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Vaccinologist Barbie: Prof Sarah Gilbert honoured with a doll
Co-creator of the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab hopes it will inspire young girls to enter Stem careers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Prof Sarah Gilbert has had quite a year. The co-creator of the Oxford/AstraZeneca jab has been made a dame, been given an emotional standing ovation at Wimbledon – and now a Barbie doll has been made in her honour. Gilbert, who led the deve
18h
Microplastics discovered in the Arctic ecosystem
Around the Svalbard archipelago in the Arctic Ocean, rhodoliths made up of coralline red algae provide ecological niches for a wide variety of organisms. A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the University of Bayreuth and Senckenberg Research Institute in Wilhelmshaven has recently discovered a large quantity of microplastics in this ecosystem.
6h
New Law Would Make Every New Car Verify That You're Sober
Engine Lock In the near future, you may need to prove to your car that you're sober before you're allowed to take the wheel. Buried on page 1,066 of the newest version of the infrastructure bill currently being debated by Congress is a provision, spotted by Motherboard , that says every new car built from 2027 onward would need to include some sort of monitoring system to catch anyone trying to d
3h
SpaceX Just Rolled Out Its Skyscraper-Sized Super Heavy Starship Booster
Roll Out SpaceX is getting closer and closer to launching its first massive Starship prototype — into orbit, or at least in its general direction, if something happens to go wrong again . The Elon Musk-led space company just rolled out the first orbital-class prototype of its Super Heavy booster, a 230-foot rocket stage designed to hoist its 160-foot Starship spacecraft into space. pic.twitter.co
7h
The Surprising Benefits of Talking to Strangers
Nic spent most of her childhood avoiding people. She was raised by a volatile father and a mother who transferred much of the trauma she'd experienced onto her daughter. The combination left Nic fearful and isolated. "My primitive brain was programmed to be afraid of everybody, because everybody's evil and they're gonna hurt you, " she told me. (Nic asked to be referred to by only her first name
11h
Joseph Campbell's Woman Problem
This article was published online on August 4, 2021. It's one of the darkest and bloodiest episodes in Ovid's Metamorphoses . King Tereus of Thrace, having lusted after his sister-in-law, Philomela, inveigles her away from her father's protection, takes her to a forest dungeon, and rapes her. Philomela, towering in eloquence, vows to tell the world what Tereus has done; her raised voice, she prom
12h
The Myth of the Golden Years
"You'll want to read this," my wife said, handing me the Sunday Boston Globe . The cover story that week in late September 2020 was about a 62-year-old woman who had colon cancer that had metastasized. She died in a local hospital; her husband was also in poor health and could not take care of her at home. After she died, he moved into an area facility. Reading of someone so close to my own age s
11h
The Voters Who Could Turn California Red
At the end of the 2020 election, California's Republicans had reason to feel hopeful. Although Joe Biden won the state by a landslide, Donald Trump won more votes (6 million) there than any other Republican candidate had ever. Increased Republican turnout led to victories in four competitive House races with large Latino populations. One of those districts even elected the state's first Republica
11h
Scientists discover Machu Picchu could be at least two decades older than thought
A team of investigators used enhanced carbon dating methods to examine human remains from the site in Peru A scientific discovery about Machu Picchu has cast doubt on the reliability of colonial records for modern western historians trying to piece together an understanding of the Inca people who built the site. For more than 75 years, many historians and scientists have worked on the assumption
23h
Videos of Turkish Wildfires Are Like a Vision of Hell
Fire Beach New videos show how the devastating wildfires in southern Turkey are turning sandy beach resorts into a scene straight out of an apocalyptic movie. One video shows residents evacuating a beach while a massive wall of fire shoots gargantuan clouds of dark smoke high into the sky. Worldwide, wildfires have been devastating this year — and these videos could be a grim foreshadowing of wha
4h
Feds Smashed Armored Vehicle Through Wall During Bitcoin Raid
Crypto Bust It's no secret that the cryptocurrency world has a criminality problem . The technology is regularly being used to launder money, buy illegal contraband, and even demand ransom . In a sense, that's a core premise of blockchain tech: a hyper-libertarian dream of exchanging money and other assets without any form of government intervention. Now, The Verge reports that a libertarian cryp
6h
Neither Star nor Planet: A Strange Brown Dwarf Puzzles Astronomers
Dan Caselden was up late on November 3, 2018, playing the video game Counter-Strike, when he made astronomy history. Every time he died, he would jump on his laptop to check in on an automated search he was running of NASA space telescope images. Suddenly, in the early hours of the morning, something bizarre popped into view. "It was very confusing," said Caselden. "It was moving faster than… S
8h
The International Travel Restrictions Make Little Sense
If you've traveled internationally this summer and have had to navigate a labyrinth of COVID-19 tests, quarantines, health-authorization forms, and scarce flights to get there, you are one of the lucky ones. Many people have been unable to travel at all. Few would argue that governments ought to fully reopen travel now, especially with the threat of the Delta variant. But the haphazard, unilatera
11h
The US Navy Is Working on a Solar-Powered Plane Can Fly for 90 Days Straight
Long Haul The US Navy is developing an uncrewed aircraft that can remain airborne for 90 days at a time thanks to massive solar panels on each of its wings, New Scientist reports . The aircraft, evocatively called Skydweller and built by US-Spanish aerospace company Skydweller Aero, could allow the Navy to keep a continuous eye on the surrounding seas while escorting ships months at a time, a maj
1h
Russia: Our Killer Robots Don't Need Any Pesky International Laws
AI Unleashed United Nations delegates are currently meeting to debate possible regulations controlling autonomous killer robots — but Russia is having none of it. The Russian delegate, representing a country that has already developed and deployed military robots in real-world conflicts, remained steadfast that the global community doesn't need any new rules or regulations to govern the use of ki
5h
Elon Musk Reportedly Wanted to Remove Steering Wheel from Model Y
No Hands! Tesla CEO Elon Musk reportedly had a huge disagreement with his engineers over a key aspect of the Model Y back when that was still being developed. The issue? Whether to include a key functionality that comes standard with every other vehicle on the market: a steering wheel. Musk, overconfident in Tesla's ability to create fully autonomous vehicles , reportedly wanted to do away with s
7h
The Atlantic Daily: What Did Andrew Cuomo Think Would Happen?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York has always loved drawing attention to himself. This is, after all, the man who signed a contract for a book about his leadership during the coronavirus pandemic—e
8h
Near-atomic look at three ways to thwart SARS-CoV-2 variants
SARS-CoV-2 nanobodies—microscopic molecules developed at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine that neutralize the virus in animals—are remarkably active against mutations found in variants, including Delta, according to new research by Pitt and Case Western Reserve University scientists.
