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A human is not a horse. So why is a livestock drug sweeping America? | Arwa Mahdawi
There is scant evidence that ivermectin can treat or prevent Covid – but that hasn't stopped rightwing pundits and conservative politicians from promoting it You are not a horse . You are not a cow. You are, I'm afraid, a homo sapiens living in a world so deranged that people would rather poison themselves with worm medicine meant for farm animals than take a vaccine meant for human beings. Relat
9h
Study shows evidence of beer drinking 9,000 years ago in Southern China
Alcoholic beverages have long been known to serve an important socio-cultural function in ancient societies, including at ritual feasts. A new study finds evidence of beer drinking 9,000 years ago in southern China, which was likely part of a ritual to honor the dead. The findings are based on an analysis of ancient pots found at a burial site at Qiaotou, making the site among the oldest in the wo
11h
Genes can respond to coded information in signals—or filter them out entirely
New research from North Carolina State University demonstrates that genes are capable of identifying and responding to coded information in light signals, as well as filtering out some signals entirely. The study shows how a single mechanism can trigger different behaviors from the same gene—and has applications in the biotechnology sector.
10h
The magnetic properties of star-forming dense cores
Magnetic fields in space are sometimes called the last piece in the puzzle of star formation. They are much harder to measure than the masses or motions of star-forming clouds, and their strength is still uncertain. If they are strong, they can deflect or even oppose gas flowing into a young stellar core as it collapses under the influence of gravity. If they are moderate in strength, however, the
14h
The Two Reasons Parents Regret Having Kids
Olivia Arthur / Magnum Updated at 11:30 A.M. ET on August 31, 2021 Carrie wishes that she'd never had children. She spent a few years feeling satisfied as a mother, but now locks herself in the kitchen and wonders, Who am I? What am I doing here? She can't pursue paid work, because she has to shepherd her 12-year-old and 10-year-old to school as well as to therapy appointments for their disabilit
13h
The New Puritans
Illustrations by Nicolas Ortega "I t was no great distance, in those days, from the prison-door to the market-place. Measured by the prisoner's experience, however, it might be reckoned a journey of some length." So begins the tale of Hester Prynne, as recounted in Nathaniel Hawthorne's most famous novel, The Scarlet Letter. As readers of this classic American text know, the story begins after He
13h
Israel registers record daily coronavirus cases
Country to press ahead with school openings as it encourages all over-12s to get third jab Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Israel has recorded its highest daily number of coronavirus cases with nearly 11,000 new infections, amid a surge caused by the highly transmissible Delta variant as schools prepare to re-open. The previous high came on 18 January, with 10,118 ca
14h
China Releases Beautiful New Photos from the Surface of Mars
Martian Landscapes China's Zhurong rover has spent the last 100 Earth days roaming the desolate landscapes of Mars. To celebrate the momentous occasion, China's space agency released a number of photos showing the path the rover has taken since leaving behind the Tianwen-1 orbiter that brought it there in May, the South China Morning Post reports . The gorgeous red landscapes, one of which is a w
9h
Toxic 'forever chemicals' contaminate indoor air at worrying levels, study finds
Food and water were thought to be the main ways humans are exposed to PFAS, but study points to risk of breathing them in Toxic PFAS compounds are contaminating the air inside homes, classrooms and stores at alarming levels, a new study has found. Researchers with the University of Rhode Island and Green Science Policy Institute tested indoor air at 20 sites and detected the "forever chemicals" i
12h
Here's why Elon Musk's robot is electrified neoliberalism | Van Badham
It is time to evaluate how much transformational control we give billionaires over our societies, and our lives A few weeks ago, Elon Musk announced that his company, Tesla, plans to have a humanoid robot prototype ready next year. The intention is to create a 56kg machine that isn't "super expensive" to retail. Oh, yes: the commercial application of the planned robot is absolutely to replace hum
20h
Doctors Claim to Have Discovered How to Reverse Cell Aging
A team of scientists from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology says it's found a way that to reverse the natural aging of immune system cells — and potentially make the elderly far more resistant to COVID-19 and other infections. The researchers identified the molecular pathway that the human body uses to create B cells, The Jerusalem Post reports , which the immune system uses to identify
5h
A Single Alcoholic Drink Immediately Increases Risk of Heart Dysfunction
Scientists have had a difficult time determining whether alcohol is good or bad for your health — myriad studies have found that wine seems to simultaneously prevent and increase the risk of cancer , for example. But when it comes to moderate amounts, like perhaps a drink with dinner, scientists have long assumed that alcohol had a mild protective effect when it comes to heart health. Unfortunate
5h
The New Thermodynamic Understanding of Clocks
In 2013, a masters student in physics named Paul Erker went combing through textbooks and papers looking for an explanation of what a clock is. "Time is what a clock measures," Albert Einstein famously quipped; Erker hoped a deeper understanding of clocks might inspire new insights about the nature of time. But he found that physicists hadn't bothered much about the fundamentals of timekeeping. S
9h
Intruder Drives Vehicle Into Elon Musk's Weird Tunnel
Unauthorized Vehicles An intruder managed to drive their vehicle into The Boring Company's Loop system in Las Vegas, according to documents obtained by TechCrunch . The "unauthorized vehicle" managed to slip past security on June 21. The Elon Musk-led company had to call the Las Vegas Metro Police as a result of the intrusion. "The driver of the unauthorized vehicle was cooperative and eventually
10h
How Novak Djokovic Became an Accidental Villain
Despite the Delta variant, the U.S. Open, which started yesterday in New York, is going ahead at full capacity, and more than 700,000 people are expected to attend the two-week tournament. A packed Arthur Ashe Stadium will provide the answer to one of the bigger questions hanging over the Open: Will this finally be the moment when tennis fans embrace Novak Djokovic? The 34-year-old Djokovic, who
15h
God May Forgive Kanye West, but You Don't Have To
To overcome what ails you, you must surrender. That is the third directive on the famous 12-step road map to sobriety and stability. Recovering from an internal battle that has had external repercussions means deciding "to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God," according to the Alcoholics Anonymous guidebook, from which multitudes of 12-step programs—treating multitudes of psycholo
1d
Burning Man Is Completely in Virtual Reality This Year
Virtual Burning Man The iconic desert festival Burning Man has moved entirely online for 2021 over COVID concerns, allowing attendees to roam the art-laden landscapes from the comfort of their own home — and inside virtual reality, The Wall Street Journal reports . It's not the first time the festival has moved online. Last year, a VR experience had to be put together in record time as the pandem
6h
Picky Astronauts Refuse to Put Pineapple on Space Pizza
Pizza Night With Friends Astronauts stationed on board the International Space Station threw their own zero-gravity pizza party, as seen in a clip uploaded to Instagram by European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet. "Floating pizza night with friends, it almost feels like a Saturday on Earth," Pesquet wrote in a caption. "They say a good chef never reveals their secrets, but I made a video so
5h
Australian health authorities warn against mixing Covid vaccine types
Concerns raised that some people may be cancelling their second AstraZeneca dose hoping to obtain a shot of Pfizer instead Follow our Covid live blog for the latest updates Hotspots: NSW ; Vic ; Qld Vaccine rollout tracker ; get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing The evidence is strongest for receiving two doses of the same Covid-19 vaccine, rather than mixing different types, med
7h
Why doesn't the U.S. win wars anymore?
