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Study: Drinking Water Prevents Heart Failure
In order to help stave off heart failure, new research suggests that most people around the world would benefit from drinking an extra glass of water . It turns out that getting properly hydrated — that means reaching and maintaining appropriate levels in the long term — can reduce the risk of developing heart failure, according to research presented at a European Society of Cardiology conference
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Japanese Scientists 3D Print Lab-Grown Wagyu Steak
Lab Wagyu Scientists at Osaka University in Japan have managed to print lab-grown steak that they say greatly resembles products made from the world-renowned breeds of Wagyu beef cattle — an environmentally conscious and sustainable alternative to a genuine delicacy. The team harvested two types of stem cells from Wagyu cows, incubated them, and then converted them into muscle, fat, and blood ves
7h
In a first, scientists capture a 'quantum tug' between neighboring water molecules
Water is the most abundant yet least understood liquid in nature. It exhibits many strange behaviors that scientists still struggle to explain. While most liquids get denser as they get colder, water is most dense at 39 degrees Fahrenheit, just above its freezing point. This is why ice floats to the top of a drinking glass and lakes freeze from the surface down, allowing marine life to survive col
11h
Evolutionary 'time travel' reveals enzyme's origins, possible future designs
"The distinction between the past, present and future is only a stubbornly persistent illusion," Albert Einstein wrote. Perhaps this is nowhere more evident than in protein evolution, where past and present versions of the same enzyme exist in different species today, with implications for future enzyme design. Now, researchers have used evolutionary "time travel" to learn how an enzyme evolved ov
17h
The World's Biggest Wind Turbine Is Being Built in China
In 2018, GE unveiled its Haliade-X turbine, and it has since been the largest and most powerful offshore wind turbine in the world. At 853 feet tall and with a rotor measuring 722 feet across, a single rotation of its blades can power a home for two days (that's a home in the UK, not the US; homes here tend to be bigger energy hogs). Last year, the Haliade-X prototype located in the Netherlands s
12h
LED streetlights decimating moth numbers in England
'Eco-friendly' lights found to be worse than sodium ones – but both contribute to insect decline, says study "Eco-friendly" LED streetlights produce even worse light pollution for insects than the traditional sodium bulbs they are replacing, a study has found. The abundance of moth caterpillars in hedgerows by rural roads in England was 52% lower under LED lights and 41% lower under sodium lights
8h
Manatees Are Starving en Masse as Florida's Ecosystem Crumbles
Mass Casualties As Florida's fragile ecosystems crumble under the ravages of climate change, beloved local wildlife is finding it hard to survive. That became especially evident when the bodies of 677 manatees washed up along the state's east coast between December 2020 and May 2021, as the Orlando Sentinel reports . The winter is usually tough for the local manatee population, but experts examin
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Banks Warned That Crypto Could Replace Dollar Within Five Years
According to a recent survey of finance industry executives by consulting giant Deloitte, digital assets will likely replace fiat currencies in five to ten years — and banks should take notice. "Deloitte's 2021 Global Blockchain Survey affirms that banks should embrace their inevitable digital future," the report reads. "In a seismic shift, financial leaders increasingly see digital assets as the
7h
Someone Is Secretly Working on "Privately Owned" Space Station
Moonraker? Collins Aerospace, a subsidiary of military and aerospace contractor Raytheon Technologies, is working on environmental control and life support technologies for a "privately owned and operated low Earth orbit outpost," according to SpaceNews . There's plenty of money being poured into developing a commercial presence in space right now. The small firm was awarded a $2.6 million contra
8h
'Genetic fossil': intact DNA from woman who lived 7,200 years ago discovered in Indonesia
Skeleton of hunter-gatherer found in Leang Panninge cave sheds light on ancient human migration Archaeologists have discovered ancient DNA in the remains of a woman who died 7,200 years ago in Indonesia, a find that challenges what was previously known about migration of early humans. The remains, belonging to a teenager nicknamed Bessé, were discovered in the Leang Panninge cave on the Indonesia
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Being You by Professor Anil Seth review – the exhilarating new science of consciousness
Our world and the self are constructions of the brain, a pioneering neuroscientist argues For every stoner who has been overcome with profound insight and drawled, "Reality is a construct, maaan," here is the astonishing affirmation. Reality – or, at least, our perception of it – is a "controlled hallucination", according to the neuroscientist Anil Seth. Everything we see, hear and perceive aroun
20h
New Zealand won't 'throw in towel' on Covid-zero strategy despite rising infections
Covid response minister says it would be a waste to stop aiming for elimination after plan was questioned by foreign media See all our coronavirus coverage New Zealand's Covid response minister says the country will not "throw in the towel" with its elimination strategy, as cases continue to rise. New Zealand announced 63 new cases of Covid-19 on Wednesday, bringing the total to 210 cases. It is
22h
Japan Is Digging an Undersea Tunnel To Dump Fukushima's Radioactive Water
30-Year Flush In order to safely dispose of the radioactive water building up and threatening to overflow at the destroyed Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Tokyo Electric Power Company Holdings (TEPCO) has announced plans to drill an undersea tunnel that will allow it to dump the contaminated water at a moderate distance from the shore. The idea is for the kilometer-long (0.6 miles) tun
9h
It's the Pandemic, Stupid
L osing a war undermines the public's trust in any leader. But the setback causing the most damage to Joe Biden's political standing likely isn't the U.S. military defeat in Afghanistan—it's the frustrating home-front struggle against the resurgent coronavirus pandemic. Support for Biden's performance as president has tumbled in the most recent batch of polling. For the first time since he took o
10h
Scientists Shocked by Discovery of Enormous, Healthy Coral
Hello There A team of scientists was shocked when they accidentally stumbled upon an "exceptionally large" mass of coral in the Great Barrier Reef that they believe to be more than 400 years old. The new coral is likely the widest of its type, according to research published in the Nature journal Scientific Reports last week. And, in a surprising twist, the bus-sized coral was shockingly healthy
11h
Blue Origin Is Working on a SpaceX Super Heavy Clone
Project Jarvis Blue Origin is making headwind on developing a fully reusable rocket stage designed to launch its New Glenn rocket, according to images taken near the test site and published by Ars Technica today. The test tank bears a striking resemblance to SpaceX's Super Heavy booster prototypes — which is striking, because the two space companies are currently embroiled in an increasingly bitt
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Elon Musk Wants To Dig a New Tunnel Near his Texas Spaceport
Hammer Vision Among the local Texans who live near SpaceX's Boca Chica Starbase facility, one of the biggest complaints is the fact that the company frequently blocks the highway while shipping rocket parts or shuts it down altogether for launches, cutting off would-be travelers from the area. As the saying goes, to the man with a tunnel-digging company, everything looks like, well, a great spot
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Alleged Email Leak Shows ULA Plotting Against Elon Musk and SpaceX
An alleged email leak appears to show the United Launch Alliance, a prominent SpaceX competitor, plotting to spread damaging conspiracy theories about SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. The authenticity of the emails has yet to be confirmed, though Ars Technica is reporting that they "appear to be legitimate." And ULA spokeswoman Jessica Rye told Futurism that "we will not comment at this time but are taking
9h
Does Covid immunity wane and will vaccine booster jabs be needed?
