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Nyheder2021august24

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ET NYT TØJMATERIALE, DER VED HJÆLP AF NANOTEKNOLOGI REFLEKTERER ALMINDELIGT LYS OG ULTRAVIOLET LYS, KAN AFKØLE PERSONEN, DER BÆRER TØJET, UNDER EKSTREM VARME, OG KAN DERVED NEDSÆTTE STRØMFORBRUGET TIL AIRCONDITIONING, SOM BLIVER ET PROBLEM MED STIGENDE GLOBAL TEMPERATUR PÅ GRUND AF KLIMAÆNDRINGERNE: New fabric might help in the fight against climate change. Scientists created metafabric using nanotechnology. It works by reflecting light and  UV rays. This protects the wearer and keeps them cool in extreme sun. In the future with extremely sunny climate expectations this could reduce AC usage (which is harmful to the environment) and protect people.

https://futurism.com/the-byte/metafabric-survive-extreme-heat

Possible new antivirals against COVID-19, herpes

In addition to antibodies and white blood cells, the immune system deploys peptides to fight viruses and other pathogens. Synthetic peptides could reinforce this defense but don't last long in the body, so researchers are developing stable peptide mimics. Today, scientists report success in using mimics known as peptoids to treat animals with herpes virus infections. These small synthetic molecule

11h

LATEST

China Reportedly Working on "Ultra-Large" Spacecraft That's Miles Across

XXL Space Station China is reportedly working on a "ultra-large spacecraft" that would be so large that it would span entire miles, according to the South China Morning Post . The project is still many years out, but the National Natural Science Foundation of China is calling on scientists to figure out how to construct such a massive structure in orbit. It's a massive undertaking — but given the

1h

Confirming the pedigree of uranium cubes from Nazi Germany's failed nuclear program

During World War II, Nazi Germany and the U.S. were racing to develop nuclear technology. Before Germany could succeed, Allied forces disrupted the program and confiscated some of the cubes of uranium at the heart of it. The ultimate fate of most of that uranium is unknown, but a few cubes thought to be associated with the program are in the U.S. and Europe. Today, scientists report initial result

11h

How did homosexuality evolve? There might be a clue in our genes

Genetic effects associated with same-sex sexual behavior are also associated with a mating advantage among people who engage only in opposite-sex sexual behavior, according to a study involving participants from the United States and United Kingdom published in Nature Human Behaviour. However, the authors caution that the genetic differences studied here are small, are spread throughout the human

7h

Compounds that give coffee its distinctive 'mouthfeel'

Coffee drinkers intuitively recognize the pleasure of swallowing a smooth, rich brew versus a watery one. Aside from added cream or sugar, the coffee itself contributes to this sensation—referred to as body or mouthfeel—but the specific compounds are not well defined. Now, researchers report several coffee compounds that contribute to the feeling of the beverage coating the inside of the mouth, as

11h

The FDA Really Did Have to Take This Long

After months of anticipation, Americans have a fully licensed COVID-19 vaccine. Today, the FDA announced the approval of Pfizer-BioNTech's shot for people 16 and older—the first complete thumbs-up among the three vaccines available in the U.S. The pervasive mood has been: Finally . Pfizer's shot was given its emergency use authorization—the vaccine's training wheels—back in December, and the comp

20h

Climate crisis made deadly German floods 'up to nine times more likely'

Study reinforces the hard evidence that carbon emissions are the main cause of worsening extreme weather The record-shattering rainfall that caused deadly flooding across Germany and Belgium in July was made up to nine times more likely by the climate crisis, according to research. The study also showed that human-caused global heating has made downpours in the region up to 20% heavier. The work

21h

First commercial rocket due to be launched from Australia later in 2021

Taiwanese company TiSPACE is planning three launches from South Australia in 2021, amid hopes the event will provide a boost to Australia's space industry Get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Australia's first commercial rocket launch will take place in South Australia this year, after receiving approval from the federal government. Australian space company Southern Launch will

9h

COVID Is Once Again Killing More Than 1,000 Americans Every Day

The United States finds itself, once again, in a grave situation. The COVID-19 pandemic is once again killing more 1,000 people in the country every single day, according to The New York Times ' online tracker — and that death toll is now spiking into what looks like one of the most deadly waves yet. That's a threshold that we haven't crossed since late March 2021, when we were finally recovering

1h

Departed Neuralink Co-Founder Locks Down $47 Million for Secretive Neuroscience Startup

When Neuralink co-founder Max Hodak announced his enigmatic departure from the company earlier this year, it was unclear whether he quit due to disagreements with fellow co-founder Elon Musk or if he was fired for moving too slow on clinical trials. Now, Futurism has learned, Hodak is working on what appears to be a well-funded new brain interface venture called Science Corp. According to an SEC

3h

Watch a Floating, 500 Square Mile Iceberg Nearly Crash Into Antarctica

Close Calls Earlier this month, a free-floating iceberg nearly 500 square miles in size almost crashed into Antarctica — a near-miss that could have further fragmented the already-crumbling ice shelf. The European Space Agency's Copernicus Sentinel-1 spacecraft watched as the A-74 iceberg swung around and just narrowly avoided colliding with the Brunt Ice Shelf over the past two weeks, according

3h

GM Just Recalled Every Chevy Bolt Ever Made

Total Recall GM just issued a recall for the Chevrolet Bolt that, when taken into account alongside two previous recalls, now encompasses every single Bolt that the company has ever made. The new recall, which was announced on Friday by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, encompasses every model year 2019-2022 Bolt because the batteries have the unfortunate tendency to catch fire

3h

NASA Has a New Plan After Mars Rover Fumbles Rock Collection

Take Two Earlier this month, NASA's prized Mars rover Perseverance totally fumbled the ball during its first attempt to collect rock samples to send back to Earth. NASA preemptively celebrated when the rover dug through a rock that the agency nicknamed Roubion, but was left scrambling for answers when the sample tube was still empty after the attempted collection. NASA initially blamed the rock —

3h

The Brain Doesn't Think the Way You Think It Does

Neuroscientists are the cartographers of the brain's diverse domains and territories — the features and activities that define them, the roads and highways that connect them, and the boundaries that delineate them. Toward the front of the brain, just behind the forehead, is the prefrontal cortex, celebrated as the seat of judgment. Behind it lies the motor cortex, responsible for planning and…

5h

The Atlantic Daily: Delta and the School Year Have Converged in the Worst Possible Way

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. This time, things were supposed to be different. Instead, the 2021–22 school year is kicking off with more of the same: confusion and fear. Kids are flooding hallways right as Delta drives pediatr

7h

Energy harvesting technology based on ferromagnetic resonance

Researchers from the Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka City University have succeeded in storing electricity with the voltage generated from the conversion phenomenon of ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) using an ultra-thin magnetic film of several tens of nanometers.