The type of wars that Americans win — major wars between the great powers — no longer occur. The type of wars that Americans lose — civil wars in foreign countries — are the ones that remain. American strength will continue to lure presidents into foreign intervention. The following is an excerpt from The Right Way to Lose a War: America in an Age of Unwinnable Conflicts . It is reprinted with pe
7h
World's Largest Aircraft Mocked for Looking Like Giant Butt
NSFW Behold, the world's largest aircraft: a gigantic airship called the Airlander 10 that, when viewed from a certain angle, looks a whole lot like a ginormous — and possibly, uh, plugged — butt. The Airlander 10, for all of its glory, has a bit of a troubled past. It was originally designed in 2010 by the US military as a way to provide surveillance in Afghanistan for up to two weeks at a time,
7h
GOLD's bird's-eye reveals dynamics in Earth's interface to space
New research using data from NASA's Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk, or GOLD, mission, has revealed unexpected behavior in the swaths of charged particles that band Earth's equator—made possibly by GOLD's long-term global view, the first of its kind for this type of measurement.
1d
Francisco Goya: how a Spanish painter fooled kings and queens
Goya's patriotic painting, The Third of May 1808, earned him the reputation of a true nationalist. His royal portraits, on the other hand, reveal subtle yet sharp criticisms aimed at Spain's incapable rulers. Toward the end of his life, he created a series of disturbing "Black Paintings" on the walls of his house. On May 2, 1808, residents of Madrid rebelled against the Napoleonic forces that had
10h
Maybe You Missed It, but the Internet 'Died' Five Years Ago
If you search the phrase i hate texting on Twitter and scroll down, you will start to notice a pattern. An account with the handle @pixyIuvr and a glowing heart as a profile picture tweets, "i hate texting i just want to hold ur hand," receiving 16,000 likes. An account with the handle @f41rygf and a pink orb as a profile picture tweets, "i hate texting just come live with me," receiving nearly 3
11h
Your beliefs are much harder to justify than you think
Epistemic justification is the area of philosophy that asks: what counts as enough to justify a belief? Coherentism is the theory that states a belief is justified insofar as it coheres or is consistent with our other beliefs. It is a great theory to call out the inconsistencies of others, but it has been criticized for allowing circular reasoning. There are many ways children can be annoying. Th
12h
Robo-penguin: how artificial birds are relaying the secrets of ocean currents
They can go on research missions in stormy weather, dive to 150 metres and could soon be 'singing' signals. These penguin-like devices are helping to explain the eddies that are key to all life If it looks like a penguin and swims like a penguin – but it's actually a robot – then it must be the latest advance in marine sensory equipment. The Quadroin is an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV): a 3
12h
Pandemic led to lower birth rates in wealthy countries
A team of researchers at Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi, has found evidence showing that birth rates in wealthy countries have declined during the global pandemic. For their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group studied birth rates in 22 of the wealthiest countries in the world over the period 2016 to the early months of 2021.
13h
New study of fossil caimans in North America determines their evolutionary history
A new study of two approximately 52-million-year-old fossil finds from the Green River Formation in Wyoming, U.S., has fit them into the evolutionary history of crocodiles. Biogeologists Jules Walter, Dr. Márton Rabi of the University of Tübingen, working with some other colleagues, determined the extinct species Tsoabichi greenriverensis to be an early caiman crocodile. Species of caimans living
13h
Huge decrease in organ transplants as Covid took hold across world
UK and international studies show the impact pandemic has had on health services and patients Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The number of solid organ transplants fell dramatically around the world between 2019 and 2020, researchers have found, highlighting the widespread impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on health services and patients. As the pandemic surged, hospit
1d
Needs
Editor's Note: Read an interview with Karen Brown about her writing process. P atty's murder happened on a Tuesday afternoon in June, overcast and cool. You needed a sweater if you were going to work in the yard. It was 1966, a small town in Windham County, Connecticut. Milkweed and moths at screens, fields of corn and goldenrod and Queen Anne's lace. There were woods behind her new house, a cape
14h
Three new ultra-faint dwarf galaxies discovered
Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), astronomers have detected three new ultra-faint dwarf galaxies associated with the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 253. The newly found dwarfs turn out to be among the faintest systems so far discovered beyond the Local Group. The finding is reported in a paper published August 20 on arXiv.org.
11h
Marine mussels are a model for improving strength, stretchiness and adhesion in hydrogels for wound healing
Hydrogels are everywhere. They are water-loving polymers that can absorb and retain water, and can be found in such everyday consumer products such as soft contact lenses, disposable diapers, certain foods, and even in agricultural applications. They are also extremely useful in several medical applications due to their high degree of biocompatibility and their ability to eventually degrade and be
1d
Photos: The Aftermath of Hurricane Ida
On August 29, Hurricane Ida made landfall as a Category 4 storm southwest of New Orleans. The storm was one of the most intense hurricanes to ever hit the state, with sustained winds of 150 miles per hour, causing widespread power outages, flooding, and at least four deaths. Hurricane Ida struck Louisiana exactly 16 years after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005. As Ida weakens and
7h
The Atlantic Daily: Why Hurricane Ida Caught America Off Guard
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Afghanistan The last American military flight departed from Kabul a day ahead of President Joe Biden's withdrawal deadline, bringing two decades of U.S. presence in Afghanistan to a close. The pre
10h
Ravenous Stars Keep Devouring Habitable Planets
Midnight Snack The search for a habitable world where alien life could be thriving has hit a new roadblock. An extremely large number of stars, scientists say, keep swallowing their own planets as little snacks. Not only do 30 to 35 percent of Sun-like stars end up consuming several of their own planets, but there are signs that astronomers can look for in order to determine which stars indulged
8h
Can we really solve the climate crisis by planting trees? (part one) – podcast
In an era of divisions over the climate breakdown, tree planting seems to bring everyone together. But are there situations where tree planting can cause more harm than good? And how much can it help us counteract global heating? Patrick Greenfield leads you through the science and controversy behind the decisions we're making and how those decisions could shape our future environment. He and Pho
21h
Want to live longer? You may need to move
A new study finds that life expectancy for seniors can change if they move. If you want to live longer, head for the coast or a major city. However, location is not destiny. Currently, life expectancy in the U.S. is about 78.5 years. However, that number is a general value, and it can shift dramatically based on variables such as sex, race, how old you are now, and even where you live. These shif
5h
State of Russia's ISS segment sparks safety concerns
A Russian space official on Tuesday raised concerns about the deteriorating state of Russia's segment of the International Space Station due to out-of-date hardware, warning it could lead to "irreparable failures".
