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The Struggle to Overcome Mass-Shooting Cynicism
At first, the video offers a perspective we've seldom seen: an inside-the-classroom view of high-school students trying to evade an active shooter. Kids crouch below their desks and strategize in hushed tones. The lights are off. Fearing that the voice on the other side of the door is that of a killer, they flee. Then, as teenagers push open a window and thrust themselves to safety, the footage s
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LATEST

Californian firm touts 'mushroom leather' as sustainability gamechanger
Vegan leather alternative isn't just the hot fashion must-have – it could teach us about consumption and waste Vegan alternatives to leather could save more than just animals. The scientists behind fashion's new latest must-have – the "mushroom leather" handbag – believe that mycelium, a material grown from fungi which can be engineered to look and feel like calfskin or sheepskin, could help save
7h
Elon Musk Proposes Setting an Age Limit on US Politicians
Go the Limit SpaceX CEO and noted cyberbully Elon Musk seemed to take another shot at President Joe Biden early Thursday morning via Twitter — and added a trademark man-childish joke while doing so. "Let's set an age limit after which you can't run for political office, perhaps a number just below 70," the billionaire tweeted . Yes, that appears to be a crude, shoehorned-in 69 joke on top of his
1h
Omicron's Best- and Worst-Case Scenarios
World, meet Omicron; Omicron, meet a lot of people who are very, very anxious to know more about you. The arrival of the newest coronavirus variant, first identified in Botswana and South Africa and now present in the United States , might be bad news, or it might be terrible news—or maybe it's just a temporary distraction from Delta. Ultimately, Omicron's effect on the course of the pandemic wil
20h
Advancing mathematics by guiding human intuition with AI
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04086-x A framework through which machine learning can guide mathematicians in discovering new conjectures and theorems is presented and shown to yield mathematical insight on important open problems in different areas of pure mathematics.
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Three-dimensional imaging with optical frequency combs
Holography is a powerful technique of photography of a light field without a lens for 3D imaging and display. Now, scientists at the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics are moving holography forward by implementing it with optical frequency combs. Thousands of holograms over all colors of the rainbow can be recorded. Via digital processing, each hologram provides a three-dimensional image of th
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Bizarre tail weaponry in a transitional ankylosaur from subantarctic Chile
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04147-1 Stegouros elengassen, an ankylosaur from the late Cretaceous of Chile, has a large tail weapon, named a macuahuitl after the Aztec club, with a frond-like structure formed by seven pairs of laterally projecting osteoderms encasing the distal half of the tail.
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A different kind of COVID vaccine is about ready to roll
Protein subunit vaccines work by injecting people with a tiny portion of a virus. In the case of the COVID-19 vaccine, that tiny portion is the spike protein that the coronavirus uses to enter cells. (Image credit: Karen Ducey/Getty Images)
22h
Covid: scientists find possible trigger for AstraZeneca jab blood clots
Experts hope better understanding of rare side effect of vaccine could help 'turn the tide' on pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists believe they may have found the trigger behind the extremely rare blood clot complications stemming from the Oxford/AstraZeneca's Covid vaccine. According to a team of researchers from Cardiff and the US, the reaction can
8h
Bad News, Boys! Vaping Linked to Erectile Dysfunction
Scientists have discovered yet another reason why vaping sucks, and this time, it's affecting a whole different organ from your lungs. A joint study conducted by New York University and Johns Hopkins has found that men who smoke e-cigarettes are more 2.4 times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than their non-vaping counterparts — a sorry state of affairs for those who use e-cigs because th
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Misinformation fuelled by 'tsunami' of poor research, says science prize winner
Dutch microbiologist Elisabeth Bik, winner of prestigious John Maddox prize, says trust in science is being undermined A "tsunami" of poor quality research is fuelling misinformation and could undermine trust in science, the winner of the prestigious John Maddox prize has warned. Elisabeth Bik, a Dutch microbiologist turned science sleuth who on Wednesday evening won the John Maddox prize for sta
22h
Scientists Say the Sun May Have Kinda Sprayed the Earth With Water
Scientists may have answered a longstanding question about exactly where Earth's huge supply of water came from. A new study published in Nature Astronomy postulates that there may have been an additional step to the commonly-held theory that terrestrial water comes from carbonaceous asteroids — and it involves the sun. The root of the initial question about Earth's water, which covers about 70 p
23h
Sending the right message about the omicron variant is tricky
Scientists may not know for a couple weeks yet how risky the new coronavirus variant will be to public health. But getting out front now about what is known helps dispel misinformation, they say. (Image credit: Brian Munoz/St. Louis Public Radio)
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An Omicron Cryptocurrency Started Spiking, Because We Are Doomed
Omicron First there was the "Squid Game"-inspired crypto token that ended up being a sham . Then we got Thanksgiving parade balloons being used to sell NFTs . Absolutely nothing is sacred, with the crypto world sticking its fingers in practically every pie. In fact, not even the deadly COVID-19 pandemic is safe — one new cryptocurrency hit the crypto market this month with the same name as the sc
20h
The End of Roe
Anyone listening to today's oral argument on abortion could not miss that something historic was happening. The case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization , involves a Mississippi law that bans abortion at 15 weeks. Such a ban is clearly unconstitutional under current law— Roe v. Wade and its successor case, Planned Parenthood of Southeastern Pennsylvania v. Casey , recognize a right to c
18h
NASA Scientists: SpaceX Starship "Revolutionary" for Exploring Solar System
NASA scientists are really starting to get fired up about the idea of SpaceX's Starship, a massive spacecraft with the goal of lugging unprecedented amounts of cargo and passengers to distant corners of our solar system, Ars Technica 's Eric Berger reports . "You can really take advantage of the Starship architecture and get to the outer Solar System in ways we haven't thought about before," NASA
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Hubble Space Telescope Calls Out "Hot Mess" Galactic Collision
Hot Mess NASA is throwing shade at some colliding galaxies as they merge into what's known as "interacting galaxies," which is astrophysics speak for when galaxies, uh, collide . "This galaxy is kind of a hot mess," NASA's Hubble Space Telescope tweeted in reference to galaxy ESO 239-2, which is located a cool 550 million lightyears away from Earth. The account noted that eventually, galaxy ESO 2
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A Day Before the Bankruptcy Leak, Musk Quietly Hinted at Taking SpaceX Public
So we're doing this whole thing again, huh? About two months ago, a Twitter user posted screenshots of a 2013 email SpaceX CEO Elon Musk sent to employees, in which he elaborated on why he wanted to keep SpaceX private. Then, the day before yesterday, Musk suddenly replied to the months-old tweet, saying cryptically that "a lot has happened in eight years" — perhaps a hint that the billionaire is
19h
Safely delivering radiation to cancer patients in a 'FLASH'
Researchers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have shown for the first time the potential for linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to deliver effective, targeted doses of "FLASH" radiation to cancer patients. The new technique selectively kills cancer cells with minimal damage to healthy cells. The approach is outlined in a Scientific Reports paper.