7h

An 'Early Test Case' for a China-Led World

F or those of us wondering what kind of superpower China might be, we'll soon get some clues in, of all places, Afghanistan. In the aftermath of the American departure, how Beijing handles relations with Kabul—whether it can forge economic ties with the Taliban, how much political and diplomatic sway it seeks, and, most crucial, if it can use its leverage to influence the new regime—could offer a

9h

What should we be feeding our cats? – podcast

In mid-June this year, some brands of cat food were recalled as a precaution after a sudden increase in cases of feline pancytopenia, a rare blood disease that can be fatal. Shivani Dave speaks to Daniella Dos Santos, a practicing small animal and exotic pet vet and the senior vice-president of the British Veterinary Association, to understand what the food recall means for cat owners, and to fin

15h

Rhesus monkeys found to choke under pressure

A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University has found that like humans, rhesus macaques can choke when facing a high-stakes situation. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes experiments they conducted involving training rhesus monkeys to carry out increasingly difficult tasks for increasingly large rewards.

6h

The genetic structure of the Turkish population reveals high levels of variation and admixture [Genetics]

The construction of population-based variomes has contributed substantially to our understanding of the genetic basis of human inherited disease. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of Turkey from 3,362 unrelated subjects whose whole exomes (n = 2,589) or whole genomes (n = 773) were sequenced to generate a Turkish (TR)…

2h

Eric Adams is Making White Liberals Squirm

M ore than 20 years ago , I sat down to talk with a Black cop from New York City. He had a weightlifter's powerful hands, a quick-trigger tongue, and a scar on the back of his shaved head from his days in a youth gang. At the time, the relationship between police officers and Black residents was raw. This was Rudy Giuliani's New York, where a white New York cop sodomized a suspect with his baton

9h

NASA Astronaut Warns Wealthy Space Tourists: Space Requires "Grit"

Roughing It As the space tourism industry prepares to take off, NASA astronaut Megan McArthur issued a warning to the wealthy passengers that they shouldn't expect a particularly glamorous journey. McArthur compared surviving space travel to being an explorer back on Earth: toughing uncomfortable and dangerous situations for the sake of better understanding the unknown. "I think it's a little bit

2h

Coronavirus live news: Hawaii governor wants to curb travel; Israel boosters 'beating Delta'

US state asks people to reduce movement to tackle spread of Delta strain ; Israel sees cases dip in wake of third shots ; Australia's Crood plan US: FDA gives full approval to Pfizer Covid vaccine UK deaths averaging 100 a day amid fears over rise when schools return 'My taste hasn't come back': vaccinated people on catching Covid See all our coronavirus coverage 7.33am BST A comprehensive study

14h

Breakthrough in actinide metal-metal bonding

Scientists from The University of Manchester have managed to successfully make actinide metals form molecular actinide-actinide bonds for the first time, opening up a new field of scientific study in materials research.

7h

Is Ginkgo's synthetic-biology story worth $15 billion?

The Boston genetic engineering company Ginkgo Bioworks and its CEO, Jason Kelly, have been spectacularly successful selling a story: that synthetic biology will transform the manufacture of physical products. What computers did for information, Kelly says, biology will do for the physical world. Instead of making a chemical from petroleum, why not have Ginkgo's multi-floor "foundry" in Boston's s

9h

Vaccines Are Changing How the Coronavirus Evolves

If evolution is a numbers game, the coronavirus is especially good at playing it. Over the past year and a half, it's copied itself quickly and sloppily in hundreds of millions of hosts, and hit upon a glut of genetic jackpots that further facilitate its spread. Delta, the hyper-contagious variant that has swept the globe in recent months , is undoubtedly one of the virus's most daring moves to d

1h

Nasa delays ISS spacewalk due to astronaut's medical issue

Sortie will not take place until after SpaceX cargo run this weekend and Russian spacewalks in September Nasa is delaying a spacewalk at the International Space Station because of a medical issue involving one of its astronauts. Officials announced the postponement on Monday, less than 24 hours before Mark Vande Hei was supposed to float outside. Continue reading…

20h

Male Y chromosome facilitates the evolution of sex differences in body size

Females and males differ in many ways and yet they share the same genome. The only exception is the male Y chromosome. Using beetles as a study system, new research from Uppsala University, now published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, shows that despite the Y chromosome containing very few genes, it can dramatically change male body size and thus facilitate the evolution of sex differences.

5h

In situ extraction and detection of DNA using nanopores

Being able to detect DNA from a single cell is important for the detection of diseases and genetic disorders. Measuring single DNA molecules has been possible for some time; however, directly detecting samples at the point of extraction with no need for subsequent steps has not. Now, researchers at SANKEN, Osaka University have demonstrated a method of releasing DNA at the point of measurement. Th

5h

People whose mothers were overweight at higher risk of bowel cancer, study suggests

Findings may help explain why incidence of bowel cancer is rising among younger adults in developed regions Children of women who were overweight or obese when pregnant have a higher risk of developing bowel cancer in later life, research suggests. Obesity in women has previously been linked to health problems in their offspring . Among them, studies have suggested women who are overweight when t

21h

The Way Forward for Movie Theaters Is Clear

Last week, I attended my first film screening that required proof of vaccination against COVID-19 upon entry. I presented my Excelsior Pass and photo ID and swanned on in. The entire process took 15 seconds, and in return I received the invaluable assurance that my fellow cinemagoers had also been inoculated. My experience was in line with New York City policy , which mandates proof of vaccinatio