13h
What's happening with covid vaccine apps in the US
A year ago, vaccines to tackle the covid pandemic still seemed like a far-off idea. Today, though, doses have been delivered to almost 40% of the world's people—and some are being asked to prove they're among them, leading to the rise of so-called vaccine passports . The details of these credentials vary from place to place, but at their heart they are the same: digital health records, stored on
7h
Anchoring single atoms for catalysis
There is a dictum to "never change a running system." New methods can however be far superior to older ones. While to date chemical reactions are mainly accelerated by catalytic materials that comprise several hundreds of atoms, the use of single atoms could provide a new approach for catalysis.
12h
Physicists mix classical light with half a photon on a qubit
A Russian-U.K. research team has proposed a theoretical description for the new effect of quantum wave mixing involving classical and nonclassical states of microwave radiation. This effect, which previously lacked a rigorous mathematical description, could be of use to quantum computer scientists and fundamental physicists probing light-matter interactions. The study is published in Physical Revi
12h
A unique scanning tunneling microscope with magnetic cooling to study quantum effects
Scanning tunneling microscopes capture images of materials with atomic precision and can be used to manipulate individual molecules or atoms. Researchers have been using the instruments for many years to explore the world of nanoscopic phenomena. A new approach by physicists at Forschungszentrum Jülich is now creating new possibilities for using the devices to study quantum effects. Thanks to magn
8h
State-of-the-art computer code could advance efforts to harness fusion energy
Think of light bulb filaments that glow when you flip a switch. That glow also occurs in magnetic fusion facilities known as tokamaks that are designed to harness the energy that powers the sun and stars. Understanding how resistivity, the process that produces the glow, affects these devices could help scientists design them to operate more efficiently.
11h
How to keep the power on during hurricanes and heat waves and fires and …
Global warming is underscoring the point, again and again and again , that the infrastructure in the US was built for the climate conditions of the past. Hurricane Ida, turbocharged by unusually warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, plunged New Orleans into darkness after reportedly knocking out all eight of the transmission lines into the city. That and other damage to the power system left more th
5h
Measurement beyond standard quantum limit realized with nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond
Many measurements are limited by standard quantum limit (SQL). SQL is defined as the measured noise levels set by quantum mechanics. Quantum entanglement can be used to beat SQL and approach an ultimate limit called Heisenberg limit (HL). Sub-SQL measurements have been realized in many systems under extreme conditions and sensors in these systems are not suitable for realistic measurements under a
11h
What's next for lab-grown human embryos?
Nature, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02343-7 Researchers are now permitted to grow human embryos in the lab for longer than 14 days. Here's what they could learn.
3h
This rainbow-making tech could help autonomous vehicles read signs
A new study explains the science behind microscale concave interfaces (MCI) — structures that reflect light to produce beautiful and potentially useful optical phenomena. Future applications of these effects could include aiding autonomous vehicles in recognizing traffic signs, researchers say. Multiple images, including of a sign created using the material, are available.
4h
Childhood trauma changes how morphine feels
People who experienced childhood trauma get a more pleasurable "high" from morphine, new research suggests. Scientists have identified high rates of childhood trauma in people with addictions, but little research has explored the mechanisms that underlie this link, says Molly Carlyle from the University of Queensland's School of Psychology. "Our findings show these sorts of experiences can actual
5h
Dark Energy Camera captures detailed view of striking peculiar galaxy
A spectacular portrait of the galaxy Centaurus A has been captured by astronomers using the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. This galaxy's peculiar appearance—cloaked in dark tendrils of dust—stems from a past interaction with another galaxy, and its size and proximity to Earth make it one of the best-studied
6h
Ferroelectrics everywhere?
A new family of materials that could result in improved digital information storage and uses less energy may be possible thanks to a team of researchers who demonstrated ferroelectricity in magnesium-substituted zinc oxide.
6h
T. rex had a cousin from the East Coast of North America
Tyrannosaurus rex, the fearsome predator that once roamed what is now western North America, appears to have had an East Coast cousin. A new study describes two dinosaurs that inhabited Appalachia—a once isolated land mass that today composes much of the eastern United States—about 85 million years ago: an herbivorous duck-billed hadrosaur and a carnivorous tyrannosaur. The findings appear in the
6h
Correction for Ebbing et al., Stromal-derived interleukin 6 drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and therapy resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma [Corrections]
MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for "Stromal-derived interleukin 6 drives epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and therapy resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma," by Eva A. Ebbing, Amber P. van der Zalm, Anne Steins, Aafke Creemers, Simone Hermsen, Rosa Rentenaar, Michelle Klein, Cynthia Waasdorp, Gerrit K. J. Hooijer, Sybren L. Meijer, Kausilia K. Krishnadath, Cornelis J. A….
6h
Origin of enhanced water oxidation activity in an iridium single atom anchored on NiFe oxyhydroxide catalyst [Engineering]
The efficiency of the synthesis of renewable fuels and feedstocks from electrical sources is limited, at present, by the sluggish water oxidation reaction. Single-atom catalysts (SACs) with a controllable coordination environment and exceptional atom utilization efficiency open new paradigms toward designing high-performance water oxidation catalysts. Here, using operando X-ray absorption…
6h
Assessing the origins of the European Plagues following the Black Death: A synthesis of genomic, historical, and ecological information [Evolution]
The second plague pandemic started in Europe with the Black Death in 1346 and lasted until the 19th century. Based on ancient DNA studies, there is a scientific disagreement over whether the bacterium, Yersinia pestis, came into Europe once (Hypothesis 1) or repeatedly over the following four centuries (Hypothesis 2)….