Multiple studies seem to suggest immunity declines over time, though what this means is unclear Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With plans for the UK's Covid vaccine booster programme this autumn soon to be revealed, we take a look at what we do – and don't – know about waning immunity after vaccination. Continue reading…
15h
Not Everyone Can Afford to 'Learn to Live With' COVID-19
For most of human history, the majority of people died of infectious disease. Scourges like tuberculosis, typhoid, plague, smallpox, and (in some places) malaria carried most people to their graves, many as infants or children. As public health and biomedicine advanced, cancers and organ diseases replaced microbes as the main causes of mortality. The control of infectious disease, and consequent
16h
All theories on origins of Covid-19 outbreak still 'on the table', says WHO
Remarks follow reports US intelligence study unable to conclude if virus came from animals or a Wuhan lab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The World Health Organization has said all theories on the origins of the Covid-19 outbreak, including the possibility of laboratory leak, are "on the table" and urged Chinese scientists to carry out their own investigations. WHO o
18h
Alibaba Says Delivery Robots Are Great Because They Don't Smoke on the Job
More Into Vaping The Chinese tech and e-commerce giant Alibaba recently announced a plan to roll out 1,000 delivery robots throughout the country this year — and it's taking some jabs at the human delivery workers they'd be replacing. The delivery bot rollout is meant to better tackle the "last mile problem" of delivery logistics, according to The Register , in which an otherwise smooth process c
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The Era of Easier Voting for Disabled People Is Over
It's long been difficult for Americans with disabilities to vote. Inaccessible paths are an obstacle to people who use wheelchairs. Long lines are a huge hurdle to people with chronic pain. Voting machines without audio or large-print ballots are an impediment to those who are blind or who have low vision. But last year, something different happened: As states passed pandemic-driven reforms to ma
15h
VP Kamala Harris' Trip to Vietnam Delayed by Mysterious Havana-Like Incident
Anomalous Health Incidents A suspected new case of the mysterious "Havana syndrome" has reportedly delayed US vice president Kamala Harris' visit to Vietnam, ABC News reports . According to a statement by the US embassy in Hanoi, an "anomalous health incident" is the first to involve a senior US leader, according to A BC . While we don't have a direct confirmation that the incident has any direct
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Elon Musk Admits That Tesla's Full Self-Driving Is "Not Great"
Car engineer and critic Sandy Munro recently got a demo of Ford's hands-free driving feature BlueCruise. And he wasn't exactly impressed. In a recent video, Munro had a chat with lead engineer Chris Billman, chief engineer at Ford Driver Assist Technologies, while testing out the new feature. "All in all, it was OK," Munro told Billman in the video after taking the car for a ride. "But I guess I'
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How the U.S. Could Slash Climate Pollution by 2030
President Joe Biden has been giving climate advocates heartburn. In April, soon after rejoining the Paris Agreement, he set a goal: The United States would cut its greenhouse-gas pollution by 50 percent from 2005 levels by 2030. The White House promised that "a careful interagency process" had produced that goal, and at least a dozen reports from outside scholars and nonprofits argued that such a
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New research solves the mystery of magnetic moon rocks brought back on Apollo
Surrounding Earth is a powerful magnetic field created by swirling liquid iron in the planet's core. Earth's magnetic field may be nearly as old as the Earth itself – and stands in stark contrast to the Moon, which completely lacks a magnetic field today. But did the Moon's core generate a magnetic field in the past? In the 1980s, geophysicists studying rocks brought back by Apollo astronauts con
7h
Math Can, in Theory, Help You Escape a Hungry Bear
Our June Insights puzzle added a few twists to a classic puzzle made famous by Martin Gardner in his 1965 Scientific American column and later published in the book The Colossal Book of Short Puzzles and Problems. In our version, a swimmer at the center of a circular lake of radius 3.5 is attempting to escape a bear hunting him from the shore. The bear doesn't swim but can run along the… Source
9h
Want to remember something? Maybe eat some chocolate
Sleep is essential to how we function, and one of its more important aspects is how it consolidates memories. The brain decides for us which memories we ought to keep. It does so based upon the strength of an emotional experience, either positive or negative. New research suggests that during NREM sleep, our brain is more likely to store positive memories. Sleep feels great. After a long day, the
9h
SpaceX Doesn't Have Enough Rocket Fuel Because COVID Patients Need It to Breathe
Bagel Boosters In an unfortunate turn of events, rocket companies are running low on liquid oxygen (LOX), a cryogenic oxidizer used to propel rockets into orbit. The reason? The ongoing — and now severely worsening — COVID-19 pandemic. That's because hospitals are using the stuff to keep patients alive as well as for water treatment, according to Insider . SpaceX president Gwynne Shotwell noted d
12h
Mapping possible routes for early humans out of Africa using climate models
A trio of researchers from the University of Cambridge working with a colleague from the University of Tartu has found possible evidence of multiple opportunities for early humans to migrate out of Africa to the Arabian Peninsula prior to the mass migration that occurred approximately 65,000 years ago. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes mapping clima
13h
Rise of the robo-drama: Young Vic creates new play using artificial intelligence
Inspired by a Guardian article, the theatre's surreal and spellbinding show AI is a collaboration between humans and the system GPT-3 Last autumn, a deep-learning computer programme wrote an essay for the Guardian . The GPT-3 system argued that humans had nothing to fear from robots. Kwame Kwei-Armah, artistic director of the Young Vic, read it and felt inspired. Could there be a future in creati
19h
Researchers describe a new fossil species representing the ancient forerunner of most modern reptiles
Lizards and snakes are a key component of most terrestrial ecosystems on earth today. Along with the charismatic tuatara of New Zealand (a "living fossil" represented by a single living species), squamates (all lizards and snakes) make up the Lepidosauria—the largest group of terrestrial vertebrates in the planet today with approximately 11,000 species, and by far the largest modern group of repti
11h
Famous map of a woman's heart tells only half the story
Early 19th century heart-shaped map remains a popular allegory of love. Looking beyond its shape, the map shows the social restrictions of its time. Its lesser known male twin reveals an even more pessimistic take on love. "Kiss me quick": a humorous take on the social minefield that had to be navigated in early 19th century courtships. Credit: Currier & Ives, New York City (ca. 1840) / Public do
13h
This Wasp Nest of Mine, I'm Gonna Let It Shine
On a muggy spring night in 2016, the chemist Bernd Schöllhorn was tromping alone through a forest in northern Vietnam . Into the inky darkness, he raised a black light—and saw an extraordinarily bright shape winking at him in eerie shades of yellowish green. "I thought it was somebody else," Schöllhorn, a researcher at the University of Paris, told me. But when he cut his own light, the stranger'
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The Remote-Option Divide
On August 9, faculty and administrators in the Clark County School District—which serves Las Vegas and surrounding areas—welcomed students back to classrooms for full-time in-person instruction. And, at the beginning, leaders of the nation's fifth-largest school district were cautiously optimistic; aside from difficulty with air-conditioning in some buildings, the first day went off without issue
12h
Oxygen firms accused of intimidating Mexican hospitals during pandemic
Hospitals received letters threatening large fines after they installed their own onsite O2 plants in response to shortages In March 2020, Benjamin Espinoza Zavala saw an entire floor of his small hospital in Guanajuato, central Mexico, converted into Covid-19 wards. The hospital's need for oxygen soared. Deliveries from CryoInfra, part of the Grupo Infra group , occasionally slowed to once every
20h
'Mini-Neptunes' beyond solar system may soon yield signs of life
Cambridge astronomers identify new hycean class of habitable exoplanets, which could accelerate search for life Signs of life beyond our solar system may be detectable within two to three years, experts have said after rethinking the kinds of planets that may be habitable. Researchers have mostly looked for planets of a similar size, mass, temperature and atmospheric composition to Earth. But Uni
3h
The giant jurassic dinosaur Allosaurus was a scavenger, not a predator
In a paper published August 23, authors Cameron Pahl and Luis Ruedas, of Portland State University, show that Allosaurus, a large carnivorous dinosaur from the Jurassic that has long been thought to be a top predator, could probably have acquired most of its calories by scavenging on the carcasses of enormous sauropod herbivores that lived alongside it. Pahl noted that "This new perspective may ov
10h
Protecting gardens and crops from insects using the 'smell of fear'
For home gardeners and farmers, herbivorous insects present a major threat to their hard work and crop yields. The predator insects that feed on these bugs emit odors that pests can sense, which changes the pests' behavior and even their physiology to avoid being eaten. With bugs becoming more resistant to traditional pesticides, researchers now report they have developed a way to bottle the "smel
17h
The Congo rainforest makes its own spring rain
The Congo basin is home to the world's second-largest rainforest, whose 500 million acres have been slowly drying out for the last four decades. To figure out why the dry season is getting longer, scientists have been asking: What makes it rain in the Congo rainforest?
10h
Janus graphene opens doors to sustainable sodium-ion batteries
In the search for sustainable energy storage, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, present a new concept to fabricate high-performance electrode materials for sodium batteries. It is based on a novel type of graphene to store one of the world's most common and cheap metal ions—sodium. The results show that the capacity can match today's lithium-ion batteries.
