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Fettsyror minskar risk för näthinnesjukdom hos för tidigt födda

Risken för svår form av näthinnesjukdomen ROP, som kan ge blindhet hos extremt tidigt födda barn, halverades när barnen gavs ett nytt kombinationstillskott av olika fettsyror, visar en studie från Göteborgs universitet. Studien som publiceras i tidskriften JAMA Pediatrics visar på en tydlig minskning av ROP (prematuritetsretinopati) hos extremprematurer, födda före graviditetsvecka 28, vars blodk

2min

We're living in a golden age of sample return missions

Observing space rocks from afar is all very well, but sometimes you need to get up close. The biggest questions in space science—how the solar system formed, how it led to life on Earth, and whether there's ever been life on other nearby worlds—can really only be answered with direct study of the materials from those worlds. And that means grabbing a sample to study back home on Earth. "You can m

8min

Covid mortality down dramatically since start of pandemic

New research shows global death rates among patients in intensive care have fallen from 60% to 36% Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Death rates among people who end up in intensive care with Covid-19 have improved dramatically since the start of the pandemic thanks to advances in treatment , new research has found. The proportion of those worst affected by the disease

24min

Viktigt att förstå studenters bild av entreprenörskap

Det är viktigt att skräddarsy entreprenörsutbildningar, visar studier. Men för detta måste man begripa studenternas förförståelse av begreppet. Bilder kan vara till hjälp, visar en avhandling från Linnéuniversitet. Studenter som läser entreprenörskap på högskole- och universitetsnivå bär med sig olika erfarenheter och förkunskaper av ämnet. Att ta reda på vilken förförståelse studenterna har kan

38min

As climate warms, summer monsoons to produce less streamflow

In the summer of 2019, Desert Research Institute (DRI) scientist Rosemary Carroll, Ph.D., waited for the arrival of the North American Monsoon, which normally brings a needed dose of summer moisture to the area where she lives in Crested Butte, Colo. – but for the fourth year in a row, the rains never really came.

1h

Say goodbye to the dots and dashes to enhance optical storage media

A new technology developed at Purdue University is aimed at modernizing the optical digital storage technology. This advancement allows for more data to be stored and for that data to be read at a quicker rate. Rather than using the traditional dots and dashes as commonly used in these technologies, the Purdue innovators encode information in the angular position of tiny antennas, allowing them to

4h

Coral decline — is sunscreen a scapegoat?

A recent paper in the journal of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (ET&C) summarizes the scientific literature assessing the impact of organic UV filters on coral ecosystems. The researchers concluded that while organic UV filters do occur in the environment, there is limited evidence to suggest their presence is causing significant harm to coral reefs.

4h

NYUAD researchers propose programming to support adolescent mothers in areas of conflict

In a new paper titled A Bioecocultural Approach to Supporting Adolescent Mothers and their Young Children in Conflict Affected Contexts , published in the journal Development and Psychopathology , Global TIES for Children researchers propose a developmental, two-generational framework to guide the design of research and policies that better address the needs of adolescent mothers and their childre

4h

Covid-19: what can we learn from Manaus?

The rainforest city of Manaus in the north-west of Brazil was the first in the country to be struck by the pandemic. The virus rapidly spread, and by October last year it was estimated that 76% of the population had been infected – a number higher than the theoretical threshold for herd immunity. Yet, in January 2021, cases surged and the health system was once again overwhelmed, with hospitals ru

5h

Covid-19: what can we learn from Manaus? – podcast

The rainforest city of Manaus in the north-west of Brazil was the first in the country to be struck by the pandemic. The virus rapidly spread, and by October last year it was estimated that 76% of the population had been infected – a number higher than the theoretical threshold for herd immunity. Yet, in January 2021, cases surged and the health system was once again overwhelmed, with hospitals r

5h

Dit næste udviklingsværktøj er i skyen

Eller måske bare i en container på din pc via browseren. I hvert fald kan bøvlet installation af tunge IDE'er snart være en saga blot med continous integration for selve udviklingsmiljøet, som nu bor i Git.

7h

Prostate drug associated with lower risk of Parkinson's disease

Taking a particular type of medication to treat enlarged prostate is associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a large observational study by researchers at the University of Iowa, and colleagues in Denmark and China. The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, suggest that terazosin, and similar medications, might have potential to prevent or delay the developm

8h

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation

Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work repre

8h

Reindeer lichens are having more sex than expected

Scientists thought that reindeer lichens (moss-looking organisms that form a major part of reindeer diets) reproduced mainly asexually by cloning themselves. But it turns out, reindeer lichens are having a lot more sex than scientists expected. In a new study, researchers found that the reindeer lichens they examined have unexpected levels of genetic diversity, indicating that the lichens have bee

8h

Potential therapeutic targets to inhibit colorectal cancer progression

Researchers have revealed that colorectal cancer tissues contain at least two types of fibroblasts, namely, cancer-promoting fibroblasts and cancer-restraining fibroblasts, and that the balance between them is largely involved in the progression of colorectal cancer. Their findings suggest that artificially altering the balance between the two types of cells could curb the spread of colorectal can

8h

Risk-taking behavior has a unique and complex brain signature

A study on more than 12,000 test subjects finds that risk aversion is related to how much gray matter people have in their brains. A follow up on another 13,000 test subjects further supports the findings. The study is not the last word on the nature versus nurture question. We've all known that one person that has a tolerance for risk that utterly shocks everyone else. The person who will go whi

9h

Scientific proof for the existence of cognitive/neurological (Aristotelian) categories?

TLDR: Can you scientifically prove that Cause and Effect preexists as a category of thought in the brain? You might think that this belongs r/philosophy but it does not. Sorry for my predominantly humanistic jargon. I went to a psychotherapist and eventually got into a debate with him over the existence of the Categories, in Aristotelian and Kantian terms, which are to be understood as innate mec

9h

What would be the best way to immensely improve cognitive function in a developing brain (20-25 yo.) ?

Does the brain stop growing at 22, 24 or 25? What would be the best way to make the most of it? Especially in terms of improving cognitive function. ​ What I mean by cognitive function is mainly processing speed and learning ability, but also referring specifically to working memory, long-term memory, problem-solving and other higher-level functions. ​ We hear a lot about preventing cognitive dec

9h

Traffic noise makes mating crickets less picky

New research has found that the mating behaviour of crickets is significantly affected by traffic noise and other man-made sounds. When man-made noise pollution was present, the females didn't take into account the courtship song of the male crickets during mating. As the courtship song is energetically costly and provides crucial information about the health of the male, this could affect long-te

9h

Everything you need to know about Johnson & Johnson's COVID vaccine

There are more and more options for COVID vaccines coming this year. (Wilfried Pohnke//) The US is likely to have a third COVID vaccine approved and ready to distribute within the month, after Johnson & Johnson announced Friday that its federally funded vaccine candidate had proved effective in early data from Phase 3 trials. But Johnson & Johnson's vaccine is quite different from the Pfizer and

11h

Mysterious magnetic fossils offer past climate clues

There are fossils, found in ancient marine sediments and made up of no more than a few magnetic nanoparticles, that can tell us a whole lot about the climate of the past, especially episodes of abrupt global warming. Now, researchers have found a way to glean the valuable information in those fossils without having to crush the scarce samples into a fine powder.

11h

A 15-Minute Smartphone COVID Test Is Coming to the US

The Biden administration has made tackling the coronavirus pandemic its top priority with plans to ramp up both testing and vaccine distribution. The Department of Defence and Department of Health and Human Services have awarded $230 million to Australian biotech firm Ellume to produce a 15-minute COVID test that sends results directly to your phone. Ellume has not gone through the full FDA appro

11h

Mathematical method developed to predict cancer and drug-specific immunotherapy efficacy

Houston Methodist researchers have developed a mathematical model to predict how specific cancers will respond to immunotherapy treatments, thus enhancing chances for successful treatments from a wide variety of cancer-immunotherapy drug combinations. The results were recently published in Nature Biomedical Engineering in collaboration with researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center.

11h

Astronomers spot bizarre activity from one of the strongest magnets in the Universe

Astronomers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Gravitational Wave Discovery (OzGrav) and CSIRO have just observed bizarre, never-seen-before behaviour from a 'radio-loud' magnetar–a rare type of neutron star and one of the strongest magnets in the Universe. Their new findings, published today in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society (MNRAS), suggest magnetars have more complex

11h

Journal pulls two studies that listed an author without his permission

Springer Nature has removed two studies that were published in its journal Cluster Computing and included a co-author who didn't know that the papers existed until December 2020, years after they were published. The move follows reporting by Retraction Watch last week about the papers, which listed David Cox, the IBM Director of the MIT-IBM … Continue reading

12h

The Brazil Variant Is Exposing the World's Vulnerability

Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Even in a year of horrendous suffering, what is unfolding in Brazil stands out. In the rainforest city of Manaus, home to 2 million people, bodies are reportedly being dropped into mass graves as quickly as they can be dug. Hospitals have run out of oxygen, and people with

12h

IBM Algorithm Can Tell Who's Going to Get Alzheimer's by Reading Their Writing

A new artificial intelligence algorithm built by IBM may be able to help doctors diagnose or predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease — years before symptoms emerge . And all it takes, The New York Times reports , is for subjects to tell that algorithm a story. By comparing writing samples from study participants over the years, the algorithm was able to predict the onset of Alzheimer's disease y

12h

Nike's lace-free sneakers offer a perfect fit you simply step into

The GO FlyEase is a new step in, step out shoe that ditches all lacing, adjusting, and technical altering. (Nike /) Humans have been tying shoelaces for millennia. The Areni-1 shoe, often-cited as the world's oldest leather shoe, was found in an Armenian cave in 2010 and radiocarbon dated back to 3500 B.C.E., and even that old loafer was laced front and back with what scientists surmise was a lea

12h

Grimes Says She'll Move to Mars for "Manual Labor Until Death"

Hard Sell Renowned electronic musician and futurist Claire "Grimes" Boucher, who happens to be in a relationship with would-be planetary colonizer Elon Musk, revealed her own latest thoughts about space travel late last week during an appearance on YouTube . As transcribed by Consequence of Sound , Boucher said she'd be down to move to Mars "after age 50." "Manual labor until death most likely,"

13h

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension

Theoretical physicists are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The central element is an extra dimension in spacetime. Until now, the scientists have faced the problem that the predictions of their theory could not be tested experimentally.