6h
Mass of genes rather than master genes underlie the genomic architecture of amphibian speciation [Evolution]
The genetic architecture of speciation, i.e., how intrinsic genomic incompatibilities promote reproductive isolation (RI) between diverging lineages, is one of the best-kept secrets of evolution. To directly assess whether incompatibilities arise in a limited set of large-effect speciation genes, or in a multitude of loci, we examined the geographic and…
6h
RNA-bound PGC-1{alpha} controls gene expression in liquid-like nuclear condensates [Cell Biology]
Plasticity of cells, tissues, and organs is controlled by the coordinated transcription of biological programs. However, the mechanisms orchestrating such context-specific transcriptional networks mediated by the dynamic interplay of transcription factors and coregulators are poorly understood. The peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) is a prototypical master regula
6h
Direct visualization of superselective colloid-surface binding mediated by multivalent interactions [Applied Physical Sciences]
Reliably distinguishing between cells based on minute differences in receptor density is crucial for cell–cell or virus–cell recognition, the initiation of signal transduction, and selective targeting in directed drug delivery. Such sharp differentiation between different surfaces based on their receptor density can only be achieved by multivalent interactions. Several theoretical…
6h
Wildfire smoke impacts on indoor air quality assessed using crowdsourced data in California [Environmental Sciences]
Wildfires have become an important source of particulate matter (PM2.5 < 2.5-µm diameter), leading to unhealthy air quality index occurrences in the western United States. Since people mainly shelter indoors during wildfire smoke events, the infiltration of wildfire PM2.5 into indoor environments is a key determinant of human exposure and…
6h
Multiple roles for PARP1 in ALC1-dependent nucleosome remodeling [Biochemistry]
The SNF2 family ATPase Amplified in Liver Cancer 1 (ALC1) is the only chromatin remodeling enzyme with a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) binding macrodomain. ALC1 functions together with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase PARP1 to remodel nucleosomes. Activation of ALC1 cryptic ATPase activity and the subsequent nucleosome remodeling requires binding of its macrodomain to PAR…
6h
Semiempirical method for examining asynchronicity in metal-oxido-mediated C-H bond activation [Chemistry]
The oxidation of substrates via the cleavage of thermodynamically strong C–H bonds is an essential part of mammalian metabolism. These reactions are predominantly carried out by enzymes that produce high-valent metal–oxido species, which are directly responsible for cleaving the C–H bonds. While much is known about the identity of these…
6h
Correction for Jeon et al., A set of NF-{kappa}B-regulated microRNAs induces acquired TRAIL resistance in Lung cancer [Corrections]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "A set of NF-κB–regulated microRNAs induces acquired TRAIL resistance in Lung cancer," by Young-Jun Jeon, Justin Middleton, Taewan Kim, Alessandro Laganà, Claudia Piovan, Paola Secchiero, Gerard J. Nuovo, Ri Cui, Pooja Joshi, Giulia Romano, Gianpiero Di Leva, Bum-Kyu Lee, Hui-Lung Sun, Yonghwan Kim, Paolo Fadda, Hansjuerg…
6h
Older people's disability risk may depend on neighborhood
Older people living in less advantaged neighborhoods become disabled roughly two years earlier than their counterparts in more affluent neighborhoods, according to a new study. The findings shed new light on the role environment plays in the disabling process and also point to a tangible effect of structural racism on the lives of older Americans, the researchers say. The researchers tracked a co
6h
Lack of non-English languages in STEM publications hurts diversity
With today's existing translation tools to overcome language barriers, global collaboration should be no major feat for researchers. Yet throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, articles published in Chinese journals focusing on critical aspects of the disease were often never cited by English journals. As a result, U.S. academics wasted precious time performing research thereby replicating already publi
6h
Elon Musk Ridicules GM Over Electric Cars That Keep Catching Fire
Flack and Fire Tesla CEO Elon Musk ridiculed General Motors in a tweet this morning, saying the US carmaker may have trouble keeping up with Tesla's EV market share — because GM's Bolt EVs keep catching fire . Musk was responding to a tweet about Tesla having 79 percent of the electric car market in the US according to registration data. "This might be part of the problem," Musk replied, adding a
7h
Fighting brain cancer at its root
Researchers identify proteins that drive cancer stem cells. Targeting and suppressing a particular protein called galectin1 could provide a more effective treatment for glioblastoma, in combination with radiation therapy.
7h
Crossrope Is a Deceptively Simple Tool for Amazing Home Workouts
Jump ropes are often associated with kids at the playground. But in reality, it's a deceptively-simple tool for getting a killer full-body workout. And the Crossrope Get Fit Jump Rope Bundle is taking the common jump rope to a whole new level. It's the simple, affordable way to achieve your fitness goals. Crossrope has reinvented the jump rope. Their weighted ropes and high-performance ergonomic
8h
Predicting climate anomalies: A real challenge
Climate change and meteorological disasters have become grave challenges to human beings. Because of global warming and the increasing extreme weather and climate events it has caused, meteorological disasters have led to worsening socioeconomic damage throughout the world in recent decades. The United Nations reported that, between 1998 and 2017, disaster-hit countries experienced direct economic
8h
Uncertainty colors pandemic workplace decisions
Each day we confront risks at home, at work and in society, but the COVID-19 pandemic, including the rise of new variants, has changed our relationship with risk. As workers and employers determine health measures and back-to-the-office plans, calculations and perceptions of risk loom large.
8h
Terrestrial biodiversity threatened by increasing global aridity velocity under high-level warming [Ecology]
Global aridification is projected to intensify. Yet, our knowledge of its potential impacts on species ranges remains limited. Here, we investigate global aridity velocity and its overlap with three sectors (natural protected areas, agricultural areas, and urban areas) and terrestrial biodiversity in historical (1979 through 2016) and future periods (2050…
8h
Fitting the standard genetic code into its triplet table [Evolution]
Minimally evolved codes are constructed here; these have randomly chosen standard genetic code (SGC) triplets, completed with completely random triplet assignments. Such "genetic codes" have not evolved, but retain SGC qualities. Retained qualities are basic, part of the underpinning of coding. For example, the sensitivity of coding to arbitrary assignments,…
8h
Robust control of floral meristem determinacy by position-specific multifunctions of KNUCKLES [Plant Biology]
Floral organs are properly developed on the basis of timed floral meristem (FM) termination in Arabidopsis. In this process, two known regulatory pathways are involved. The WUSCHEL (WUS)-CLAVATA3 (CLV3) feedback loop is vital for the spatial establishment and maintenance of the FM, while AGAMOUS (AG)-WUS transcriptional cascades temporally repress FM….