13h
Why capturing carbon is an essential part of Biden's climate plans
President Biden's early climate efforts prioritized popular actions: rejoining the Paris agreement, purchasing clean energy and vehicles, and eliminating fossil fuel subsidies. But the administration's strategies to drive the nation toward net-zero emissions also lean heavily, if less obviously, on a touchier area: capturing or removing huge amounts of the carbon dioxide driving global warming. I
17h
In the data decade, data can be both an advantage and a burden
In 2016, Dell Technologies commissioned our first Digital Transformation Index (DT Index) study to assess the digital maturity of businesses around the globe. We have since commissioned the study every two years to track businesses' digital maturity. Sam Grocott is Senior Vice President of Business Unit Marketing at Dell Technologies . Our third installment of the DT Index , launched in 2020 (the
10h
US government agencies plan to increase their use of facial recognition technology
A 90-page report published Tuesday by the US Government Accountability Office (GAO) details how federal agencies currently use, and plan to expand their use of, facial recognition systems. Ten of 24 agencies surveyed plan to broaden their use of the technology by 2023. Ten agencies are also investing in research and development for the technology. The report is the outcome of a study requested by
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'We Were Going and I Am Not at All Sorry'
America's hot vax summer began exactly how it was billed—less pandemic, more vacci-cations . Over the past few months, Americans have gone nuts with travel. Airbnbs are booked months in advance. Good luck finding a rental car. Even cruises are back … unfortunately. For a couple of days in July, airports were busier than they were at the same point in 2019. But you know what happened next. Would-b
7h
The boiling crisis and how to avoid it
It's rare for a pre-teen to become enamored with thermodynamics, but those consumed by such a passion may consider themselves lucky to end up at a place like MIT. Madhumitha Ravichandran certainly does. A Ph.D. student in Nuclear Science and Engineering (NSE), Ravichandran first encountered the laws of thermodynamics as a middle school student in Chennai, India. "They made complete sense to me," s
7h
Janusgrafen öppnar dörren till hållbara batterier
Natrium är en av världens vanligaste metaller och huvudingrediens i såväl havsvatten som bordssalt. I framtiden kan natriumjoner även vara en del av en hållbar batterilösning. Med hjälp av en ny typ av grafen, kallad janusgrafen, har Chalmersforskare skapat ett elektrodmaterial som gör att natriumjonbatterier kan få så hög kapacitet att de kan matcha dagens litiumjonbatterier. Grafen är ett mater
15h
Genetic mapping boosts hopes for restoring prized lake trout
Scientists have traced the genetic makeup of lake trout, a feat that should boost efforts to rebuild populations of the prized fish in the Great Lakes and other North American waters where they've been hammered by invasive species, overfishing and pollution, officials said Tuesday.
19h
Russian cinema: a century of state-approved propaganda
During the Soviet days, movies promoted socialist ideology. Today, films serve up cautionary tales about revolution and insurrection. However, Russian cinema is more than propaganda; the films are as rich as the country's history. In 1930, the renowned Soviet filmmaker Sergei Eisenstein traveled to New York City in the hope of striking a production deal with Paramount Pictures. While executives w
11h
Detecting an unprecedented range of potentially harmful airborne compounds
Many of the products we encounter daily—from deodorant to pesticides to paint—release molecules that drift through the air. Breathing in enough of the wrong ones can cause serious and potentially long-term health problems. However, it can be hard to estimate exposure because current devices are limited in what they can detect. Today, researchers report development of a new personal air-sampling sy
17h
I taught myself to lucid dream. You can too.
When I was 19—long before I ever thought I would land a career writing about space—I dreamed I was standing on the surface of Mars, looking over a rusted desert dotted with rocks, stuck in a perpetual lukewarm dusk, transfixed by the desolation. After soaking everything in for what seemed like hours, I looked up and saw a space station hanging in the sky. I decided to fly up there using some kind
15h
What would it be like to be a conscious AI? We might never know.
Jefferson Test / AI subject: Robert / Date: 07.12.2098 Session #54 Interviewer: Hi, Robert. Tell me about your dream again. Subject: I was confused. It made me feel happy, but also scared. I didn't know I could do that. Interviewer: Why do you think it made you feel that way? Subject: Having feelings, any feelings, makes me happy. I am here. I exist. Knowing that changes everything. But I am scar
15h
Instant gratification: The neuroscience of impulse buying
A recent episode of "Your Brain on Money" explored the psychological factors behind impulse buying. Online shopping has made it harder than ever to resist impulsive purchases, which may provide instant gratification but not long-lasting happiness. Some strategies for resisting impulse buying include planning your shopping and being cognizant of how retailers manipulate consumers. It's arguably ne
21h
Seeing is believing: Direct imaging of record exciton diffusion length
Optoelectronics—technology that gives off, detects, or controls light—are used everywhere in modern electronics and include devices such as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and solar cells. Within these devices, the movement of excitons (pairs of negative electrons and positive holes) determines how well the device performs.
11h
Photosynthesis model simulates 10–20 percent yield increase
A team from the University of Illinois has developed a model that treats photosynthesis as a dynamic process rather than an activity that either is or is not happening. This allowed the group to examine the impacts of the many fluctuations in light that crop leaves experience due to intermittent clouds, overlying leaves and the sun's daily passage across the sky. In today's densely planted crops,
14h
Career in CogSci
Can anyone share what they do with their degree in cogsci? Any unique career paths with this degree? submitted by /u/Alternative_Life_860 [link] [comments]
4min
The Electromagnetic Force of Fridge Magnets – Issue 104: Harmony
Science is not just something we do at school or professionals undertake in labs. It is at the heart of how everything works. With the development of applied scientific principles, science enables us to not only understand how things work but how to make use of that understanding in the technology that supports our everyday lives. In this excerpt from their new book, How it All Works , Adam Dant
49min
The Ecology of Good Weed – Issue 104: Harmony
In high school, Daniel Stein built a solar-powered car and drove it across the country. "I got to see the possibility of doing something with my own hands and seeing the success of taking action for what you believe in," he says, some 30 years later. It's a slow winter day on the farm as a bearded Stein prepares seeds for the planting season. Soon he will be donning a straw hat, a clean shave, an
49min
How I Escaped My Troubles Through Science – Issue 104: Harmony
"Occasionally, when Ammu listened to songs that she loved on the radio, something stirred inside her. A liquid ache spread under her skin, and she walked out of the world like a witch, to a better, happier place …" —Arundhati Roy, The God of Small Things We've all felt the need. To just drop whatever loads we're bearing, retreating to some private realm where our worldly concerns fade into oblivi
49min
Central European prehistory was highly dynamic
Recent archaeogenetic studies have shown that human movements like migrations and expansions played a major role in driving the spread of cultures and genes in ancient Europe. However, it is only now with detailed regional studies and dense sampling that researchers start to better understand the magnitude, rate and social implications of these changes.
2h
Robot mimics the powerful punch of the mantis shrimp
Mantis shrimp pack the strongest punch of any creature in the animal kingdom. How mantis shrimp produce these deadly, ultra-fast movements has long fascinated biologists. Now, an interdisciplinary team of roboticists, engineers and biologists have modeled the mechanics of the mantis shrimp's punch and built a robot that mimics the movement. The research sheds light on the biology of these pugnacio
3h
Protecting gardens and crops from insects using the 'smell of fear'
For home gardeners and farmers, herbivorous insects present a major threat. The predator insects that feed on these bugs emit odors that pests can sense, which changes the pests' behavior and physiology to avoid being eaten. With bugs becoming more resistant to traditional pesticides, researchers now report they have bottled the 'smell of fear' produced by predators to repel and disrupt insects na
3h
Add it up: Could this test equal a way to determine dementia risk?
People whose scores on a dementia risk test indicated a less brain-healthy lifestyle, including smoking, high blood pressure and a poor diet, may also have the following: lower scores on thinking skills tests, more changes on brain scans and a higher risk of cognitive impairment, according to a new study.
4h
Wildfire smoke boosts risk of premature births
Exposure to wildfire smoke during pregnancy increases the risk that the baby will be born too early, a new study shows. The study, published in Environmental Research , finds there may have been as many as 7,000 extra preterm births in California attributable to wildfire smoke exposure between 2007 and 2012. These births occurred before 37 weeks of pregnancy when incomplete development heightens
4h
Webcast: how to green your lab
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02352-6 Taking steps to lower the environmental impact of your research can reduce costs.
5h
'Nanojars' capture dissolved carbon dioxide, toxic ions from water
Carbon dioxide from the atmosphere dissolves in waterways, forming bicarbonate ions and other compounds that change water chemistry, with possible harmful effects on aquatic organisms. In addition, bicarbonate can reenter the atmosphere as carbon dioxide later. Now, researchers have developed tiny 'nanojars' that split bicarbonate into carbonate and capture it, as well as certain toxic anions, so
5h
Fossils illuminate dinosaur evolution in eastern North America
Tyrannosaurus rex, the fearsome predator that once roamed what is now western North America, appears to have had an East Coast cousin. A new study describes two dinosaurs that inhabited Appalachia — a once isolated land mass that today composes much of the eastern United States — about 85 million years ago: an herbivorous duck-billed hadrosaur and a carnivorous tyrannosaur.