13h

Detecting fake news designed to manipulate stock markets

Social media is increasingly used to spread fake news. The same problem can be found on the capital market – criminals spread fake news about companies in order to manipulate share prices. Researchers have developed an approach that can recognize such fake news, even when the news contents are repeatedly adapted.

13h

New research looks at teen bariatric surgery outcomes by age

Researchers at Children's Hospital Colorado have found that both younger and older adolescents have similar weight loss, resolution of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, nutritional impacts and improvement in quality of life after bariatric surgery. These results strongly indicate that, when working with adolescents with severe obesity, age alone should not dissuade providers and patients f

13h

These Advanced Nootropics Are Specially Formulated to Help Fight Mental Fatigue

Do you sometimes feel like your brain is in a fog? Is day-to-day life leaving you overwhelmed and mentally drained? Are you having trouble staying productive? Well, there's a name for all that. It's called mental fatigue. It's what happens during prolonged periods of intense and stressful cognitive activity. And pretty much everyone is going through it. How could we not? Modern life is stressful

13h

Listen: Queen bees don't have it easy

Queen bees don't have an easy life, Alison McAfee argues. McAfee , a postdoctoral research scholar at North Carolina State University, studies queen failure. Her latest research focuses on queen failure due to inability to reproduce using stored sperm. Once the males have mated with the queen, then she's the keeper of the sperm. She needs to be able to keep those sperm happy and healthy for a lon

13h

Photos: A Second Weekend of Protests in Russia

For a second weekend, tens of thousands of people in cities across Russia protested the jailing of the opposition leader, Alexei Navalny. An outspoken critic of President Vladimir Putin, Navalny was detained on January 17, after returning from Germany, where he had been recovering from a near-fatal poisoning that he blames on the Kremlin. According to the Associated Press, more than 5,100 protest

13h

Summer weather conditions influence winter survival of honey bees

Winter survival of honey bee colonies is strongly influenced by summer temperatures and precipitation in the prior year, according to researchers, who said their findings suggest that honey bees have a 'goldilocks' preferred range of summer conditions outside of which their probability of surviving the winter falls.

13h

Researchers discover materials capable of self-propulsion

Researchers have discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. The discovery may prove useful for various industries that want to source movement sustainably, from toys to robotics, and is expected to further inform our understanding of how the natural world fuels some types of movement.

13h

First 3D Printed House Goes on Sale in United States

Ground Up For the first time, a 3D-printed house is for sale in the United States, and its fabrication process makes it a considerably cheaper purchase than its neighbors. The three-bedroom, two-bathroom house is 3D-printed on-site by the company SQ4D, which 3D Printing Media Network reports has developed an Autonomous Robotic Construction System that prints structures out of concrete. The automa

13h

Study links intensive BP lowering to reduced CV risk in patients exposed to air pollution

In the study 'The Benefits of Intensive Versus Standard Blood Pressure Treatment According to Fine Particulate Matter Air Pollution Exposure' published this week in the journal Hypertension, researchers at University Hospitals (UH) and Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine found intensive BP lowering is effective in reducing cardiovascular risk in patients exposed to high level

13h

Arctic shrubs add new piece to ecological puzzle

A 15-year experiment on Arctic shrubs in Greenland lends new understanding to an enduring ecological puzzle: How do species with similar needs and life histories occur together at large scales while excluding each other at small scales? Its findings also reveal trends related to carbon sequestration and climate change as the Arctic becomes both greener and browner.

13h

Mysterious magnetic fossils offer past climate clues

There are fossils, found in ancient marine sediments and made up of no more than a few magnetic nanoparticles, that can tell us a whole lot about the climate of the past, especially episodes of abrupt global warming. Now, researchers have found a way to glean the valuable information in those fossils without having to crush the scarce samples into a fine powder.

13h

Study identifies noncoding RNA involved in immune response and sepsis

When the body's immune response to an infection gets out of control, the result can be sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which an overwhelming inflammatory response can lead rapidly to failure of multiple organs and death. In a new study, researchers at UC Santa Cruz have identified a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecule that regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory genes in immune syste

13h

Arctic shrubs add new piece to ecological puzzle

A 15-year experiment on Arctic shrubs in Greenland lends new understanding to an enduring ecological puzzle: How do species with similar needs and life histories occur together at large scales while excluding each other at small scales? The answer to this question has important implications for how climate change might shift species' distributions across the globe.

14h

Lactobacillus manipulates bile acids to create favorable gut environment

New research from North Carolina State University reveals that probiotic Lactobacillus bacteria use enzymes situationally to manipulate bile acids and promote their own survival in the gut. These findings further elucidate the complicated relationship between bile acids and gut bacteria and could eventually enable researchers to design lactobacilli with therapeutic properties, thereby engineering

14h

New clues emerge in how early tetrapods learned to live—and eat—on land

New research out of the University of Chicago has found evidence that the lobe-finned fish species Tiktaalik roseae was capable of both biting and suction during feeding, similar to modern-day gars. These results, published on Feb. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provide evidence that bite-based feeding originally evolved in aquatic species and was later adapted for use o

14h

Arctic shrubs add new piece to ecological puzzle

A 15-year experiment on Arctic shrubs in Greenland lends new understanding to an enduring ecological puzzle: How do species with similar needs and life histories occur together at large scales while excluding each other at small scales? The answer to this question has important implications for how climate change might shift species' distributions across the globe.

14h

Lactobacillus manipulates bile acids to create favorable gut environment

New research from North Carolina State University reveals that probiotic Lactobacillus bacteria use enzymes situationally to manipulate bile acids and promote their own survival in the gut. These findings further elucidate the complicated relationship between bile acids and gut bacteria and could eventually enable researchers to design lactobacilli with therapeutic properties, thereby engineering

14h

Physics of snakeskin sheds light on sidewinding

Most snakes get from A to B by bending their bodies into S-shapes and slithering forward headfirst. A few species, however—found in the deserts of North America, Africa and the Middle East—have an odder way of getting around. Known as "sidewinders," these snakes lead with their mid-sections instead of their heads, slinking sideways across loose sand.

14h

Mysterious magnetic fossils offer past climate clues

There are fossils, found in ancient marine sediments and made up of no more than a few magnetic nanoparticles, that can tell us a whole lot about the climate of the past, especially episodes of abrupt global warming. Now, researchers including doctoral student Courtney Wagner and associate professor Peter Lippert from the University of Utah, have found a way to glean the valuable information in th

14h

Geologists produce new timeline of Earth's Paleozoic climate changes

The temperature of a planet is linked with the diversity of life that it can support. MIT geologists have now reconstructed a timeline of the Earth's temperature during the early Paleozoic era, between 510 and 440 million years ago—a pivotal period when animals became abundant in a previously microbe-dominated world.

14h

New clues emerge in how early tetrapods learned to live—and eat—on land

New research out of the University of Chicago has found evidence that the lobe-finned fish species Tiktaalik roseae was capable of both biting and suction during feeding, similar to modern-day gars. These results, published on Feb. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, provide evidence that bite-based feeding originally evolved in aquatic species and was later adapted for use o

14h

Extreme black holes may have "hair," find scientists

Scientists discover that some extreme black holes may violate the "no hair" theorem. These black holes feature properties outside of the three classical black hole traits of mass, spin, and charge. The researchers ran sophisticated simulations to discover these space oddities. Black holes are wonderfully weird, sparking the imagination with the many mysteries surrounding their formation and funct

14h

Virtual conference CO2 emissions quantified in new study

The virtual conferencing that has replaced large, in-person gatherings in the age of COVID-19 represents a drastic reduction in carbon emissions, but those online meetings still come with their own environmental costs, new research from the University of Michigan shows.

14h

Summer weather conditions influence winter survival of honey bees

Winter survival of honey bee colonies is strongly influenced by summer temperatures and precipitation in the prior year, according to Penn State researchers, who said their findings suggest that honey bees have a "goldilocks" preferred range of summer conditions outside of which their probability of surviving the winter falls.