20h
Climate Scientist Warns That Countries Are Going to Start Geoengineering the Earth
DIY Geoengineering Surprise: It'd actually be much cheaper to artificially change the world's climate than you probably think. So cheap, in fact, that one scientist believes that some countries might soon geoengineer the planet in response to climate change. Kate Ricke, a climate scientist and researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, told Wired that since geoengineering is actually
21h
Elon Musk Tersely Addresses SpaceX Bankruptcy Leak
Fixer Upper It's rare to find SpaceX CEO Elon Musk not in the mood to crack a joke on Twitter — but it turns out one of the few things he won't wisecrack about is his company's money issues. Yesterday, an internal email Musk sent to his SpaceX employees leaked and revealed that the company is, in Musk's telling , on the brink of bankruptcy. Th e key issue seems to be lack of progress in the devel
22h
Influential Astronomers Call Out NASA For Telescope With Offensive Name
J*mes W*bb Space Telescope The controversy continues for NASA's newest space telescope. The American Astronomical Society (AAS), an influential organization of professional astronomers, has penned a letter to NASA head Bill Nelson asking for a report on the agency's investigation into the naming of the controversial James Webb Space Telescope. "At the Nov AAS Board meeting, a letter to NASA Admin
19h
The Scariest Movie of the Year Isn't a Horror Movie
The Humans features no ghosts, monsters, or poltergeists. It's not set inside a haunted house, an abandoned building, or a tract of shadowy woods. And yet, it might be the scariest movie of the year. Based on Stephen Karam's Tony-winning play, and adapted and directed by Karam himself, The Humans centers on the Blake family as they gather in lower Manhattan for a Thanksgiving dinner. The mood is
21h
2021 Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar
It's time again for one of my favorite holiday traditions: the 14th annual Hubble Space Telescope Advent Calendar. Every day until Saturday, December 25, this page will present one new incredible image of our universe from NASA's Hubble telescope. Be sure to come back every day until Christmas, and follow us on Twitter or Facebook for daily updates. I hope you can enjoy these amazing and awe-insp
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Cancel Mel Gibson
Every day, as dawn's rosy fingers reach through my window, I arise and check in with Twitter, to see what fresh hell awaits. Generally, by about 6:30, I've been made furious by the outrage du jour. But recently, I experienced more of a sense of bemusement than ire, as I took in Deadline 's headline: " Mel Gibson in Talks to Direct Lethal Weapon 5 ." Gibson is a well-known Jew-hater ( anti-Semite
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Trump Tested Positive for COVID Before Breathing His Germs on Hundreds of People
A new book penned by one of former President Donald Trump's high ranking staffers claims that the commander-in-chief tested positive for COVID-19 before interacting, mostly maskless, with countless hundreds of people in the fall of 2020. As The Guardian reported , the forthcoming book from former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows describes a tense scene aboard Air Force One when it emerged
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The Norwegian wolf is extinct
There' s no longer any doubt—the wolves found in Norway and Sweden today are actually Finnish, according to extensive studies done on their genetic makeup. Humans wiped out Norway's original wolf population in the wild around 1970.
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America Is Running on Fumes
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . Let's start with a simple mystery: What happened to original blockbuster movies? Throughout the 20th century, Hollywood produced a healthy number of entirely new stories. The top movies of 1998—including Titanic , Saving Private Ryan , and There's Something About Mary —were almost all based on original screenplays. But since then, the U.S. box office has been
20h
The Rise of Déjà Zoom
If 2020 was a year of isolation, 2021 has been a year of reunions. Hugging and sharing meals with loved ones you haven't seen for months is great. But seeing someone in the flesh can feel weird if you previously knew them only from virtual meetings and videochats. Meeting Zoom friends in real life reveals how much is omitted when your computer's graphics card renders someone: their height, whethe
5h
When You Can't Change the World, Change Your Feelings
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Click here to listen to his new podcast series on all things happiness, How to Build a Happy Life . E veryone—even the most privileged among us—has circumstances they would like to change in their life. As the early sixth-century Roman philosopher Boethius put it, "One has abundant riches, bu
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The pandemic body: how the Covid era changed us – from hair loss to weight gain
Sore, blurry eyes, decaying teeth, spreading feet – the strange, difficult years of coronavirus have had unexpected effects on our general health This year, out of nowhere, my left heel has started hurting. Is it the onset of some degenerative condition, a normal byproduct of ageing, or simply pandemic life, I wonder. After all, living through this period has had surprising health consequences –
11h
Amazon Is Quietly Researching How to Block Out the Sun
Dim the Sun A billionaire researching plans to dim the Sun might seem like the plot of a famous "The Simpsons" episode — but that's exactly what Jeff Bezos seems to be doing. Bezos' megaretailer Amazon has partnered with the National Center for Atmospheric Research and the geoengineering nonprofit SilverLining to help create models that show what exactly would happen if we blocked out some of the
40min
NASA Rover's New Selfie Will Make You Feel Like You're on Mars, and Maybe a Little Drunk
360 View NASA has shared a brand new selfie its Curiosity Mars rover took late last month — and it's a real doozy. A whopping 81 images were stitched together to form a massive 360-degree panorama. Thanks to some clever editing, the entire vista was squished into one convenient frame, a beautifully warped — and slightly nausea-inducing — mess. Rock Hopping The unique image also gives us a tantali
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We Opened the Schools and … It Was Fine
When the coronavirus pandemic first hit, many states and towns closed everything, including schools . Public-health experts didn't know enough about how COVID was spread or how contagious it was, and the health-care system was overwhelmed in parts of the country. The American public could see the disaster unfolding in Italy, and many people believed that the U.S. needed to act before things got o
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Lunar radar data uncovers new clues about moon's ancient past
The dusty surface of the moon—immortalized in images of Apollo astronauts' lunar footprints—formed as the result of asteroid impacts and the harsh environment of space breaking down rock over millions of years. An ancient layer of this material, covered by periodic lava flows and now buried under the lunar surface, could provide new insight into the Moon's deep past, according to a team of scienti
20h
Renewables are set to soar
Construction of solar farms, wind turbines, and other sources of renewable power will soar over the next five years as nations set stricter climate policies and more ambitious emissions targets. New renewable electricity capacity will set another record this year, at 290 gigawatts, according to a new report from the International Energy Agency. That's roughly equivalent to building nearly 300 nuc
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Astronomers discover strangely massive black hole in Milky Way satellite galaxy
Astronomers at The University of Texas at Austin's McDonald Observatory have discovered an unusually massive black hole at the heart of one of the Milky Way's dwarf satellite galaxies, called Leo I. Almost as massive as the black hole in our own galaxy, the finding could redefine our understanding of how all galaxies—the building blocks of the universe—evolve. The work is published in a recent iss
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We won't know how bad omicron is for another month
The discovery of the omicron variant of covid-19 in southern Africa shows how sequencing the genes of a virus can give an early alert to dangerous-looking changes in its genome. Omicron has more than 30 mutations, some of which have previously been seen in other variants and are thought to make viral transmission faster. Others are alarming because researchers have no idea what they mean. The wor
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The US crackdown on Chinese economic espionage is a mess. We have the data to show it.