1h

NASA Canceled Spacewalk Because Astronaut Had Pinched Nerve

Pinched Nerve NASA revealed yesterday that Mark Vande Hei, a current crew member on the International Space Station, suffered a "minor medical issue" that caused Tuesday's scheduled spacewalk to be delayed. While NASA said that the issue was "not a medical emergency" and didn't respond to Futurism's request for comment, we've finally heard from Vande Hei himself via his Twitter account, who says

2h

Ripples in Saturn's rings give us a peek inside the planet

Astronomers have used Saturn's rings as a giant seismometer to learn about the interior of the planet. The gas giant is constantly in flux, and shifts can trigger ripples in the planet's rings. Exactly why the planet is in flux remains a mystery. How can you tell what the inside of another planet is like? If it's a rocky planet like Mars, we could have a lander place a seismometer on the surface

5h

Record-breaking lithium-metal cell

A new type of lithium-metal battery reaches an extremely high energy density of 560 watt-hours per kilogram — based on the total weight of the active materials — with a remarkable stability. Researchers used a promising combination of cathode and electrolyte: The nickel-rich cathode enables storage of high energy per mass, the ionic liquid electrolyte ensures largely stable capacity over many cy

3min

Measuring how the Arctic responds to climate change

The Arctic has been warming more than twice as fast as the rest of the planet. Meanwhile CO2 measurements show substantial increases in the amount of carbon absorbed into and emitted by Arctic plants and soil. Scientists assumed this was playing a large role in changes to the Arctic carbon cycle. But they were not able to measure carbon uptake and release independently. This study provides insight

3min

Studying the mechanism of metal extraction with ionic liquids

The heaviest known elements are the so-called "superheavy" elements, those with atomic numbers greater than 103. These elements are found only in laboratories, where they are made by fusing together two lighter elements. This process is unlikely to occur, so scientists have only tiny amounts (a few atoms) for experiments, and chemists are interested in the chemical properties of these elements. Ho

37min

Low-cost sensors measure real-time volcanic smog exposure

When Kīlauea Volcano erupted in 2018, lava covered parts of the Island of Hawaii, but a volcanic smog, known as "vog," inundated it. The vog contained dangerous levels of fine particulate matter and sulfur dioxide gas, which threatened the health of the downwind population on the island.

49min

Developmental HCN channelopathy results in decreased neural progenitor proliferation and microcephaly in mice [Neuroscience]

The development of the cerebral cortex relies on the controlled division of neural stem and progenitor cells. The requirement for precise spatiotemporal control of proliferation and cell fate places a high demand on the cell division machinery, and defective cell division can cause microcephaly and other brain malformations. Cell-extrinsic and…

1h

Histone H3K27 methylation-mediated repression of Hairy regulates insect developmental transition by modulating ecdysone biosynthesis [Developmental Biology]

Insect development is cooperatively orchestrated by the steroid hormone ecdysone and juvenile hormone (JH). The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)–mediated histone H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) epigenetically silences gene transcription and is essential for a range of biological processes, but the functions of H3K27 methylation in insect hormone action are poorly understood….

1h

Variable strategies to solve risk-reward tradeoffs in carnivore communities [Ecology]

Mesopredator release theory suggests that dominant predators suppress subordinate carnivores and ultimately shape community dynamics, but the assumption that subordinate species are only negatively affected ignores the possibility of facilitation through scavenging. We examined the interplay within a carnivore community consisting of cougars, coyotes, black bears, and bobcats using contemporaneous

1h

Strong within-host selection in a maternally inherited obligate symbiont: Buchnera and aphids [Evolution]

Numerous animal lineages have maternally inherited symbionts that are required for host reproduction and growth. Endosymbionts also pose a risk to their hosts because of the mutational decay of their genomes through genetic drift or to selfish mutations that favor symbiont fitness over host fitness. One model for heritable endosymbiosis…

1h

The LpoA activator is required to stimulate the peptidoglycan polymerase activity of its cognate cell wall synthase PBP1a [Microbiology]

A cell wall made of the heteropolymer peptidoglycan (PG) surrounds most bacterial cells. This essential surface layer is required to prevent lysis from internal osmotic pressure. The class A penicillin-binding proteins (aPBPs) play key roles in building the PG network. These bifunctional enzymes possess both PG glycosyltransferase (PGT) and transpeptidase…

1h

Robust high-temperature potassium-ion batteries enabled by carboxyl functional group energy storage [Chemistry]

The popularly reported energy storage mechanisms of potassium-ion batteries (PIBs) are based on alloy-, de-intercalation-, and conversion-type processes, which inevitably lead to structural damage of the electrodes caused by intercalation/de-intercalation of K+ with a relatively large radius, which is accompanied by poor cycle stabilities. Here, we report the exploration of…

1h

Correction for Krishna et al., Infrared optical and thermal properties of microstructures in butterfly wings [Corrections]

ECOLOGY, ENGINEERING Correction for "Infrared optical and thermal properties of microstructures in butterfly wings," by Anirudh Krishna, Xiao Nie, Andrew D. Warren, Jorge E. Llorente-Bousquets, Adriana D. Briscoe, and Jaeho Lee, which was first published January 9, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.1906356117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 1566–1572). The authors note that…

1h

Stressed teens benefit from coping online, but a little goes a long way

An adolescent's day can be filled with a dizzying array of digital technologies. For many teenagers, being online is a way to pass the time and communicate with friends. Cell phones and social media can also help teens cope with stressful events — as long as they strike the right balance between spending time online and pursuing other coping activities.

1h

Social mindfulness varies around the globe

Compare human social behavior at a country level and you will find differences. Japan has the highest score whereas the Netherlands is just above average. This is what psychologist Niels van Doesem discovered in research with an international team of 64 colleagues in 61 industrialized countries. Their findings have published in PNAS.

