework for managing space traffic and preventing a future pla
12h
Photos: Deadly Flash Floods Hit Tennessee After a Torrential Storm
On Saturday, an intense thunderstorm stalled over central Tennessee, dropping a record-setting 17 inches of rain in a 24-hour period. The heavy rainfall filled rivers and streams and unleashed dangerous flash floods, wiping out roads and structures. At least 21 people were killed, and another 40 are listed as missing. Rescue and recovery efforts are still under way, many of them focused on the ha
3h
Volcanoes acted as a safety valve for Earth's long-term climate
Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that extensive chains of volcanoes have been responsible for both emitting and then removing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) over geological time. This stabilized temperatures at Earth's surface.
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Australian Research Council under pressure after funding rule angers academic community
Researchers are worried the ban on preprint materials in grant proposals will diminish the nation's scientific potential The Australian Research Council says it is "looking into" a controversial rule change that affects academic grant applications, amid growing political pressure and criticism from the Australian research community. More than 450 "concerned members of the Australian research comm
4h
Visualizing molecular motion of substituted 9-phosphaanthracene
Anthracene is a solid organic compound derived from coal-tar distillation. Apart from its use as a red dye, it has also been used in the field of nanographene material design, as it exhibits excellent electronic and light-emitting properties. One of its derivatives, called 9-phosphaanthracene, has been widely studied for decades due to its radical reactivity. This activity grants 9-phosphaanthrace
5h
Scientists Just Discovered the Fastest Asteroid in the Solar System
Speed Demon A team of researchers led by Scott Sheppard, a staff scientist at the Carnegie Institution of Science, has discovered the fastest-orbiting asteroid in the solar system. The tiny space rock, just 1 kilometer across and dubbed 2021 PH27, travels around the Sun in only 113 Earth days. It's the shortest orbital period of any known celestial object, except for Mercury, which circles the Su
1h
Mathematicians build an algorithm to 'do the twist'
Mathematicians at the Center for Advanced Mathematics for Energy Research Applications (CAMERA) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed a mathematical algorithm to decipher the rotational dynamics of twisting particles in large complex systems from the X-ray scattering patterns observed in highly sophisticated X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) experiments.
2h
What you should know about COVID-19 vaccine booster shots
US officials have announced that they will prepare to offer booster shots of the COVID-19 vaccine starting the week of September 20 for healthy, immunized people. The boosters will be available to individuals eight months after the completion of their second dose. Federal health authorities first announced in mid-August that they would allow immunocompromised people to get special, additional dos
2h
Steep rise in cardiac arrests associated with opioid use
A nationwide US study has shown that the rate of opioid-related cardiac arrests has steeply risen and is now on par with the rate of cardiac arrest from other causes. Opioid use disorder, which includes dependence and addiction, affects more than two million people in the US, while opioid overdose is the leading cause of death for those aged 25 to 64 years. This study examined the trends and outco
2h
More than two thirds of food kids eat is 'ultraprocessed'
The calories that children and adolescents consumed from ultraprocessed foods jumped from 61% to 67% of total caloric intake from 1999 to 2018, according to a new study Ultraprocessed foods are ready-to-eat or ready-to-heat items often high in added sugar, sodium, and carbohydrates, and low in fiber, protein, vitamins, and minerals. They typically contain added sugars, hydrogenated oils, and flav
2h
Martian snow is dusty, could potentially melt, new study shows
Over the last two decades, scientists have found ice in many locations on Mars. Most Martian ice has been observed from orbital satellites like NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. But determining the grain size and dust content of the ice from that far above the surface is challenging. And those aspects of the ice are crucial in helping scientists determine how old the ice is and how it was deposi
2h
Bird eye size reveals a whole lot about them
The eye size of birds can reveal broad patterns of their biology and behavior, including where they live, what they eat, and how they hunt, according to a new study. The findings providing a potential roadmap for future conservation efforts. Birds have some of the largest eyes relative to their bodies of all vertebrate land animals, second only to frogs. With a limited range of taste and smell, b
3h
NASA Head Confirms Blue Origin Lawsuit Will Delay Moon Program
Delays Confirmed NASA administrator Bill Nelson has confirmed that Blue Origin's lawsuit against the agency will result in "further delay" for NASA's mission to return astronauts to the lunar surface. "The lawyers at the Justice Department are the ones that handle the case," Nelson told SpaceNews ' Jeff Foust in an interview on Friday after being asked if he was worried the lawsuit will delay NAS
3h
Most Americans are OK with vaccine mandates in certain places
Most Americans support COVID-19 vaccine mandates for crowded events, air travel, health care professionals, and workers who interact with the public, according to a new poll. While worries about the COVID-19 virus have grown as cases of the Delta variant rise throughout the country, precautionary measures including mask wearing and social distancing have not returned to the levels seen before vac
3h
Preclinical study defines the spleen-heart connection in cardiac repair
A preclinical study has analyzed the interactions of the lipid mediator sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) in the spleen and heart during the transition from acute to chronic heart failure. Using a mouse model of heart failure, the researchers discovered new mechanisms to help define how the spleen and heart coordinate physiological inflammation in cardiac repair.