14h

UMass Amherst researchers discover materials capable of self-propulsion

Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst have discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. The discovery may prove useful for various industries that want to source movement sustainably, from toys to robotics, and is expected to further inform our understanding of how the natural world fuels some types of movem

14h

Guidelines for extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation in children and adults: New ELSO statements in ASAIO Journal

Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) is a potentially lifesaving treatment for patients in cardiac arrest when the circulation can't be restored by conventional CPR. New guidelines for ECPR in adults and children, developed by the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO), are presented by the ASAIO Journal, official journal of the American Society for Artificial Internal Orga

14h

Elon Musk Says Neuralink Has a Monkey Playing Video Games With Its Mind

Monkey Business During an appearance last night on the app Clubhouse, Neuralink co-founder Elon Musk said that the brain-computer interface startup has implanted a monkey with a device that allows it to play video games with its mind. "We have a monkey with a wireless implant in their skull with tiny wires who can play video games with his mind," Musk said during the appearance, according to Bloo

14h

Who were the most legendary ancient rulers of all time?

We often dismiss ancient history and the people in it as too long past to be noteworthy. Some early rulers were so iconic that their names and works passed into legend and influenced others for centuries. Every person on this list contributed to the world you live in today. A lot of people can be rather dismissive of ancient history, even using the term to refer to past events so remote as to be

14h

Fish blood could hold the answer to safer de-icing solutions during snowstorms

Rock salt is great at getting the de-icing job done, but it can take a toll on water systems and aquatic life. (Gudella/Deposit Photos/) Monika Bleszynski is a research scientist and adjunct professor at the University of Denver. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Many people associate a fresh snowfall with pleasures like hot chocolate and winter sports. But for city dwellers, i

14h

Prostate drug associated with lower risk of Parkinson's disease

Taking a particular type of medication to treat enlarged prostate is associated with a reduced risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a large observational study by researchers at the University of Iowa, and colleagues in Denmark and China. The findings, published in JAMA Neurology, suggest that terazosin, and similar medications, might have potential to prevent or delay the developm

15h

Do fungi in the goat gut create most methane?

New research identifies a possible mechanism for much of the methane often blamed on cows and goats. Back in 2015, Michelle O'Malley, chemistry professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and her research team first embarked on an ambitious project to characterize gut microbes in large herbivores. The purpose? To understand how these animals manage, via their microbiomes, to extract

15h

Startup Tests Spacecraft That Runs on Farm-Grown Rocket Fuel

Astronaut Farmer The space startup bluShift Aerospace successfully launched a low-flying rocket on Sunday using a kind of fuel that the company says can be grown on a farm . The company plans to become the first private aerospace company to launch a single-engine biofuel-powered rocket, according to Space.com , though there's a long way to go in order to reach that point from its mile-high test.

15h

The Guardian view on the vaccine rollout: the state we're in | Editorial

Making mistakes, as Boris Johnson and the EU have discovered, is a precondition for ongoing success Britain's Covid-19 vaccine success contains an important lesson for the rest of the world: a pandemic is no place for the rigid application of free-market principles. Boris Johnson has got many things wrong in the past year, but his decision to mobilise the Keynesian state has saved lives. Faced wi

15h

Experts put new method of analysing children's play to the test

How to study the stages children go through as they play together has been highlighted in new research by a Swansea University academic.Dr Pete King, who specialises in play and childhood studies, devised a method of studying the process of children's play – the Play Cycle Observation Method (PCOM) – and has now published research which demonstrates how effective it is as an observational tool.

15h

I jumped the queue to get an expiring vaccine. Did I do the right thing?

Around 10 p.m. last Thursday, I received a call from a friend. The two of us primarily text, so a call was out of the ordinary. I picked up immediately, assuming it was an emergency. She told me that a friend of a friend —a health-care worker who was distributing covid-19 vaccines that evening— was looking for people who wanted one. A freezer containing 1,600 doses of the Moderna vaccine had just

15h

Näringskedjorna svajar när naturens kalender skiftar

Med klimatuppvärmningen förskjuts naturens kalender. Det som händer på våren kommer tidigare och hösthändelser senare. Men i Ryssland och dess grannländer sker nu en förvirrande blandning av förändringar, något som får hela näringskedjor att knaka i fogarna. Under de senaste decennierna har vetenskapen påvisat hur de händelser som inträffar under våren sker tidigare och de som inträffar under hös

15h

Telling kids why they were wrong can backfire

Explaining to kids why their behavior is wrong may not always have the intended positive effect if the parent is loud and abrupt, according to a new study. The findings indicate both positive and negative outcomes that could have lasting consequences on children's emotional development. Verbal reasoning, which explains why the behavior is wrong, was associated with higher levels of getting along

15h

Screening, Within and Without

So I'm a small-molecule drug discovery person at heart, since I started out as a synthetic organic chemist. Talking about vaccines and antibodies nonstop is a bit of a strain, then, because immunology is full of stuff that's rather far removed from good ol' small-molecule ligands. Actually immunology eventually wears out everyone . Even immunologists. It just keeps on going: detail on top of deta

15h

Study finds revised concussion guidelines shorten duration of symptoms

New research published in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine shows adoption of the latest concussion guidelines can dramatically reduce symptoms in 11- to 18-year-old athletes with first-time concussions. The study's lead researcher, John Neidecker, DO, a sports concussion specialist in Raleigh, North Carolina, found the median length of concussion symptoms dropped from 1 month to 1 week in femal

15h

Scientists develop method to detect fake news

Social media is increasingly used to spread fake news. The same problem can be found on the capital market – criminals spread fake news about companies in order to manipulate share prices. Researchers at the Universities of Göttingen and Frankfurt and the Jožef Stefan Institute in Ljubljana have developed an approach that can recognise such fake news, even when the news contents are repeatedly ada

15h

Double delight: New synthetic transmembrane ion channel can be activated in two ways

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and University of Tokyo, Japan, have, for the first time, synthesized a novel artificial transmembrane ion channel–modelled on a naturally found transmembrane channel involved in neuron signaling–that responds to both chemical and electrical stimuli. Given its overall properties, this artificial channel opens doors to novel fundamental res

15h

Tool predicts risk of premature birth

Researchers have developed a new diagnostic tool to better predict the likelihood of premature birth and neonatal morbidity in the early stages of pregnancy. The tool may improve care and outcomes for both baby and mother. Premature birth affects one out of 10 women in the United States and can lead to multiple complications in newborns. Until now, there were limited tools available to predict pr

16h

What we know about the South African variant of Covid

Experts say 501Y.V2 variant is more infectious and resistant to vaccines, though there are no signs that it leads to more severe disease Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The South African variant, like the new UK variant, contains a mutation known as N501Y which is believed to make the virus more contagious than older variants. The South African variant also contains

16h

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension

Theoretical physicists of the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. The central element is an extra dimension in spacetime. Until now, the scientists have faced the problem that the predictions of their theory could not be tested experimentally. They have now overcome this problem in a p

16h

The US finally has a national mask mandate

Masks will now be required on public transit in the US. (Anna Shvets/Pexels/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including the truth about herd immunity , advice for pregnant women , and a tutorial on making your own mask . It's now been a year since the WHO first declared the COVID-19 pandemic a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. The pandemic's toll has been catastrop

16h

Synthetic biology reinvents development

Richard Feynman, one of the most respected physicists of the twentieth century, said "What I cannot create, I do not understand." Not surprisingly, many physicists and mathematicians have observed fundamental biological processes with the aim of precisely identifying the minimum ingredients that could generate them. One such example are the patterns of nature observed by Alan Turing. The brilliant

16h

Optimized LIBS technique improves analysis of nuclear reactor materials

In a new study, investigators report an optimized approach to using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for analyzing hydrogen isotopes. Their new findings could enable improved rapid identification and measurement of hydrogen and other light isotopes that are important in nuclear reactor materials and other applications.

16h

The Incredibly Affordable Titan VR Bundle Is Bringing Virtual Sex To the Masses

The 2020s are doing for adult content what the Great Depression did for Hollywood musicals. But no matter what the economy looks like, you get sick of watching chorus lines after a while. Fortunately, we have technology that goes well beyond the simple act of watching. With the KIIROO Titan VR Experience bundle, you can get everything you need to explore the cutting edge of virtual sex in one pac

16h

Anti-Vaxx Mob Shuts Down COVID Vaccine Distribution Site

Dozens of anti-vaxxers gathered on Saturday and blocked the entrance to Dodger's Stadium in Los Angeles, which the county is using as its primary site to administer coronavirus vaccines. As a COVID-19 testing site and now as a vaccination center , the Dodger's Stadium center has been known for several-hour-long lines that can sometimes even loop for miles through Los Angeles. Those long waits wer

16h

Synthetic biology reinvents development

Richard Feynman, one of the most respected physicists of the twentieth century, said "What I cannot create, I do not understand." Not surprisingly, many physicists and mathematicians have observed fundamental biological processes with the aim of precisely identifying the minimum ingredients that could generate them. One such example are the patterns of nature observed by Alan Turing. The brilliant

16h

Searching for dark matter through the fifth dimension

Theoretical physicists of the PRISMA+ Cluster of Excellence at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz are working on a theory that goes beyond the Standard Model of particle physics and can answer questions where the Standard Model has to pass—for example, with respect to the hierarchies of the masses of elementary particles or the existence of dark matter. The central element of the theory is an ext

16h

Paving the way for effective field theories

Over the past century, a wide variety of models have emerged to explain the complex behaviors which unfold within atomic nuclei at low energies. However, these theories bring up deep philosophical questions regarding their scientific value. Indeed, traditional epistemological tools have been rather elaborated to account for a unified and stabilized theory rather than to apprehend a plurality of mo