14h
UK children aged 16 and 17 expected to be offered Covid vaccine
Minister says JCVI experts to update advice 'imminently' on widening access to vaccine to more teenagers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid vaccines are expected to be offered to children in the UK aged 16 and 17, in line with many other countries, after a minister confirmed government experts will update their advice "imminently". Michelle Donelan, the universiti
14h
Coronavirus live news: more UK teenagers could get jab; highest cases in China since January
Teenagers in UK could be given green light for vaccine; US moratorium on evictions; Sydney man in his 20s dies from virus US Covid hospitalisations rise as doctors say patients are unvaccinated Nicola Sturgeon expects jab to be recommended for over-16s New York to require vaccination for indoor dining and events Hopes UK vaccine trial in pregnant women will allay jab fears See all our coronavirus
17h
What the Ohio Special Election Actually Means
Updated at 9:55 a.m. ET on August 4, 2021. In the next few days and weeks, Americans will read headlines announcing all the lessons learned from Nina Turner's primary loss to Shontel Brown in Ohio's Eleventh Congressional District yesterday. Political writers might treat the race as a parable: a warning for progressives and an endorsement of the Democratic establishment's approach to politics. Tw
1d
Blue Origin Posts Salty Infographic About SpaceX
Jeff Bezos is presumably fuming. His space company, Blue Origin, had initially contested NASA's decision in April to award SpaceX with the Human Landing System contract, a multi-billion agreement to build a lander capable of bringing the first astronauts to the surface of the Moon since the Apollo missions. In early May, NASA told SpaceX to cease all work on the contract after Blue Origin and Ala
2h
To the very beginning: going back in time with Steven Weinberg (Part 2)
Following Steven Weinberg's lead, we plunge further back into cosmic history, beyond the formation of atomic nuclei. Today, we discuss the origin of the quark-gluon plasma and the properties of the famous Higgs boson, the "God Particle." Is there a limit? How far can we go back in time? Last week , we celebrated the great physicist Steven Weinberg, bringing back his masterful book The First Three
6h
Flexible, wearable X-ray detector doesn't require heavy metals
X-ray imaging is a fast and painless way for doctors to see inside a person. But radiation detectors, which go under the body part being imaged, are rigid panels that contain harmful heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. Now, researchers in ACS' Nano Letters report a proof-of-concept wearable X-ray detector prepared from nontoxic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) layered between flexible plastic a
10h
What you need to know about New York City's new vaccine proof
New York City will be the first city in the US to require proof of vaccination to enter a variety of indoor places, the city's mayor announced yesterday. Mayor Bill de Blasio told a press conference that starting September 13, the city will start requiring the proof at indoor venues like bars, restaurants, and gyms. The so-called Key to NYC Pass (which, rather confusingly, is a program, not an ac
12h
When vibrations increase on cooling: Anti-freezing observed
An international team has observed an amazing phenomenon in a nickel oxide material during cooling: Instead of freezing, certain fluctuations actually increase as the temperature drops. Nickel oxide is a model system that is structurally similar to high-temperature superconductors. The experiment shows once again that the behavior of this class of materials still holds surprises.
6h
The risks and rewards of vaccinating UK children against Covid
Analysis: official advisers have called for jabs to be given to children aged 16 and 17 in a rethink of policy Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Just weeks ago, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) recommended that children over the age of 12 should only be vaccinated if they were extremely vulnerable or lived with someone at risk, citing concerns
6h
Tokyo 2020: Photos From the Summer Olympics
Over the past 12 days of Olympic competition in and around Tokyo, records have been broken and dreams shattered as more than 11,500 athletes have put forward their best efforts, observed through the lenses of thousands of cameras. Collected here are images from the past week of the Tokyo 2020 Summer Olympics.
5h
Queensland Covid update: 19 new cases reported as state faces biggest outbreak since last year
Delta cluster rises to 63 as Victoria records one new local case of coronavirus in a Melbourne teacher Follow our Covid live blog for the latest updates Qld hotspots ; Qld restrictons Updated national plan suggests 80% of eligible Australians could be fully vaccinated by end of 2021 Vaccine rollout tracker ; get our free news app ; get our morning email briefing Queensland has cancelled next Wedn
20h
Can AI make democracy fairer?
Democracy in ancient Athens looked quite different from democracies today. Instead of elections, most offices—including those in the legislature, governing councils, and magistrates—were filled by citizen volunteers, selected by random lottery. These citizens' assemblies drafted, debated, and passed laws; made major foreign policy decisions; and controlled military budgets.
6h
NASA model describes nearby star that resembles early sun
New research led by NASA provides a closer look at a nearby star thought to resemble our young sun. The work allows scientists to better understand what our sun may have been like when it was young, and how it may have shaped the atmosphere of our planet and the development of life on Earth.
9h
The Infrastructure Deal Is Not Not a Climate Bill
Last week, Senate negotiators released the text of the $1.2 trillion bipartisan infrastructure deal. For the first time since the deal was announced in June, we can actually see what's in it. On its face, this isn't a climate bill. It invests significantly in a federal road and highway system that encourages fossil-fuel-based travel in private cars and trucks. It also just does too little, making
1d
Do we still need math?
For the average person, math seems to play little to no role in their day-to-day life. But, the fanciest gadgets and technologies are all heavily reliant on mathematics. Without advanced (and often obscure) mathematics, modern society would not be possible. The following is an adapted excerpt from the book What's the Use? It is reprinted with permission of the author and Hachette Book Group. What
9h
You've Never Seen Legs Like These
Let's start with what harvestmen are not. They are not men, nor do they harvest; they probably get their name from the time of year they're commonly spotted, in late summer or early fall. Though eight-legged , they are not spiders, but they are part of the broader arachnid group, which also includes ticks and mites. And despite some truly slanderous rumors , they are not venomous and pose absolut
23h
How to Build a Solar Oven
Cook a variety of simple foods—or just heat up last night's pizza—using our environment's most accessible heating element.
11h
Boeing Starliner launch delayed indefinitely
Boeing's Starliner won't launch Wednesday as had been planned following problems with its propulsion system that prevented a key uncrewed test flight to the international space station a day earlier—and it's not clear when the troubled spaceship will fly next.
8h
Study sheds more light on the nature of HESS J1857+026
Argentinian astronomers have conducted radio observations of a very-high-energy gamma-ray source known as HESS J1857+026. Results of this study provide new insights into the nature of this mysterious source. The research was detailed in a paper published July 27 on the arXiv pre-print server.