2h

Hearing sensitivity: An underlying mechanism for niche differentiation in gleaning bats [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

Tropical ecosystems are known for high species diversity. Adaptations permitting niche differentiation enable species to coexist. Historically, research focused primarily on morphological and behavioral adaptations for foraging, roosting, and other basic ecological factors. Another important factor, however, is differences in sensory capabilities. So far, studies mainly have focused on the…

2h

H2 in Antarctic firn air: Atmospheric reconstructions and implications for anthropogenic emissions [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The atmospheric history of molecular hydrogen (H2) from 1852 to 2003 was reconstructed from measurements of firn air collected at Megadunes, Antarctica. The reconstruction shows that H2 levels in the southern hemisphere were roughly constant near 330 parts per billion (ppb; nmol H2 mol−1 air) during the mid to late…

2h

DNA-encoded chemistry technology yields expedient access to SARS-CoV-2 Mpro inhibitors [Medical Sciences]

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has killed more than 4 million humans globally, but there is no bona fide Food and Drug Administration–approved drug-like molecule to impede the COVID-19 pandemic. The sluggish pace of traditional therapeutic discovery is poorly suited to producing targeted treatments against rapidly evolving viruses….

2h

Pericentromeric noncoding RNA changes DNA binding of CTCF and inflammatory gene expression in senescence and cancer [Cell Biology]

Cellular senescence causes a dramatic alteration of chromatin organization and changes the gene expression profile of proinflammatory factors, thereby contributing to various age-related pathologies through the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Chromatin organization and global gene expression are maintained by the CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF); however, the molecular mechanism under

2h

The evolution of targeted cannibalism and cannibal-induced defenses in invasive populations of cane toads [Evolution]

Biotic conflict can create evolutionary arms races, in which innovation in one group increases selective pressure on another, such that organisms must constantly adapt to maintain the same level of fitness. In some cases, this process is driven by conflict among members of the same species. Intraspecific conflict can be…

2h

Clock proteins and training modify exercise capacity in a daytime-dependent manner [Physiology]

Exercise and circadian biology are closely intertwined with physiology and metabolism, yet the functional interaction between circadian clocks and exercise capacity is only partially characterized. Here, we tested different clock mutant mouse models to examine the effect of the circadian clock and clock proteins, namely PERIODs and BMAL1, on exercise…

2h

Using time-use diaries to track changing behavior across successive stages of COVID-19 social restrictions [Social Sciences]

How did people change their behavior over the different phases of the UK COVID-19 restrictions, and how did these changes affect their risk of being exposed to infection? Time-use diary surveys are unique in providing a complete chronicle of daily behavior: 24-h continuous records of the populations' activities, their social…

2h

Identification of a KLF5-dependent program and drug development for skeletal muscle atrophy [Medical Sciences]

Skeletal muscle atrophy is caused by various conditions, including aging, disuse related to a sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity, and cachexia. Our insufficient understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying muscle atrophy limits the targets for the development of effective pharmacologic treatments and preventions. Here, we identified Krüppel-like factor…

2h

Phosphoenolpyruvate depletion mediates both growth arrest and drug tolerance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in hypoxia [Microbiology]

Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is difficult to treat because Mtb spends the majority of its life cycle in a nonreplicating (NR) state. Since NR Mtb is highly tolerant to antibiotic effects and can mutate to become drug resistant (DR), our conventional tuberculosis (TB) treatment is not effective. Thus, a novel…

2h

Enlisting wild grass genes to combat nitrification in wheat farming: A nature-based solution [Agricultural Sciences]

Active nitrifiers and rapid nitrification are major contributing factors to nitrogen losses in global wheat production. Suppressing nitrifier activity is an effective strategy to limit N losses from agriculture. Production and release of nitrification inhibitors from plant roots is termed "biological nitrification inhibition" (BNI). Here, we report the discovery of…

2h

Reply to Leimar and Hammerstein: Limited gene flow leads to individuals being related within groups [Biological Sciences]

The aim of our paper (1) is to evaluate whether all impactful published models where altruism evolves (or can evolve under some range of model parameter values) are based on a life cycle with local reproduction and local interactions leading to interacting individuals being genetically related. In their response (2),…

2h

Monkeys exhibit a paradoxical decrease in performance in high-stakes scenarios [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]

In high-stakes situations, people sometimes exhibit a frustrating phenomenon known as "choking under pressure." Usually, we perform better when the potential payoff is larger. However, once potential rewards get too high, performance paradoxically decreases—we "choke." Why do we choke under pressure? An animal model of choking would facilitate the investigation…

2h

Correction for Benton et al., The effect of the D614G substitution on the structure of the spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 [Corrections]

MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "The effect of the D614G substitution on the structure of the spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2," by Donald J. Benton, Antoni G. Wrobel, Chloë Roustan, Annabel Borg, Pengqi Xu, Stephen R. Martin, Peter B. Rosenthal, John J. Skehel, and Steven J. Gamblin, which published February 12, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2022586118…

2h

The magnetosphere waxes and wanes every 200 million years

Working out the ancient history of Earth is hard because evidence keeps getting ground up within the planet. A new technique fills in some important blanks in the history of the planet's critical magnetosphere. Every 200 million years, it seems, the magnetosphere weakens and then strengthens. Life, at least as we know it, requires a relatively radiation-free place to thrive and a breathable atmos

2h

Geneticists map the rhinoceros family tree

There's been an age-old question going back to Darwin's time about the relationships among the world's five living rhinoceros species. One reason answers have been hard to come by is that most rhinos went extinct before the Pleistocene. Now, researchers have helped to fill the gaps in the rhino evolutionary family tree by analyzing genomes of all five living species together with the genomes of th

2h

Cosmic rays may be key to understanding galactic dynamics

While moving around within the gas in the interstellar medium, cosmic rays kickstart the background protons, which causes a collective plasma wave movement akin to ripples on a lake. The big question is how cosmic rays deposit their momentum into the background plasma. Plasma astrophysicists review recent developments within the field of studying the streaming instability triggered by cosmic rays,

2h

How do wind turbines respond to winds, ground motion during earthquakes?