5h
This Beautiful Cannabis Art Educates, Entertains and Decorates Your Space
Let's face it. Cannabis is more popular (and some would say cooler ) than ever. The use of marijuana and CBD products, both medically and recreationally, is fast becoming the norm. However, explaining the intricacies of the cannabis plant and the products that are made from it can be difficult. Fortunately, a new company called Goldleaf is producing slick-looking cannabis-themed charts and infogr
5h
The Candyman Lives On
The 1992 original Candyman film, my favorite piece of horror cinema from that decade, is about an interloper. Helen Lyle (played by Virginia Madsen), a plucky, white graduate student researching urban legends in Chicago, is drawn to the city's dilapidated Cabrini-Green projects , where she learns of a monster named the Candyman: a vengeful Black ghost who appears if you say his name five times wh
6h
Engineers are 'driving' innovation to help eliminate plastic waste
Each year in the United States, millions of tons of plastic waste are discarded and not recycled, leading to serious environmental problems. In an effort to help keep this waste from ending up in the environment, engineers at the University of Missouri are partnering with Dow and the Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) to test mixing plastic waste into the asphalt pavement mixtures for p
6h
How a Japanese far-right hate group helped popularize anti-Korean sentiment
Studies show that anti-Korean sentiment in Japan has grown steadily in the past decade, despite the growing acceptance of more visibly "foreign" Southeast Asian migrants in Japan. A University of Notre Dame researcher conducted two years of ethnographic fieldwork in a historic Korean ghetto in Osaka, Japan, to shed light on the legacy of discrimination that third- and fourth-generation Korean mino
6h
Offices Are Trying to Tempt Workers Back With Live Bees for Some Reason
Busy Bees New York City office buildings are scrambling for new ways to lure tenants — and their employees — back to in-person work while the coronavirus pandemic rages on. And among their top strategies is adding amenities reminiscent of the more nature-adjacent lifestyles that some workers may have experienced during the last year and a half such as, oddly enough, rooftop beekeeping classes, Th
7h
The Atlantic Daily: Afghanistan Evacuations Are a Race Against the Clock
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The Taliban is no longer allowing fleeing Afghans to travel to the Kabul airport , while the United States is sticking with its August 31 withdrawal deadline for now , despite calls for an extensi
7h
Baby detector software embedded in digital camera rivals ECG
Facial recognition is now common in adults, but researchers have developed software that can reliably detect a premature baby's face in an incubator and remotely monitor its heart and breathing rates – rivaling ECG machines and even outperforming them. This is the first step in using non-contact monitoring in neonatal wards, avoiding skin tearing and potential infections from adhesive pads.
7h
Underlying instincts: An appetite for survival
Microscopic roundworms may hold the key to understanding what is happening in the brain when the instinct of an animal changes in order to survive. In a newly published paper in the journal Current Biology, University of Rochester Medical Center researchers found that a signaling system in the brain changes to redirect the behavior of an animal when their survival is at risk because there is not e
7h
Team captures data from unarmed Minuteman III test launch
A team from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) successfully collected data from the recent operational test of an Air Force Global Strike Command unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) launched from Vandenberg Space Force Base.
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Profound Treg perturbations correlate with COVID-19 severity [Immunology and Inflammation]
The hallmark of severe COVID-19 is an uncontrolled inflammatory response, resulting from poorly understood immunological dysfunction. We hypothesized that perturbations in FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg), key enforcers of immune homeostasis, contribute to COVID-19 pathology. Cytometric and transcriptomic profiling revealed a distinct Treg phenotype in severe COVID-19 patients, with an…
8h
Opinion: The power and promise of improved climate data infrastructure [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The announcement by the Biden Administration to reengage the Paris climate process and lower US greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions 50% by the end of this decade is an essential development in the global effort to avoid the worst impacts of climate change (1). However, promises to reduce US GHG emissions…
8h
SLC-30A9 is required for Zn2+ homeostasis, Zn2+ mobilization, and mitochondrial health [Cell Biology]
The trace element zinc is essential for many aspects of physiology. The mitochondrion is a major Zn2+ store, and excessive mitochondrial Zn2+ is linked to neurodegeneration. How mitochondria maintain their Zn2+ homeostasis is unknown. Here, we find that the SLC-30A9 transporter localizes on mitochondria and is required for export of…
8h
Lipid-based and protein-based interactions synergize transmembrane signaling stimulated by antigen clustering of IgE receptors [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Antigen (Ag) crosslinking of immunoglobulin E–receptor (IgE-FcεRI) complexes in mast cells stimulates transmembrane (TM) signaling, requiring phosphorylation of the clustered FcεRI by lipid-anchored Lyn tyrosine kinase. Previous studies showed that this stimulated coupling between Lyn and FcεRI occurs in liquid ordered (Lo)-like nanodomains of the plasma membrane and that Lyn…
8h
TRIM47 activates NF-{kappa}B signaling via PKC-ϵ/PKD3 stabilization and contributes to endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer [Medical Sciences]
Increasing attention has been paid to roles of tripartite motif–containing (TRIM) family proteins in cancer biology, often functioning as E3 ubiquitin ligases. In the present study, we focus on a contribution of TRIM47 to breast cancer biology, particularly to endocrine therapy resistance, which is a major clinical problem in breast…
8h
An in vitro vesicle formation assay reveals cargo clients and factors that mediate vesicular trafficking [Cell Biology]
The fidelity of protein transport in the secretory pathway relies on the accurate sorting of proteins to their correct destinations. To deepen our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms, it is important to develop a robust approach to systematically reveal cargo proteins that depend on specific sorting machinery to be…
8h
Catabolism of lysosome-related organelles in color-changing spiders supports intracellular turnover of pigments [Cell Biology]
Pigment organelles of vertebrates belong to the lysosome-related organelle (LRO) family, of which melanin-producing melanosomes are the prototypes. While their anabolism has been extensively unraveled through the study of melanosomes in skin melanocytes, their catabolism remains poorly known. Here, we tap into the unique ability of crab spiders to reversibly…
8h
Low-temperature emergent neuromorphic networks with correlated oxide devices [Applied Physical Sciences]
Neuromorphic computing—which aims to mimic the collective and emergent behavior of the brain's neurons, synapses, axons, and dendrites—offers an intriguing, potentially disruptive solution to society's ever-growing computational needs. Although much progress has been made in designing circuit elements that mimic the behavior of neurons and synapses, challenges remain in designing…
8h
Subsize Pt-based intermetallic compound enables long-term cyclic mass activity for fuel-cell oxygen reduction [Chemistry]
Pt-based alloy catalysts may promise considerable mass activity (MA) for oxygen reduction but are generally unsustainable over long-term cycles, particularly in practical proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Herein, we report a series of Pt-based intermetallic compounds (Pt3Co, PtCo, and Pt3Ti) enclosed by ultrathin Pt skin with an average particle…
8h
The radish Ogura fertility restorer impedes translation elongation along its cognate CMS-causing mRNA [Plant Biology]
The control of messenger RNA (mRNA) translation has been increasingly recognized as a key regulatory step for gene control, but clear examples in eukaryotes are still scarce. Nucleo-cytoplasmic male sterilities (CMS) represent ideal genetic models to dissect genetic interactions between the mitochondria and the nucleus in plants. This trait is…
8h
PD-1 preferentially inhibits the activation of low-affinity T cells [Immunology and Inflammation]
Anti–PD-1 therapies can activate tumor-specific T cells to destroy tumors. However, whether and how T cells with different antigen specificity and affinity are differentially regulated by PD-1 remain vaguely understood. Upon antigen stimulation, a variety of genes is induced in T cells. Recently, we found that T cell receptor (TCR)…
8h
Study: One in Two Young Adults With ADHD Also Had a Substance Use Disorder
A study on the overlap between various psychiatric conditions found an alarmingly strong correlation between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and substance use disorders in young adults, suggesting that one condition may hypothetically put people at risk of the other. Just about half of the young adults with ADHD who responded to a mental health survey also reported having had a su
8h
Microglial Calhm2 regulates neuroinflammation and contributes to Alzheimers disease pathology
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease in the world. Neuronal calcium dysfunction and microglial-mediated neuroinflammation are closely associated with the development of AD. However, it remains unknown whether calcium dysfunction contributes to microglial activation and, in turn, AD pathology in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that the expression of calcium ho
8h
Rapid greening response of Chinas 2020 spring vegetation to COVID-19 restrictions: Implications for climate change
The 2019 novel coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) negatively affected global public health and socioeconomic development. Lockdowns and travel restrictions to contain COVID-19 resulted in reduced human activity and decreased anthropogenic emissions. However, the secondary effects of these restrictions on the biophysical environment are uncertain. Using remotely sensed big data, we investigated how l
8h
Submicrometer perovskite plasmonic lasers at room temperature
Plasmonic lasers attracted interest for their ability to generate coherent light in mode volume smaller than the diffraction limit of photonic lasers. While nanoscale devices in one or two dimensions were demonstrated, it has been difficult to achieve plasmonic lasing with submicrometer cavities in all three dimensions. Here, we demonstrate submicrometer-sized, plasmonic lasers using cesium-lead-