A visiting researcher at UCLA accused of hiding his connection to China's People's Liberation Army. A hacker indicted for breaking into video game company servers in his spare time. A Harvard professor accused of lying to investigators about funding from China. And a man sentenced for organizing a turtle-smuggling ring between New York and Hong Kong. For years, the US Department of Justice has us
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UK drugs watchdog approves new Covid treatment Xevudy
Drug found in trials to cut vulnerable adults' risk of hospital admission and death by 79% Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK drugs watchdog has approved a new Covid treatment after trials found it cut the likelihood of hospital admission and death by 79% in high-risk adults. The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has authorised Xevudy (so
7h
Like Watching Six Different Marriages Fall Apart
What is happening to the Beatles? Whose idea was this? What is going on ? It's January 1969, and look at them: stuck on a soundstage in Twickenham Film Studios—the Beatles!—sitting around like a bunch of YouTubers, idly generating content. They burble; they dawdle; they pick up their instruments and put them down again. They are of the '60s and they are above the '60s. "I think your beard suits y
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A dinosaur trove in Italy rewrites the history, geography and evolution of the ancient Mediterranean area
Italy is not exactly renowned for dinosaurs. In comparison to its excellent artistic and archaeological heritage, dinosaur fossils are very rare. Not surprisingly, the discovery of the first isolated dinosaurs in the early 1990s generated excitement, but are now considered nothing more than an exception to a general rule. During the reign of dinosaurs, between 230 and 66 million years ago, the anc
2h
Quack Protection Acts advance in state legislatures
Proposed laws in Wisconsin and Michigan would protect quacks who defraud patients with useless, and sometimes dangerous, nostrums, by essentially allowing them to practice medicine without a license. These Quack Protection Acts should not pass. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Will the Omicron Covid variant cancel Christmas?
A new Covid variant first identified in South Africa is spreading around the world, with leaders rushing to respond. Our science correspondent Nicola Davis outlines what we know so far about the Omicron variant The identification of a new Covid variant has sent shockwaves around the world as leaders scramble once again to close borders and reintroduce measures aimed at slowing the spread of the v
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Covid: is it safe to kiss this Christmas? It's a risk, say scientists
Boris Johnson may have given parties go-ahead but experts warn against sharing air space in poorly ventilated rooms Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Christmas parties and nativity plays may have been given the go-ahead by Boris Johnson, but a government minister had science on her side when she warned against festive kissing this Christmas. Speaking on ITV's Peston, t
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Island turns into open-air lab for tech-savvy volcanologists
They come with eagle-eyed drones and high-precision instruments. Aided by satellites, they analyze gas emissions and the flows of molten rock. On the ground, they collect everything from the tiniest particles to "lava bombs" the size of watermelons that one of nature's most powerful forces hurl as incandescent projectiles.
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Climate Advocates Are Gambling With Fate
Over the past few years, climate advocates have gained two atypical allies. For the cosmopolitan progressives who normally dominate environmental policy making, these two new groups are somewhat embarrassing to rub shoulders with, which is why discussion of the two shifts has been rejected or muted. But they signal that a new era has begun in climate politics—one that advocates have long wished f
21h
Republicans Hope Their Assault on Democracy Will Stop a Post-Roe Backlash
Women's constitutional right to decide whether to bear children appears to be hanging by a thread. At yesterday's oral argument in the case of ​​Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization , the Supreme Court's Republican-appointed justices displayed an eagerness to overturn Roe v. Wade , the legal precedent that prevents states from banning abortion. This is no surprise—the conservative legal m
42min
A Better Conversation Than Social Media
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here . I once hoped that Facebook and Twitter would enable better conversations among strangers trying to think through our complicated world together. And I've learned a lot and interacted with wonderful people on social media. But many of the most thoughtful people I know no longer engage there. It is too hostile, too time-consuming, and too influenced by outrage
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The shortest-period gas-giant exoplanet discovered with TESS
Using NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an international group of astronomers has detected a new, ultra-hot gas giant exoplanet with an extremely short orbital period. The newfound alien world, designated TOI-2109b is about five times more massive than Jupiter and turns out to be the shortest-period gas giant known to date. The finding is reported in a paper published November 2
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Welcome to Up for Debate
Sign up for Conor's newsletter here . When the social-media era began, I hoped that Facebook and Twitter would enable better conversations among people trying to think through our complicated world together. I've learned a lot and interacted with wonderful strangers on both platforms. But over time they've become hostile time-sucks warped by bad actors, flawed algorithms, and perverse incentives
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We built a database to understand the China Initiative. Then the government changed its records.
Since the US government launched the China Initiative in 2018, the main source of information about it has been press releases on the Department of Justice's China Initiative webpage announcing arrests, charges, and indictments. But the record is incomplete. Civil rights groups that have been concerned about the initiative from the start—especially its potential for racial profiling—have seen gap
4h
Unlocking the biogeographical secrets of deep-sea limpets
Researchers from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) have decoded for the first time the demographic history, genetic structure, and population connectivity of a deep-sea limpet widely distributed in vent and seep ecosystems in the Northwest Pacific. This study not only enhances our knowledge of the historical population divergence and
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Welcome to Work in Progress
Sign up for Derek's newsletter here . I've been writing for The Atlantic for more than 13 years about economics, technology, politics, and culture. My newsletter, Work in Progress, is about all those things, with a special focus on the future of work—how the changing nature of our jobs is shaping life, politics, and society—and the future of progress: How we solve the most important problems in A
22h
Gravel or Green: What Will Become of Alaska's Coastal Plain?
The ghosts of abandoned oil wells and pipelines threaten to haunt Alaska's wildlife long after the equipment itself is gone. For the region to have any chance of recovering, industry executives and land management officials will need to invest heavily — and entertain new approaches to restoration.
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Övervakning av koldioxidutsläpp från rymden
Lundaforskare har tagit fram en modell som från rymdobservationer kan beräkna enskilda länders koldioxidutsläpp. De nya resultaten kan bli användbara i arbetet med de satelliter som EU de kommande åren ska skicka iväg inom jordövervakningsprogrammet Copernicus. Vid klimattoppmötet COP26 enades världens länder om ett dokument som för första gången nämner avveckling av kol och fossila bränslen. För
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How digital and molecular data can be integrated and used to improve health
Analysing molecular characteristics and their variation during lifestyle changes, by combining digital tools, classical laboratory tests and new biomolecular measurements, could enable individualised prevention of disease. The researchers show what a proactive healthcare model could comprise and how it could help in maintaining good health.