Wind power has experienced fast growth within China during the past decade, but many wind farms are being built within regions of high seismic activity. Researchers are now exploring the dynamic behaviors of wind turbines subjected to combined wind-earthquake loading. The group discovered that changes in the wind increase and decrease the response amplitude of the wind turbine under weak and stron

2h

Turning hazelnut shells into potential renewable energy source

Researchers work on physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of wood vinegar and tar fraction in bio-oil produced from hazelnut shells pyrolysis at 400 degrees Celsius to 1,000 C. The researchers found the wood vinegar and tar left over after burning the shells contained the most phenolic substances, which laid a foundation for the subsequent research on antioxidant properties.

2h

Viruses leave traces long after infection, research finds

Viruses do not always kill the cells they infect. Researchers have discovered in experiments with mice that cells have the power to self-heal and eliminate viruses. However, these cells undergo long-term changes. The findings may provide a hint as to why cured hepatitis C patients are more susceptible to liver cancer for years after.

2h

How adolescents used drugs during the COVID-19 pandemic

Among adolescents ages 10 to 14 in the U.S, the overall rate of drug use remained relatively stable in the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, one change was a decreased use of alcohol, but an increased use of nicotine and misuse of prescription drugs.

2h

Premature analysis of child development in pandemic | Letter

Prof J Kiley Hamlin from the International Congress for Infant Studies calls into question a study showing impaired cognition in children, and says there is reason to be optimistic about their resilience Results from a scientific paper have been racing around the internet like wildfire, perhaps because they confirm parents' worst fears: infants born during the pandemic show a large and significan

2h

How predator traits shape anti-predator response

Prey animals perform a diverse variety of behaviors to escape from predators, but whether specific behaviors are used to escape from predators that represent different types of threat has been long-debated. New research from the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences shows that predators' hunting techniques and the relative degree of danger they pose are key factors dictating anti-

3h

Food claiming to have 'wild mushrooms' rarely does, study finds

Harvesting wild mushrooms requires an expert eye to distinguish between the delicious and the poisonous, which makes products with truly wild mushrooms expensive. However, due to minimal regulations around the harvest and sale of wild fungi, it's nearly impossible to know what mushroom species are included in the product. A new study used DNA barcoding to show that 16 food products labeled with wi

3h

The meaning of happiness, according to a baker in ancient Pompeii

In a testament to its resiliency, happiness, according to this year's World Happiness Report , remained remarkably stable around the world, despite a pandemic that upended the lives of billions of people. As a classicist , I find such discussions of happiness in the midst of personal or societal crisis to be nothing new. " Hic habitat felicitas " – "Here dwells happiness" – confidently proclaims

3h

New method greatly improves X-ray nanotomography resolution

It's been a truth for a long time: if you want to study the movement and behavior of single atoms, electron microscopy can give you what X-rays can't. X-rays are good at penetrating into samples—they allow you to see what happens inside batteries as they charge and discharge, for example—but historically they have not been able to spatially image with the same precision electrons can.

3h

Sizing nanoparticles using fluid-filled tubes

The functionality of nanoparticles in a host of applications, including drug delivery and nano-optics, is often dictated by their mass and size. Measuring these properties simultaneously for the same nanoparticle has also been challenging.

3h

Sediment cores indicate more heavy rain events in warm periods and less climate variability in cold periods

Fewer than one hundred kilometers lie between the flood-ravaged district of Ahrweiler and the volcanic lakes in the Eifel. These maars have now provided evidence that weather extremes could increase. Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) and the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry have used sediment cores from maar lakes and dry maars in the volcanic Eifel to precisely construe h

3h

3 brain hacks to control your Amazon addiction (from a neuroscientist)

"From the evolutionary perspective, the human brain evolved to feel first and think later," says neuroscientist and marketing consultant Terry Wu. The part of our brain that controls emotions (the limbic system) and the part that deals with rational thought (the frontal cortex) can send conflicting signals, which leads to bad decision-making. Stress, easy access to online shopping platforms, and

3h

Age-related decline in two sirtuin enzymes alters mitochondrial dynamics, weakens cardiac contractions

The potential protective effect of sirtuin enzymes in age-related diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, remains an area of intense investigation. Now, researchers has determined that sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) and sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) levels decline in aging hearts, disrupting the ability of cardiac muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) to contract in response to ischemia-reperfusion injury.

4h

Team finds fatal flaws in Caribbean cannibalism theory

A new paper undercuts renewed claims of cannibalism in the Caribbean. In January 2020, a prestigious scientific journal published a paper that revived a long-discredited theory, first suggested by the explorer Christopher Columbus : A group of marauding cannibals from South America descended on islands of the Caribbean circa CE 800, terrorizing local populations. "…their erroneous suggestion of c

4h

Global scenarios of resource and emission savings from material efficiency in residential buildings and cars

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25300-4 Material production accounts for a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions. Here, the authors show that resource efficiency and circular-economy strategies can allow for cumulative emission reductions of 20–52 Gt CO2-eq from residential buildings and 13–26 Gt CO2e-eq from cars by 2050.

4h

Invasive cane toads found to use cannibalism to improve their chances of survival in new areas

A team of researchers at the University of Sydney has found that invasive cane toad tadpoles have given their species an advantage in Australia by eating the hatchlings of native toads. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they tested the willingness of cane toad tadpoles to consume competitors and whether it gave them an advantage.

4h

What effect does early social contact have on dairy calves' welfare?

In addition to needs such as food, water, shelter, and medical care, social contact is an important aspect of welfare for animals, just as it is for humans. Yet early socialization of dairy calves is sometimes given lesser priority in the interest of physical health, with young calves housed individually to prevent the spread of contagious diseases such as those that cause diarrhea, or scours, a m

4h

Understanding Antarctic ice historic changes could reveal future changes

The Antarctic Ice Sheet, Earth's southern polar ice sheet, has grown and receded and grown again over millions of years. This changing mass influences the planet's climate and sea levels, with historic data recorded in sediment, meltwater and surrounding oceans. However, the remote and difficult nature of the sheet leaves researchers with limited access to collect samples and data that may reveal

4h

Women leaders less likely than men to receive support following major terrorist attacks

After the 9/11 terrorist attacks, U.S. President George W. Bush's approval ratings shot up from near 50 percent to over 80 percent. High-profile, international terrorist attacks typically produce this effect, which political scientists call a "rally 'round the flag"—constituents increase their support for incumbent presidents and prime ministers when their country is met with a serious national se

5h

Helping engineers better predict clay landslides

Norway experiences dangerous landslides due to its clay-rich soil. For her Master's thesis in civil engineering at EPFL, Mathilde Metral outlined steps that the country's geotechnical engineers can take to improve the predictive computer model they're currently developing.