8h
Genomic gain of RRS1 promotes hepatocellular carcinoma through reducing the RPL11-MDM2-p53 signaling
Hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) are characterized by frequent somatic genomic copy number alterations (CNAs), with most of them biologically unexplored. Here, we performed integrative analyses combining CNAs with the transcriptomic data to reveal the cis- and trans-effects of CNAs in HCC. We identified recurrent genomic gains of chromosome 8q, which exhibit strong trans-effects and are broadly a
8h
A distributed circuit for associating environmental context with motor choice in retrosplenial cortex
During navigation, animals often use recognition of familiar environmental contexts to guide motor action selection. The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) receives inputs from both visual cortex and subcortical regions required for spatial memory and projects to motor planning regions. However, it is not known whether RSC is important for associating familiar environmental contexts with specific motor a
8h
Ultrafast, tough, and adhesive hydrogel based on hybrid photocrosslinking for articular cartilage repair in water-filled arthroscopy
A hydrogel scaffold for direct tissue-engineering application in water-irrigated, arthroscopic cartilage repair, is badly needed. However, such hydrogels must cure quickly under water, bind strongly and permanently to the surrounding tissue, and maintain sufficient mechanical strength to withstand the hydraulic pressure of arthroscopic irrigation (~10 kilopascal). To address these challenges, we
8h
Microglial dyshomeostasis drives perineuronal net and synaptic loss in a CSF1R+/- mouse model of ALSP, which can be rescued via CSF1R inhibitors
Adult-onset leukoencephalopathy with axonal spheroids and pigmented glia is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R). We sought to identify the role of microglial CSF1R haploinsufficiency in mediating pathogenesis. Using an inducible Cx3cr1 CreERT2/+ – Csf1r +/fl system, we found that postdevelopmental, microglia-specific
8h
Direct observation of multiband transport in magnonic Penrose quasicrystals via broadband and phase-resolved spectroscopy
Quasicrystals are aperiodically ordered structures with unconventional rotational symmetry. Their peculiar features have been explored in photonics to engineer bandgaps for light waves. Magnons (spin waves) are collective spin excitations in magnetically ordered materials enabling non–charge-based information transmission in nanoscale devices. Here, we report on a two-dimensional magnonic quasicr
8h
High-resolution dietary reconstruction of victims of the 79 CE Vesuvius eruption at Herculaneum by compound-specific isotope analysis
The remains of those who perished at Herculaneum in 79 CE offer a unique opportunity to examine lifeways across an ancient community who lived and died together. Historical sources often allude to differential access to foodstuffs across Roman society but provide no direct or quantitative information. By determining the stable isotope values of amino acids from bone collagen and deploying Bayesia
8h
Amorphous anion-rich titanium polysulfides for aluminum-ion batteries
The strong electrostatic interaction between Al 3+ and close-packed crystalline structures, and the single-electron transfer ability of traditional cationic redox cathodes, pose challenged for the development of high-performance rechargeable aluminum batteries. Here, to break the confinement of fixed lattice spacing on the diffusion and storage of Al-ion, we developed a previously unexplored fami
8h
A cancer ubiquitome landscape identifies metabolic reprogramming as target of Parkin tumor suppression
Changes in metabolism that affect mitochondrial and glycolytic networks are hallmarks of cancer, but their impact in disease is still elusive. Using global proteomics and ubiquitome screens, we now show that Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase and key effector of mitophagy altered in Parkinson's disease, shuts off mitochondrial dynamics and inhibits the non-oxidative phase of the pentose phosphate pat
8h
Glacial carbon cycle changes by Southern Ocean processes with sedimentary amplification
Recent paleo reconstructions suggest that increased carbon storage in the Southern Ocean during glacial periods contributed to low glacial atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ( p CO 2 ). However, quantifying its contribution in three-dimensional ocean general circulation models (OGCMs) has proven challenging. Here, we show that OGCM simulation with sedimentary process considering enhanced So
8h
Sex or cannibalism: Polyphenism and kin recognition control social action strategies in nematodes
Resource polyphenisms, where single genotypes produce alternative feeding strategies in response to changing environments, are thought to be facilitators of evolutionary novelty. However, understanding the interplay between environment, morphology, and behavior and its significance is complex. We explore a radiation of Pristionchus nematodes with discrete polyphenic mouth forms and associated mic
8h
Greenhouse warming intensifies north tropical Atlantic climate variability
Variability of North Tropical Atlantic (NTA) sea surface temperature (SST), characterized by a near-uniform warming at its positive phase, is a consequential mode of climate variability. Modulated by El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the North Atlantic Oscillation, NTA warm anomalies tend to induce La Niña events, droughts in Northeast Brazil, increased frequency of extreme hurricanes, and
8h
The environment topography alters the way to multicellularity in Myxococcus xanthus
The social soil-dwelling bacterium Myxococcus xanthus can form multicellular structures, known as fruiting bodies. Experiments in homogeneous environments have shown that this process is affected by the physicochemical properties of the substrate, but they have largely neglected the role of complex topographies. We experimentally demonstrate that the topography alters single-cell motility and mul
8h
Cryo-EM structure of PepT2 reveals structural basis for proton-coupled peptide and prodrug transport in mammals
The SLC15 family of proton-coupled solute carriers PepT1 and PepT2 play a central role in human physiology as the principal route for acquiring and retaining dietary nitrogen. A remarkable feature of the SLC15 family is their extreme substrate promiscuity, which has enabled the targeting of these transporters for the improvement of oral bioavailability for several prodrug molecules. Although rece
8h
A splenic-targeted versatile antigen courier: iPSC wrapped in coalescent erythrocyte-liposome as tumor nanovaccine
The major obstacles for tumor vaccine to be surmounted are the lack of versatile property and immunity-inducing effectiveness. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) expressed various antigens the same as multiple types of tumors, providing a promising source of wide-spectrum cancer vaccines. The damaged erythrocyte membrane entrapped by spleen could be developed as antigen deliverer for enhancin
8h
Dynamic changes in genomic and social structures in third millennium BCE central Europe
Europe's prehistory oversaw dynamic and complex interactions of diverse societies, hitherto unexplored at detailed regional scales. Studying 271 human genomes dated ~4900 to 1600 BCE from the European heartland, Bohemia, we reveal unprecedented genetic changes and social processes. Major migrations preceded the arrival of "steppe" ancestry, and at ~2800 BCE, three genetically and culturally diffe
8h
Street lighting has detrimental impacts on local insect populations
Reported declines in insect populations have sparked global concern, with artificial light at night (ALAN) identified as a potential contributing factor. Despite strong evidence that lighting disrupts a range of insect behaviors, the empirical evidence that ALAN diminishes wild insect abundance is limited. Using a matched-pairs design, we found that street lighting strongly reduced moth caterpill
8h
This 'Euphoric Beverage' Is the Non Alcoholic Way To Enhance Socializing
One of the best innovations of the last year or so has been the euphoric beverage , which offer the elevated mood and better social connections associated with alcohol, but without the blackouts, hangovers, or addictive side effects. Some of the best non alcoholic euphorics around are being made by Kin, and the latest Kin product, Kin Lightwave, is no exception . Kin Lightwave combines lavender-v
8h
Can exercise prevent 'chemo brain' in women with breast cancer?
Women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, who exercise before chemotherapy (getting the recommended 150 minutes per week) are less likely to suffer from "chemo brain" during and after treatment, according to a new study. Chemo-brain, or brain fogginess, is a well-known side effect for some cancer survivors treated with chemotherapy. In prior studies, women with breast cancer have says that brain
8h
More than half of Americans now accept evolution
The level of public acceptance of evolution in the United States is now solidly above the halfway mark, according to a new study. The research is based on a series of national public opinion surveys conducted over the last 35 years. "From 1985 to 2010, there was a statistical dead heat between acceptance and rejection of evolution," says lead researcher Jon D. Miller of the Institute for Social R
8h
In hot weather, outdoor laborers work less—when economy is growing
A new analysis suggests that U.S. workers in industries that expose them to weather conditions work fewer hours per day when temperatures surpass 90 degrees Fahrenheit—but only during periods of economic growth. Matthew Neidell of Columbia University, New York, and colleagues present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on August 25, 2021.
8h
Remote-Control Firefighting Tank, Other Projects Receive Millions in 5G Grants
(Photo: Rheinmetall Defense) A number of Australian technology and manufacturing companies have spent the last several months competing for a share of $20 million AUD as part of a new 5G Innovation Initiative . The Australian government announced late last year that it would be providing organizations with up to $2 million AUD each in grants for 5G projects that will demonstrate the technology's
9h
Oldest genome from Wallacea shows previously unknown ancient human relations
The oldest genome of a modern human from the Wallacea region — the islands between western Indonesia and Papua New Guinea — indicates a previously undescribed ancient human relationship. Researchers were able to isolate sufficient genetic material from the skull of an individual buried more than 7,000 years ago on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. It belonged to a hunter-gatherer society and wa
10h
Creation of the most perfect graphene
Researchers have achieved growth and characterization of large area, single-crystal graphene that has no wrinkles, folds, or adlayers. It can be said to be the most perfect graphene that has been grown and characterized, to date.