8h
PPAR-{gamma} activation enhances myelination and neurological recovery in premature rabbits with intraventricular hemorrhage [Neuroscience]
Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) results in periventricular inflammation, hypomyelination of the white matter, and hydrocephalus in premature infants. No effective therapy exists to prevent these disorders. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonists reduce inflammation, alleviate free radical generation, and enhance microglial phagocytosis, promoting clearance of debris and re
8h
Ventral pallidum regulates the default mode network, controlling transitions between internally and externally guided behavior [Neuroscience]
Daily life requires transitions between performance of well-practiced, automatized behaviors reliant upon internalized representations and behaviors requiring external focus. Such transitions involve differential activation of the default mode network (DMN), a group of brain areas associated with inward focus. We asked how optogenetic modulation of the ventral pallidum (VP), a…
8h
Amyloid particles facilitate surface-catalyzed cross-seeding by acting as promiscuous nanoparticles [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Amyloid seeds are nanometer-sized protein particles that accelerate amyloid assembly as well as propagate and transmit the amyloid protein conformation associated with a wide range of protein misfolding diseases. However, seeded amyloid growth through templated elongation at fibril ends cannot explain the full range of molecular behaviors observed during cross-seeded…
8h
Priming COVID-19 salience increases prejudice and discriminatory intent against Asians and Hispanics [Social Sciences]
Mounting reports in the media suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic has intensified prejudice and discrimination against racial/ethnic minorities, especially Asians. Existing research has focused on discrimination against Asians and is primarily based on self-reported incidents or nonrepresentative samples. We investigate the extent to which COVID-19 has fueled prejudice and discrimination…
8h
SNX27-FERM-SNX1 complex structure rationalizes divergent trafficking pathways by SNX17 and SNX27 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The molecular events that determine the recycling versus degradation fates of internalized membrane proteins remain poorly understood. Two of the three members of the SNX-FERM family, SNX17 and SNX31, utilize their FERM domain to mediate endocytic trafficking of cargo proteins harboring the NPxY/NxxY motif. In contrast, SNX27 does not recycle…
8h
All-or-none amyloid disassembly via chaperone-triggered fibril unzipping favors clearance of {alpha}-synuclein toxic species [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
α-synuclein aggregation is present in Parkinson's disease and other neuropathologies. Among the assemblies that populate the amyloid formation process, oligomers and short fibrils are the most cytotoxic. The human Hsc70-based disaggregase system can resolve α-synuclein fibrils, but its ability to target other toxic assemblies has not been studied. Here, we…
8h
Early assessment of the relationship between the COVID-19 pandemic and births in high-income countries [Social Sciences]
Drawing on past pandemics, scholars have suggested that the COVID-19 pandemic will bring about fertility decline. Evidence from actual birth data has so far been scarce. This brief report uses data on vital statistics from a selection of high-income countries, including the United States. The pandemic has been accompanied by…
8h
MicroED structure of the human adenosine receptor determined from a single nanocrystal in LCP [Biochemistry]
G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), or seven-transmembrane receptors, are a superfamily of membrane proteins that are critically important to physiological processes in the human body. Determining high-resolution structures of GPCRs without bound cognate signaling partners, such as a G protein, requires crystallization in lipidic cubic phase (LCP). GPCR crystals grown in…
8h
Chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection enhances susceptibility to colitis [Microbiology]
Oral infection with Toxoplasma gondii results in dysbiosis and enteritis, both of which revert to normal during chronic infection. However, whether infection leaves a lasting impact on mucosal responses remains uncertain. Here we examined the effect of the chemical irritant dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) on intestinal damage and wound healing…
8h
Stretchable origami robotic arm with omnidirectional bending and twisting [Engineering]
Inspired by the embodied intelligence observed in octopus arms, we introduce magnetically controlled origami robotic arms based on Kresling patterns for multimodal deformations, including stretching, folding, omnidirectional bending, and twisting. The highly integrated motion of the robotic arms is attributed to inherent features of the reconfigurable Kresling unit, whose controllable…
8h
Trisulfur radical anion S3•-—A maȷor carrier for platinum in hydrothermal fluids [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Platinum (Pt) and other platinum group elements (PGE), including palladium (Pd), iridium (Ir), rhodium (Rh), ruthenium (Ru), and osmium (Os), have many advantageous characteristics, including catalytic properties, corrosion resistance, and high melting points (Table 1), which lend themselves to various applications ranging from automotive catalysts to pharmaceutics to use in…
8h
Correction to Supporting Information for Skene et al., Separation of circadian- and behavior-driven metabolite rhythms in humans provides a window on peripheral oscillators and metabolism [SI Correction]
PHYSIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Separation of circadian- and behavior-driven metabolite rhythms in humans provides a window on peripheral oscillators and metabolism," by Debra J. Skene, Elena Skornyakov, Namrata R. Chowdhury, Rajendra P. Gajula, Benita Middleton, Brieann C. Satterfield, Kenneth I. Porter, Hans P. A. Van Dongen, and Shobhan…
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Correction for Alnas et al., Patterns of sociocognitive stratification and perinatal risk in the child brain [Corrections]
NEUROSCIENCE, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for "Patterns of sociocognitive stratification and perinatal risk in the child brain," by Dag Alnæs, Tobias Kaufmann, Andre F. Marquand, Stephen M. Smith, and Lars T. Westlye, which was first published May 14, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2001517117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 12419–12427). The authors…
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Correction for Wu et al., ALS/FTD mutations in UBQLN2 impede autophagy by reducing autophagosome acidification through loss of function [Corrections]
NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "ALS/FTD mutations in UBQLN2 impede autophagy by reducing autophagosome acidification through loss of function," by Josephine J. Wu, Ashley Cai, Jessie E. Greenslade, Nicole R. Higgins, Cong Fan, Nhat T. T. Le, Micaela Tatman, Alexandra M. Whiteley, Miguel A. Prado, Birger V. Dieriks, Maurice A. Curtis, Christopher…
8h
Correction to Supporting Information for Lea et al., Dominance rank-associated gene expression is widespread, sex-specific, and a precursor to high social status in wild male baboons [SI Correction]
ANTHROPOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Dominance rank-associated gene expression is widespread, sex-specific, and a precursor to high social status in wild male baboons," by Amanda J. Lea, Mercy Y. Akinyi, Ruth Nyakundi, Peter Mareri, Fred Nyundo, Thomas Kariuki, Susan C. Alberts, Elizabeth A. Archie, and…
8h
Global patterns of raptor distribution and protected areas optimal selection to reduce the extinction crises [Applied Biological Sciences]
Globally, human-caused environmental impacts, such as habitat loss, have seriously impacted raptor species, with some 50% of species having decreasing populations. We analyzed global patterns of distribution of all 557 raptor species, focusing on richness, endemism, geographic range, conservation status, and population trends. Highest species diversity, endemism, species at risk,…
8h
Publisher offers cash for citations
Worried about scarce research funding? Does the prospect of paying rent on that meager post-doc salary keep you up at night? Fear no more! Innoscience Research in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, to the rescue. The company has launched an innovative (read: shady) scheme to pay researchers to cite studies from several journals it controls. How much … Continue reading
8h
Minimum wage hike boosts customer experience
The ongoing debate over raising the national minimum wage generally focuses on the negative impact it would have on employers, but a new study finds it has a positive effect on a different group: consumers.