8h
This is a map of half a billion connections in a tiny bit of mouse brain
Neuroscientists have released the most detailed 3D map of the mammalian brain ever made, created from an animal whose brain architecture is very similar to our own—the mouse. The map and underlying data set, which are now freely available to the public , depict more than 200,000 neurons and half a billion neural connections contained inside a cube of mouse brain no bigger than a grain of sand. Th
6h
Looking for work? Here's how to write a résumé that an AI will love.
Through job-matching platforms and AI-powered games and interviews, companies are relying more and more on artificial intelligence to streamline the hiring process. But some job seekers feel frustrated and misunderstood by these technologies. Malika Devaux is a student at the HOPE Program , a Brooklyn-based nonprofit that provides job training. Devaux is looking for a job, and we asked her to com
11h
An overactive sweet tooth may spell trouble for our cellular powerplants
The average American eats roughly 22 teaspoons of added sugar a day — more than three times the recommended amount for women and more than double the recommended amount for men. Although this overconsumption is known to contribute to diabetes and other disorders, the exact ways in which eating too much sugar sets the stage for metabolic diseases on a cellular level has been less clear. Now, a tea
21h
The UAE Is Using Drones to Zap Clouds With Electricity and Make It Rain
Extreme weather events seem to be getting more common. In the last month in particular, we've seen dramatic flash floods in various parts of the world, including Germany , China , and the US . But while some regions get an excess of rainfall, others are seeing a dearth of it. They're not all waiting for Mother Nature to show them some love, though. Scientists in the United Arab Emirates are takin
8h
Podcast: Beating the AI hiring machines
When it comes to hiring, it's increasingly becoming an AI's world—we're just working in it. In this, the final episode of Season 2 of our AI podcast "In Machines We Trust" and the conclusion of our series on AI and hiring, we take a look at how AI-based systems are increasingly playing gatekeeper in the hiring process—screening out applicants by the millions, based on little more than what they s
14h
Effective EMI shielding behavior of thin graphene/PMMA nanolaminates
Since its isolation in 2004 by Geim and Novoselov from the University of Manchester (Nobel Prize in Physics in 2010), graphene has been termed a 'wonder material' due to its exceptional properties, which have already been exploited in many applications and products. However, the use of graphene in the form of tiny flakes in polymer composites limits the full exploitation of its excellent propertie
6h
Genetically altered daddy longlegs have short legs
A team of researchers from the University of Wisconsin, the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History, and Western Connecticut State University, has assembled the first draft genome of Phalangium opilio—the daddy longlegs spider. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes clues they found that explain why the spider developed such long le
8h
Manipulating magnetic domain dynamics in ultrathin multi-layered materials
A novel route to tune and control the magnetic domain wall motions employing combinations of useful magnetic effects inside very thin film materials, has been demonstrated by researchers from Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) in Korea. The research, published in the journal Advance Science, offers a new insights into spintronics and a step towards new ultrafast, ultrasmal
6h
Toward a COVID-19 breathalyzer for kids
Adults infected with SARS-CoV-2 exhale different metabolites in their breath than uninfected people. Now, researchers have shown that children infected with SARS-CoV-2 also show breath metabolite changes, but they're largely different from the ones in adults. Someday, this information could be used to quickly and easily screen children for infection, the researchers say.
34min
Genetic secret to age women start menopause discovered
Research could lead to doctors being able to tell women how long they have got left to start a family A series of genetic signals that influences the age women begin menopause has been identified, potentially paving the way to fertility treatment that could extend the natural reproductive lifespan of women. Researchers scanned the genes of more than 200,000 women and found nearly 300 genetic sign
53min
Flexible, wearable X-ray detector doesn't require heavy metals
X-ray imaging is a fast and painless way for doctors to see inside a person. But radiation detectors, which go under the body part being imaged, are rigid panels that contain harmful heavy metals, such as lead and cadmium. Now, researchers report a proof-of-concept wearable X-ray detector prepared from nontoxic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) layered between flexible plastic and gold electrodes fo
1h
ArtSea Ink: A colorful, seaweed-based ink for 3D printing
Some artists are embracing 3D printing as a new medium, allowing them to create intricate 3D compositions that are difficult to produce in any other way. But the rigid, plastic-based materials used in many 3D printers require high heat for workability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Omega have developed a colorful new ink for 2D and 3D art made of mica pigments in alginate, a sugar from seaweed
1h
Dissolvable smartwatch makes for easier electronics recycling
Small electronics, including smartwatches and fitness trackers, aren't easily dismantled and recycled. So when a new model comes out, most users send the old devices into hazardous waste streams. To simplify small electronics recycling, researchers have developed a two-metal nanocomposite for circuits that disintegrates when submerged in water. They demonstrated the circuits in a prototype transie
1h
Bill Gates Associate Says He Fainted When Epstein Connection Was Revealed
Epstein Connection Even now, months after it was revealed that Bill Gates' relationship with Jeffrey Epstein was likely a driving factor in his divorce and a great source of personal turmoil, more troubling details about the duo continue to emerge. New reporting from Rolling Stone reveals a greater insight into the disgraced financier and convicted sex criminal's playbook for ingratiating himself
1h
Illuminating tissue formation
Researchers have developed a molecule that fluoresces where new tissue is forming in the body. Alongside helping to detect tumors, the molecule could play a significant role in research of wound healing disorders.
2h
Researchers develop coating for endotracheal tubes that releases antimicrobial peptides
In a proof-of-concept study, researchers have created a coating that can be applied to endotracheal tubes and release antimicrobial peptides that target infectious bacteria with specificity. The innovation could reduce upper-airway bacterial inflammation during intubation, a situation that can lead to chronic inflammation and a condition called subglottic stenosis, the narrowing of the airway by a
2h
My favorite Martian image: Helicopter scouts ridge area for Perseverance
Ask any space explorer, and they'll have a favorite photo or two from their mission. For Kevin Hand, a scientist at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California and co-lead of the Perseverance rover's first science campaign, his latest favorite is a 3D image of low-lying wrinkles in the surface of Jezero Crater. The science team calls this area "Raised Ridges." NASA's Ingenuity Mars Hel
2h
137 human genomes from the Middle East fill gaps in human history
Whole-genome sequencing efforts around the world have offered important insights into human diversity, historical migrations, and the relationships between people of different regions — but scientists still don't have a complete picture because some regions and people remain understudied. A new study helps to fill one of these big gaps by generating more than 100 high-coverage genome sequences fr
2h
New genes linked to longer reproductive lifespan in women
Scientists have identified nearly 300 gene variations that influence reproductive lifespan in women. Additionally, in mice, they have successfully manipulated several key genes associated with these variants to extend their reproductive lifespan. Their findings substantially increase our knowledge of the reproductive ageing process, as well as providing ways to improve the prediction of which wome
2h
Researchers around the world are buzzing about a candidate superconductor
Since receiving a $25 million grant in 2019 to become the first National Science Foundation (NSF) Quantum Foundry, UC Santa Barbara researchers affiliated with the foundry have been working to develop materials that can enable quantum information-based technologies for such applications as quantum computing, communications, sensing, and simulation.