10h
The health and climate benefits of reducing air pollution
Air pollution is linked to more than 4 million deaths around the globe every year, according to the World Health Organization. Atmospheric pollutants like aerosols and ozone affect not only human health but also the global climate—though they stay in the atmosphere for significantly shorter time periods than carbon dioxide. Their short atmospheric life span makes aerosols, ozone, and methane—so-ca
10h
Universal pair polaritons in a strongly interacting Fermi gas
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03731-9 Directly coupling cavity photons to the photo-association resonances of pairs of atoms in a strongly interacting Fermi gas generates pair polaritons—hybrid excitaions coherently mixing photons, atom pairs and molecules.
11h
Single-crystal, large-area, fold-free monolayer graphene
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03753-3 Restricting the initial growth temperatures used for chemical vapour deposition of graphene on metal foils produces optimum conditions for growing large areas of fold-free, single-crystal graphene.
11h
Direct observation of ultrafast hydrogen bond strengthening in liquid water
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03793-9 Liquid ultrafast electron scattering measures structural responses in liquid water with femtosecond temporal and atomic spatial resolution to reveal a transient hydrogen bond contraction then thermalization preceding relaxation of the OH stretch.
11h
A body map of somatic mutagenesis in morphologically normal human tissues
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03836-1 Laser-capture microdissection and mini-bulk exome sequencing are combined to analyse somatic mutations in morphologically normal tissues from nine organs from five donors, revealing variation in mutation burdens, mutational signatures and clonal expansions.
11h
Sympathetic cooling of a trapped proton mediated by an LC circuit
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03784-w A single electromagnetically trapped proton is sympathetically cooled to below ambient temperature by coupling it through a superconducting LC circuit to a laser-cooled cloud of Be+ ions stored in a spatially separated trap.
11h
A Triassic stem lepidosaur illuminates the origin of lizard-like reptiles
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03834-3 Taytalura alcoberi, represented by a three-dimensionally preserved skull from the Late Triassic epoch of Argentina, is phylogenetically inferred as the earliest known lepidosauromorph, and reveals that sphenodontian skull architecture is plesiomorphic for lepidosaurs.
11h
Rechargeable Na/Cl2 and Li/Cl2 batteries
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03757-z are produced with a microporous carbon positive electrode, aluminium chloride in thionyl chloride as the electrolyte, and either sodium or lithium as the negative electrode.
11h
African tropical montane forests store more carbon than was thought
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02266-3 The inaccessibility of African montane forests has hindered efforts to quantify the carbon stored by these ecosystems. A remarkable survey fills this knowledge gap, and highlights the need to preserve such forests.
11h
Mutation fingerprints encode cellular histories
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02269-0 Cells continually acquire mutations and pass them on to their progeny. The mutation profiles of human cells shine a light on the cells' developmental history and their dynamics in adult tissue.
11h
Single proton cooled by distant ions
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02267-2 Laser-cooled ions have been used to substantially lower the temperature of a proton located several centimetres away. This technique could be useful in ultraprecise measurements of the properties of antimatter particles.
11h
Biophotonic probes for bio-detection and imaging
Sensitive detection and imaging in bio-microenvironment is highly desired in biophotonic and biomedical applications. However, conventional photonic materials inevitably show incompatibility and invasiveness to bio-systems. To address this issue, Scientists in China reviewed recent progresses of biophotonic probes, including bio-lasers, biophotonic waveguides, and bio-microlenses, made from biolog
11h
A new platform for integrated photonics
SiC photonics has been developed for over a decade, one of the major obstacles is the difficulty of fabricating ultralow optical loss SiC thin-films. Scientists in China have fabricated an ultralow loss 4H-SiCOI platform with a record-high-Q factor of 7.1 × 106. Nonlinear photonics process, including second-, third- and fourth-harmonic generations, Raman lasing, and Kerr frequency combs have been
11h
History of human antibiotic use written in the oral bacteria of wild brown bears
An international team of researchers used historical museum collections to study the effects of human-made antibiotics over the entire history of their application. They found that the increased use of antibiotics in medicine and agriculture in the 1950–1990s led to increases in antibiotic resistance in wild Swedish brown bears. However, they also detected a clear downward trend in antibiotic resi
11h
Cooling technique allows easier measurements of key particle property
Scientists from the BASE-collaboration, led by RIKEN scientists, have developed a new cooling method that will allow easier measurements of a property of protons and antiprotons called the magnetic moment. This is one of the properties that is being investigated to solve the mystery of why our universe contains matter but almost no antimatter.
11h
What eases grief? Try progressive muscle relaxation
A simple relaxation technique is an effective coping strategy for grief after the loss of a loved one, say researchers. Their study combined two methods for treating grief: one focused on the mind, the other on the body. The researchers looked at 95 widows and widowers who lost their spouses as recently as six months or within two years of the study's start. "What surprised us was that the abilit
12h
Så är noshörningar släkt med varandra
Släktskapet mellan dagens fem arter av noshörning har länge varit omdiskuterat. Men genom analyser av arvsmassan hos våra nuvarande arter och tre utdöda arter kan forskarna nu fylla i luckor i noshörningarnas släktträd. De nya forskningsresultat som presenteras i tidskriften Cell visar att noshörningarnas afrikanska och euroasiatiska släktlinjer delade sig för cirka 16 miljoner år sedan. Studien
12h
Fully-gapped pairing in the new vanadium-based Kagome superconductors
Due to its unique geometry, the Kagome lattice intrinsically exhibits topological electronic structures and flat bands, making it an ideal platform for studying novel emergent states. In the recently discovered Kagome superconductors AV3Sb5 (A = K, Rb, Cs), V atoms form an ideal Kagome lattice. As a rare realization of superconductivity on the ideal Kagome lattice, and because superconductivity em
12h
How The Saga Narrowly Made Quota | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ #DeadliestCatch #Discovery #TheSaga Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://ww
12h
6 answers about the Pfizer COVID vaccine FDA approval
The COVID-19 vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech has now received full approval from the US Food and Drug Administration for those 16 years and older. Aaron Lottes worked with the FDA on the approval of drug-device combination products for 13 years. Now, as an associate professor of engineering practice in Purdue University's Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, he continues to collaborate with
13h
Crews struggle to stop fire bearing down on Lake Tahoe
A California fire that gutted hundreds of homes advanced toward Lake Tahoe on Wednesday as thousands of firefighters tried to box in the flames and tourists who hoped to boat or swim found themselves looking at thick yellow haze instead of alpine scenery.
13h
Hydrological alteration and nutrient input greatly affect greenhouse gas emission
Changes in global rainfall patterns and the construction of artificial dams have led to widespread alteration of hydrological processes in riparian ecosystems. Meanwhile, intensified agricultural activities have resulted in enhanced inputs of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) into the riparian ecosystems associated with the Yangtze River. However, it remains unclear how the greenhouse gases (CO2, CH
13h
RNA technologies explained
The mRNA vaccine success story is one of the few positives to emerge from COVID-19. But these vaccines from Moderna and Pfizer/BioNTech are only the tip of the iceberg in the coming RNA medical technology revolution.
13h
Bird communities threatened by urbanization
Urbanization is one of the most drastic forms of land-use change, and its negative consequences on biodiversity have been studied extensively in temperate countries such as Germany. However, less research has been conducted in tropical regions from the Global South, where most of the ongoing and future urbanization hotspots are located, and little is known about its effects on agricultural biodive
13h
Stamping out sexual harassment in elite private boys' schools
A Monash University study has found female teachers in elite private boys' schools are vulnerable to sexual harassment due to the school's status and unique constructs, and recommends a restructure of policies and practices to combat this behavior.
13h
Improved statistical methods for high-throughput omics data analysis
High-throughput omics technology has revolutionized biological and biomedical research and large volumes of omics data have been produced. For this, computational tools to manage and analyze the omics data have been developed and there are big challenges in how to process and interpret the omics data in the best way. Wenjiang Deng has worked to develop novel statistical methodologies and algorithm
13h
Sickle-cell disease
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02137-x A condition that affects many people of African descent is finally meeting its therapeutic match.
13h
The sickle-cell drug boon
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02141-1 A growing number of promising treatments is set to bring hope to people living with the disease.