4h
Should the Pythagorean theorem be renamed the Thalean theorem?
The Greeks believed that geometry and philosophy were inextricably linked. The mathematician Thales is credited with several geometrical propositions. It is plausible that his investigations into triangles led him to a visual proof of the Pythagorean theorem decades before Pythagoras. Pythagoras or his followers might have proved the theorem subsequently. Among my colleagues working in ancient sc
4h
Phosphorescent material inspired by 'glow in the dark' wood
Scientists have harnessed the natural ability of wood to faintly glow to develop a new sustainable phosphorescent material that could potentially be used in a wide number of applications, from medical imaging and optical sensing to 'glow in the dark' dyes and paints.
4h
Understanding cookiecutter sharks
For years, researchers studying marine life in the wild would occasionally come across animals—such as dolphins, swordfish, leatherback sea turtles, whales, white sharks and even humans—with oddly shaped plugs of tissue taken out of their bodies. Those fresh bites and scars were almost like someone took a cookie cutter and surgically removed a hunk of tissue. These bites were not only restricted t
4h
Sin taxes could unintentionally make others pay
When an excise tax hike was levied on cigarettes, New York City taxi drivers who smoked were one and a half times more likely to cheat their customers by overcharging the fare than those who didn't smoke. That finding comes from forthcoming research in Accounting, Organizations, and Society.
5h
Interference leads to inaccurate Raman spectroscopic analysis of vitamin B12
Many natural products are complicated organic molecules. Despite this complexity, scientists are usually able to investigate them using spectroscopic techniques. However, a team of researchers has now discovered that care should be taken using Raman spectroscopy to analyze certain chiral molecules (molecules that have handedness; i.e., they can exist in two "mirror image" forms of each other). The
5h
Using big data to explore the principles of people's online activities globally
A research team led by Shiori Hironaka, a project assistant professor of Computer Science and Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology, collected big data on social media in ten countries and analyzed the relationship between connections and the behaviors of people on the Internet. The researchers found that the users had the same characteristics in follow ratios, which reflect the behavi
5h
Researchers spot a 'golden' bear while studying endangered spectacled bears in Peru
The number of spectacled bears in Peru might be larger than suspected, a new study in Ursus suggests. A team of researchers from Gothenburg University, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Stony Brook University studied the population of the endangered species in Northern Peru. By identifying individuals through facial patterns, they were able to estimate the population density in t
5h
To be more creative, teams must feel free to show emotions, study finds
Companies are always looking for ways to get teams to innovate more and find creative answers to problems. New research co-authored by Myeong-Gu Seo at the University of Maryland's Robert H. Smith School of Business finds one way to do so is to encourage employees to bare their feelings—both positive and negative—to team members.
5h
Shrubs are most vulnerable to extreme drought in savannas
Drought is one of the most prevalent environmental stress conditions globally. It may cause sudden and widespread tree mortality. Previous studies have shown that drought-induced mortality of a given species can be predicted reasonably by hydraulic traits. However, relatively little information is available regarding the vulnerability of savanna species to extreme drought.