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Scientists raise concerns over UK baby genome sequencing plan
Exclusive: experts say scheme seems designed to create valuable dataset rather than improve screening Scientists have raised concerns about a proposed overhaul of newborn screening that could lead to the UK becoming the first country to offer whole-genome sequencing for every baby. Speaking before the publication of plans for an NHS pilot study in which up to 200,000 babies' genomes will be seque
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The Best 3D Printer for Beginners for 2022
The best 3D printer for beginners make it simple for hobbyists to take advantage of this innovative technology. While 3D printing has been around for a while, it's only recently become more accessible to the mainstream consumer market. Desktop 3D printers bring this exciting technology to your home. How 3D Printing Works 3D printers use a process called additive manufacturing (or more colloquiall
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Mouse study suggests manipulation of certain nerve cells can help regenerate lost heart muscle
Human heart muscle cells cease to multiply after birth, making any heart injury later in life a permanent one, reducing function and leading to heart failure. Now, however, researchers say they have new evidence from mouse experiments that manipulating certain nerve cells or the genes that control them might trigger the formation of new heart muscle cells and restore heart function after heart att
44min
Cannabis impacts sperm counts, motility in two generations of mice
An intense but short-term exposure to cannabis vapor lowered sperm counts and slowed sperm movement, or motility, not only in the directly exposed male mice but also in their sons, according to a new study. The findings build on other human and animal research, showing that cannabis can impede male reproductive function. The current study uses more controlled circumstances than human studies, whic
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Septic system waste pervasive throughout Florida's Indian River lagoon
There are more than 300,000 septic systems permitted in six counties adjacent to the 156-mile-long Indian River Lagoon (IRL) in Florida. Researchers assessed water quality and measured stable nitrogen isotopes in groundwater, surface water, and macrophyte tissue to identify nitrogen sources impacting the lagoon. Sucralose, an artificial sweetener that is not completely broken down by septic system
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Ocean plastic is creating new communities of life on the high seas
Coastal plants and animals have found a new way to survive in the open ocean — by colonizing plastic pollution. A new commentary reports coastal species growing on trash hundreds of miles out to sea in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, more commonly known as the 'Great Pacific Garbage Patch.'
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Breastmilk for baby brains
For such a natural part of being a human, breastfeeding has had a controversial past whether in private or in public- in fact, it only became legal to breastfeed in public in all 50 states in 2018, when Utah and Idaho were the last to legalize it. While this trend of normalizing breastfeeding seems recent, […]
44min
How gratitude rewires your brain | Christina Costa
When a psychologist who studies well-being ends up with a brain tumor, what happens when she puts her own research into practice? Christina Costa goes beyond the "fight" narrative of cancer — or any formidable personal journey — to highlight the brain benefits of an empowering alternative to fostering resilience in the face of unexpected challenges: gratitude.
46min
Voice assistants aren't great at giving quality health information
Research shows Alexa, Siri, and Google Assistant aren't equal in providing answers to our health questions. According to Google, one in 20 Google searches seek health-related information. And why not? Online info is convenient, free, and occasionally provides peace of mind. But obtaining health information online can also cause anxiety and drive people to delay essential treatment or seek unneces
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Guldsmycken från Nefertitis tid hittade i bronsåldersgrav på Cypern
Över 150 mänskliga skelett och närmare 500 föremål – bland annat guldsmycken, ädelstenar och keramik – från omkring 1350 f.Kr. Det är några av fynden utgrävningen av två gravar i bronsåldersstaden Hala Sultan Tekke på Cypern. Den svenska arkeologiska expeditionen The Söderberg Expedition har grävt på Cypern i olika omgångar grävt sedan 2010. 2018 upptäckte arkeologerna två gravar, utformade som u
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Live imaging of transcription using active RNA polymerase II-specific probes
A genetically encoded "live-cell" probe designed by researchers from Tokyo Tech has been able to identify phosphorylated Ser2 in the enzyme RNA polymerase II, subsequently identifying sites of the elongation phase of active transcription in living cells. This probe could be used to specifically image transcription elongation in real time in living animals, furthering gene regulation research by le
54min
Growing carbon footprint for plastics
Plastics are useful, cheap and extremely popular. Global demand has quadrupled in the last forty years and is expected to continue to rise, with correspondingly negative consequences for the environment and human health. The public is generally aware of the environmental harm caused by plastics at the end of their life cycle in particular, such as when they release greenhouse gasses and air pollut
54min
New review highlights cancer-crushing viruses
In a recent review article researchers describe a class of viruses that act to combat rather than cause deadly disease. Such oncolytic viruses as they are known, have a remarkable ability to target and destroy cancer cells, while leaving healthy cells untouched.
1h
Climate adaptation of households compared internationally
The climate is changing, not only in the Netherlands, but far beyond, as well. The U.N. climate conference in Glasgow in 2021 had a clear message: Climate adaptation is required of everyone, from governments to individuals around the world. Researchers from Delft University of Technology and Twente University investigated the drivers of what motivates or hinders people in different cultures in cli
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Freeze-dried vaccine could one day be used for COVID-19
Researchers report that they have successfully freeze-dried a liposome-based liquid vaccine formula that could be developed for potential use in COVID-19 vaccines. Freeze-drying is a method for removing water from a product. First, you freeze the item you're trying to dehydrate, causing any water in it to become ice. Then, you remove the ice through a process called sublimation, in which ice turn
1h
Using Raman spectroscopy and computational techniques to study interfacial water on Pd single-crystal surfaces
A team of researchers affiliated with a number of institutions in China and one in the U.K. has used Raman spectroscopy and computational techniques to study the interfacial water on Pd single-crystal surfaces. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their study of the dynamics and structure of water at the solid-liquid interface and what they learned from it. Matthias
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Some polycrystal grain boundaries feel the heat more than others
Polycrystals are solid materials that are made up of lots of small crystals. The points where the crystals meet are known as grain boundaries (GBs). GBs are important because they can affect the way the solid behaves. However, conventional analysis techniques are unable to measure the nanoscale detail at GBs. Now, researchers from The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science have used e
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Septic system waste pervasive throughout Florida's Indian River lagoon
For more than a decade, fertilizer leaching and associated stormwater runoff were thought to be the major drivers of harmful algal blooms in Florida's Indian River Lagoon. Despite the numerous residential fertilizer ordinances passed since 2011, water quality, harmful algal blooms, and seagrass loss, which has resulted in mass deaths of the threatened Florida manatee, have continued to worsen.