16h

Don't let pressure of one-upmanship dictate your gift selection

There is a considerable gap in our current understanding of gift-giving because much of what has been studied has focused on gift-giving as an affair between just two consumers—a single giver and a recipient. Little is known about the impact other gifts have on the recipient of the gifts, even though some of the most common occasions for giving a gift, such as birthdays, the winter holidays, Mothe

16h

From biofuels and other chemicals to methane production: Study peers into the mysteries of a goat's gut

Michelle O'Malley has long been inspired by gut microbes. Since she began studying the herbivore digestive tract, the UC Santa Barbara chemical engineering professor has guided several students to their doctoral degrees, won early and mid-career awards (including a recognition from President Obama), attained tenure and advanced to the position of full professor. She even had three children along t

16h

From biofuels and other chemicals to methane production: Study peers into the mysteries of a goat's gut

Michelle O'Malley has long been inspired by gut microbes. Since she began studying the herbivore digestive tract, the UC Santa Barbara chemical engineering professor has guided several students to their doctoral degrees, won early and mid-career awards (including a recognition from President Obama), attained tenure and advanced to the position of full professor. She even had three children along t

16h

Much to glean when times are rough

Scientists say stable seafood consumption amongst the world's poorer coastal communities is linked to how local habitat characteristics influence fishing at different times of the year.

16h

Research catches up to world's fastest-growing plant

Wolffia, also known as duckweed, is the fastest-growing plant known, but the genetics underlying this strange little plant's success have long been a mystery to scientists. Now, thanks to advances in genome sequencing, researchers are learning what makes this plant unique—and, in the process, discovering some fundamental principles of plant biology and growth.

16h

Team imaging resources used in international experiment with new photocatalysts

Skoltech researchers helped their colleagues from Japan, Germany, the United States, and China study the crystal structure and optical properties of a new class of two-dimensional compound, which can be used as effective visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for energy and chemical conversion. They used the Advanced Imaging Core Facility equipment for imaging and structural analysis. The paper w

16h

Research catches up to world's fastest-growing plant

Wolffia, also known as duckweed, is the fastest-growing plant known, but the genetics underlying this strange little plant's success have long been a mystery to scientists. Now, thanks to advances in genome sequencing, researchers are learning what makes this plant unique—and, in the process, discovering some fundamental principles of plant biology and growth.

16h

Scientific investigations of believed remains of two apostles

In Rome lies the Santi Apostoli church, cared for by Franciscan brothers for more than 500 years. For more than 1500 years, this site has held the believed remains of two of the earliest Christians and Jesus apostles: St. Philip and St. James the Younger—relics of the Holy Catholic Church.

16h

Digitization is key element in the growth potential of agroecological cooperatives

The coronavirus crisis has led to some of the general public developing a critical view of the current food consumption model, as shown by a recent survey by the Catalan Consumer Agency, which reveals that 60.5% of all Catalans tend to think that the pandemic will promote more responsible, sustainable and fair consumption. Moreover, the various lockdowns have caused a significant increase in onlin

16h

Physicists develop new material for water desalination

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles with gold absorb about 96% of the solar spectrum and turn it into heat. The material can accelerate the evaporation in desalination plants up to 2.5 times and can track hazardous molecules and compounds. An international research team with representatives from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), ITMO University, and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of

16h

Brightening the future of semiconductor-based photocatalytic processes

A collaboration between the Pericàs group with Prof. Timothy Noël and Dr. Paola Riente at the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e, The Netherlands), has crystallized in a Nature Communications paper where they provide key insight into the chemical nature of the true photocatalyst involved in the Bi2O3-driven atom-transfer radical addition (ATRA) reaction.

16h

Hyaluronan is effective in treating chronic lung disease

Researchers found that inhaling unfragmented hyaluronan improves lung function in patients suffering from severe exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hyaluronan, a sugar secreted by living tissue that acts as a scaffold for cells, is also used in cosmetics as a skin moisturizer and as a nasal spray to moisturize lung airways. Utilized as a treatment, hyaluronan decreased t

16h

Easily assembled gold nanoparticle scaffolding serves as molecular probe

The development of pharmaceutical treatments is difficult—clinicians and researchers know a certain drug can regulate particular functions, but they might not know how it actually works. Researchers at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have developed a new, streamlined method to better understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning these interactions.

16h

Jonpump levererar läkemedel till rätt plats i nervsystemet

Elektroniska jonpumpar kan snart vara i bruk inom neurologin, tror forskare. Små implantat som kan känna av tillstånd som epilepsi och parkinson, innan symptom uppstår. Och leverera läkemedel till precis rätt ställe i nervsystemet. Nu kompletteras uppfinningen med protonfällor som ger en mer precis läkemedelsdosering. Uppskattningsvis lider cirka sex procent av världens befolkning av neurologiska

16h

Discovery could lead to self-propelled robots

Army-funded researchers discovered how to make materials capable of self-propulsion, allowing materials to move without motors or hands.Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst discovered how to make materials that snap and reset themselves, only relying upon energy flow from their environment. This research, published in Nature Materials and funded by the U.S. Army, could enable fut

17h

Paving the way for effective field theories

This special issue, published in EPJ A , presents a coherent collection of work by theoretical experts from around the world regarding the use of effective field theories. Several unanswered questions are addressed and clarified, leading to detailed assessments of the philosophical foundations of effective field theories.

17h

Wonder fungi

Michelle O'Malley(link is external) has long been inspired by gut microbes. Since she began studying the herbivore digestive tract, the UC Santa Barbara chemical engineering professor has guided several students to their doctoral degrees, won early and mid-career awards (including a recognition from President Obama), attained tenure and advanced to the position of full professor. She even had thre

17h

The Slow, Creeping Horror of The Salisbury Poisonings

AMC's newest British import, the four-part drama The Salisbury Poisonings , is a dystopia with a bucolic English setting, and the disconnect between the two is where the show's slow creep of horror begins. On an ordinary street, a man and a woman quietly convulse on a park bench. Later, workers in ghostly white hazmat suits swab hastily abandoned cups of tea for signs of contamination. Swans, one

17h

What makes people want more self-control?

A new study shows that people differ greatly in their desire to increase their self-control, and that merely having low self-control is not sufficient to induce a strong desire for better self-control. Desire for better self-control shows most potently after people acknowledge the relevance of self-control for their present needs. As such, the findings explain why so many self-control intervention

17h

NIH study shows hyaluronan is effective in treating chronic lung disease

Researchers at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators found that inhaling unfragmented hyaluronan improves lung function in patients suffering from severe exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hyaluronan, a sugar secreted by living tissue that acts as a scaffold for cells, is also used in cosmetics as a skin moisturizer and as a nasal spray to moisturize

17h

BU researchers identify promising therapeutic agent against melanoma

There have been great advances in treating melanoma over the past five years, however, even with these treatments many patients quickly develop drug resistance and die from their disease. A new study from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) has discovered that a drug (YK-4-279) that was previously created to target one specific type of protein has much broader use against a family of prote

17h

Listen: Why US research urgently needs more funding

There's an urgent need to reinvest in American research, Barbara Snyder argues in a new podcast. In this episode of the Big Brains podcast, Snyder explains how more federal funding can secure American innovation. "As other countries have ramped up spending and ramped up the percentage of their GDP that they're investing in research, we have disinvested in research and I think that's going the wro

17h

Xiaomi's long-range wireless charger shows a glimpse of a cord-free future

Wireless charging in its current form is only moderately more convenient than simply plugging in your devices every time they need to power up. You don't have to fuss with cables that could break and ports that might get clogged with pocket lint, but because the device needs to continuously touch the charger, your phone is typically stranded as it slowly sips power from its source. Chinese device

17h

Data shows strain on ICU capacity leads to more deaths during COVID-19 pandemic

New research from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine shows that people treated in the ICU for COVID-19 are twice as likely to die when the ICU capacity is strained by the number of COVID-19 patients. Strain on hospital capacity has been associated with increased mortality under normal circumstances. This study provides evidence

17h

Elon Musk Grills Robinhood CEO for Shutting Down Wall Street Bets Trades

Explaining GameStop Grilled by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk on the audio-based social media app Clubhouse, Robinhood founder and CEO Vlad Tenev said that he had no choice but to restrict users from buying more shares in companies including GameStop and AMC. Musk didn't mince words. "Did something maybe shady go down here?" he asked, according to CNBC . But Tenev said that Robinhood simply didn't have the

17h

Origami with DNA

To study the behavior of T-cells, an unusual method was used: DNA molecules were folded in an ingenious way, similar to the paper folding art origami. In this way, not just a double helix is created, but a rectangular 'molecular raft' that floats across a cell membrane and serves as a tool for novel measurements.