5h
This Captivating Board Game Lets You Build a Planet From Scratch
Most of us, unfortunately, will never get the chance to create our own planetary body from scratch. It's just a sad fact of life that the resources necessary to create a planet are not accessible to us normal humans. But thanks to the board game Planet , we can come as close as possible to seeing how a planet designed by us would fare in the cold vacuum of space. Players of Planet are tasked with
5h
Readers puzzle over marketing journal's failures to retract
A marketing journal is taking heat on social media for issuing an expression of concern over a 2019 paper that many readers believe should have been retracted — and correcting another instead of retracting it. The article now subject to an expression of concern, "Role of Ambient Temperature in Influencing Willingness to Pay in Auctions … Continue reading
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Vilda djur söker kontakt med människor
Vilda djur kan utveckla ett socialt samspel med människor precis som husdjuren gör. Det visar en studie på djungelhöns – tamhönsens vilda släktingar. Forskare på SLU och Linköpings universitet lade märke till att djungelhönsen i deras försök gick fram och tittade på den forskare som de hade haft kontakt med under tidigare försök, det vill säga uppvisade ett kontaktsökande beteende. Detta är ett b
6h
The Hobbit's bite gets a stress test
If you've ever suffered from a sore jaw that popped or clicked when you chewed gum or crunched hard foods, you may be able to blame it on your extinct ancestors. That's according to a recent study of the chewing mechanics of an ancient human relative called Homo floresiensis, which inhabited the Indonesian island of Flores before our species arrived there some 50,000 years ago.
6h
Delayed care for juvenile new-onset type 1 diabetes
Four out of ten children and adolescents who were admitted with new-onset type 1 diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis did not receive hospital treatment the same day as contacts were taken with primary care. In severe cases, a delay before hospital care begins can lead to life-threatening conditions.
6h
Fine aerosols from talking and singing contain more viral particles
Fine respiratory aerosols may play a significant role in SARS-CoV-2 transmission, researchers report. Their new findings show SARS-CoV-2 particles can be aerosolized by an infected person during talking and singing. The researchers also find that fine aerosols (less than 5 micrometers, or μm) generated from these two types of activities contain more viral particles than coarse aerosols (more than
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Six strange things to do with your body after you die
Today, burial and cremation remain the most common ways to dispose of human corpses. However, some individuals, cultures, and companies have tried to look at death from a different perspective. From launching your remains into space to turning your ashes into a diamond, here are some of the alternatives they came up with. The startup turning human ashes into diamonds | Challengers by Freethink ww
6h
How elephants evolved strategies that reduce the biomechanical complexity of their trunks
The elephant proboscis (trunk) exhibits an extraordinary kinematic versatility as it can manipulate a single blade of grass but also carry loads up to 270 kilograms. Using motion-capture technologies developed for the movie industry, a team of scientists at the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, demonstrates that the complex behaviors of the elephant trunk emerge from the combination of a
7h
Meeting biodiversity, climate, and water objectives through integrated strategies
We are collectively failing to conserve the world's biodiversity and to mobilize natural solutions to help curb global warming. A new study carried out by the Nature Map Consortium shows that managing a strategically placed 30% of land for conservation could safeguard 70% of all considered terrestrial plant and vertebrate animal species, while simultaneously conserving more than 62% of the world's
7h
Study assesses risk that fruits, vegetables sold in US are products of forced labor
A new study in Nature Food calls attention to the need for better systems to track forced labor in food supply chains. The study—a methodological advance—reports on the development of a new scoring system that identifies the risk of forced labor for fruits and vegetables sold in the United States. It finds a high risk of forced labor, but also scattered and incomplete data sources that limit actio
7h
How white clover got its cyanide trick
Biologists have figured out how white clover, a common component of lawns, releases cyanide when its leaves suffer damage. White clover ( Trifolium repens ) got its start about 20,000 years ago when two European clover species hybridized . Its chemical defense, a response called cyanogenesis, helps deter insect pests. Research published in New Phytologist shows how white clover developed its anti
7h
Protein-structure prediction revolutionized
Nature, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02265-4 The full might of a world-leading artificial-intelligence laboratory has been brought to bear on protein-structure prediction. The resulting method, AlphaFold2, promises to transform our understanding of proteins.