8h
New tool estimates how much affordable housing a city needs
Canada needs a more cohesive strategy to help the more than 1.7 million people currently living in unaffordable, overcrowded or poor-condition housing, says UBC expert Dr. Penny Gurstein, head of the Housing Research Collaborative at UBC's school of community and regional planning.
8h
Compact speaker systems direct sound efficiently
Researchers have developed three designs for compact speaker systems that control the direction of sound more efficiently than previous models. For each speaker, the scientists were able to manipulate the timing and strength of the outgoing sound waves. They combined multiple speakers together into an array and used the constructive and destructive interference of sound waves to their advantage.
8h
High virus count in the lungs drives COVID-19 deaths, study finds
A buildup of coronavirus in the lungs is likely behind the steep mortality rates seen in the pandemic, a new study finds. The results contrast with previous suspicions that simultaneous infections, such as bacterial pneumonia or overreaction of the body's immune defense system, played major roles in heightened risk of death, the investigators say.
8h
Anchoring single atoms
There is a dictum to 'never change a running system'. New methods can however be far superior to older ones. While to date chemical reactions are mainly accelerated by catalytic materials that comprise several hundreds of atoms, the use of single atoms could provide a new approach for catalysis. An international research team has now developed a new method for anchoring individual atoms in a contr
9h
Screening kan minska risk för stroke
Att screena befolkningen för att upptäcka förmaksflimmer kan minska risken för stroke, allvarlig blödning och död. Dessutom är screeningen kostnadseffektiv, menar forskarna. För den som har förmaksflimmer, en form av rytmrubbning i hjärtat, är risken att få en stroke fem gånger högre. Symtomen blir dessutom ofta svårare eftersom extra stora blodproppar kan bildas i hjärtat, lossna och riskera att
9h
Why you should get a COVID-19 booster shot
The National Institutes of Health announced August 18 that it is recommending booster shots for people vaccinated with mRNA vaccines against COVID-19. The recommendations say people should consider getting their vaccine boosters eight months after they received their second dose of Pfizer or Moderna. Here, Matt Koci , a professor in the poultry science department at North Carolina State Universit
9h
NASA Source: No Way Artemis Moon Mission Is Launching This Year
One Small Delay NASA's Space-Launch System (SLS) rocket, which was supposed to launch the first Artemis Moon missions this year, now probably won't take flight until the middle of 2022. Publicly, NASA is maintaining the expectation of a 2021 launch for the uncrewed Artemis I's trip around the Moon, but a source at the agency told Ars Technica that tests are so delayed that now the best-case scena
10h
Find a Lucrative Rental Property in Minutes With This Innovative Investment Platform
It only takes a brief glance at the rental property listings to know that the landlord business is a good one to be in. But finding the right property for your investment needs can be a long, arduous search that could take months out of your life, if you manage to find it at all. But with Mashvisor , what used to take months of research involving hundreds or even thousands of properties can now b
10h
To develop quantum networks, the unique needs of industry must be considered and may provide a solution
Large-scale quantum networks have been proposed, but so far, they do not exist. Some components of what would make up such networks are being studied, but the control mechanism for such a large-scale network has not been developed. In AVS Quantum Science, investigators outline how a time-sensitive network control plane could be a key component of a workable quantum network.
10h
Extreme pandemics aren't as rare as we thought
The COVID-19 pandemic may be the deadliest viral outbreak the world has seen in more than a century, but statistically, such extreme events aren't as rare as we may think, a new study shows. The study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences used a newly assembled record of novel disease outbreaks over the past 400 years to estimate the intensity of those events and the yearly proba
10h
More natural sugar may be as bad for you as the artificial stuff
Consuming sucrose, the more "natural form of sugar," may be as bad for your health as consuming high fructose corn syrup, according to a new study. "This is the first dietary intervention study to show that consumption of both sucrose- and high fructose corn-sweetened beverages increase liver fat and decrease insulin sensitivity," says Kimber Stanhope, a research nutrition biologist with the Univ
10h
SpaceX Cargo Ship Delivers Fruit, Girl Scout Experiments to the ISS
SpaceX's Dragon approaching the ISS following a previous launch. (Photo: SpaceX) SpaceX's Dragon approaching the ISS following a previous launch. (Photo: SpaceX) A SpaceX ship just finished making its way to outer space with an eclectic collection of fresh fruit, equipment, and Girl Scout experiments. Over the weekend, the company used its own Falcon 9 rocket to send a Dragon cargo ship from the
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Do distressed, help-seeking couples improve on their own? Not much, study says
Does relationship quality continue to worsen, stabilize, or improve for distressed, help-seeking couples before they receive assistance? A team of researchers sought to answer that question in a new study examining what happens to couples who seek online help for their relationship, but have to wait six months before beginning an intervention program.
10h
Exploring quantum correlations of classical light source for image transmission
There has been an interesting debate on the quantum versus classical origin of ghost imaging in thermal light. To clarify this quantum-classical dilemma, Lixiang Chen at Xiamen University of China formulated a density matrix to fully describe thermal two-photon orbital angular momentum state, which revealed the hidden quantumness with non-zero discord. Then, a scheme of mimicking teleportation was
11h
New sensor detects rare earth element terbium
A new luminescent sensor can detect terbium, a valuable rare earth element, from complex environmental samples like acid mine waste. The sensor takes advantage of a protein that very specifically binds to rare earth elements. It could help develop a domestic supply of these metals , which smart phones, electric car batteries, and energy efficient lighting require. A paper describing the sensor ap
11h
New dragon-like lizard species discovered in the Tropical Andes
The Huallaga River in the Andes of central Peru extends for 1,138 km, making it the largest tributary of the Marañón River, the spinal cord of the Amazon River. This basin harbors a great variety of ecosystems, including the Peruvian Yunga ecoregion, which is considered a shelter of endemic birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians.