17h

Supersaturation: The barrier between protein folding and misfolding

It's commonly accepted that protein folding/misfolding are alternative reactions of unfolded proteins but the principles governing this remain unknown. Here, researchers describe a general concept that links protein folding and misfolding: protein folding and amyloid formation are separated by the supersaturation barrier of a denatured protein. Breakdown of this supersaturation barrier is required

17h

When the world is burning, is art a waste of time? | R. Alan Brooks

Is art worth it? "Hell yeah," says graphic novelist R. Alan Brooks — art has the power to scare dictators, inspire multitudes and change hearts and minds across the world. Reflecting on his journey to become an artist at a time when the world felt like it was burning, Brooks shares how creating something from a place of sincerity and passion can positively impact people in ways you may never know

17h

Researchers describe a molecular mechanism involved in the pathology's neurodegeneration

Protein alteration in the family of lamins causes several diseases, known as laminopathies, such as progeria or precocious ageing. A study in which UB researchers have taken part states that alterations in the levels of one of these proteins, lamin B1, contribute to the degeneration of neuronal populations in Huntington's disease. Caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gen, this pathology features

17h

Skoltech imaging resources used in international experiment with new photocatalysts

Skoltech researchers helped their colleagues from Japan, Germany, the United States, and China study the crystal structure and optical properties of a new class of two-dimensional compounds, which can be used as effective visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for energy and chemical conversion. They used the Advanced Imaging Core Facility equipment for imaging and structural analysis.

17h

New realm of personalized medicine with brain stimulation

Millions of patients suffering from neurological and mental disorders such as depression, addiction, and chronic pain are treatment-resistant. New research paves the way for a promising alternative: personalized deep brain stimulation. Researchers have found a way to predict what effect electrical stimulation will have on an individual's brain activity across multiple brain regions. The work repre

17h

The first steps toward a quantum brain

An intelligent material that learns by physically changing itself, similar to how the human brain works, could be the foundation of a completely new generation of computers. Radboud physicists working toward this so-called 'quantum brain' have made an important step. They have demonstrated that they can pattern and interconnect a network of single atoms, and mimic the autonomous behaviour of neuro

17h

Stem cell study illuminates the cause of a devastating inherited heart disorder

Penn Medicine scientists have uncovered the molecular causes of a congenital form of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM)– one of multiple congenital disorders caused by inherited mutations in a gene called LMNA. The scientists used stem cell techniques to grow human heart muscle cells containing DCM-causing mutations in LMNA. They found that these mutations severely disrupt the structural organization o

17h

Discovery of stars sheds new light on dark matter and galactic cannibalism

Nine more stars found in Tucana II, revealing galaxy to be larger than previously thought The discovery of a handful of stars at the edge of a fossil galaxy has shed new light on dark matter and provided clues of a possible early instance of galactic cannibalism, researchers say. Tucana II is an ultrafaint dwarf galaxy about 163,000 light years from Earth and is thought to be a remnant from the f

18h

Boris Johnson suggests England will not return to regional Covid tiers

New variant is a 'national phenomenon' that may call for a nationwide approach, says PM Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage England is unlikely to return to a localised tier system of restrictions as Covid infections and hospital admissions slow, as Boris Johnson admitted the infectiousness of the new variant had made the system less workable. The UK has now vaccinated 9

18h

People become less likely to contribute to a virtual public good like Wikipedia if they know many others are doing it

While people tend to contribute more to a virtual public good if they see others doing the same, this effect reverses if they become aware too many people are participating, according to research that I conducted over the summer. Public goods are things that many people share. They can be physical, such as highways, clean air and blood banks, or virtual, like a free online encyclopedia or mobile t

18h

Facebook can actually boost older adults' well-being

What older adults actually do on Facebook may be more important to their user experience and well-being than their overall use of the site, according to researchers. A new study shows older adults experience different levels of competence, relatedness, and autonomy on Facebook based on the types of their activity. Specifically, older adults who posted more pictures to Facebook felt more competent

18h

Unmatched dust storms raged over Western Europe during Ice age maximum

Every late winter and early spring, huge dust storms swirled across the bare and frozen landscapes of Europe during the coldest periods of the latest ice age. These paleo-tempests, which are seldom matched in our modern climate frequently covered Western Europe in some of the thickest layers of ice-age dust found anywhere previously on Earth.

18h

More than meets the eye (of the storm): Typhoons in Korea amplified wildfires in America

The year 2020 played host to an uncharacteristically large number of natural disasters. The year began with large wildfires in the Amazon rainforest and Australia. A series of wildfires broke out in the American states of California during summer and Oregon in September 2020. In particular, the Oregon wildfire intensified to an uncontrollable extent and was spread over a wide area by strong gusts

18h

Water disinfection with ozone

While chlorine and ultraviolet light are the standard means of disinfecting water, ozone is equally effective in killing germs. To date, ozone has only been used as an oxidation agent for treating water in large plants. Now, however, a project consortium from Schleswig-Holstein is developing a miniaturized ozone generator for use in smaller applications such as water dispensers or small domestic a

18h

The first steps toward a quantum brain

An intelligent material that learns by physically changing itself, similar to how the human brain works, could be the foundation of a completely new generation of computers. Radboud physicists working toward this so-called "quantum brain" have made an important step. They have demonstrated that they can pattern and interconnect a network of single atoms, and mimic the autonomous behavior of neuron

18h

Physicists have developed new material for water desalination

Titanium dioxide nanoparticles decorated by gold absorb about 96% of the solar spectrum and turn it into heat. The material can accelerate the evaporation in desalination plants up to 2.5 times and can track hazardous molecules and compounds. An international research team with representatives from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), ITMO University, and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Ac

18h

Rumbles on Mars Raise Hopes of Underground Magma Flows

Once upon a time, Mars was a world of cataclysms. Its namesake, the Roman war god, would likely have been pleased to see it in action: Volcanic cathedrals of flame unleashed armies of molten rock that obliterated the surface of the planet. Today, its volcanoes are quiet. The lack of evidence for any lava has led scientists to assume that its volcanic activity expired long ago. We imagine Mars to

18h

Monitoring system protects trial crops

The world is having to feed an increasing number of mouths. Studies indicate that global population will rise to over nine billion by the year 2050. In response, Bayer AG is researching resistant cereal varieties and enhanced crop protection. A new 24-hour monitoring system from the Fraunhofer Institute for Communication, Information Processing and Ergonomics FKIE will help protect the fields wher

18h

An integrated approach based on activated carbon removes trace substances from wastewater

Wastewater plants employ a variety of effective and established processes to treat sewage and wastewater. As yet, however, there is no ideal, uniformly recognized method for removing trace substances. Researchers from the Fraun-hofer Institute for Environmental, Safety and Energy Technology UMSICHT are seeking to change this. In a project known as ZeroTrace, they are pursuing an integrated approac

18h

Targeting a rapid market breakthrough for new vaccine production method

In a so-called inactivated or killed vaccine, the virus particles it contains are first rendered inactive by means of the toxic chemical formaldehyde. A better way of achieving this, however, is to irradiate the pathogens with low-energy electrons. Four Fraunhofer Institutes have now developed a new method of vaccine production based on this technique that is not only quicker but also guarantees a

18h

Targeting a rapid market breakthrough for new vaccine production method

In a so-called inactivated or killed vaccine, the virus particles it contains are first rendered inactive by means of the toxic chemical formaldehyde. A better way of achieving this, however, is to irradiate the pathogens with low-energy electrons. Four Fraunhofer Institutes have now developed a new method of vaccine production based on this technique that is not only quicker but also guarantees a

18h

Getting the message right on nature-based solutions to climate change

Nature‐based solutions can play a key role in helping to tackle the climate and nature crises, while delivering other benefits for people, according to a new paper today from the Nature-based Solutions Initiative (NbSI) at the University of Oxford—but it is vital to get the message right about how to deliver successful NbS and avoid potential pitfalls.

18h

Origami with DNA

T-cells are an important component of our immune system: with the receptors they carry on their surface, they can recognize highly specific antigens. Upon detection of an intruder, an immune response is triggered. It is still unclear exactly what happens when antigens are recognized: How many antigens are necessary to elicit an immune response, and does the response depend on their spatial arrange

18h

Jo Bossanyi obituary

My friend Jo Bossanyi, who has died aged 96, was an environmental scientist and lecturer whose approach to teaching was driven by his belief that a well-educated public would be key to addressing the alarming degradation of the natural world. Jo was born in Lübeck, northern Germany, the only child of Ervin Bossanyi, a celebrated Hungarian stained glass artist, and Wilma (nee Maasz). The family fl

18h

Origami with DNA

T-cells are an important component of our immune system: with the receptors they carry on their surface, they can recognize highly specific antigens. Upon detection of an intruder, an immune response is triggered. It is still unclear exactly what happens when antigens are recognized: How many antigens are necessary to elicit an immune response, and does the response depend on their spatial arrange

18h

Closer look shows Neanderthals on La Cotte de St Brelade interbred with modern humans

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.K. and one in Germany has found evidence of interbreeding between Neanderthals and modern humans on Jersey island. In their paper published in Journal of Human Evolution, the group describes their study of teeth found at La Cotte de St Brelade, a cave on the southwest side of the island, back in 1911.

18h

Are plastics and microplastics in the ocean on the increase?

That is the question that Prof. Alan Deidun, resident academic within the Department of Geosciences of the Faculty of Science, along with a cohort of high-profile co-authors, posed within a study recently published in the Microplastics and Nanoplastics journal. Specifically, the study overviews a plethora of marine litter monitoring survey data available for different regions of the world ocean, a

18h

Why ocean pollution is a clear danger to human health

Ocean pollution is widespread, worsening, and poses a clear and present danger to human health and wellbeing. But the extent of this danger has not been widely comprehended—until now. Our recent study provides the first comprehensive assessment of the impacts of ocean pollution on human health.