2h
Perceiving sound-letter associations in English can help people learn to read it better
Learning to read in English is not just about using context (e.g., pictures) to guess the meaning of the words on the page but also about being aware of the sounds in words and their use. This ability, called "phonological awareness" (PA), is the foundation of learning how to read in an alphabetic language like English. Traditionally, L2 (second and foreign language) reading has not focused on usi
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People with anxiety, depression may use 'sextech' to ease distress
People who report higher rates of anxiety and depression—but not loneliness—are more likely to use emerging digital sexual technologies, or "sextech," a new study shows. Sextech includes sending sexually explicit images or videos and visiting erotic webcam sites. The findings suggest that people with impaired mental health may use sexual technologies to experience temporary relief from their psyc
2h
Novel quantum device design promises a regular flow of entangled electrons on demand
Quantum computer and many other quantum technologies rely on the generation of quantum-entangled pairs of electrons. However, the systems developed so far typically produce a noisy and random flow of entangled electrons, which hinders synchronized operations on the entangled particles. Now, researchers from Aalto University in Finland propose a way to produce a regular flow of spin-entangled elect
2h
Swimming Naked with Sharks | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. #NakedAndAfraid #Discovery #Survival Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.l
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Up to Half of Earth's Water May Come From Solar Wind and Space Dust
Water is vital for life on Earth, and some experts say we should all drink around two liters every day as part of a healthy lifestyle. But beyond the tap, where does our water come from? It flows from local rivers, reservoirs, and aquifers. But where has that water originated from? Over geological time , Earth cycles water through living organisms, the atmosphere, rivers, oceans, the rocks beneat
2h
Two versions of a Curiosity selfie: narrow and wide
NASA's Curiosity Mars rover took this 360-degree selfie using the Mars Hand Lens Imager, or MAHLI, at the end of its robotic arm. The selfie comprises 81 individual images taken on Nov. 20, 2021—the 3,303rd Martian day, or sol, of the mission.
2h
A one-way phone call from Mars
This November, ESA's Mars Express spacecraft carried out a series of experimental communication tests with the Chinese (CNSA) Zhurong Mars rover. Mars Express successfully caught data sent up 'in the blind' by the rover and relayed them to Earth where they were forwarded to the Zhurong team in China.
2h
Tracking contaminated water from the Fukushima nuclear accident
In a paper published in the National Science Review, a team from Tsinghua University analyzed the diffusion process of the treated Fukushima accident contaminated water to be discharged into the Pacific Ocean from 2023. Results show that the tritium, the main pollutant in the radioactive water, will spread to the whole North Pacific in 1200 days, which is important to formulate global coping strat
2h
New evidence hints at volcanic activity within Venuses' Idunn Mons
An international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests possible volcanic activity involving Venuses' Idunn Mons. In their paper published in The Planetary Science Journal, the group describes the evidence they found, but also note that their theories cannot be confirmed until new spacecraft are sent to Venus.
2h
Solvinden kan ha skapat en del av jordens vatten
Solvinden är den ström av laddade partiklar som sveper genom rymden från vår sol. Bland dessa partiklar finns protoner, som är enkla väteatomkärnor. När de krockar med ett gruskorn som innehåller syre kan vattenmolekyler bildas. Forskare från Australien, Storbritannien och USA har analyserat stoftkorn från en asteroid och kommit fram till att den här processen kan ha bidragit med en andel av jorde
3h
Brooke Gardner Probes the Cell's Peroxisomes
The University of California, Santa Barbara, cell biologist is investigating the formation and functions of the peroxisome, an organelle which exists in many copies in each cell and can be created, lost, or altered to meet the cell's metabolic needs.
3h
Aktiva inlärningsmetoder stärker minnet
Vilken metod för inlärning som används i skolan påverkar hur elevernas hjärnor aktiveras när de testas på sina kunskaper. Elever som undervisats med aktiva lärandemetoder hade högre aktivitet i områden i hjärnan som kopplas till återaktivering av väl befästa minnen. Studiens resultat tyder på att aktiva lärandemetoder, oberoende av ämne, kan stimulera processer i hjärnan som är bra för elevens pr
3h
Team creates new phase of matter, the 'time crystal'
A team of researchers has created and observed a new phase of matter, popularly known as a "time crystal." There is a huge global effort to engineer a computer capable of harnessing the power of quantum physics to carry out computations of unprecedented complexity. While formidable technological obstacles still stand in the way of creating such a quantum computer , today's early prototypes are st
3h
Peloton Is Stuck, Just Like the Rest of Us
It was the best of pelotimes, it was the worst of pelotimes. If the graph of Peloton's stock-price fluctuations were the blueprint for a new roller coaster, it would be a terrifying ride for anyone brave enough to strap in. The line undulates with disasters: Since the fitness-tech company went public in late 2019, it has weathered a virally bad holiday ad campaign , pandemic delivery delays so ex
4h
Is SpinLaunch Viable
Recently on the SGU we talked about a new company, SpinLaunch , which just conducted a test of their system to hurl satellites into orbit by spinning them up to high speeds then releasing them. We also did a follow up discussion on the show which will release this Saturday. It's an interesting case study in how to assess the plausibility and viability of potential new technology. The basic idea i
4h
This enormous eagle could have killed you, probably
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03585-1 The extinct Haast's eagle — known from fossils found in New Zealand — hunted like its modern relatives, but also had habits of a scavenger.
4h
Researcher discusses community policing in the Global South
Community policing is meant to combat citizen mistrust of the police force. This policing model was developed in the mid-20th century to help officers work more collaboratively with the communities they are assigned to. The hope was that activities such as town hall meetings and "meet and greet" foot patrols would create a partnership between citizens and the police force, increasing trust and ult
4h
What big data reveals about online extremism
As extremist groups and fringe movements like QAnon have gained mainstream awareness, their ability to rapidly proliferate misinformation and conspiracies has put social media platforms under heightened public scrutiny. Facebook, Twitter, and other tech companies have been reprimanded by Congress and media outlets alike for failing to seriously address online radicalization among their users. As t
4h
Ta av lurarna när du ska tänka
En del föredrar att jobba eller plugga med musik. Andra vill ha tyst. Hur vi uppfattar ljud är väldigt individuellt. Musik sägs ofta öka kreativiteten, men nu tyder forskning på att det kan vara precis tvärtom. Många lyssnar på musik när de jobbar eller pluggar, och menar att det hjälper dem att prestera. Men enligt forskare från Högskolan i Gävle och Leeds universitet stämmer inte denna, ganska
5h
Daily briefing: Omicron was already spreading in Europe
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-03610-3 The Omicron coronavirus variant was present in the Netherlands before it was identified in southern Africa. Plus, Anthony Fauci on four decades of progress against HIV, and the ripple effect of the Moderna–NIH vaccine-patent fight.
5h
Authors retract, resubmit "very poorly conducted" meta-analysis of COVID-19 treatment
A journal has retracted a meta-analysis on Covid-19 after concerned readers complained about the quality — or lack thereof — of the study. The article, "A meta-analysis of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) antibody treatment for COVID-19 patients," appeared in Therapeutic Advances in Chronic Disease, a SAGE title. According to the retraction notice: At the request … Continu
5h
Mechanism of phosphate sensing and signaling revealed by rice SPX1-PHR2 complex structure
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27391-5 SPX proteins sense phosphate levels in plant cells by binding to inositol polyphosphates (InsP) and suppressing the activity of PHR transcription factors. Here the authors show that when bound to InsP6, the rice SPX1 protein inhibits the activity of PHR2 by attenuating both its dimerization and DNA binding a
6h
Discovery of an exosite on the SOCS2-SH2 domain that enhances SH2 binding to phosphorylated ligands
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-26983-5 SOCS2 is a key regulator of growth hormone and cytokine signaling, which recognizes phosphotyrosine (pTyr)-modified targets via a central SH2 domain. Here, the authors discover and characterize an exosite on this SH2 domain that can bind a non-phosphorylated peptide to enhance SOCS2:pTyr affinity.