5h

With a focus on deterrence, the first police force was a success

The world's first professional police force, The London Metropolitan Police, deterred crime and brought a significant reduction in violent crimes when it was introduced nearly 200 years ago. By using historical data, a new economics study examines the relationship between policing and crime levels.

5h

Mystiska svängningar i Europas klimathistoria

Genom avancerade sedimentanalyser har forskare kartlagt europeiska klimatvariationer under de senaste 60 000 åren. Märkligaste fyndet är återkommande perioder av klimatförändringar som varade mellan 20 och 150 år. Det sediment som analyserats har borrats upp från tyska sjöbottnar. Innehållet i sedimenten har jämförts med klimatdata från tre kilometer långa borrkärnor som tagits upp från mellersta

5h

Reversal of lung fibrosis in mouse model suggests a novel therapeutic target for pulmonary fibrosis

Researchers have reversed lung fibrosis in a mouse model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Mice were given bleomycin for 12 days to establish lung fibrosis, and then treated daily until 21 days with ABT-199, whose medical form is known as Venetoclax, a medication approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for use in several forms of leukemia. Control bleomycin mice had lung fibrosi

5h

Statistics say large pandemics are more likely than we thought

The COVID-19 pandemic may be the deadliest viral outbreak the world has seen in more than a century. But statistically, such extreme events aren't as rare as we may think, asserts a new analysis of novel disease outbreaks over the past 400 years. A newly assembled record of past outbreaks was used to estimate the probability of a pandemic with similar impact to COVID-19 is about 2 percent in any y

5h

Lagging chromosomes among causes of infertility

Why do women over 35 have more difficulty getting pregnant? After discovering one of the causes of age-related female infertility, researchers suggest that it will be possible in the future to improve the quality of the eggs of older patients by intervening on the cell cycle level.

5h

3D modeling used to understand how chameleons' tails work

Tails come in all shapes and sizes and can be used for all sorts of things. For instance, tails can help with locomotion, to keep balance, and to communicate with others. Some tails are even able to grasp an object firmly and allow the animal to hang its full body weight on it. These tails are called prehensile, an adaptation found among some monkeys, seahorses—and chameleons.

5h

SARS survival and Pfizer vax combine for useful antibodies

People who survived SARS in 2003 and who got the Pfizer-BioNTech mRNA vaccine produce antibodies that can neutralize all known SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, plus other animal coronaviruses that have the potential to infect humans, research finds. This study, which appears in The New England Journal of Medicine , is the first to demonstrate cross-neutralizing reactivity in humans. The finding fu

5h

Lizards, snakes and turtles: Dispelling the myths about reptiles as pets

Reptiles are all the rage. Mochi the bearded dragon is a viral sensation, with over 1.8 million views on YouTube. Meanwhile, Chris Pratt is singing to his bearded dragon while walking it on a leash, and he is just one of many other celebrities with pet reptiles. It is obvious that having reptiles as pets has gained popularity in recent years.

5h

Världens första poliskår blev en succé

När världens första poliskår infördes i London för snart 200 år sedan blev den en succé. Våldsbrotten minskade markant. Kan vi dra nytta av de lärdomarna idag? Professionella poliskårer är en självklar del av det straffrättsliga systemet i dag. Men i vilken grad de avskräcker från brottslighet kan vara svårt att mäta. Randi Hjalmarsson, professor i nationalekonomi på Handelshögskolan vid Göteborg

5h

Surprise! Our Bodies Have Been Hiding a Trojan Horse for Gene Therapy

Nature hides astonishing medical breakthroughs. Take CRISPR , the transformative gene editing tool. It was inspired by a lowly bacterial immune defense system and co-opted to edit our genes to treat inherited diseases, bolster cancer treatments, or even extend lifespan . Now, Dr. Feng Zhang, one of the pioneers of CRISPR, is back with another creation that could unleash the next generation of gen

6h

Why has same-sex sexual behavior persisted during evolution?

Same-sex sexual behavior may seem to present a Darwinian paradox. It provides no obvious reproductive or survival benefit, and yet same-sex sexual behavior is fairly common—around 2-10% of individuals in diverse human societies—and is clearly influenced by genes.

6h

Car Breaks Down Right at the Start! | Street Outlaws: Memphis

Stream Street Outlaws: Memphis on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-memphis About Street Outlaws: Memphis: Street Outlaws is traveling to the toughest, meanest and wildest streets in the South, as it heads to Memphis to spotlight JJ Da Boss and his team of family and friends who have been racing together for decades. #StreetOutlawsMemphis #StreetRacing #Discovery Subs

6h

First 3D-bioprinted structured Wagyu beef-like meat

Scientists from Osaka University used stem cells isolated from Wagyu cows to 3D-print a meat alternative containing muscle, fat, and blood vessels arranged to closely resemble conventional steaks. This work may help usher in a more sustainable future with widely available cultured meat. Wagyu can be literally translated into "Japanese cow," and is famous around the globe for its high content of in

6h

New combination of materials creates record-breaking lithium-metal cell

Currently, lithium-ion batteries are the most prevalent solution for mobile power supply. In some applications, however, it reaches its limits. This especially holds for electric mobility, where lightweight and compact vehicles with large ranges are desired. Lithium-metal batteries may be an alternative. They are characterized by a high energy density, meaning that they store much energy per mass

6h

Changes in color indicate material deformations

ETH Zurich researchers have developed a new type of laminate that changes color as soon as the material is deformed. This way, the materials researchers can kill two birds with one stone: a lightweight composite material that inspects itself.