18h

Origami with DNA

To study the behaviour of T-cells, an unusual method was used at TU Wien: DNA molecules were folded in an ingenious way, similar to the paper folding art origami. In this way, not just a double helix is created, but a rectangular "molecular raft" that floats across a cell membrane and serves as a tool for novel measurements.

18h

More than meets the eye (of the storm): Typhoons in Korea amplified wildfires in America

In August 2020, the Korean peninsula was hit by 3 devastating typhoons. A recent study by a team of scientists from Korea and the U.S. reveals that these typhoons played a role in the wildfires in Oregon, thousands of miles away. The extreme changes in weather patterns caused by these typhoons reiterate that the consequences of natural disasters are far-reaching and not always limited to the origi

18h

Land-use to solve climate change: a focus on livestock

The land sector can strongly contribute to climate change mitigation if sustainable land-use options are applied. A study led by the CMCC Foundation highlights that land-based mitigation options at small-scale landscape level can lead towards carbon neutral livestock systems while providing an additional wide range of ecological, environmental and socio-economic co-benefits at local level.

18h

Unravelling the coronavirus structure

Since the beginning of the pandemic, scientists worldwide have been working intensely to precisely characterize the novel SARS-CoV2 virus. Only by understanding in detail how the virus is constructed and how it replicates can targets for effective antiviral medications and vaccines be identified. Various Max Planck Institutes are investigating the structure of SARS-CoV2 down to the atomic level, t

18h

Land-use to solve climate change: a focus on livestock

The land sector can strongly contribute to climate change mitigation if sustainable land-use options are applied. A study led by the CMCC Foundation highlights that land-based mitigation options at a small-scale landscape level can lead towards carbon neutral livestock systems while providing an additional wide range of ecological, environmental and socio-economic co-benefits at local level. Green

18h

Closer look shows Neanderthals on La Cotte de St Brelade interbred with modern humans

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.K. and one in Germany has found evidence of interbreeding between Neanderthals and modern humans on Jersey island. In their paper published in Journal of Human Evolution, the group describes their study of teeth found at La Cotte de St Brelade, a cave on the southwest side of the island, back in 1911.

18h

Modeling galaxy formation

Understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies is difficult because so many different physical processes besides just gravity are involved, including processes associated with star formation and stellar radiation, the cooling of the gas in the interstellar medium, feedback from accreting black holes, magnetic fields, cosmic rays, and more. Astronomers have used computer simulations of galax

18h

Unravelling the coronavirus structure

Since the beginning of the pandemic, scientists worldwide have been working intensely to precisely characterize the novel SARS-CoV2 virus. Only by understanding in detail how the virus is constructed and how it replicates can targets for effective antiviral medications and vaccines be identified. Various Max Planck Institutes are investigating the structure of SARS-CoV2 down to the atomic level, t

18h

How will COVID-19 ultimately impact climate change?

Business closures. Travel restrictions. Working and learning from home. These and other dramatic responses to COVID-19 have caused sharp reductions in economic activity—and associated fossil fuel consumption—around the world. As a result, many nations are reporting significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions for the year 2020, edging them a bit closer to meeting the initial emissions target

18h

We Interviewed the New Head of NASA About SpaceX, China, and Aliens

When Joe Biden became president, there was a changing of the guard at NASA. Trump appointee Jim Bridenstine resigned, leaving associate administrator Steve Jurczyk in charge . NASA hired Jurczyk as an electrical engineer in the late 1980s, but over time he climbed the ladder until he was the highest-ranking civilian at the agency. Now he's in charge until President Biden decides to name a formal

18h

What would Seneca say? Six Stoic tips for surviving lockdown

To live through a pandemic, Albert Camus wrote , is to be made to live as an exile . Lovers are parted from lovers, (grand)parents from children, families from their dead. And we are exiled from many things we enjoy: freedom of movement, the ability to eat out or swim at public pools … In such times, older wisdom traditions can be helpful. The ancient Stoics wrote extensively about facing death,

19h

The lost art of rest: How to relax

Even though our bodies and minds are begging for a break, modern culture has turned rest into a sin. So how can we catch a breath? I'll start by telling my own story. It will serve as proof that I represent one of the most severe deficits of contemporary society: I don't know how to rest. However, it also shows that each of us is the best healer of our own exhaustion and can find a way to deep re

19h

A full-scale prototype for muon tomography

Each year, billions of tons of goods are transported globally using cargo containers. Currently, there are concerns that this immense volume of traffic could be exploited to transport illicit nuclear materials, with little chance of detection. One promising approach to combating this issue is to measure how goods interact with charged particles named muons—which form naturally as cosmic rays inter

19h

Supersaturation: The barrier between protein folding and misfolding

Correct, or native, protein folding is essential for correct protein function. Protein misfolding can lead to the formation of amyloid fibrils, and amyloidosis, which is implicated in various human neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. In this study Yuji Goto and colleagues describe, for the first time, a dynamic link between protein folding and

19h

Algorithm for algal rhythms

An atlas of harmful algal blooms across the Red Sea revealstheir link with industrial aquaculture and how these blooms have changed in recent decades.

19h

Collaborative planning in an uncertain world

Corporate planning is difficult in the best of times, let alone in the middle of a global health crisis. The coronavirus pandemic has made strategic planning harder because of economic upheaval, personal stress, work and lifestyle changes, and the unpredictability of everything. This report explores how companies worldwide conduct strategic enterprise planning—particularly in uncertain times. MIT

19h

Supersaturation: The barrier between protein folding and misfolding

Correct, or native, protein folding is essential for correct protein function. Protein misfolding can lead to the formation of amyloid fibrils, and amyloidosis, which is implicated in various human neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases. In this study Yuji Goto and colleagues describe, for the first time, a dynamic link between protein folding and

19h

Wellbeing benefits of wetlands

Australians love their beaches, and now a new study also confirms the broad appeal of other coastal assets such as tidal wetlands, nature trails and protected areas including bird and dolphin sanctuaries.

19h

Increasing snow depth prevented wintertime soils from cooling during the warming hiatus

Soil temperature has a significant impact on land-atmosphere interaction within the Earth system, affecting surrounding ecology, agriculture, and much more. This influence is a primary component of what is called a 'thermal regime' of land, or a regular pattern of temperature change within the soil. Climatologists are intrigued by fluctuating soil temperatures, especially during the first decade o

19h

Unlocking the power of a molecule's spin

Behind the devices that shape modern life is an array of natural and human-made materials. One such component of smartphones and computers are rare earth metals, a group of 17 elements that, because they aren't found in concentrated deposits, require energy-intensive and toxic methods to extract. While recycling rare earth metals from used devices is one way to relieve strained supply chains and r

19h

Carp genomes uncover speciation and chromosome evolution of fish

In a study published online in Molecular Ecology Resources, a research team led by Prof. He Shunping from Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and collaborators have revealed the evolutionary history of East Asian cyprinids, and further explored the evolution and speciation of the silver carp and bighead carp, as well as genomic differentiation between the populations

19h

A call for a global ban on lead paint

Once lead paint is on a wall, it becomes an expensive problem to fix. In impoverished settings, be they neighborhoods in Philadelphia or developing nations globally, remediation can be prohibitively costly.

19h

Carp genomes uncover speciation and chromosome evolution of fish

In a study published online in Molecular Ecology Resources, a research team led by Prof. He Shunping from Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and collaborators have revealed the evolutionary history of East Asian cyprinids, and further explored the evolution and speciation of the silver carp and bighead carp, as well as genomic differentiation between the populations

19h

Elon Musk's $100 Million Carbon Capture Push

Even if the world rapidly ramps up climate action, most experts agree that cutting emissions is no longer enough to avert disaster . W e also need to invest in pull ing CO2 out of the atmosphere, and t hat effort just got a major boost after Elon Musk announced a $100 million prize for the technology. For years, talk of technological solutions to directly counteract global warming , known as geoe

19h

Asian-relevant lung cancer research presented at Global Lung Cancer Conference hosted in Singapore

-Lung cancer continues to be the leading cause of cancer death in Singapore and the world.-The World Conference on Lung Cancer, the largest international gathering of clinicians, researchers and scientists in the field of lung cancer – with more than 6,000 participants – was held from 28 January to 31 January 2021 as a worldwide virtual event hosted by Singapore.-A group of Singapore clinicians an

19h

The first observation of a marginal Fermi glass

For several years, the condensed-matter physics community has been trying to gain a better understanding of material systems made up of strongly interacting particles. Interestingly, many metals can be described as systems with effectively weakly interacting electrons, even if interactions between electrons are typically quite strong.

19h

Can scientists find the 'holy grail' of Alzheimer's research?