7h
A-74 iceberg near collision with Brunt Ice Shelf
Iceberg A-74, approximately 1.5 times the size of Greater Paris, calved from Antarctica's Brunt Ice Shelf earlier this year. Over the last six months, it has remained close to the shelf it broke away from owing largely to ocean currents. In early August, strong easterly winds have spun the iceberg around the western tip of Brunt, brushing slightly against the ice shelf before continuing southwards
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Scientists distill cow's milk into nano-capsules for drug delivery
Exosomes are nano-sized biological capsules that cells produce to protect and courier delicate molecules throughout the body. The capsules are hardy enough to withstand enzymatic breakdown, as well as acidic and temperature fluctuations in the gut and bloodstream, making them a prime candidate for drug delivery.
7h
Signs of drought from space
As Tracy Schohr goes about her day, water is always on her mind. She's thinking of it as she rides an all-terrain vehicle around the pasture, looks up hay prices and weather forecasts, and collects data on grazing and invasive weeds for a scientific study.
7h
One material with two functions could lead to faster memory
Researchers have developed a new light-emitting memory device by integrating a resistive random-access memory with a light-emitting electrochemical cell that are both based on perovskite. The results are promising for faster data storage and reading in future electronic devices and open a new avenue of applications for perovskite optoelectronics.
7h
Indian capital opens first 'smog tower'
India's capital New Delhi opened its first "smog tower" on Monday aimed at reducing the air pollution blamed for thousands of premature deaths every year, but experts were sceptical.
7h
'Neurograins' Could Record Brain Activity From Thousands of Locations
Today's brain implants are bulky and can typically only record from one or two locations. Now researchers have shown that a network of tiny "neurograins" can be used to wirelessly record and stimulate neurons in multiple locations in rat brains. Researchers have been experimenting with brain computer interfaces (BCIs) that can record and stimulate groups of neurons for decades. But in recent year
7h
These Crazy People Are Shooting At Us! | Bering Sea Gold
Stream Bering Sea Gold on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/bering-sea-gold About Bering Sea Gold: In Nome, Alaska, the gold rush is on. Driven by gold fever and sometimes desperate need, miners pilot their ragtag dredges and dive with hoses to suck up gold from the bottom of the frigid, unpredictable Bering Sea. #BeringSeaGold #Discovery #Gold Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/
8h
Hubble views a galaxy in a 'furnace'
This jewel-bright image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows NGC 1385, a spiral galaxy 68 million light-years from Earth, which lies in the constellation Fornax. The image was taken with Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3, which is often referred to as Hubble's workhorse camera thanks to its reliability and versatility. It was installed in 2009 when astronauts last visited Hubble, and 12 years
8h
Assessing anti-Asian attitudes in the US and Australia
Researchers from the University of Melbourne and University of Queensland have analysed negative attitudes towards Asian people in both the United States and Australia to better understand the factors that contribute to these prejudices.
8h
How to double voter turnout and increase representation during local elections
Low and uneven turnout is a serious problem for local democracy. However, simply moving off-cycle, local elections to be held on the same day as statewide and national contests doubles voter turnout and leads to an electorate that is considerably more representative in terms of race, age, class and partisanship, according to new University of California San Diego research.
8h
Sergey Young is on a mission to extend *healthy* lifespans of > 1 billion people by preventing aging and all its major diseases, such as Alzheimer's and cancer | The Telegraph
1 billion people by preventing aging and all its major diseases, such as Alzheimer's and cancer | The Telegraph" title="" src="https://external-preview.redd.it/ydiLCGdTh7G03MjCzFRzW8C2l7mq_AnOeyKwgDXzWSE.jpg?width=640&crop=smart&auto=webp&s=cc78153149910d09c19a0a04f281e368576581ca"> submitted by /u/StoicOptom [link] [comments]
8h
Gut bacteria and flavonoid-rich foods are linked and improve blood pressure levels
Flavonoids found in plants and plant foods such as berries, apples, tea, wine and dark chocolate are known to offer health benefits, including some protective effects on the cardiovascular system. A study of over 900 adults in Germany evaluated the quantity and frequency of eating flavonoid-rich foods and measured bacteria in the gut microbiome to determine if there was an association with blood p
8h
Planning system in England is perpetuating racial inequality
New research published by the Institute for Social Policy, Housing, Equalities Research (I-SPHERE) based at Heriot-Watt University has found that the planning process in England is reinforcing racial inequality, despite having clear potential to support the needs of ethnic minority residents.