2h
Using graphene foam to filter toxins from drinking water
Some kinds of water pollution, such as algal blooms and plastics that foul rivers, lakes, and marine environments, lie in plain sight. But other contaminants are not so readily apparent, which makes their impact potentially more dangerous. Among these invisible substances is uranium. Leaching into water resources from mining operations, nuclear waste sites, or from natural subterranean deposits, t
3h
Ras-like Gem GTPase induced by Npas4 promotes activity-dependent neuronal tolerance for ischemic stroke [Neuroscience]
Ischemic stroke, which results in loss of neurological function, initiates a complex cascade of pathological events in the brain, largely driven by excitotoxic Ca2+ influx in neurons. This leads to cortical spreading depolarization, which induces expression of genes involved in both neuronal death and survival; yet, the functions of these…
3h
Cloud shadows drive vertical migrations of deep-dwelling marine life [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Many zooplankton and fishes vertically migrate on a diel cycle to avoid predation, moving from their daytime residence in darker, deep waters to prey-rich surface waters to feed at dusk and returning to depth before dawn. Vertical migrations also occur in response to other processes that modify local light intensity,…
3h
Protein interaction landscapes revealed by advanced in vivo cross-linking-mass spectrometry [Biochemistry]
Defining protein–protein interactions (PPIs) in their native environment is crucial to understanding protein structure and function. Cross-linking–mass spectrometry (XL-MS) has proven effective in capturing PPIs in living cells; however, the proteome coverage remains limited. Here, we have developed a robust in vivo XL-MS platform to facilitate in-depth PPI mapping by…
3h
Quantifying the compressibility of complex networks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Many complex networks depend upon biological entities for their preservation. Such entities, from human cognition to evolution, must first encode and then replicate those networks under marked resource constraints. Networks that survive are those that are amenable to constrained encoding—or, in other words, are compressible. But how compressible is a…
3h
Proteolytic processing of secretory pathway kinase Fam20C by site-1 protease promotes biomineralization [Biochemistry]
Family with sequence similarity 20C (Fam20C), the major protein kinase in the secretory pathway, generates the vast majority of the secreted phosphoproteome. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Fam20C transport, secretion, and function remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that Fam20C exists as a type II transmembrane protein within the secretory…
3h
High-throughput suppressor screen demonstrates that RcsF monitors outer membrane integrity and not Bam complex function [Microbiology]
The regulator of capsule synthesis (Rcs) is a complex signaling cascade that monitors gram-negative cell envelope integrity. The outer membrane (OM) lipoprotein RcsF is the sensory component, but how RcsF functions remains elusive. RcsF interacts with the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) complex, which assembles RcsF in complex with OM proteins…
3h
Methane-derived carbon flows into host-virus networks at different trophic levels in soil [Microbiology]
The concentration of atmospheric methane (CH4) continues to increase with microbial communities controlling soil–atmosphere fluxes. While there is substantial knowledge of the diversity and function of prokaryotes regulating CH4 production and consumption, their active interactions with viruses in soil have not been identified. Metagenomic sequencing of soil microbial communities enables…
3h
Active topolectrical circuits [Applied Physical Sciences]
The transfer of topological concepts from the quantum world to classical mechanical and electronic systems has opened fundamentally different approaches to protected information transmission and wave guidance. A particularly promising emergent technology is based on recently discovered topolectrical circuits that achieve robust electric signal transduction by mimicking edge currents in…
3h
Relationship with dad may ease some teen troubles
New research links a close, supportive relationship with parents, especially fathers, at key points during adolescence with fewer adjustment issues. The researchers examined how "parental intimacy" in families with mothers and fathers affected the children's self-esteem, weight concerns, and depressive symptoms at different points across adolescence. They found that closeness with fathers had bro
4h
Promoting biodiversity-friendly landscapes – beyond organic farming
Is organic farming the only alternative to conventional agriculture to promote biodiversity in agricultural landscapes? An international research team questions this. According to the authors, a landscape mosaic of natural habitats and small-scale and diverse cultivated areas is the key to promoting biodiversity on a large scale in both conventional and organic agriculture. They state that politic
4h
Barriers to voting in elections linked to increased odds of being uninsured
Groups commonly targeted by voting restriction laws—those with low incomes, who are racial minorities, and who are young—are also less likely to be insured in states with more voting restrictions, according to a study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and University of Alberta School of Public Health, Edmonton, Canada. However, those who are wealthier, white or
4h
Increase in extreme precipitation in the northeast caused by Atlantic variability and climate change
Recent record-breaking rainfall across the northeastern United States is part of a larger trend. From Maine to West Virginia, the Northeast has seen an abrupt increase in extreme precipitation—heavy rain and snow resulting in about 1 to 2 inches of water in a day depending on location since 1996, which has coincided with warming sea surface temperatures in the North Atlantic. Northeast extreme pre
4h
Nanotech device can detect risk for serious complication during pregnancy
Researchers have developed a new way to detect a potentially life-threatening condition that can occur during pregnancy. The condition, placenta accreta spectrum disorder, occurs when the placenta grows too deeply into the uterine wall and fails to detach from the uterus after childbirth. It can lead to significant blood loss during pregnancy and delivery, requiring blood transfusions and intensiv
4h
Repurposing RNA sequencing for discovery of RNA modifications in clinical cohorts
The study of RNA modifications in large clinical cohorts can reveal relationships between the epitranscriptome and human diseases, although this is especially challenging. We developed ModTect ( https://github.com/ktan8/ModTect ), a statistical framework to identify RNA modifications de novo by standard RNA-sequencing with deletion and mis-incorporation signals. We show that ModTect can identify
4h
GRB2 enforces homology-directed repair initiation by MRE11
DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is initiated by MRE11 nuclease for both homology-directed repair (HDR) and alternative end joining (Alt-EJ). Here, we found that GRB2, crucial to timely proliferative RAS/MAPK pathway activation, unexpectedly forms a biophysically validated GRB2-MRE11 (GM) complex for efficient HDR initiation. GRB2-SH2 domain targets the GM complex to phosphorylated H2AX at DS
4h
The epigenetic factor FVE orchestrates cytoplasmic SGS3-DRB4-DCL4 activities to promote transgene silencing in Arabidopsis
Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is a regulatory mechanism to suppress undesired transcripts. Here, we identified Flowering locus VE ( FVE ), a well-known epigenetic component, as a new player in cytoplasmic PTGS. Loss-of-function fve mutations substantially reduced the accumulation of transgene-derived small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). FVE interacts with suppressor of gene silencing 3 (S