Alzheimer's is a neurodegenerative disease that is estimated to affect twice as many Americans by 2050, making it a troubling eventuality for many young adults. There's currently no cure for Alzheimer's, but clinical trials of immunotherapy approaches show promise. Immunotherapies may also alleviate the psychotic symptoms of Alzheimer's, like agitation, aggression, and paranoia. It can be hard to

19h

Supersaturation: The barrier between protein folding and misfolding

It's commonly accepted that protein folding/misfolding are alternative reactions of unfolded proteins but the principles governing this remain unknown. Here, researchers from Osaka University describe a general concept that links protein folding and misfolding: protein folding and amyloid formation are separated by the supersaturation barrier of a denatured protein. Breakdown of this supersaturati

19h

Early functional SARS-COV-2 specific T cell response may prevent severe infection

Antibodies and T cells are components of the human immune system that directly act against viral infections and eliminate infected cells. A new study by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, provides evidence that an early presence of SARS-CoV-2 specific T cells in COVID-19 is likely to prevent severe disease. The study, published in Cell Reports , has important implications for the clinical ma

19h

Increasing snow depth prevented wintertime soils from cooling during the warming hiatus

Scientists investigated snow cover along with other direct and indirect soil temperature influences in northeastern China. The research further showed that the increasing snow depth in northeastern China may be the main reason for the continued warming trend in soil temperatures. In addition to the thermal insulation effect of snow cover, the ability for soil to record human changes and environmen

19h

Wellbeing benefits of wetlands

Australians love their beaches, and now a new study also confirms the broad appeal of other coastal assets such as tidal wetlands, nature trails and protected areas including bird and dolphin sanctuaries.In one of the first studies of its kind in Australia, ahead of World Wetlands Day (2 February), Flinders University environment and marine ecology experts have conducted an Adelaide-based survey o

19h

Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed

A calculation so complex that it takes twenty years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicists have now designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly.

19h

Ultralow magnetic damping of a common metallic ferromagnetic film

Ultralow damping is of key importance for spintronic and spin-orbitronic applications in a range of magnetic materials. However, the number of materials that are suited for charge-based spintronic and spin-orbitronic applications are limited due to magnon-electron scattering. To quantitatively calculate the transition metallic ferromagnetic damping, researchers have proposed theoretical approaches

19h

Remdesivir 'trick' could lead to better antiviral treatments

New research shows how remdesivir works to inhibit coronavirus. Remdesivir is the only treatment of its kind currently approved in the US for the coronavirus. The findings could lead to more effective antiviral treatments. Remdesivir targets a part of the coronavirus that allows it to make copies of itself and spread through the body. For the first time, scientists identified a critical mechanism

19h

New weapon for inflammation

Flinders University researchers have discovered a new anti-inflammatory role for well-known blood clot protein fibrinogen, which could support targeted new treatments for kidney, heart and other common diseases. The study in Redox Biology describes how fibrinogen can be protective against hypochlorite – a chemical generated by the body during inflammation – and so act as a kind of antioxidant in b

20h

Socioeconomic, demographic and urban factors influence the spread of COVID-19

Per capita income, population volume and density, the structure of cities, transport infrastructure or whether districts have their own schools are all factors that can affect the spread of COVID-19. This has been confirmed by a study carried out in 73 districts in Barcelona (Spain) by researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili, the results of which have been published in the Journal of Pub

20h

The application Radar COVID detects twice as many contacts as the manual tracing system

The application Radar COVID detects twice as many close contacts of people infected with the virus SARS-Cov2 as the manual tracing system. This is the conclusion of the first scientific study that was carried out to assess the application in a trial carried out last summer on the island of La Gomera in the Canary Islands (Spain). The results have been published in the scientific journal Nature Com

20h

South African variant of Covid found in eight areas of England

Door-to-door testing launched as cases found in Hertfordshire, Surrey, Kent, Walsall, Sefton and three London boroughs Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The South African variant of coronavirus has been discovered in eight different areas of England where people had no clear travel links to South Africa, sparking a "a two-week sprint to test everyone" in the affected p

20h

Two-drug combo starves bone cancer cells to death

Starving cancer cells of the energy they need to grow could one day provide an alternative to a commonly used chemotherapy drug without the risk of severe side effects, according to a new study. Studying human cancer cells and mice, researchers report that a two-drug combination targeting a tumor's energy sources could prove as effective and less toxic than methotrexate, a long-used chemotherapy

20h

New quasi-periodic oscillation detected from XTE J1858+034

Using NASA's NuSTAR and Swift space observatories, Indian astronomers have inspected an X-ray pulsar known as XTE J1858+034 during its outburst and identified a low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) from this source. The finding is reported in a paper published January 22 on the arXiv pre-print repository.

20h

Research catches up to world's fastest-growing plant

Wolffia, also known as duckweed, is the fastest-growing plant known, but the genetics underlying this strange little plant's success have long been a mystery to scientists. A multi-investigator effort led by scientists from the Salk Institute is reporting new findings about the plant's genome that explain how it's able to grow so fast.

20h

The spillover effect

You can't have your cake and eat it too, as the saying goes. But what if you could save your slice while enjoying the benefits at the same time? New research suggests this is possible when it comes to marine reserves.

20h

Care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement at heart of improving access to care

The American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Summit will feature several poster presentations on care delivery, cost reduction and quality improvement that offer innovative concepts to combat access to care, especially during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and as the broader health care system works to improve health equity. Research examines the rapid adoption of virtual outpatient care, en

20h

Semiconductor Shortage Could Cost Automakers $61B in Lost Sales

The often-overlooked Nissan Sentra is way better looking with the seventh generation, lower and wider. The top trim SR on display had a gorgeous cockpit. Nissan Safety Shield with six driver-assist technologies is standard. A surround-view camera system is optional. It gets a new engine with 149 hp, and a CVT transmission. It goes on sale in January. Six million Sentras have been sold since 1982.

21h

Earth's 'Minimoon' Is About to Leave Us Forever

Late last summer, Earth picked up a new moon. No, you didn't just miss seeing it in the night sky — this was a so-called "minimoon." Earth's gravity occasionally snags passing space rocks, holding them in irregular orbits before they fly off. With the object known as 2020 SO, it was more of a homecoming. Scientists confirmed 2020 SO was actually a discarded rocket booster from the 1960s, but it's

21h

Svenska bönor och ärtor – det mest klimatsmarta vi kan äta

Svenskodlade ärtor, bönor och linser kokade och förpackade i Sverige har väsentligt lägre klimatpåverkan än deras importerade motsvarigheter. Men, om de svenska baljväxterna transporteras utomlands för förädling och paketering försvinner klimatvinsten snabbt. Baljväxter såsom ärter, bönor och linser är viktiga i en hållbar kost och bidrar därför med positiva ekosystemtjänster i jordbruket. Baljvä

21h

How to get 360 audio on your new AirPods

The AirPods Pro and AirPods Max just got a new feature. (Omid Armin/Unsplash/) If you own a pair of Apple AirPods Pro or AirPods Max headphones, you just got a neat upgrade with the arrival of iOS 14 : spatial audio. Apple developed its spatial audio feature in an effort to create a surround sound effect from just two audio sources—one in your left ear and one in your right. The company describes

21h

Protein Switches and COVID Testing

Researchers report in Nature the development of a new technique for designing protein switches that can be used as biosensors. The recent development of the technology to design specific protein switches is an underreported story, in my opinion, and represents a technology with incredible possibilities. Reporting on the recent study emphasizes one possible application – development of a new rapid

21h

Inevitable Planetary Doom Has Been Exaggerated

It feels as if the world is on fire—and it is. In the last days of the Trump administration, U.S. government scientists announced that 2020 was one of the two hottest years in recorded history. The other hottest year was 2016: fittingly, the year that the United States elected Donald Trump president, a disaster for the environment as well as democratic norms. I am an environmental writer, and in

21h

Meet the nano-chameleon, a new contender for the title of world's smallest reptile

An international team, led by the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology (ZSM-SNSB), has discovered a minuscule new species of chameleon. The sole known, apparently adult male of the new species has a body size of just 13.5 mm, making it the smallest known male of the roughly 11,500 known non-avian reptiles. A comparison with 51 other chameleon species showed that the new species has exceptionally l

21h

Researchers realize single full field-of-view reconstruction fourier ptychographic microscopy

Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is a recently developed computational imaging technique, which has high-resolution and wide field-of-view (FOV). However, due to the lower light efficiency of the off-axis LEDs, the exposure time of dark-field images has to be extended to improve the signal-to-noise of dark-field images. In addition, effected by the spherical illumination wavefronts of LEDs,

21h

Image: Hubble spots an interstellar interaction

The life of a planetary nebula is often chaotic, from the death of its parent star to the scattering of its contents far out into space. Captured here by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, ESO 455-10 is one such planetary nebula, located in the constellation of Scorpius (The Scorpion).

21h

Meet the nano-chameleon, a new contender for the title of world's smallest reptile

An international team, led by the Bavarian State Collection of Zoology (ZSM-SNSB), has discovered a minuscule new species of chameleon. The sole known, apparently adult male of the new species has a body size of just 13.5 mm, making it the smallest known male of the roughly 11,500 known non-avian reptiles. A comparison with 51 other chameleon species showed that the new species has exceptionally l

21h

Multiple genomes give switchgrass an advantage

Nature, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00212-x The genome sequence of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) sheds light on genetic mechanisms that have enabled the ancestors of this valuable biomass crop to adapt to cycles of climate warming and cooling.

21h

The role and rule of relatedness in altruism

Nature, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00210-z Inclusive fitness theory shows that social partners must be related for altruism to evolve, yet some models suggest that relatedness is not needed. An analysis concludes that assumptions in those models build in a role for relatedness, after all.

21h

Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed

A calculation so complex that it takes 20 years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicist Andreas Ekström at Chalmers University of Technology, together with international research colleagues, has designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly.