8h
Making sense of quantum-level chaos
Nature, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02293-0 Fabio Deelan Cunden draws inspiration for his studies of randomness from ancient books and artefacts in a mathematics museum.
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Hunting a creature that hunts me: Collecting ticks for research
It's a sweltering summer afternoon. I'm pushing aside tree limbs and crunching leaves to get back to the trap that I baited two hours ago with dry ice to attract ticks. When I get closer, I can see a gossamer mist hovering over a bright white cloth in the dark underbrush. Dry ice "sublimates" in the open air, going from a solid to a gaseous state. It gives off a vapor of carbon dioxide gas that's
8h
Synecdoche: what a psychological drama can teach us about life and death
Following the film's release in 2008, critics worried Kaufman may have finally gotten too meta for his own good. On the contrary, this confusing story about the inevitability of death contains a simple lesson about the meaning of life. Death, like birth, is one of the few things all human beings have in common. It should not be feared but contemplated. When screenwriter Charlie Kaufman was asked
8h
How to help your students learn with masking in classrooms
Associate Professor Lauren Calandruccio, who specializes in auditory perception in the Department of Psychological Sciences, shared that while wearing masks is critical during this time, increased effort is required when listening to someone that is speaking with a mask. Wearing a mask while speaking can increase the effort required to hear and impact how much is actually heard.
9h
An inexpensive resource for the protein-research community
Labs can easily make their own protein ladders—molecular rulers for estimating the sizes of proteins—for less than a penny per experiment using the newly developed, license-free "Penn State Protein Ladder system." A research team of undergraduate students led by Song Tan, Verne M. Willaman Professor of Molecular Biology at Penn State, developed the ladders to be easily used in two of the most comm
9h
Barrier Island marine ecosystem altered by storm events
Coastal areas are popular places to live and visit. Every summer, families load up their cars and head to the beach for a few days of relaxation. In Alabama, one destination is Dauphin Island, a small barrier island three miles south of Mobile Bay.
9h
The Warrens and the White Lady of Union Cemetery
In the early days of my skeptical activism I and my colleagues often took on some of the classics of pseudoscience, such as UFOs, dowsing, astrology, and ghost-hunting. As a New England-based group we also focused on local pseudoscience, which means ghosts and ghost-hunting. By coincidence we had perhaps the most famous ghost hunters in the world living just a couple towns over from us, Ed and Lo
9h
NanoVMs Has Innovative Technology That Protects The World From Cyberattacks
There has never been a greater need for innovative technology in cloud infrastructure. The size of the cloud computing market has grown to $264 billion, and cybersecurity is now a major priority at the highest levels of international government. Global corporations are repeatedly paying many millions of dollars to criminal hacker syndicates and worldwide damage costs are expected to soar past $26
10h
Daily briefing: How to quash post-PhD imposter syndrome
Nature, Published online: 20 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02306-y Evidence-based strategies for coping with a postgraduate job search, baby bats babble like human infants and how saving the ozone layer also mitigated global warming.
11h
'Flushing' out drug use trends early in the COVID-19 pandemic
At the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, stay-at-home orders and other restrictions drastically affected how people lived and worked, resulting in social isolation and economic instability. Now, researchers show that some people turned to a variety of drugs for relief. Using wastewater analysis, the team identified a spike in consumption of easily abused prescription opioids and anti-anxiety sedativ
12h
Real-space observations of 60-nm skyrmion dynamics in an insulating magnet under low heat flow
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25291-2 Skyrmions are a type of topological spin texture that great potential across a wide variety of technological applications. Here, Yu et al. study the thermally driven motion of Skyrmions and find a minimum temperature gradient for the motion of skyrmions two orders of magnitude smaller than for domain walls.