4h
The exon-junction complex helicase eIF4A3 controls cell fate via coordinated regulation of ribosome biogenesis and translational output
Eukaryotic initiation factor 4A-III (eIF4A3), a core helicase component of the exon junction complex, is essential for splicing, mRNA trafficking, and nonsense-mediated decay processes emerging as targets in cancer therapy. Here, we unravel eIF4A3's tumor-promoting function by demonstrating its role in ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) and p53 (de)regulation. Mechanistically, eIF4A3 resides in nucleoli
4h
The physics of cement cohesion
Cement is the most produced material in the world. A major player in greenhouse gas emissions, it is the main binding agent in concrete, providing a cohesive strength that rapidly increases during setting. Understanding how such cohesion emerges is a major obstacle to advances in cement science and technology. Here, we combine computational statistical mechanics and theory to demonstrate how ceme
4h
Effect of BCG vaccination on proinflammatory responses in elderly individuals
We investigated the influence of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination on the unstimulated plasma levels of a wide panel of cytokines, chemokines, acute-phase proteins (APPs), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and growth factors in a group of healthy elderly individuals (age, 60 to 80 years) at baseline (before vaccination) and 1 month after vaccination as part of our clinical study to exami
4h
Cointegration of single-transistor neurons and synapses by nanoscale CMOS fabrication for highly scalable neuromorphic hardware
Cointegration of multistate single-transistor neurons and synapses was demonstrated for highly scalable neuromorphic hardware, using nanoscale complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication. The neurons and synapses were integrated on the same plane with the same process because they have the same structure of a metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor with different function
4h
The source scaling and seismic productivity of slow slip transients
Slow slip events (SSEs) represent a slow faulting process leading to aseismic strain release often accompanied by seismic tremor or earthquake swarms. The larger SSEs last longer and are often associated with intense and energetic tremor activity, suggesting that aseismic slip controls tremor genesis. A similar pattern has been observed for SSEs that trigger earthquake swarms, although no compara
4h
A widely diverged locus involved in locomotor adaptation in Heliconius butterflies
Heliconius butterflies have undergone adaptive radiation and therefore serve as an excellent system for exploring the continuum of speciation and adaptive evolution. However, there is a long-lasting paradox between their convergent mimetic wing patterns and rapid divergence in speciation. Here, we characterize a locus that consistently displays high divergence among Heliconius butterflies and act
4h
Early evidence for historical overfishing in the Gulf of Mexico
Fisheries encompass complex interplays between social, economic, and environmental factors, but limitations on historical fisheries data can hamper efforts to identify and contextualize the long-term spatiotemporal patterns that shape them. We integrate 2500 years of stable isotope ( 34 S, 13 C, and 15 N) and zooarchaeological evidence from Gulf of Mexico fisheries to assess cultural, demographic
4h
Efficient energy transport in an organic semiconductor mediated by transient exciton delocalization
Efficient energy transport is desirable in organic semiconductor (OSC) devices. However, photogenerated excitons in OSC films mostly occupy highly localized states, limiting exciton diffusion coefficients to below ~10 –2 cm 2 /s and diffusion lengths below ~50 nm. We use ultrafast optical microscopy and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations to study well-ordered poly(3-hexylthiophene) nanof
4h
Oxygen-deficient metal oxides supported nano-intermetallic InNi3C0.5 toward efficient CO2 hydrogenation to methanol
Direct CO 2 hydrogenation to methanol using renewable energy–generated hydrogen is attracting intensive attention, but qualifying catalysts represents a grand challenge. Pure-/multi-metallic systems used for this task usually have low catalytic activity. Here, we tailored a highly active and selective InNi 3 C 0.5 /ZrO 2 catalyst by tuning the performance-relevant electronic metal-support interac
4h
Absence of a long-lived lunar paleomagnetosphere
Determining the presence or absence of a past long-lived lunar magnetic field is crucial for understanding how the Moon's interior and surface evolved. Here, we show that Apollo impact glass associated with a young 2 million–year–old crater records a strong Earth-like magnetization, providing evidence that impacts can impart intense signals to samples recovered from the Moon and other planetary b
4h
Self-assembling synthetic nanoadjuvant scaffolds cross-link B cell receptors and represent new platform technology for therapeutic antibody production
Host antibody responses are pivotal for providing protection against infectious agents. We have pioneered a new class of self-assembling micelles based on pentablock copolymers that enhance antibody responses while providing a low inflammatory environment compared to traditional adjuvants. This type of "just-right" immune response is critical in the rational design of vaccines for older adults. H
4h
Muscle protein that makes vertebrates more fit linked to limited lifespan
Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine say they have added to evidence that a protein called CaMKII improves strength, endurance, muscle health and fitness in young animals. Their experiments working with mice and fruit flies, however, found that the gene for CaMKII also contributes to an evolutionary tradeoff: increased susceptibility to age-associated diseases, frailty and mortality.
4h
Haunting Video Shows Space Station Module Burning as It Falls
Pour One Out Last week, Russia's Pirs module was retired and detached from the International Space Station, one month before its 20th work anniversary. As it fell back to the Earth, space station crew members got to watch a six-minute light show as the module incinerated and broke apart in the atmosphere like a slow-burning shooting star, according to Space.com . Thankfully, for those of us who d
4h
Nearby star resembles ours in its youth
New research provides a closer look at a nearby star thought to resemble our young Sun. The work allows scientists to better understand what our Sun may have been like when it was young, and how it may have shaped the atmosphere of our planet and the development of life on Earth.
4h
Researchers identify approach for potential nontypeable haemophilus influenzae vaccine
Scientists have identified two proteins that could be used for a potential vaccine against nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Working in a mouse model, the investigators found that administering two bacterial adhesive proteins that play a key role in helping the bacteria to latch on to respiratory cells and initiate respiratory tract infection stimulated protective immunity against diverse
4h
Using virtual reality to help students understand the brain's complex systems, researchers demonstrate effectiveness of 3D visualization as a learning tool
Researchers have developed unique, interactive, 3D narrated diagrams to help students learn about the structure and function of perceptual systems in the human brain. A new study exploring how students responded to these lessons on desktop PCs and in virtual reality (VR) offers new insights into the benefits of VR as an educational tool.