11h
Understanding a nanomuscle
Cells in the human body constantly receive substances from the outside via a process called endocytosis. One important endocytosis pathway involves the formation of a protrusion within the cell membrane, pointing to the inside of the cell, triggered when a molecule needing to get in reaches the membrane. The protrusion wraps and closes around the molecule, after which it is cut off, leaving the wr
11h
Regulators for extracellular vesicle production
Biological vesicles are nano-sized containers that transport proteins and other substances within or between cells. Most cells release so-called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which play important roles in cell-to-cell communication. EVs also are involved in diseases, however—the spreading of a tumor, for example, is sometimes stimulated by particular EVs. For the development of therapies, regulato
11h
Climate model shows drought in North and South America at the same time during La Niña events
A team of researchers at Columbia University has shown that long-term droughts in southwestern parts of North America and in southwestern parts of South America have occurred at the same time on multiple occasions over the past 1,000 years coinciding with La Niña events. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes how they used archival data and paleoclimate prox
11h
Konstgjorda moln ska rädda barriärrevet
En fin dimma av havsvatten sprutas ur speciella munstycken, ungefär som en snökanon. När de små dropparna kommer ut i luften avdunstar vattnet och kvar blir små saltpartiklar som stiger och fungerar som kondensationskärnor för nya vattendroppar som ökar molnigheten så att mer solljus reflekteras bort. Det är teorin bakom "marin molnblekning", ett av flera koncept för att på konstgjord väg ändra jo
11h
Lamborghini Huracan vs a Truck! | Street Outlaws: Memphis
Stream Street Outlaws: Memphis on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-memphis About Street Outlaws: Memphis: Street Outlaws is traveling to the toughest, meanest and wildest streets in the South, as it heads to Memphis to spotlight JJ Da Boss and his team of family and friends who have been racing together for decades. #StreetOutlawsMemphis #StreetRacing #Discovery Subs
11h
Deep Learning Is Tackling Another Core Biology Mystery: RNA Structure
Deep learning is solving biology's deepest secrets at breathtaking speed. Just a month ago, DeepMind cracked a 50-year-old grand challenge: protein folding . A week later, they produced a totally transformative database of more than 350,000 protein structures, including over 98 percent of known human proteins. Structure is at the heart of biological functions. The data dump, set to explode to 130
11h
Hong Kong's marine ecosystem over the last 100 years
The skyscrapers and urban development that have made Hong Kong the 'Pearl' have also generated pollutants that affect the marine species that live in Hong Kong's coastal waters. On-going climate change and dams along the Pearl River have also altered these coastal ecosystems. However, it is largely unknown in what ways they are altered, because we lack information about baseline conditions back th
11h
Fully hydrophobic ionogel developed for wearable underwater sensor and communicator
The Smart Polymer Materials group led by Prof. Chen Tao at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering (NIMTE) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has developed a fully hydrophobic ionogel which enables high-efficiency wearable underwater sensors and communicators in underwater operations. The study was published in Materials Horizons.
11h
Pandemic restrictions enable unique bird study
How do birds avoid collision when flying in dense foliage and other cramped environments with many obstacles? And what does flying in such complex environments entail for the birds? These were the questions Per Henningsson of Lund University in Sweden pondered before engaging the help of the family's own pet budgie to get some answers. His study has now been published in Royal Society Open Science
12h
Crowd-pleasing alpine cloud formations yield secrets
A "sea of clouds" (SOC) occurs when low-level clouds form in mountainous areas, resembling an ocean when seen from higher elevations. Using a camera, sensing equipment and satellite data, University of Tsukuba researchers Yuki Kobayashi and Kenichi Ueno have identified some important factors in how these clouds form, as well as specific areas in the Japan Alps where they occur frequently.
12h
Molecular trap allows study of single proteins
Researchers from the technical universities of Delft and Munich have invented a new type of molecular trap that can hold a single protein in place for hours to study its natural behavior—a million times longer than before. The new NEOtrap technique enables scientists to use electrical currents to study the vibrant nature of proteins, which may spark innovation in biomedicine, biotechnology, and mo
12h
New calculation models for a more evidence-based debate about sustainability
Clear indicators and evaluation criteria are essential to save the environment. Two Sweden-based researchers hence introduce a new indicator, eco-balance, and a new criterion that takes into account both human and environmental sustainability. The conclusion is that many countries need to reconsider their consumption as well as their population in order to be sustainable.
12h
Modulation to sonoluminescence achieved in presence of carbon nano-dots in water
Researchers led by Prof. Xu Wen from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, along with their collaborators from Chongqing Medical University, recently investigated the influence of carbon nanodots (CNDs) on sonoluminescence effect, and they found that the color of sonoluminescence driven by intense ultrasound could be altered from ultraviolet-blue in w
12h
New options for sustainable antibiotic therapy
Public health is coming under increasing pressure worldwide due to the antibiotic crisis: the rapid increase in resistance of bacterial pathogens could mean that in the near future bacterial infections that are usually harmless will be difficult or impossible to treat. The spread of antibiotic resistance is based on the ability of pathogens to adapt quickly to the drugs. In principle, evolutionary
12h
The right mixture of salts to get life started
In modern organisms, the hereditary material DNA encodes the instructions for the synthesis of proteins—the versatile nanomachines that enable modern cells to function and replicate. But how was this functional linkage between DNA and proteins established? According to the "RNA world" hypothesis, primordial living systems were based on self-replicating RNA molecules. Chemically speaking, RNA is cl
12h
Why We Need Terrifying Stories
Editor's Note: Read Karen Brown's new short story, " Needs ." " Needs " is a new short story by Karen Brown. To mark the story's publication in The Atlantic , Brown and Oliver Munday, the design director of the magazine, discussed the story over email. Their conversation has been lightly edited for clarity. Oliver Munday: Your story " Needs " takes place in a disquieting domestic setting in rural
12h
The Origins of COVID
We are approaching two years into this pandemic and we still haven't proved the origins of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. However, this is not unusual at all, and in itself is not suspicious. It took 13 years to identify the origin of SARS, and we have never identified the origins of some Ebola outbreaks. But what do we know about the origins of SARS-CoV-2? The question has become highly political, which
12h
Satellite data provide valuable support for IPCC climate report
Earlier this month, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published its latest assessment report laying out the accumulating evidence of the climate crisis. The report identifies Earth observing satellites as a critical tool to monitor the causes and effects of climate change and directly acknowledges the contribution of ESA's Climate Change Initiative—a research program that draws
13h
New measurement technique finds harmful PFAS in indoor air
The air we breathe in our homes, schools, and workplaces can be polluted with harmful PFAS chemicals, according to a study published today in Environmental Science & Technology Letters. A new measurement technique developed by the research team detected PFAS chemicals in the air of kindergarten classrooms, university offices and laboratories, and a home—some with levels as high as those measured a
13h
How to distribute scarce medical supplies in a pandemic, and do it fairly
In the spring of 2020, with global supply chains for medical equipment crumbling under the stresses of the COVID-19 pandemic, states turned to the federal government for help. Since 1998, the United States has maintained the Strategic National Stockpile, a cache of pharmaceuticals and medical supplies intended for emergency use. The stockpile held ventilators, N95 masks, gloves, and gowns—the very
13h
A push to make 'ecocide' a global crime
Scientists recently confirmed the Amazon rainforest is now emitting more carbon dioxide than it absorbs, due to uncontrolled burning and deforestation. It brings the crucial ecosystem closer to a tipping point that would see it replaced by savanna and trigger accelerated global heating.