13h
Why the Middle East is a sickle-cell hotspot
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02144-y Clinical haematologist Adlette Inati explains how the disease arrived in the region, what affects its spread and how to control it.
13h
Why severe sickle-cell pain has been neglected
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02142-0 Pain in sickle-cell disease is poorly understood — and patients face both medical and socioeconomic problems when seeking delivery from discomfort.
13h
Leisure time's benefits depend on your beliefs about it
Happiness depends, at least in part, on believing that leisure activities are not a waste of time, according to a new study. "While work can impart meaning and a sense of purpose in life, leisure, such as time with family and friends, hobbies, and exercise, is what makes our lives happy and healthy," says lead author Gabriela Tonietto, an assistant professor of marketing at Rutgers Business Schoo
13h
Scans link baby brain structure and language at 5
A baby's brain's organizational pathways might set a foundation for a child's language-learning abilities within the first year of life, research indicates. From inside the womb and as soon as they enter the world, babies absorb information from their environment and the adults around them, quickly learning after birth how to start communicating through cries, sounds, giggles, and other kinds of
14h
Portable MRI provides life-saving information to doctors treating strokes
When patients exhibit stroke symptoms, doctors must quickly make a life or death determination: Are their symptoms caused by a clot that can be treated with blood thinners or by bleeding in the brain, which may require surgery? A new study shows that a portable MRI device can help identify such intracranial hemorrhages, potentially life-saving information particularly in areas or scenarios where a
14h
Asian paper wasp nests found to have bright green fluorescence
A team of researchers with members from Sorbonne Université, the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology and Université de Paris, has found that the nests of multiple species of Asian wasps display bright green fluorescence under a UV lamp. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their harrowing treks through multiple North Vietnamese tropical fore
14h
Evolutionary 'arms race' may help keep cell division honest
Certain proteins may have evolved to tamp down 'cheating' during meiosis, the cell-division process that gives rise to eggs and sperm. While chromosomes can tip the scales in their favor of winding up in an egg, the team's new work identifies a mechanism that keeps the odds closer to 50-50, possibly reducing the likelihood that chromosomal abnormalities will arise during egg production.
14h
Tracking the nitric oxide signaling pathway
Both nitric oxide (NO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) act as gaseous signaling molecules with similar physiological effects. Many of the critical questions about the interplay between these two gasotransmitters hinge on their chemical reactivity and the fleeting existence of HSNO, a key product of the reaction between them. A team of researchers has been able to stabilize, isolate, and characterize tw
14h
Drought and climate change shift tree disease in Sierra Nevada
Even pathogens have their limits. When it gets too hot or too dry, some pathogens—like many living things—search for cooler, wetter and more hospitable climes. Ecologists have questioned if a warming, drying climate is connected to the spread of plant disease, but detecting a climate change fingerprint has been elusive.
14h
Installation demonstrates how terawatt lasers can control and safely divert lightning
Almost 270 years since Benjamin Franklin invented the lightning rod, lightning protection is still based on this same concept. Although we can't deny the benefits of lightning rods, major drawbacks do remain. Installing permanent lightning rods isn't often feasible, and lightning rods also only protect against the direct effects of lightning. By attracting lightning strikes to conduct their curren
14h
Scientists Discover the Fastest Known Asteroid
Astronomers have discovered a new asteroid, but unlike most newsworthy space rocks, this one is not notable because it's threatening to hit Earth. The asteroid known as 2021 PH27 keeps its distance from our fragile blue marble. That distance varies widely, though. According to researchers at the Carnegie Institution of Science, 2021 PH27 is the fastest asteroid orbiting the sun. It takes just 113
14h
The reunion
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02256-5 Original sin.
14h
Daily briefing: Clues to evolution of homosexuality
Nature, Published online: 24 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02329-5 Genetic patterns associated with homosexual behaviour might help people who have only heterosexual sex to find more partners. Plus, US gives full approval to Pfizer–BioNTech vaccine and how high-fructose corn syrup messes with the guts of mice.
14h
A piece of our mind
October / November 1976 From "Pharmacology and the Brain": Since ancient times, drugs have been used to restore mental health or explore the mind. It was said that the Homeric physician Polydama presented Menelaos and Helen with "a drug against sorrow and anger, a drug to survive despair" on their way home to Troy. The number of mind-bending drugs available today is countless. Some have altered t
15h
The world's largest collection of malformed brains
These cross-sections of a human brain were used for teaching. The collection had been neglected for decades when photographer Adam Voorhes first visited, in 2011. These images are taken from a book he published about the brains, coauthored with Alex Hannaford. ADAM VOORHES & ROBIN FINLAY The University of Texas has one of the world's largest collections of preserved abnormal human brains. The 100
15h
Understanding the mind
Inside the three-pound lumps of mostly fat and water inside our heads we can, in a very real sense, find the root of everything we know and ever will know. Sure, the universe gave rise to our brains. But what good is the cosmos without brains and, more specifically, minds? Without them, there'd be no understanding, no appreciation, no probing of great mysteries. Which is what this issue is all ab
15h
Is everything in the world a little bit conscious?
Panpsychism is the belief that consciousness is found throughout the universe—not only in people and animals, but also in trees, plants, and bacteria. Panpsychists hold that some aspect of mind is present even in elementary particles. The idea that consciousness is widespread is attractive to many for intellectual and, perhaps, also emotional reasons. But can it be empirically tested? Surprisingl
15h
How big science failed to unlock the mysteries of the human brain
In September 2011, a group of neuroscientists and nanoscientists gathered at a picturesque estate in the English countryside for a symposium meant to bring their two fields together. At the meeting, Columbia University neurobiologist Rafael Yuste and Harvard geneticist George Church made a not-so-modest proposal: to map the activity of the entire human brain at the level of individual neurons and
15h
Our brains exist in a state of "controlled hallucination"
When you and I look at the same object we assume that we'll both see the same color. Whatever our identities or ideologies, we believe our realities meet at the most basic level of perception. But in 2015, a viral internet phenomenon tore this assumption asunder. The incident was known simply as "The Dress." For the uninitiated: a photograph of a dress appeared on the internet, and people disagre
15h
"I understand what joy is now": An MDMA trial participant tells his story
Nathan McGee was only four years old when he experienced the trauma that would eventually lead him to MDMA therapy almost four decades later. It's still too painful to go into the details. In the intervening years, he played what he calls "diagnosis bingo." Doctors variously told Nathan he had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, anxiety, depression, and dyslexia. In 2019 he was diagnosed wi
15h
Five poems about the mind
DREAM VENDING MACHINE I feed it coins and watch the spring coil back, the clunk of a vacuum-packed, foil-wrapped dream dropping into the tray. It dispenses all kinds of dreams—bad dreams, good dreams, short nightmares to stave off worse ones, recurring dreams with a teacake marshmallow center. Hardboiled caramel dreams to tuck in your cheek, a bag of orange dreams with Spanish subtitles. One neon
15h
Weather, ocean currents key to fish spawning in Micronesia
Larval fish are spawned in a given location and may be recruited into their next life stage—larger, older fish—in the same place or a distant location. The recruitment of rabbitfish in Guam and groupers in Palau has historically been unpredictable. A published study, co-authored by a University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) research professor, found t
15h
Measuring the sound velocity of Majorite under mantle transition zone conditions
Researchers at Ehime University have reported the sound velocity of MgSiO3 Majorite garnet up to the pressure of 18 gigapascals and temperature up to 2,000 Kelvins. Their results lead to understanding of the mineral composition of the Earth's mantle transition zone (MTZ), which has not been fully elucidated yet. This study suggests that a mechanical mixture of slab and mantle rocks, rather than eq
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Create Compelling Video In Minutes With 91% Off FlexClip
More and more, video is becoming central to both our private lives and how we engage with others for business. Yet producing, shooting, and editing video is a time-consuming and expensive process that many of us don't have time for. FlexClip Lifetime for Business streamlines the production process so you can create great videos from stock clips and your own footage quickly and easily. Valued at $
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A hybrid molecular peapod of sp2- and sp3-nanocarbons enabling ultrafast terahertz rotations
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25358-0 Mechanical motions in hybrid sp2/sp3 -hybrid nanocarbon peapods might lead to promising materials applications, but have been insufficiently explored. Here the authors demonstrate that a diamondoid molecule trapped inside a carbonaceous cylinder undergoes solid-state rotations at terahertz frequencies.
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Portable, bedside, low-field magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of intracerebral hemorrhage
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25441-6 Conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) operates at a high magnetic field strength and requires a strict access-controlled environment, making MRI often inaccessible. Here, the authors present a portable low-field MRI device that detects intracerebral hemorrhage with high accuracy.