4h
Generous people cheat the masses in this experiment
An experiment finds that even generous people are willing to steal half the earnings of a large group if their personal gain exceeds 100 euro, report researchers. In the recent years, the general public has steadily lost confidence in financial institutions, economic authorities, and corporate managers in particular. People hold a view that key economic actors will do anything for profits, includ
5h
Brain 'switching system' wards off neurological crashes
A system in the brain used in the processing of information and the storing of memories works similarly to railroad switches controlling a train's destination, researchers report. The findings offer new insights into how the brain functions and reveal coordination the brain uses to avoid neurological clashes. "Researchers have sought to identify neural circuits that have specialized functions, bu
5h
Home heat pumps could cut pollution and save money
Deploying residential heat pumps more widely across the United States has the potential to help reduce carbon pollution while also saving homeowners money, according to a new study. However, in most parts of the country the electricity grid will have to get cleaner and electric heat pumps will have to get cheaper before these devices become both environmentally and financially compelling, says Pa
5h
Fighting antibiotic resistance with phages
Farmers around the world rely on antibiotics to keep livestock healthy, but increased bacterial resistance has created problems for both animals and humans. Instead of expensive new drugs, scientists have found a potential affordable solution that comes from nature. A new article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, details how bacteriophages co
6h
Watch: How parents can ready kids to head back to school
Many students have been out of their classrooms for a year and a half, and though this fall is shaping up to be more "normal," there are still plenty of questions about what back to school will look like. Gearing up for this year's back-to-school season means thinking about a lot more than notebooks and highlighters. "We may be quarantined at different times or back to e-learning. We may or may n
6h
German flood risks were clearly underestimated
To better estimate flood risks, risk maps should also consider historical data. This is recommended by researchers of CEDIM—Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). CEDIM has now presented its first report on the flood disaster in Rhineland-Palatinate and North Rhine-Westphalia. As regards the role of climate change, the combination o
6h
Biotech startup aims for 'new paradigm' in medicine by parsing proteins
DNA testing is one of modern medicine's most significant breakthroughs. Today, anyone can receive personalized information about their genes and ancestry with just a little saliva. Now, a Seattle-based company is working to bring equally deep analysis to another set of complicated molecules in humans: the trillions of proteins circulating within our bodies.
6h
New global map shows populations are growing faster in flood-prone areas
Even as climate change and urbanization make floods more frequent and their consequences more severe, a higher proportion of people are living in areas that experience them. In a new study published today in Nature, researchers used satellite images to map over 900 flood events that occurred between 2000 and 2018, affecting between 255 million and 290 million people. And while the global populati
7h
Flood risk rises as people surge into vulnerable regions
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02149-7 Satellite imaging has shown population increases are 10x higher in flood prone areas than previously thought, and a new way to introduce fairness into a democratic process.
7h
Emergent order in hydrodynamic spin lattices
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03682-1 A macroscopic analogue of a spin system is shown to emerge in an ensemble of droplets bouncing on the surface of a vibrating bath, revealing symmetry-breaking phenomena such as 'magnetic' ordering.
7h
Agrochemicals interact synergistically to increase bee mortality
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03787-7 A meta-analysis of studies in which bees were exposed to combinations of agrochemicals, nutritional stressors and/or parasites revealed evidence for synergistic effects on mortality when bees were exposed to multiple agrochemicals at field-realistic levels.
7h
Quantized nonlinear Thouless pumping
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03688-9 Nonlinearity is shown to induce quantized topological transport via soliton motion; specifically, we demonstrate nonlinear Thouless pumping of photons in waveguide arrays with a non-uniformly occupied energy band.
7h
Connectomes across development reveal principles of brain maturation
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03778-8 Serial-section electron microscopy is used to reconstruct the full brain connectome of eight individual Caenorhabditis elegans at various stages of development, providing insight into the principles underlying brain maturation.
7h
Fair algorithms for selecting citizens' assemblies
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03788-6 Principles from the field of fair division are used to develop selection algorithms for citizens' assemblies that produce panels that are representative of the population while simultaneously selecting individuals with near-equal probabilities.
7h
A cocktail of pesticides, parasites and hunger leaves bees down and out
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02079-4 Pollinators are under threat. A meta-analysis reveals that the combination of agrochemicals, parasites and malnutrition has a cumulative negative effect on bees, and that pesticide–pesticide interactions increase bee mortality.
7h
A bridge across the democracy–expertise divide
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02006-7 An innovative algorithm provides a way of fairly selecting representative individuals for citizens' assemblies to learn about and deliberate on certain topics. Such groups hold promise for closing the gap between democracy and expertise.
7h
Bouncing droplets mimic spin systems
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02077-6 Experiments show that a collection of bouncing fluid droplets can behave like a microscopic system of spins — the intrinsic angular momenta of particles. This discovery could lead to a better understanding of the physics of spin systems.
7h
The fraction of the global population at risk of floods is growing
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01974-0 Satellite imaging combined with population data shows that, globally, the number of people living in flood-prone areas is growing faster than is the number living on higher ground — greatly increasing the potential impact of floods.
7h
Deranged chromatin drives uterine fibroid tumours
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02005-8 A previously unknown subgroup of uterine fibroid tumours is driven by mutations that result in disruption of the DNA–protein complex chromatin. The findings could inform the management of this common condition.
7h
Insights into a receptor that lets insects sense scents
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02076-7 In insects, odorant receptor proteins form membrane ion channels that open on binding to an odorant molecule. The structures of an inactive and an active channel lend insights into how insects detect and distinguish between odours.
7h
Surprisingly modern lessons from classic Russian literature
Russian literature has a knack for precisely capturing and describing the human condition. Fyodor Dostoevsky, Leo Tolstoy, and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn are among the greatest writers who ever lived. If you want to be a wiser person, spend time with the great Russian novelists. In Fyodor Dostoevsky's 1864 novella Notes from Underground , an unnamed narrator asks the following question: "What can be
7h
Don't call people out — call them in | Loretta J. Ross
We live in a call-out culture, says activist and scholar Loretta J. Ross. You're probably familiar with it: the public shaming and blaming, on social media and in real life, of people who may have done wrong and are being held accountable. In this bold, actionable talk, Ross gives us a toolkit for starting productive conversations instead of fights — what she calls a "call-in culture" — and shar
7h
Inside look shows how 'headless' hydra react to a poke
Researchers are taking advantage of hydras' transparency to manipulate the remarkably resilient creatures in just about every possible way to learn how they sense touch. The new comprehensive analysis of hydra is a small step toward understanding neural networks in all living creatures. Hydra vulgaris , freshwater cnidarians that look like miniature jellyfish polyps, expand and contract as they n
7h
How the African house gecko made its way to the New World
A team of researchers from Villanova University, the Thackeray Wildlife Foundation and Museu de História Natural e da Ciência da Universidade do Porto has found evidence that the African house gecko made its way to the New World by riding aboard slave trading ships hundreds of years ago. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their DNA analysis of g
8h
Promoting biodiversity-friendly landscapes: Beyond organic farming
Is organic farming the only alternative to conventional agriculture to promote biodiversity in agricultural landscapes? An international research team led by the University of Göttingen questions this. According to the authors, a landscape mosaic of natural habitats and small-scale and diverse cultivated areas is the key to promoting biodiversity on a large scale in both conventional and organic a
8h
West coast fires produce east coast effects
Earlier this month, New York City and other cities along the east coast experienced some of the worst air pollution in the world. The cause? Wildfires in California and Oregon so large they produced smoke that drifted thousands of miles. If smoke that dense can travel from one end of the U.S. to the other, imagine what it could do to your lungs.