6h

Eliminating annoying loops and blisters in adhesives

Blisters (tiny air pockets) or loops in Band-Aids or tapes can be quite annoying and difficult to remove. What's more, they can also affect the materials used to make flexible electronics and soft robotics. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology and University of Twente have studied the unpeeling of looped adhesive tape and developed a new model to explain how best to remove troubleso

6h

Åtta faktorer som ökar risken för magtarmblödning efter hjärtinfarkt

Blödningar i magtarmkanalen är vanliga efter en akut hjärtinfarkt. Forskare har identifierat åtta faktorer som ökar risken. Blödningar i den övre delen av magtarmkanalen utgör en stor andel av blödningskomplikationerna efter akut hjärtinfarkt. Tillståndet kräver stora resurser från sjukvården, och bidrar till ett ökat lidande och ökad dödlighet. Dessutom begränsar blödningskomplikationer användan

6h

An innovative process prevents irreversible energy loss in batteries

When its battery is fully charged, an electronic device will normally indicate that it is at 100% capacity. However, this value only represents 70–90% of the theoretical energy density that can be stored in the batteries, owing to the permanent loss of Li ions that occurs during the initial charge in the stabilization (formation) stage of battery production. By preventing this initial loss of Li i

6h

New computational method opens window into immune cell behavior

Immune cells have many jobs to do: Some identify infected cells and eliminate them. Others help rein in inflammation to prevent damage to healthy tissue. And many are critical components of cancer treatment. Researchers know that the specialized receptors of a type of immune cell called a T cell help regulate T cells' activity and immune roles. A new computational method called CoNGA, published to

6h

Curiosity Rover Takes Stunning Panorama to Celebrate 9 Years on Mars

NASA's new Perseverance rover hasn't even been on the red planet long enough to get dusty, so everything it does is still big news. However, the Curiosity rover is still there as well, plugging along as it sojourns up the side of Mount Sharp. NASA recently released a new panorama image from Curiosity to celebrate the rover's ninth year exploring Mars. The expansive snapshot shows where the robot

6h

Nature recycles trash to create diamonds

The Earth's deepest diamonds are commonly made up of former living organisms that have effectively been recycled more than 400 kilometers below the surface, new Curtin research has discovered.

6h

Green hydrogen: Focusing on the catalyst surface

Using energy from solar modules and wind turbines, water can be split by electrolysis into its constituents hydrogen and oxygen without producing any dangerous emissions. As the availability of energy from renewable sources varies when producing green, i.e. CO2-neutral, hydrogen, it is very important to know the behavior of the catalysts under high loading and dynamic conditions.

6h

National parks are great. Now, let's create a World Park

America's system of national parks is among the best ideas that the country ever had. While they are a remarkable achievement, they are not representative of all biodiversity that exists, and they are not connected to each other. We must physically connect them so ecosystems can adapt to climate change. Constructing a World Park that connects global protected areas could be achieved with as littl

6h

Website offers tips and tricks to fix a leaky bladder

A new web tutorial could help people manage a leaky bladder. If your bladder leaks when you cough, sneeze or laugh, or every time you come home–even if you left 10 minutes ago–you're not alone. It's thought that 30%-50% of women will experience some sort of bladder issue by middle age. This problem worsens with age, but many women still hate talking about incontinence , even with their health car

7h

Laminate changes color to highlight damage

A new kind of laminate changes color as soon as the material is deformed, making it a lightweight composite material that inspects itself. Lightweight construction is now part of industries like automotive manufacturing, shipbuilding, and aircraft construction. In addition to traditional lightweight metals such as aluminum, magnesium, or titanium, load-bearing applications increasingly feature co

7h

ESA astronaut joins glacier expedition in Alps

From space, the synchronous retreat of the world's glaciers can be clearly observed. To get a first-hand view of these changes, ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano, along with Susanne Mecklenburg, Head of ESA's Climate Office, have joined a science expedition taking place at one of the biggest ice masses in the Alps: the Gorner Glacier.

7h

Study: Merit-based employment practices contribute to gender pay gap

Rather than reducing gender-based pay inequality by limiting managers' reliance on factors such as gender bias and favoritism, a shift to performance bonuses and other meritocratic employment practices may actually widen the gap by preserving the status quo, according to research co-written by a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign expert who studies labor market institutions.

7h

New sophisticated simulation models can help reduce yogurt spoilage by yeast

Spoilage of yogurt by yeast poses a problem for the dairy industry that includes economic losses from wasted product. Understanding the effects of factors such as storage conditions, yeast species, and bioprotective cultures on yeast spoilage can help yogurt producers make decisions that improve quality and minimize loss. In an article appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists from the

7h

The limits to human domination of nature

Issues of war and peace, racism, sexism, homophobia, xenophobia, and economic oppression are the result of humans interacting with other humans. These dysfunctions are as old as humanity, and they cause great pain and suffering. As an optimist, I hope they are receding, but as a realist, I know they will never go away. While humans have always battled, as my colleague Peter Coleman has observed, m

7h

Volcanic surge narrowed seas during ancient global warming event

Curtin University research has found that a surge in volcanic activity 56 million years ago not only triggered a major global warming event turning polar regions into a lush tropical landscape, but also altered the shape of the Earth's continents thereby restricting the flow of water between oceans.