6h
Mapping the serum proteome to neurological diseases using whole genome sequencing
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27387-1 Serum proteins are easily accessible biomarkers and drug targets. Here, the authors use whole genome sequencing data to describe the genetic architecture of neurologically-relevant serum proteins and establish causal protein-neurological disease relationships.
6h
Theta rhythmicity governs human behavior and hippocampal signals during memory-dependent tasks
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27323-3 The hippocampus is a central memory hub and exhibits prominent theta oscillations. Here the authors show that oscillations are visible in behavior when decisions depend on memory, paralleled by theta phase synchronization in hippocampal recordings.
6h
Wafer-scale integration of stretchable semiconducting polymer microstructures via capillary gradient
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27370-w Though stretchable semiconducting polymers are advantageous for electronic applications requiring low cost, the low performance of patterned microstructures remains a challenge. Here, the authors realize high mobility, stretchable polymer microstructures via a capillary-gradient assembly method.
6h
Catalytic flexibility of rice glycosyltransferase OsUGT91C1 for the production of palatable steviol glycosides
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27144-4 Steviol glycosides from the plant Stevia rebaudiana are already used as lowcalorie sweeteners, but the most abundant naturally occurring compounds have a bitter aftertaste. Here, the authors characterize and engineer rice glycosyltransferase OsUGT91C1 to facilitate the large-scale production of naturally rar
6h
Survey on blockchain implementation
Hello everyone, We are conducting survey regarding blockchain implementation in supply chain ans need many answer to project results on population. Every answer would help incrementally. Link : https://forms.gle/ADCwYWa5ycfPKWkv5 Thanks in advance! submitted by /u/Smooth_Strategy_1817 [link] [comments]
6h
GALLERI: Svensk elvej gøres klar
PLUS. Dan Zethraeus er idemanden bag det svenske projekt Elonroad. Ideen til en elvej, hvor lastbiler, busser og personbiler kan oplade mens de kører, kom fra den type legetøjsracerbaner, hvor en lille metalnet rammer en strømførende skinne i midten af banen. Det førte til udviklingen af en skinne der i version 2 (det er den, som ses på billederne), fungerer ved, 1 meter lange stykker hhv. er plus
6h
The Experiment Podcast: When It Comes to Murder, Does Intent Matter?
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts This week, The Experiment takes a look at the charge that sent Anissa Jordan to prison for a crime she didn't even know had been committed. We consider how the felony-murder rule disproportionately punishes youth of color and women, and the debate over whether the same rule is key to holding police officers responsible in
8h
Which role models are best for STEM? Researchers offer recommendations in new analysis
An analysis of the effect role models have on students' motivation in studying STEM subjects points to new ways to deploy these leaders in order to encourage learning across different populations. The recommendations provide a resource for parents, teachers, and policymakers seeking to maximize role models' impact in diversifying the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
8h
Researchers whose funding applications were rejected win appeal to Australian Research Council
Of 32 reassessed applications, six were ranked high enough to be recommended for potentially career-defining funding Researchers who challenged the Australian Research Council's rejection of critical funding applications on the basis of a controversial rule change have been vindicated, with their appeal upheld and 32 previously rejected projects deemed eligible for funding. Researchers across the
8h
Skeptical Science New Research for Week #48, 2021
117 articles in 88 journals by 779 contributing authors Physical science of climate change, effects Relative humidity gradients as a key constraint on terrestrial water and energy fluxes Kim et al. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences Open Access pdf 10.31223/x59880 Improving Ground Heat Flux Estimation: Considering the Effect of Freeze/thaw Process on the Seasonally Frozen Ground Wang et al. Jour
11h
Emergence of a neopelagic community through the establishment of coastal species on the high seas
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-27188-6 Discoveries of persistent coastal species in the open ocean shift our understanding of biogeographic barriers. Floating plastic debris from pollution now supports a novel sea surface community composed of coastal and oceanic species at sea that might portend significant ecological shifts in the marine enviro
11h
Why cannabis smells skunky
As cannabis is legalized in more areas, it has become increasingly popular as a medicinal and recreational drug. This plant produces a pungent, skunk-like odor that is pleasing to some but repulsive to others. Now, researchers have discovered a new family of prenylated volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) that give cannabis its characteristic skunky aroma. The findings open up opportunities to investi
13h
Shrinking qubits for quantum computing with atom-thin materials
Current approaches to create superconducting qubits for quantum computers yield chips that are substantially larger than those found in classical computers. To shrink things down, researchers have taken advantage of atomically thin, 2D materials to construct the necessary capacitors for superconducting qubits. Their two-qubit chip is 1,000x smaller than those made with conventional fabrication tec
13h
Altered DNA repair and DNA damage in neurodegenerative conditions
Researchers have confirmed a link between altered DNA repair and increased DNA damage associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7), a debilitating, sometimes deadly neurodegenerative condition causing movement disorders. Their work also revealed a potential therapeutic target for the currently incurable and difficult to treat condition.
13h
What Industrial Societies Get Wrong About Childhood – Issue 108: Change
Each year across the world, kids of roughly the same age are packed into classrooms and confined to desks with the intent of learning from an adult teacher. But is this how children were adapted to learn? In today's technologically dependent, economically complex world in which a particular subset of skills is critical, fact-based knowledge is no doubt best imparted from those with experience—whi
14h
The Power of the Waves – Issue 108: Change
Sea waves are among the world's most misunderstood phenomena. When an incoming wave breaks on the shoreline, it appears as though the water has come to the end of a long journey, but in fact the water itself has hardly moved. Most surface sea waves transmit energy, not water, and the turbulence at the surf zone is the result of that moving energy encountering a solid obstruction—usually the shelv
14h
A Lab of Her Own – Issue 108: Change
On a cold, dry Tuesday in December, 1940, Rita Levi-Montalcini rode a train from the station near her home in Turin, Italy, for 80 miles to Milan to buy a microscope. Milan had not seen bombings for months. On her return to the Turin train station, two police officers stopped her and demanded to see inside the cake-sized box that she was carrying. With wartime food rationing, panettone cakes were
14h
Distortion: Researchers discover new strategy for antibodies to disable viruses
It is widely understood that antibodies neutralize viruses by latching onto their surfaces and blocking them from infecting host cells. But new research reveals that this barrier method isn't the only way that antibodies disable viruses. An international team of researchers has discovered that antibodies also distort viruses, thereby preventing them from properly attaching to and entering cells.