21h

Dear Therapist's Guide to Love and Relationships

Editor's Note: With Lori Gottlieb on book leave, Rebecca J. Rosen, the editor of Dear Therapist, begins another month as The Atlantic 's resident "Dear Therapist" archivist, pointing readers to some of Lori's most beloved columns. Lori Gottlieb continues to work on her book, and I continue to bring you some "Dear Therapist" wisdom in her stead. This month, I'm exploring the theme of relationships

22h

The Vaccine Line Is Illogical

In mid-January, I got an email telling me that I should schedule a visit to get my COVID-19 vaccination. I was a little surprised, as I am only 57 years old and didn't think I qualified for the shot. I am also HIV-positive, but that shouldn't move me ahead in line; my virus is well controlled on antiretroviral therapy, and my life expectancy is near normal. I am a professor at a public-health sch

22h

Superstar Cities Are in Trouble

S ome evenings, when pandemic cabin fever reaches critical levels, I relieve my claustrophobia by escaping into the dreamworld of Zillow, the real-estate website. From the familiar confines of my Washington, D.C., apartment, I teleport to a ranch on the outskirts of Boise, Idaho; to a patio nestled in the hillsides of Phoenix, Arizona; or to a regal living room in one of the baroque palaces of Pl

23h

People are fed up with broken vaccine appointment tools — so they're building their own

Across the US, people are clamoring to get the hottest ticket of the season: an appointment for a covid-19 vaccination. The recommended method is to visit a local hospital website or call a hotline. But the results can be frustrating. Families have spent hours on the hotlines, scoured appointments on platforms like the ticket sales site Eventbrite , and posted desperately on local news sites like

23h

The new COVID-19 team has a lot of work to do. Here's how they should start.

Jeffrey Zients, pictured in the middle seat, at a meeting in 2013 when he served under the Obama administration. (Pete Souza/) Since his election in November, much attention has been paid to now-President Joseph R. Biden's plans to mobilize the federal government's response to the pandemic, especially in contrast to the lack of any cohesive, national plan from the Trump White House. Throughout th

23h

Springer Nature to retract chapter on sign language critics call "unbelievably insulting"

Springer Nature is retracting a book chapter describing conference research after scholars in the deaf community blasted it for being "unbelievably insulting." The chapter, "Implementation of Hand Gesture Recognition System To Aid Deaf-Dumb People," appeared in Advances in Signal and Data Procesing: Select Proceedings of ICSDP 2019. The authors were Supriya Ghule and Mrunalini Chavaan, … Continue

23h

The Library of Possible Futures

T he pandemic, which has seemed stranger than science fiction in so many ways, has occasioned much debate about the role of speculative fiction in imagining the future : The possibilities of such stories have felt, to some, like answers amid uncertainty, even as others have questioned the limits of dystopian visions. But perhaps an equally relevant literature to revisit is speculative non fiction

23h

Generna dirigerar både molekyl och mängd

Den genetiska koden styr inte bara vilka proteiner cellen tillverkar, utan bestämmer också till stor del hur mycket. Genom att utnyttja superdatorer och artificiell intelligens, AI, har systembiologer på Chalmers gjort en banbrytande upptäckt om allt biologiskt liv. Att dna-molekylen innehåller instruktioner för de olika proteiner som cellerna tillverkar har varit känt ända sedan den långa dubbel

23h

Palladium-catalyzed allene synthesis enabled by β-hydrogen elimination from sp2-carbon

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20740-w β-Hydrogen elimination is a fundamental reaction in palladium catalysis, however, the eliminated β-hydrogen is usually attached to a sp3-carbon. Here, the authors report a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction involving a β-vinylic hydrogen elimination from an allylic palladium intermediate.

23h

PopDel identifies medium-size deletions simultaneously in tens of thousands of genomes

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20850-5 Identifying structural variants (SVs) from whole genome sequence data has been a significant bioinformatic challenge. Here, the authors describe PopDel, which uses a joint SV detection approach to reliably and efficiently identify 500-10,000 bp deletions across large population cohorts.

23h

Asymmetric thinning of the cerebral cortex across the adult lifespan is accelerated in Alzheimer's disease

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21057-y Cortical thickness is asymmetric, and cortical thinning occurs with age and in disease. Here the authors investigate if both cortices thin at the same rate or if the thicker hemisphere declines faster in aging and in Alzheimer's disease.

23h

Mesenchymal stem cell-derived interleukin-28 drives the selection of apoptosis resistant bone metastatic prostate cancer

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20962-6 The effects of bone-marrow derived MSCs on prostate cancer cells remain unknown. Here the authors show that MSC-derived IL-28 induces prostate cancer cell apoptosis via IL-28Rα-STAT1 signalling, while acquired resistance to apoptosis is associated with a shift in IL-28Rα signalling via STAT1 to STAT3.

23h

Identification and analysis of splicing quantitative trait loci across multiple tissues in the human genome

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20578-2 The profiling of genetic variants affecting splicing can give insight into disease mechanisms. Here, the authors develop a pipeline for discovery of variants affecting splicing (sQTLs) and with application to the GTEx dataset they generate a catalog of human sQTLs.

23h

Unusual solute segregation phenomenon in coherent twin boundaries

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21104-8 Segregation of solute atoms at interfaces affects the properties of alloys and needs to be understood to allow their rational design. Here the authors report an unusual solute segregation phenomenon in a group of Mg alloys, driven by chemical bonding, where solute atoms larger than Mg segregate to compressio

23h

Calcium channel ITPR2 and mitochondria–ER contacts promote cellular senescence and aging

Nature Communications, Published online: 01 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20993-z Contacts between mitochondria and endoplasmatic reticulum (ER), and the transfer of calcium between them, have an important role in the regulation of cellular phenotypes, including senescence. Here the authors show that ITPR2 deficient mice display improved aging, associated with a decreased number of contac

23h

Are Conservative Policies Shortening American Lives?

A 2013 report tried to suss out why Americans suffer a "health disadvantage" compared to their peers in other high-income countries, but it was unable to do so. Since then, health in the U.S. has continued to slide. But more recent work points to a surprising culprit: America's conservative public policies.

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Familjens relationer följer med in i styrelserummet

Styrelsens roll i familjeföretag skiljer sig från andra typer av företag. Etablerade styrningsmodeller fungerar inte alltid, eftersom man måste ta hänsyn till familjerelationerna inom företaget. – Hur nära man är släkt kan ha också betydelse, säger Jenny Ahlberg som forskar om bolagsstyrning. Jenny Ahlberg har studerat hur små och medelstora familjeföretags styrelser fungerar. Styrelsens roll i f

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Why countries with 'loose', rule-breaking cultures have been hit harder by Covid | Michele Gelfand

Our research shows how 'tighter' societies do better – and how the rest must learn to adapt in order to defeat the pandemic Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With a death toll over 2 million and nearly 100 million people infected worldwide, Covid-19 is still wreaking havoc even as vaccines are rolled out. Yet fatalities are far from evenly distributed. Some nations hav

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The efforts of antivaxxers to portray COVID-19 vaccines as harmful or even deadly continue apace (VAERS edition)

With the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines continuing apace, so are the efforts of antivaxxers to portray the vaccines as dangerous. This time around, they've resurrected the old antivaccine trick of deceptively misusing the VAERS database to imply causation from VAERS reports. That's not how VAERS works, however. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .

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Barnum-uttalanden

Allmänna påståenden som verkar specifika Ett Barnum-uttalande är ett påstående om en person som känns väldigt specifikt för den det handlar om, trots att det är tillräckligt vagt för att … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .

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Planeterna som dansar i takt

Ungefär 200 ljusår bort, i Bildhuggarens stjärnbild, finns en liten orange stjärna, TOI-178, med minst sex planeter. Fem av dem har banor som har anpassat sig till varandra enligt en regelbunden rytm. Banorna förhåller sig till varandra med nära nog hela tal – på samma tid som den yttersta av dem gör två varv runt stjärnan gör nästa tre, den närmast innanför den fyra, och planeterna innanför den s

1d

Starwatch: red jewel of Antares in a pre-dawn pairing with the moon

Brightest star in the Scorpius constellation, a supergiant 68o times larger than our sun, draws close to waning crescent Those up before dawn should look south for a pretty pairing this week. On 6 February, the waning crescent moon will draw close to the beautiful red jewel of Antares, the brightest star in the constellation of Scorpius, the scorpion. Continue reading…

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Just add mushrooms: Making meals more nutritious

Researchers have identified another good reason to eat more mushrooms. New research , published in Food Science & Nutrition (January 2021) found that adding a mushroom serving to the diet increased the intake of several micronutrients, including shortfall nutrients such as vitamin D, without any increase in calories, sodium or fat.

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Solving complex physics problems at lightning speed

A calculation so complex that it takes twenty years to complete on a powerful desktop computer can now be done in one hour on a regular laptop. Physicist Andreas Ekström at Chalmers University of Technology, together with international research colleagues, has designed a new method to calculate the properties of atomic nuclei incredibly quickly.

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Viral Discoveries, 1929

The "mother of plant virology and serology," Helen Purdy Beale, developed techniques to understand the nature of viruses that went unappreciated for decades.

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Feeling the Foundation

This year has started out in a fashion that is sadly similar to the way 2020 unspooled. But the steady pace of scientific discovery helps maintain our sense of hope.

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