14h
Increasing sugar availability for oil synthesis
A team from the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has bred a plant that produces more oil by manipulating the availability of sugar for oil synthesis. The team, led by BNL's John Shanklin, achieved these results in using leaves of the fast-growing plant Arabidopsis, to mimic stem cells of plants like energycane and Miscanthus.
14h
Back Up Everything With 92% Off 2TB Of Internxt Decentralized Storage
While the rapid expansion of processors and internet connections has a lot of positives, the downside is that when privacy systems fail, or if you lose your files, you're probably on your own . That's where Internxt comes into play. You can get a year-long subscription to Internxt with 2TB of Decentralized Cloud Storage right now for 92% off at just $9.99. Well-Protected Storage When you start yo
14h
Sju av tio piloter skulle misslyckats med Hudson-nödlandningen
Trots att piloter är tränade att följa protokoll och lösa problem som uppkommer, är det bara vissa piloter som har förmågan att tänka och handla snabbt under extrem stress visar forskning från Högskolan i Gävle. När en Airbus slår eld strax efter start fattar kapten Chesley Sullenberger ett blixtsnabbt beslut, att landa i Hudson River i New York , och räddar samtliga passagerare. – Det handlar in
14h
COVID-19 wastewater tracking paper ends up in the sewer
A paper that sought to bring some math to the idea that the spread of COVID-19 could be tracked in human excrement has been retracted because of the authors submitted it to two different Elsevier journals on the same day — and because of some eyebrow-raising behavior by the alleged peer reviewers. The first author … Continue reading
15h
Despite Delta Surge, States Are Going Dark on Some Covid Data
Despite a fourth, delta-fueled surge, states are going dark on Covid data. In several states, data on cases in prisons has been removed or reduced. Florida has halted daily data in favor of weekly reporting. And in Georgia, a state website removed a link to Covid cases and deaths in long-term care facilities.
15h
Mechanochemical transformation of planar polyarenes to curved fused-ring systems
Nature Communications, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25495-6 The transformation of planar aromatic molecules into non-planar structures is a challenging task and has not been realized by mechanochemistry before. Here, the authors demonstrate that mechanochemical forces can transform a planar polyarene into a curved geometry by creating new C-C bonds along the rim of the
15h
Acquisition of aneuploidy drives mutant p53-associated gain-of-function phenotypes
Nature Communications, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25359-z Previous studies report that mutant p53 proteins have gain-of-function activities and cause oncogenic phenotypes. Herein, the authors engineered two isogenic epithelial cell lines to express wild-type or missense mutant p53 or be deficient for p53 protein and show that aneuploidy drives several of the GOF phen
15h
Paleocene/Eocene carbon feedbacks triggered by volcanic activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25536-0 The Paleocene–Eocene boundary coincided with runaway global warming possibly analogous to future climate change, but the sources of greenhouse gasses have remained unresolved. Here, the authors reveal volcanism triggered initial warming, and subsequent carbon was released after crossing a tipping point.
15h
A quantitative model predicts how m6A reshapes the kinetic landscape of nucleic acid hybridization and conformational transitions
Nature Communications, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25253-8 m6A RNA post-transcriptional modification changes RNA hybridization kinetics. Here the authors show that the methylamino group can adopt syn-conformation pairing with uridine with a mismatch-like conformation in RNA duplex. They also develop a quantitative model that predicts how m6A affects the kinetics of hy
15h
Preliminary demonstration of a persistent Josephson phase-slip memory cell with topological protection
Nature Communications, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25209-y Superconducting computing promises enhanced computational power, but scalable and fast superconducting memories are still not implemented. Here, the authors demonstrate a superconducting memory cell based on hysteretic phase-slip transition, without degradation up to ~1 K over several days.
15h
Predicting post-operative right ventricular failure using video-based deep learning
Nature Communications, Published online: 31 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25503-9 The echocardiogram allows for a comprehensive assessment of the cardiac musculature and valves, but its rich temporally resolved data remain underutilized. Here, the authors develop a video AI system trained to predict post-operative right ventricular failure.
15h
"USA gjorde precis det som al-Qaida ville"
Efter 20 år har USA nått vägs ände med sin militära intervention i Afghanistan och dragit hemåt – tveklöst med svansen mellan benen. Det menar Isak Svensson, som är professor i freds- och konfliktforskning vid Uppsala universitet. – Interventionen är ingenting annat än ett kapitalt misslyckande, då man inte har uppnått målet med att skapa en stabil, självständig demokrati – trots en enorm invester
16h
Sämre hälsa hos unga LGBTI-personer
Tjejer som är homo- eller bisexuella mår sämre än killar som är gay eller bi. Sämst hälsa har de som är trans. Det är några av slutsatserna i en rapport som tagits fram på uppdrag av Nordiska ministerrådet. – Trots alla insatser och lagändringar ser man tydligt i forskningen att personer i LGBTI-gruppen sticker ut när det gäller fysisk och psykisk ohälsa, säger Anna Siverskog, universitetslektor
17h
Tandsten hos björn visar antibiotikaresistens
De senaste 20 åren har antibiotikaresistensen hos björnar gått ner. Forskare har kunnat följa nivåerna av antibiotikaresistens i naturen genom att analysera kalkavlagringar från tänderna hos brunbjörnar i naturhistoriska museisamlingar. Mellan 1950-talet och 90-talet ökade resistensen hos de svenska björnarna, vilket sammanfaller med ökad användning av antibiotika i medicin och jordbruk. – Vi tit
17h
Avemar: Wheat Germ for Cancer
Avemar is fermented wheat germ. It is claimed to be an effective addition to conventional cancer treatment. The evidence is lacking. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
18h
Can we really solve the climate crisis by planting trees? (part one)
In an era of divisions over the climate breakdown, tree planting seems to bring everyone together. But are there situations where tree planting can cause more harm than good? And how much can it help us counteract global heating? Patrick Greenfield leads you through the science and controversy behind the decisions we're making and how those decisions could shape our future environment. He and Phoe
21h
Improved water splitting method: A green energy innovation
Hydrogen is a promising clean energy source with great potential to replace greenhouse gas-emitting fossil fuels. While total water (H2O) splitting is the easiest way to obtain hydrogen (H2), this reaction is slow and not yet commercially feasible. Now, scientists have developed a novel electrocatalyst that significantly improves hydrogen production from water splitting in an energy and cost-effic
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What is ESP?
Also known as "the sixth sense" or "psi," extrasensory perception, or ESP, encompasses a wide range of paranormal abilities, including mind reading and predicting the future.
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