8h
Deckhand Redeems Himself with Huge Haul | Deadliest Catch
Stream Full Episodes of Deadliest Catch: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/deadliest-catch Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/deadliest-catch/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow Us o
8h
Illuminating tissue formation through flourescence
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed a molecule that fluoresces where new tissue is forming in the body. Alongside helping to detect tumors, the molecule could play a significant role in research of wound healing disorders.
8h
Roadside ditches are effective at nitrogen removal
Roadside ditches are a catchall for water, from both sheets of rain that fall on roads and runoff from lawns or fields. Although ditches are ubiquitous in the landscape, they have the potential to be much more than a storm water conduit. In fact, ditches are human-made lowlands that often act as wetlands, complete with fluctuating water levels and a broad array of vegetation and microbes.
8h
Loss of eelgrass beds gives rise to large emissions of carbon and nutrients
Losses of important eelgrass meadows in western Sweden since the 1980s have led to considerable bottom erosion and the release of carbon and nitrogen; substances that contribute to increasing climate change and eutrophication. This is shown in a new study by researchers at the University of Gothenburg, Stockholm University, Åbo Akademi University and the University of Southern Denmark, published i
9h
Study: No evidence that climate change is fueling East African migration
No link currently exists proving climate change is driving migration out of East Africa, despite a widespread acceptance that human mobility is a key impact of climate change, according to research today from a multi-disciplinary Oxford University team, which maintains the factors driving migration are complex.
9h
A dissolvable smartwatch makes for easier electronics recycling
Small electronics, including smartwatches and fitness trackers, aren't easily dismantled and recycled. So when a new model comes out, most users send the old devices into hazardous waste streams. To simplify small electronics recycling, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a two-metal nanocomposite for circuits that disintegrates when submerged in water. They
9h
NASA identifies likely locations of the early molten moon's deep secrets
Shortly after it formed, the moon was covered in a global ocean of molten rock (magma). As the magma ocean cooled and solidified, dense minerals sank to form the mantle layer, while less-dense minerals floated to form the surface crust. Later intense bombardment by massive asteroids and comets punched through the crust, blasting out pieces of mantle and scattering them across the lunar surface.
9h
New findings on the evolution of galaxies
Emirati national Aisha Al Yazeedi, a research scientist at the NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Center for Astro, Particle, and Planetary Physics, has published her first research paper, featuring some key findings on the evolution of galaxies.
9h
Image: Mediterranean continues to bake
This map shows the temperature of the land surface on 2 August 2021. It is clear to see that surface temperatures in Turkey and Cyprus have reached over 50°C, again. A map we published on 2 July shows pretty much the same situation. The Mediterranean has been suffering a heatwave for some weeks, leading to numerous wildfires. Turkey, for example, is reported to be amid the country's worst blazes i
9h
Dancing ghosts point to new discoveries in the cosmos
Researchers from Western Sydney University and CSIRO, Australia's national science agency, have discovered strange clouds of electrons surrounding galaxies deep in the cosmos. The clouds, which are about a billion light years away and never been seen before, resemble two ghosts dancing.
9h
Rate of nuclear reaction in exploding stars
New research by Surrey's Nuclear Physics Group has shown that it's possible to mimic excited quantum states with exotic nuclei, opening up a host of opportunities for next generation radioactive beam facilities, such as the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB).
9h
What it takes to become Australia's first woman astronaut
I'm currently training to become Australia's first woman astronaut. I expect to fly my first suborbital mission sometime in 2023 as a payload specialist on a commercial mission. In other words, I'll be one of few certified crew members who can handle specialized scientific equipment aboard a suborbital spacecraft.
9h
Keeping clubroot in rapeseed in check by using fungi
Teams from the Chair of Plant Physiology at Technische Universität Dresden and the Julius Kühn Institute in Braunschweig have been researching biological methods to better control the widespread plant disease 'clubroot' in rapeseed in a joint project. They were able to observe an increase in fresh weight in infected plants through the addition of the fungus Acremonium alternatum. This is a promisi
9h
Visualizing stress in plastics
A research team led by Prof. Dr. Michael Sommer, Professorship of Polymer Chemistry at Chemnitz University of Technology, and PD Dr. Michael Walter, project leader at the Cluster Of Excellence Living, Adaptive, and Energy-autonomous Materials Systems (livMatS) at the University of Freiburg, has succeeded in constructing a new dye molecule from the area of so-called mechanophores.
9h
Climate change is already disrupting US forests and coasts, evidence at 5 long-term research sites shows
Record-breaking heat waves and drought have left West Coast rivers lethally hot for salmon, literally cooked millions of mussels and clams in their shells and left forests primed to burn. The extraordinary severity of 2021's heat and drought, and its fires and floods, has many people questioning whether climate change, fueled by human actions, is progressing even faster than studies have predicted
9h
98% of emperor penguin colonies could be extinct by 2100. Can Endangered Species Act protection help them?
Emperor penguins thrive on Antarctica's coastlines in icy conditions any human would find extreme. Yet, like Goldilocks, they have a narrow comfort zone: If there's too much sea ice, trips to bring food from the ocean become long and arduous, and their chicks may starve. With too little sea ice, the chicks are at risk of drowning.
9h
A Home Equity Investment Lets You Tap Your Home's Value Without Monthly Payments
The equity in your home, when used correctly, can be a powerful tool in reaching your financial goals. And countless homeowners are looking to take advantage of today's booming housing market. There are numerous ways to get cash for your home equity, including home loans and HELOCs. But a third option is a home equity investment which gives you cash today in exchange for a portion of the future v
9h
LEDs light the way to coronavirus disinfection
LEDs are commonly used for sterilization—you may be using one to clean your electric toothbrush, for example. In the continued effort to combat the coronavirus pandemic, LEDs can also help inactivate SARS-CoV-2.
9h
The escapee
Nature, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02095-4 Making a clean sweep.