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The retinal ipRGC-preoptic circuit mediates the acute effect of light on sleep
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25378-w The preoptic area (POA) is critical for sleep regulation but its role in acute, non-circadian, light effects on sleep are unclear. The authors show that intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells provide substantial input into the POA and through these modulate the amount of non-rapid eye movement (NR
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Opposing roles for striatonigral and striatopallidal neurons in dorsolateral striatum in consolidating new instrumental actions
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25460-3 New instrumental learning occurs through an unexpected delivery of a rewarding stimulus or the withdrawal of a punishing stimulus. The authors show that D1 receptor-expressing medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in the anterior dorsolateral striatum encode newly learned instrumental actions whereas D2 MSNs promote the
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A high-resolution temporal atlas of the SARS-CoV-2 translatome and transcriptome
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25361-5 Here, Kim et al. apply various sequencing techniques (RPF-seq, QTI-seq, mRNA-seq, sRNA-seq) to unravel the high-resolution, longitudinal translatome and transcriptome of SARS-CoV-2. They identify a translation initiation site in the leader sequence of all genomic and subgenomic RNAs and show its relevance for
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Global spread of Salmonella Enteritidis via centralized sourcing and international trade of poultry breeding stocks
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25319-7 Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis is a pathogen of poultry that can cause outbreaks in humans. Here the authors use genomic and trade data to investigate a pandemic in the 1980s, finding evidence that international trade of breeding stocks led to global spread of the pathogen.
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T cell receptor recognition of hybrid insulin peptides bound to HLA-DQ8
Nature Communications, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25404-x Epitopes formed by fusion of more than one self peptide, such as proinsulin and other β cell proteins, can result in the formation of non-self hybrid peptides that can potentially trigger autoimmune responses. Here the authors show how TRBV5 + T cell receptors are geared towards recognition of HLA-DQ8 bound hy
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Humanitarians Push to Vaccinate in Conflict Zones
From Afghanistan to Myanmar, Nigeria to Azerbaijan, people caught in the midst of violence and instability will need to be vaccinated in order to fully end the pandemic. But hammering out the necessary interludes of peace isn't easy — in all of world history, a global ceasefire has never taken place.
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Control methane to slow global warming — fast
Nature, Published online: 25 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02287-y Carbon dioxide reductions are key, but the IPCC's latest report highlights the benefits of making cuts to other greenhouse gases, too.
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'Nanojars' capture dissolved carbon dioxide, toxic ions from water
Carbon dioxide from the atmosphere can dissolve in oceans, lakes and ponds, forming bicarbonate ions and other compounds that change water chemistry, with possible harmful effects on aquatic organisms. In addition, bicarbonate can reenter the atmosphere as carbon dioxide later, contributing to climate change. Now, researchers have developed tiny "nanojars," much smaller than the width of a human h
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Scientists launch effort to collect water data in US West
The U.S. Department of Energy on Tuesday announced a new kind of climate observatory near the headwaters of the Colorado River that will help scientists better predict rain and snowfall in the U.S. West and determine how much of it will flow through the region.
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Ny målsætning: Nul hoftebrud i Nord
Efter at det er lykkedes Region Nordjylland at nedbringe antallet af operationer for hoftebrud væsentligt, er ­målet nu også så vidt muligt at få has på de sidste. Det er til gengæld også det sværeste.
22h
There's a bright side to being a 'Debbie Downer'
New research shows that keeping busy with a variety of activities can elicit both positive and negative emotions, and some of the relationship could depend on your age. A new study finds that engaging in diverse daily activities is associated with a diverse set of emotions.
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Healthy sugar origin in stingless bee honey revealed
Stingless bees are found throughout tropical and subtropical parts of the world and produce significantly less honey than their European honey bee counterparts (Apis mellifera) which are the world's major honey production species. However, stingless bee honey is highly prized as a specialty food, noted in Indigenous cultures for its medicinal properties, and attracts a high price. Now new research
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Green hydrogen: Focus on the catalyst surface
Hydrogen produced from renewable energy sources with the help of electric power is deemed a key to the energy transition: It can be used to chemically store wind and solar energy in a CO2-neutral way. Researchers have studied water electrolysis processes on the surface of an iridium oxide catalyst.
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Quantum computing: Exotic particle had an 'out-of-body experience'
Scientists have taken a clear picture of electronic particles that make up a mysterious magnetic state called quantum spin liquid (QSL). The achievement could facilitate the development of superfast quantum computers and energy-efficient superconductors. The scientists are the first to capture an image of how electrons in a QSL decompose into spin-like particles called spinons and charge-like part
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A novel gene involved in male infertility: ZFP541
A new gene that controls the completion of meiosis in spermatogenesis has been discovered. Until now, details of the mechanism that inactivates the expression of genes involved in the meiotic program during spermatogenesis had not been clarified. The researchers believe that this may lead to an advancement in reproductive medicine, like identifying causes for infertility from azoospermia or sperma
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An Average Pick From This Stock Picking Service Has an Insane Average Return of 590%
Investing services aren't exactly cheap. So what's someone like you supposed to do when you want to invest your hard-earned money? Hiring a financial advisor can be pricey since most base their fees on how much of your money they're managing. This means their fees can range from 0.25-to-1 percent of what you're investing overall, which can add up pretty quickly. But what if you could manage your
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Open air
Last spring, strings of bistro lights and outdoor seating in a courtyard behind the Student Center beckoned students to gather safely outside. The lights were a hit—and the plan is to make them permanent.
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The practice of moving energy around
One of the things Rod Bayliss III '20, MEng '21, remembers most clearly from his childhood is his father's 1964 Ford Mustang. "I was fascinated by that car," says Bayliss. "Especially by the engine, this thing that converted oxygen and fuel into power." Bayliss grew up in Augusta, Georgia. Math and physics came easily to him, and in high school he developed a passion for Latin, Greek, and debatin
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Pairing economics with empathy to study life in the developing world
Reshmaan Hussam '09, PhD '15, once dreamed of becoming a "psychohistorian" like the protagonist in Isaac Asimov's Foundation novels who combines sociology, history, and statistics to save the world. Maybe, she thought, such a psychohistorian would be able to make sense of the stark and unnerving contrasts that marked her childhood living in suburban Virginia and visiting her parents' families in
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A "far out" take on transportation planning
As a boy, Eric Plosky '99, MCP '00, rode the New York subway with his grandmother to every city attraction on the map. "Whenever anyone asks me how I got into transportation, I always ask them, 'How did you get out of it?'" he says. "Every little kid seems to love trains and subways and buses and cars and planes, and for some reason they 'grow out of it.' I never did." Now, as chief of transporta
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A window into the clean room
Abbie (Carlstein) Gregg '74 remembers giving up on wearing lab gloves during her undergraduate research at MIT. There weren't any small enough to fit her, at a time when undergraduate men outnumbered women on campus 15 to 1. Even so, it was the first time she'd met other women interested in engineering and technology—and she quickly found a home in the Metallurgy Department (now Materials Science
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"Rocket Woman": from space shuttle engineer to space historian
Linda (Getch) Dawson '71 grew up during the height of the space race between the US and the USSR. She recalls driving with her family to an observatory to hear the beeping of the Soviet satellite Sputnik as it passed overhead. "It's funny how your path takes different turns, but I always came back to that first love: aerospace," she says. Dawson's path took her from MIT to NASA, then into a secon
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Technology Day: Pathways to the Future
Continuing an annual tradition, Technology Day offered alumni an inside view of MIT's role in solving global challenges. The online symposium focused on online learning, cancer research, computing, and climate change. The first three topics were covered in updates from Curt Newton, director of MIT OpenCourseWare; Matthew Vander Heiden, director of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Researc
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Virtual Photo Booth
Patrice Langford '95 Paul Chai '99 Claude Gerstle '68 with his wife, Ellen Gerstle Claire DeRosa '11, MEng '12, and Kimberly Gonzalez '11 John Paul Mattia '86, SM '91, Eng '96, PhD '96 Tara Chang Pettus '08 with daughter Celeste and father Clifton Chang '71
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Log on all ye of MIT
A record-breaking total of more than 5,000 alumni and friends attended this year's MIT Tech Reunions, held online June 4–6. There were special events for reunion-year classes, and the entire MIT community was invited to watch the online Tech Night at Pops, learn from faculty during Technology Day, and take virtual campus tours. Symphony Hall at home BOSTON POPS/WINSLOW TOWSON Because the 123rd an
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A musical postcard to MIT graduates
On February 11, I got a call from MIT's executive director of Institute events and protocol, Gayle Gallagher. President Reif had just announced that MIT would again be conducting commencement online—and to open the ceremony, we needed a compelling piece of music that would evoke renewal as we began to emerge from the pandemic. After nearly a year of socially distanced teaching, learning, and livi
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