7h

Quantum Computers and Nanodots

Quantum computers are at the cusp of becoming an amazing technological breakthrough with many applications. Some heavy-hitters are working on the technology, including IBM and Google, and progress has been steady. IBM predicts it will have a 1000 qubit quantum computer by 2023. Quantum computers are essentially a direct application of quantum weirdness, and so now every time there is an advance i

7h

Primärvården missar barn med nydebuterad diabetes

Fyra av tio barn med nydebuterad diabetes typ 1 fick inte regelmässig akutbehandling på sjukhus samma dag som familjerna sökte hjälp i primärvården visar forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Fördröjd akutbehandling med insulin och vård på sjukhus kan få allvarliga konsekvenser för barn som drabbas av diabetes typ 1. I svåra fall kan det leda till livshotande tillstånd för de som drabbas. Vid typ

8h

Learn New Skills And Protect Your Privacy With 97% Off This App Bundle

2021 has been a year where everything has shifted to the internet, including education for busy adults. And that makes both lifelong learning and a secure easy-to-access internet connection key to your future success. The StackSkills, KeepSolid VPN Unlimited, & Sticky Password Lifetime Subscription Bundle gives you it all for 97% off. A Better Connection Sticky Password and KeepSolid VPN both off

9h

Why Parents Kept Their Kids Home From School

Last fall, reports from New York City and other large public school districts highlighted a worrisome pattern—parents of white children were tending to send their kids back to school in person, while parents of children of color were disproportionately opting to keep them learning at home. At the time, many commentators and experts speculated as to the reasons for the disparity. Maybe it was raci

9h

Li-ion storage properties of two-dimensional titanium-carbide synthesized via fast one-pot method in air atmosphere

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25306-y A facile and cost-effective synthesis of MXenes is not yet available. Here, the authors propose a one-pot molten salt-based method of MXenes synthesis from elemental precursors in an air atmosphere. Li-ion storage properties of the MXenes are also reported and discussed.

10h

Differentiable sampling of molecular geometries with uncertainty-based adversarial attacks

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25342-8 Neural Networks are known to perform poorly outside of their training domain. Here the authors propose an inverse sampling strategy to train neural network potentials enabling to drive atomistic systems towards high-likelihood and high-uncertainty configurations without the need for molecular dynamics simulati

10h

Nonlinear shifts in infectious rust disease due to climate change

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25182-6 Climate change is expected to have major impacts on forest tree diseases. Here the authors analyse long-term data of white pine blister rust in the southern Sierra Nevada, finding evidence of climate change-driven disease range expansion that was mediated by spatially varying host-pathogen-drought interactions

10h

Undecidability in quantum thermalization

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25053-0 The question whether a given isolated quantum many-body system would thermalize has currently no general answer. Here, Shiraishi and Matsumoto demonstrate the computational universality of thermalization phenomena already for simplified 1D systems, thus proving that the thermalization problem is undecidable.

10h

Battery-free, wireless soft sensors for continuous multi-site measurements of pressure and temperature from patients at risk for pressure injuries

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25324-w Uninterrupted monitoring of pressure and temperature at skin interfaces can help to minimize the potential for pressure injuries in hospitalized or bedridden patients. Here, the authors introduce a soft, skin-mountable sensor that can continuously provide readings via antennas mounted under bedding, and demons

10h

Humans and other commonly used model organisms are resistant to cycloheximide-mediated biases in ribosome profiling experiments

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25411-y Ribosome profiling has become the gold standard to analyze mRNA translation dynamics, and the translation inhibitor cycloheximide (CHX) is often used in its application. Here the authors systematically demonstrate that CHX does not bias the outcome of ribosome profiling experiments in most organisms.

10h

PD-L1 degradation is regulated by electrostatic membrane association of its cytoplasmic domain

Nature Communications, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25416-7 The cytoplasmic domain of PD-L1 (PD-L1-CD) is involved in regulating PD-L1 stability and degradation. Here the authors show that membrane binding of PD-L1-CD mediates the cellular levels of PD-L1, while metformin can disrupt the interaction between PD-L1-CD and the membrane to reduce PD-L1 levels.

10h

Ny sekvenseringsteknik putsar genetikernas förstoringsglas

Att studera genetiska förändringar vid leukemi är viktigt för att kunna ställa korrekt diagnos och ge rätt behandling. Hittills har det bara varit möjligt att studera den sammanslagna genetiska koden tillhörande en blandning av många olika celler. Med den nya tekniken "singelcellsekvensering" kan vi fånga in enskilda celler och studera dess genetiska kod. Målet är att förstå varför leukemi uppstår

11h

Psykiskt våld tas inte på allvar

Vi har svårt att förstå allvaret i psykisk misshandel och i kvinnors våld mot män. En studie från Lunds universitet visar på stora skillnader i hur den våldutsatte respektive omgivningen värderar olika typer av misshandel. Fysiskt våld uppfattas ofta som värre än psykiskt av omgivningen. Samma sak gäller för våld utfört av kvinnor respektive våld utfört av män. När en man blir slagen av en kvinna

12h

What should we be feeding our cats?

In mid-June this year, some brands of cat food were recalled as a precaution after a sudden increase in cases of feline pancytopenia, a rare blood disease that can be fatal. Shivani Dave speaks to Daniella Dos Santos, a practicing small animal and exotic pet vet and the senior vice-president of the British Veterinary Association, to understand what the food recall means for cat owners, and to find

16h

Blueprints for how human kidneys form their filtering units

A team of scientists has conducted a comprehensive analysis reconstructing how kidneys form their filtering units, known as nephrons. The team studied hundreds of human and mouse nephrons at various points along their typical developmental trajectories, comparing important processes that have been conserved during the nearly 200 million years of evolution since humans and mice diverged from their

19h

Understanding how elephants use their trunk

The elephant proboscis (trunk) exhibits an extraordinary kinematic versatility as it can manipulate a single blade of grass but also carry loads up to 270 kilograms. Using motion-capture technologies developed for the movie industry, a team of scientists demonstrates that the complex behaviors of the elephant trunk emerge from the combination of a finite set of basic movements such as the propagat

19h

The Future of Forests

http://www.iBiology.org What is the future of forests? Will they survive the threats of climate change? Four researchers ponder these questions, and leave us thinking more deeply about how we can make our forests more resilient. 0:00 Forest health + climate change 5:20 Pine beetle 6:40 Every tool in the box 8:05 Biotechnology as a tool Speaker Biographies: Jason Delborne, Ph.D – Professor of Scie

20h

I read about Google's quantum computer and I am freaked.

Is anyone else feeling insecure about their cyber safety after hearing about this? I heard there are some companies around trying to create software that can counter the power of these computers but nothing solid yet… has anyone heard of anything that might make me feel better? submitted by /u/Tech-Genius-780 [link] [comments]

21h

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