9h
Skeptiker i parken! (8 augusti, Malmö)
Parkträff med quiz och grillning! Plats: Pildammsparken i Malmö (närmare platsangivelse kommer inom kort) Vi träffas utomhus, håller avstånd på säkert sätt och pratar vetenskap och skepticism. Barnvänligt! Grillmöjligheter finns, … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
9h
Improving weather simulations through increased generality
Modern weather forecasts and climate studies rely heavily on computer simulations implementing physical models. These models need to make cohesive large-scale predictions but also include enough small-scale detail to be relevant and actionable. Given the enormous physical complexity of weather systems and the climate, realistic stochastic simulation of hydroenvironmental events in space and time,
10h
Finding friends of friends on social media
A quick way to identify the "nth" friends of social media users based on spatial data mining of profiles and behavior on a service such as Twitter is described in the International Journal of Advanced Intelligence Paradigms.
10h
Study: Road safety campaigns linked to fewer deaths
Since 2011, the United Nations has continually targeted, and largely failed to realize, greater road safety on a global scale. Road deaths are, in fact, increasing. Road safety efforts are nothing new to Japan, which has been conducting seasonal, nationwide education and enforcement campaigns since 1952.
11h
Protect Your Internet Privacy With These Top VPN Deals
A virtual private network (VPN) helps protect your privacy by routing all your internet traffic through an encrypted connection to a remote server. However, each VPN has its own tools and features to protect you, so you should choose the service that best meets your needs. For a limited time, take your pick from these ten VPN deals, now 30% off with code ANNUAL30. FastestVPN: Lifetime Subscriptio
11h
The Water Crisis in Climate-Vulnerable Bangladesh
In Bangladesh's coastal districts — including Khulna, Satkhira, and Bagerhat — the effects of climate change have made the water so salty that it can no longer be used for drinking or for other domestic purposes. According to one study, some 70 percent of local residents now depend on water in distant ponds.
13h
Shear band-driven precipitate dispersion for ultrastrong ductile medium-entropy alloys
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25031-6 Precipitation hardening, used as an effective strengthening strategy in various alloy systems, has been usually achieved by coherent precipitates. Here, the authors develop ultrastrong ductile alloys employing structurally dissimilar semicoherent precipitates by shear band-driven precipitation.
13h
CD13 orients the apical-basal polarity axis necessary for lumen formation
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24993-x Epithelial cells that organise into structures that contain a lumen are polarised. Here, the authors show that the short intracellular domain of transmembrane protein CD13 is required to capture endosomes at the apical site and is required for the polarisation of cells.
13h
Reversible gene silencing through frameshift indels and frameshift scars provide adaptive plasticity for Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25055-y Bacterial adaptation through frame-shifting insertions and deletions (indels) could be reversed by secondary introduction of a frame-restoring indel. Here, the authors develop ScarTrek, a program that scans genomic data for different indels, and analyze 5977 clinical M. tuberculosis isolates for indel frequenc
13h
NK cells in hypoxic skin mediate a trade-off between wound healing and antibacterial defence
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25065-w During wound healing and infection in the skin there is a hypoxic environment involving HIF-1α and NK cells. Here the authors show that NK cells through HIF-1α provide a cross-regulatory balance to provide an adequate antimicrobial defence that can inhibit subsequent wound healing.
13h
GIANA allows computationally-efficient TCR clustering and multi-disease repertoire classification by isometric transformation
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25006-7 Grouping T-cell receptors (TCRs) by sequence similarity could lead to new immunological insights. Here, the authors propose a tool that allows the rapid clustering of millions of TCR sequences, identifying TCRs potentially associated with the response to cancer, infectious and autoimmune diseases.
13h
Phosphorus coordinated Rh single-atom sites on nanodiamond as highly regioselective catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25061-0 Single-atom Rh catalysts present superior activity in olefins hydroformylation, yet with limited success in regioselectivity control. Here the authors develop a Rh1 single-atom catalyst with nanodiamond as support, with which good to excellent regioselectivities to branched aldehydes in hydroformylation of ter
13h
Thresholds of temperature change for mass extinctions
Nature Communications, Published online: 04 August 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25019-2 The linkage between temperature change and extinction rates in the fossil record is well-known qualitatively but little explored quantitatively. Here the authors investigate the relationship of marine animal extinctions with rate and magnitude of temperature change across the last 450 million years, and identi
13h
Miljövänligare engångsblöjor med gluten istället för olja
Material som kan suga upp mycket stora mängder vätska, i till exempel blöjor, tillverkas av fossil petroleumolja. Forskare från SLU och KTH har tagit fram vete- och potatisbaserade material med liknande egenskaper. Många småbarnsföräldrar tänker på hälsa och miljö i samband med inköp till sina barn. Vad de ofta inte är medvetna om är att den stora miljöboven vid användning av engångsblöjor är de
13h
Protecting Port Fourchon: Scientists pinpoint how to manage sediment to prevent land loss and improve hurricane prepared
The southernmost port in Louisiana is a key place for the U.S. energy industry, but also one of the most vulnerable places in the nation. Port Fourchon in Lafourche Parish serves 90% of the Gulf of Mexico's deepwater oil and gas activities, which is why the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory has invested $25 million in LSU to create a digital dome protecting Port Fourchon and the Louisiana Offshore Oi
14h
New report: State of the science on western wildfires, forests and climate change
Exceptionally hot and dry weather this summer has fueled dozens of wildfires across the western U.S., spewing smoke across the country and threatening to register yet another record-breaking year. More than a century of fire exclusion has created dense forests packed with excess trees and brush that ignite and spread fires quickly under increasingly warm and dry conditions.
14h
Early molten moon's deep secrets
Recently, a pair of NASA studies identified the most likely locations to find pieces of the Moon's mantle on the surface, providing a map for future lunar sample return missions such as those under NASA's Artemis program. If collected and analyzed, these fragments from deep within the Moon can provide a better understanding of how the Moon, the Earth, and many other solar system worlds evolved.
21h
State of the science on western wildfires, forests and climate change
Seeing the urgent need for change, a team of scientists from leading research universities, conservation organizations and government laboratories across the West has produced a synthesis of the scientific literature that clearly lays out the established science and strength of evidence on climate change, wildfire and forest management for seasonally dry forests. The goal is to give land managers
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Insight into underlying causes of seizure disorder in babies
Researchers report that infantile spasms, a rare but serious seizure disorder in babies, appear to be the result of a molecular pathway gone awry. In their study of a mouse model of the disorder, the researchers discovered that genetic mutations associated with the disease impair a pathway that is involved in building new synapses in the hippocampus, a brain region essential to learning and memory
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