12h
Ultra-fast single-crystal polymerization of large-sized covalent organic frameworks
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24842-x Rapid growth of highly crystalline Covalent organic framework (COF) materials remains challenging. Here, the authors accelerate single-crystal polymerization using supercritical CO2 and realize the fabrication of two-dimensional COF single crystals within several minutes.
12h
AMPA receptor anchoring at CA1 synapses is determined by N-terminal domain and TARP γ8 interactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25281-4 Changes in AMPAR localization can control the strength of synaptic transmission. Here, the authors show that the interactions of TARP γ8 and the AMPAR N-terminal domain work together to regulate receptor accumulation and positioning at the post-synapse of mouse hippocampal CA1 neurons.
12h
An ester bond underlies the mechanical strength of a pathogen surface protein
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25425-6 Bacterial surface adhesion proteins are characterized by unusual mechanical properties. Here, the authors use atomic force microscopy-based technique to study a surface-anchoring protein Cpe0147 from Clostridium perfringens and show that an ester bond can withstand considerable mechanical forces and prevent co
12h
Unveiling the additive-assisted oriented growth of perovskite crystallite for high performance light-emitting diodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25407-8 Additives have been widely used for passivating defects in perovskite semiconductors, yet the role of additive and their interaction is not clear. Here, the authors reveal an additive-assisted crystal formation in FAPbI3 perovskite by tracking the chemical interaction in the precursor solution and crystallogra
12h
Chlorine activated stacking fault removal mechanism in thin film CdTe solar cells: the missing piece
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25063-y Stacking fault removal and improvement in CdTe solar efficiency is known to be correlated, yet the nature of the relationship is not well-established. Here, the authors explain the passivation process responsible for this improvement, and also elucidate the associated stacking fault removal mechanism.
12h
A single genetic locus controls both expression of DPEP1/CHMP1A and kidney disease development via ferroptosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25377-x Identifying causal variants and genes is an essential step in interpreting GWAS loci. Here, the authors investigate a kidney disease GWAS locus with functional genomics data, CRISPR editing and mouse experiments to identify DPEP1 and CHMP1A as putative kidney disease genes via ferroptosis.
12h
The Federation of State Medical Boards vs. COVID-19 misinformation: A losing battle so far
A few weeks ago, the Federation of State Medical Boards, which itself does not have any regulatory power but advocates for state medical boards, issued a statement that physicians who spread COVID-19 misinformation should be subject to disciplinary measures. Unfortunately, a recent report found that not a single US physician has had action taken against their medical license for doing this. Why?
15h
Konspira­tionsteorier
Attacken mot World Trade Center, 11 september 2001(c) 2001 Michael Foran (Creative Commons 2.0) En kon­spira­tions­teori är tron på att flera personer eller grupper ägnar sig åt något moraliskt tvivelaktigt … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
16h
Get A Lifetime Of VPN Unlimited And CuriosityStream For 60% Off
There's a lot to learn in any given lifetime, yet often concerns about safety and privacy can get in the way of exploring the world. The CuriosityStream + KeepSolid VPN Unlimited Lifetime Subscription Bundle helps you do both at once, and for a limited time, you can get a $10 store credit on top of more than $250 in savings. The Best Documentaries Launched by John Hendricks, one of the visionarie
20h
What will life be like for a rich person in 2050?
How the daily lives of a rich person will be in 2050, the opportunities, trips and experiences and objects that they will have and that they will be able to enjoy. I'm not talking about someone ultra rich with billions or hundreds of millions, but someone who has at least a fortune of a few million dollars, what will the life and daily life of the rich be like in 30 years? submitted by /u/Augustu
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Command Apps With Ease With This React Coding Training Package
App design is a complex discipline, and bad apps can have frightening consequences . Whether you're looking to change careers, build apps as part of your job, or just want to understand how the small programs we use daily work, the 2021 Learn to Code with React Certification Bundle will show you how apps are built the right way. It's currently on sale for only $24.99. Learning React React is a Ja
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