14h
Making predictions with the CMIP6 ensemble
The CMIP6 multi-model ensemble is a unique resource with input from scientists and modeling groups from around the world. But as we've discussed before ( #NotAllModels ) there are some specific issues that require users to be cautious in making predictions. Fortunately, there are useful 'best practices' that can help avoid the worst pitfalls. A new paper by McCrystall et al that has just appeared
15h
Eye imaging technology breaks through skin by crossing beams
Biomedical engineers have demonstrated a method for increasing the depth at which optical coherence tomography (OCT) can image structures beneath skin. The new 'dual-axis' approach opens new possibilities for OCT to be used in applications such as spotting skin cancer, assessing burn damage and healing progress, and guiding surgical procedures.
15h
New way of identifying early risk of cardiovascular disease
The risk of developing cardiovascular disease is strongly associated with 'bad' LDL cholesterol. A large study now shows that two proteins that transport cholesterol particles in the blood provide early and reliable risk information. The researchers now advocate introducing new guidelines for detecting cardiac risk and say the results may pave the way for early treatment, which could help lower mo
16h
Targeting the brain's immune cells may help prevent or treat Alzheimer's disease
A gene mutation linked to Alzheimer's disease alters a signaling pathway in certain immune cells of individuals with the disease, according to a new study. The team also found that blocking the pathway — with a drug that's currently being tested in cancer clinical trials — protects against many features of the condition in a preclinical model. The results could lead to new strategies to block th
16h
Lunar radar data uncovers new clues about moon's ancient past
The dusty surface of the moon — immortalized in images of Apollo astronauts' lunar footprints — formed as the result of asteroid impacts and the harsh environment of space breaking down rock over millions of years. An ancient layer of this material, covered by periodic lava flows and now buried under the lunar surface, could provide new insight into the Moon's deep past, according to a team of s
16h
Headwater refuges: Combined effect of drought and fire on stream communities
Life is water, and water is life. This truism certainly applies to the Pacific coast, where streams and rivers function as the region's arteries. The water they carry fosters plant life and wildlife in Southern California's Mediterranean climate. They provide sanctuary during droughts and often serve as the nexus for recovery after fires.
18h
Arecibo data still has astronomers in a spin
Data collected by the Arecibo Radio Telescope before it collapsed late last year will help astronomers better understand how our local neighbourhood of galaxies formed. Arecibo was the world's largest single-dish radio telescope until it was surpassed in 2016 by China's Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical Telescope (FAST). At the end of 2020, Arecibo's 900-ton receiver platform suddenly and spec
18h
Biosensor barcodes identify, detail 'chatting' among cancer cells
Ever since the first barcode appeared on a pack of chewing gum in 1974, the now-ubiquitous system has enabled manufacturers, retailers and consumers to quickly and effectively identify, characterize, locate and track products and materials. Scientists now demonstrate how they can do the same thing at the molecular level, studying the ways cancer cells 'talk' with one another.
18h
Footprints from site a at Laetoli, Tanzania, are from early humans, not bears
The oldest unequivocal evidence of upright walking in the human lineage are footprints discovered at Laetoli, Tanzania in 1978, by paleontologist Mary Leakey and her team. The bipedal trackways date to 3.7 million years ago. Another set of mysterious footprints was partially excavated at nearby Site A in 1976 but dismissed as possibly being made by a bear. A recent re-excavation of the Site A foot
19h
When variations in Earth's orbit drive biological evolution
Coccolithophores are microscopic algae that form tiny limestone plates, called coccoliths, around their single cells. They are responsible for half of the limestone produced in the oceans and therefore play a major role in the carbon cycle and in determining ocean chemistry. A team of scientists show that certain variations in Earth's orbit have influenced the evolution of coccolithophores.
19h
Deep learning dreams up new protein structures
Using artificial intelligence and deep learning, researchers have developed a neural network that 'hallucinates' the structures of new protein molecules. The scientists made up completely random protein sequences and introduced mutations into them until the neural network predicted they would fold into stable structures. The software was not guided toward a particular outcome; the proteins were ju
19h
Researchers unlock biogeographical secrets of deep-sea limpets
Researchers have decoded for the first time the demographic history, genetic structure, and population connectivity of a deep-sea limpet widely distributed in vent and seep ecosystems in the Northwest Pacific. This study not only enhances our knowledge of the historical population divergence and contemporary gene flow of deep-sea organisms under the intricate interactions amongst local habitats, s
19h
Observing the base-by-base search for native structure along transition paths during the folding of single nucleic acid hairpins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Biomolecular folding involves searching among myriad possibilities for the native conformation, but the elementary steps expected from theory for this search have never been detected directly. We probed the dynamics of folding at high resolution using optical tweezers, measuring individual trajectories as nucleic acid hairpins passed through the high-energy transition…
20h
Topological liquid crystal superstructures as structured light lasers [Physics]
Liquid crystals (LCs) form an extremely rich range of self-assembled topological structures with artificially or naturally created topological defects. Some of the main applications of LCs are various optical and photonic devices, where compared to their solid-state counterparts, soft photonic systems are fundamentally different in terms of unique properties such…
20h
An ancient antimicrobial protein co-opted by a fungal plant pathogen for in planta mycobiome manipulation [Plant Biology]
Microbes typically secrete a plethora of molecules to promote niche colonization. Soil-dwelling microbes are well-known producers of antimicrobials that are exploited to outcompete microbial coinhabitants. Also, plant pathogenic microbes secrete a diversity of molecules into their environment for niche establishment. Upon plant colonization, microbial pathogens secrete so-called effector proteins
20h
Tryptophan metabolism and bacterial commensals prevent fungal dysbiosis in Arabidopsis roots [Plant Biology]
In nature, roots of healthy plants are colonized by multikingdom microbial communities that include bacteria, fungi, and oomycetes. A key question is how plants control the assembly of these diverse microbes in roots to maintain host–microbe homeostasis and health. Using microbiota reconstitution experiments with a set of immunocompromised Arabidopsis thaliana…
20h
Mg2+-dependent conformational rearrangements of CRISPR-Cas12a R-loop complex are mandatory for complete double-stranded DNA cleavage [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
CRISPR-Cas12a, an RNA-guided DNA targeting endonuclease, has been widely used for genome editing and nucleic acid detection. As part of the essential processes for both of these applications, the two strands of double-stranded DNA are sequentially cleaved by a single catalytic site of Cas12a, but the mechanistic details that govern…
20h
Sensory computations in the cuneate nucleus of macaques [Neuroscience]
Tactile nerve fibers fall into a few classes that can be readily distinguished based on their spatiotemporal response properties. Because nerve fibers reflect local skin deformations, they individually carry ambiguous signals about object features. In contrast, cortical neurons exhibit heterogeneous response properties that reflect computations applied to convergent input from…
20h
Core Concept: Green ammonia could produce climate-friendly ways to store energy and fertilize farms [Chemistry]
Curbing climate change goes hand-in-hand with decarbonizing energy production. But how can communities continue to meet the global demand for electricity without releasing more CO2? A cadre of chemists says one solution may be hiding in an unlikely source: ammonia—the pungent, clear, nitrogen-rich gas, or liquid, that's most often used…
20h
'Paradox brands' hold strong appeal for bicultural consumers
Bicultural consumers such as Asian Americans or Hispanic Americans are the fastest growing demographic in the U.S., and one of the challenges marketers face is how to build brands that resonate with consumers who have assimilated norms from different cultures and are able to code-switch between behaviors in response to social cues.
20h
Successful treatment in mice for severe childhood cancer
In mice with high-risk neuroblastoma, tumors disappeared in response to a new combination treatment with precision medicines, a recent study shows. This is a vital step toward a potentially curative treatment for a form of cancer affecting young children that is currently difficult to treat.
20h
10 Best Ebikes of 2022 for Commuting and Fun
Since ebikes emerged onto the scene some 20 years ago, they've only grown in popularity as people look to abandon their cars for greener and healthier alternatives to commuting. Improvements to battery technology have made these power-assisted bikes lighter while improving their range. Batteries and motors have also become smaller, allowing them to fit into sleeker-looking bike frames, making ebi
20h
De novo protein design by deep network hallucination
Nature, Published online: 01 December 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-04184-w The trRosetta neural network was used to iteratively optimise model proteins from random 100-amino-acid sequences, resulting in 'hallucinated' proteins, which when expressed in bacteria closely resembled the model structures.
21h
The diabetes medication that could revolutionize heart failure treatment
A medication originally used for patients with diabetes is the first to help people with heart failure and could revolutionize treatment. Early research had shown that SGLT2 inhibitors could help around half of heart failure patients — those with a condition known as reduction ejection fraction. But a new study shows that the medication could be beneficial for all heart failure patients — includ
21h
The Atlantic Continues Newsletter Expansion With Work in Progress, Up for Debate, and The Good Word
Today The Atlantic is inviting readers to subscribe to five new newsletters and alerts , anchored by staff writer Derek Thompson on the world's most important mysteries, with a special emphasis on the future of work and the future of societal progress; staff writer Conor Friedersdorf on a better way to talk about the most intriguing and timely public debates; and crossword editor Caleb Madison on
22h
3D laser nanoprinters become compact
Lasers in conventional laser printers for paper printouts are very small. 3D laser printers for 3-dimensional microstructures and nanostructures, by contrast, have required big and expensive laser systems so far. Researchers now use another process for this purpose. Two-step absorption works with inexpensive and small, blue laser diodes. As a result, much smaller printers can be used.
22h
Constraining quantum measurement
The quantum world and our everyday world are very different places. Physicists now investigate how the act of measuring a quantum particle transforms it into an everyday object.
22h
Aerogels: Airy and efficient
Researchers have developed a new photocatalyst made from an aerogel that could enable more efficient hydrogen production. The key is sophisticated pretreatment of the material.
22h
Diversity of the gut microbiome in gorillas
A new study sheds light on the gut microbiome of gorillas, moving researchers closer to developing tools that can use the microbiome to diagnose potential health challenges for gorillas in human care. Specifically, the study found significant diversity among gorilla microbiomes, suggesting that what constitutes a 'healthy' microbiome can vary between individuals.
22h
Cell types of the iris in mice
Researchers report they have genetically mapped the cell types that make up the mouse iris — the thin disc of pigmented tissue that, in humans, gives eyes their distinct colors.
22h
Ancient lineage of algae found to include five 'cryptic' species
All land plants originated from a single evolutionary event when freshwater algae got a foothold on land. The group of algae that would later give rise to land plants had already been living in freshwater and terrestrial habitats for over one billion years. A tiny group of these algae, most distantly related to land plants, still lives. A team homed in on one species, Chlorokybus, which lives in w
22h
Welcome to The Good Word
Sign up for Caleb's newsletter here . I've been writing and editing crossword puzzles since I was a teenager, for publications ranging from BuzzFeed to The New York Times . I worked at the Oxford English Dictionary for three summers. Placed in a few spelling bees here and there. I promise I'm not sharing this to bait you into going back in time and bullying me. It may come as no surprise that I l
22h
Common food additive messes with gut bacteria
A widely used food additive, carboxymethylcellulose, alters the intestinal environment of healthy people, perturbing levels of beneficial bacteria and nutrients, a new study shows. The findings, published in the journal Gastroenterology , demonstrate the need for further study of the long-term impacts of this food additive on health. "It certainly disproves the 'it just passes through' argument…"
22h
Can windy days shield you from COVID-19?
Low wind speeds and stale air are associated with a higher incidence of contracting COVID-19 when people socialize outside, perhaps as much as 45% more, a new study shows. While it may not be the season for beach going and barbecues, people continue to work and gather outside in many settings. Is that cause for concern in these latest stages of the pandemic, and new variants? Not necessarily, the
23h
Potential new treatment for Alzheimer's disease would be relatively cheap
Researchers have discovered a protein involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Studies in mice showed that eliminating this protein entirely or using drugs to block its function reduced physical changes in the brain associated with the disease and improved memory. Drug therapy that aims to block the protein's activity could be a more effective treatment than what is currently available,
23h
Resolute scientific work could eliminate wheat disease within 40 years
Wheat and barley growers know the devastating effects of Fusarium head blight, or scab. The widespread fungal disease contaminates grain with toxins that cause illness in livestock and humans, and can render worthless an entire harvest. As Fusarium epidemics began to worsen across the eastern U.S. in the 1990s and beyond, fewer and fewer farmers were willing to risk planting wheat.
23h
Bacteria and plants fight alike
A brown blotch on a plant leaf may be a sign that the plant's defenses are hard at work: When a plant is infected by a virus, fungus or bacterium, its immune response keeps the disease from spreading by killing the infected cell, as well as a few surrounding ones. A new study at the Weizmann Institute of Science points to the evolutionary origins of this plant immune mechanism. The study may help
23h
Less ploughing enables carbon storage in agricultural soils
The value of long-term studies can be found when you're ready to dig deep. WUR scientists and European partners asked: what happens when organic farmers stop plowing? In a joint effort, we sampled nine field trials across Europe and assessed the impact of reduced tillage versus plowing on soil carbon storage: Humus was always enriched in the soil surface layer in reduced tillage systems, which is
23h
Researchers identify key RNA "gatekeeper" in gene expression, pointing to possible new drug targets
An important player in the healthy development of female embryos turns out also to play a key role in regulating the behavior of chromosome loops and gene expression in both sexes, according to a new study by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). These findings, reported in the journal Cell, could help create new targets for drug development.
23h
Earthquakes and tsunamis in Europe?
Since the tsunami that devastated coasts around the Indian Ocean in December 2004 and the Fukushima disaster in March 2011, people worldwide are aware that geological processes in the ocean can cause significant damage. From a European perspective, such events are seen to occur mostly in distant regions. "It is often forgotten that the European coasts are also located in areas that are tectonicall
23h

 

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