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A Glitch in the Matrix review – deep-dive into simulation theory
Using animation, archive and clips from the movie franchise, Rodney Ascher's genre-bending doc gives philosophers and kooks space to explain why we are living in a synthetic world With Room 237 , a deep dive into theories about Stanley Kubrick's The Shining, writer-director-animator Rodney Ascher practically invented a new sub-genre of documentary: the fathoms-five-low inspection of fandom theori
29min
California's rainy season starting nearly a month later than it did 60 years ago
The start of California's annual rainy season has been pushed back from November to December, prolonging the state's increasingly destructive wildfire season by nearly a month, according to new research. The study cannot confirm the shift is connected to climate change, but the results are consistent with climate models that predict drier autumns for California in a warming climate, according to t
1h
Study links brain cells to depression
Major depressive disorder is a significant medical condition that leads to a variety of serious emotional and physical problems. New research further highlights the potential implication of astrocytes in depression. These cells support the function of neurons in the brain and postmortem analysis reveals they are found in reduced numbers in depressed patients who have died by suicide. It is hoped t
1h
From the archive: what's it like to live without smell? – podcast
For many people infected with the Sars-CoV-2 virus, the first sign of contracting the disease is a loss of smell and taste; something we reported on last May. Studies have now shown that months later an unlucky minority will still be lacking these senses – while for others they may have returned somewhat distorted. While scientists try to fathom what exactly causes this and what treatments could
1h
From the archive: what's it like to live without smell?
For many people infected with the Sars-CoV-2 virus, the first sign of contracting the disease is a loss of smell and taste; something we reported on last May. Studies have now shown that months later an unlucky minority will still be lacking these senses – while for others they may have returned somewhat distorted. While scientists try to fathom what exactly causes this and what treatments could h
1h
New piezoelectric material remains effective to high temperatures
Piezoelectric materials hold great promise as sensors and as energy harvesters but are normally much less effective at high temperatures, limiting their use in environments such as engines or space exploration. However, a new piezoelectric device remains highly effective at elevated temperatures.
3h
Don't climate bet against the house
Decades ago (it seems) when perhaps it was still possible to have good faith disagreements about the attribution of current climate trends, James Annan wrote a post here summarizing the thinking and practice of Climate Betting . That led to spate of wagers on continued global warming (a summary of his bets through 2005 and attempts to set up others is here ). There were earlier bets, the most wel
3h
The business of bees
The economic value of insect pollinators was $34 billion in the U.S. in 2012, much higher than previously thought. The team also found that areas that are economically most reliant on insect pollinators are the same areas where pollinator habitat and forage quality are poor.
3h
Nanotech plastic packaging could leach silver into some types of foods and beverages
Antimicrobial packaging is being developed to extend the shelf life and safety of foods and beverages. However, there is concern about the transfer of potentially harmful materials, such as silver nanoparticles, from these types of containers to consumables. Now, researchers illustrate that silver embedded in an antimicrobial plastic can leave the material and form nanoparticles in foods and bever
3h
New ink jet approach offers simple way to print microdisk lasers for biosensing
Researchers have developed a unique inkjet printing method for fabricating tiny biocompatible polymer microdisk lasers for biosensing applications. The approach enables production of both the laser and sensor in a room temperature, open-air environment, potentially enabling new uses of biosensing technologies for health monitoring and disease diagnostics.
3h
The quick choice might be a choice-overload avoidance strategy
Making a choice quickly might appear effortless, but research that measured cardiovascular responses in the moment of making a choice, rather than after-the-fact, suggests that the apparent swift certainty might instead be a defense from having to think too deeply about the choices being presented to them.
3h
Biodiversity is its own catalyst — to a point
For decades, scientists have wrestled with rival theories to explain how interactions between species, like competition, influence biodiversity. Tracking microbial life across the planet, researchers show that biodiversity does in fact foster further diversity in microbiomes that are initially less diverse. However, diversity rates plateau with increased competition for survival and space in more
4h
I Want to Be a Feminist Dad – Issue 95: Escape
One of the kids in my house feels bad for people named Karen. He announced it at the dinner table. "They're not all annoying, or racist, or anti-vaxxer," he said. "They don't all demand to speak to the manager. How do you think the good Karens feel?" I pass a plate of steamed broccoli to my partner, Amanda, and explain to all four kids that while the Karen-meme has been controversial,1 and may in
4h
The Doctor Will Sniff You Now – Issue 95: Escape
It's 2050 and you're due for your monthly physical exam. Times have changed, so you no longer have to endure an orifices check, a needle in your vein, and a week of waiting for your blood test results. Instead, the nurse welcomes you with, "The doctor will sniff you now," and takes you into an airtight chamber wired up to a massive computer. As you rest, the volatile molecules you exhale or emit
4h
Cognitive Scientists Are Going to the Dogs – Issue 95: Escape
An old dog, it turns out, can teach humans new tricks. "In recent years the dog has grown to be one of the most important animals for researchers who aim to understand the biological background of complex traits," says Eniko Kubinyi, an ethologist at Eötvös Loránd University in Budapest, Hungary. Previously dogs weren't considered good models for studies into animal behavior because they were tho
4h
Albert Camus on why accepting absurdity is the start of a fruitful life
Camus thought that life was absurd, but that knowing that was a beginning, not an end. By realizing it is all absurd, you have the opportunity to rebel against the meaninglessness. Søren Kierkegaard, another philosopher, went with a different answer. If you haven't noticed, life is absurd . We humans strive to find meaning in the world, and the world responds with cold indifference. This contrast
4h
Oxford trial to test efficacy of mix of Covid vaccines for individuals
Scientists aim to establish level of immunity in trial of 820 people, giving some a substitute vaccine at second appointment Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Volunteers are being sought for a world-first trial to establish the efficacy of giving people a first dose of one vaccine and a second dose of a different vaccine. The trial, which is being run by Oxford Univers
6h
Marine biologists discover 4 new types of photoreceptor
The ocean is full of simple single-celled organisms that somehow follow day-night cycles. Researchers have just discovered four new groups of photoreceptors that help the organisms detect light. The photoreceptors may find use in studies of the human brain. When it comes to senses like ours, tiny single-celled organisms floating in the ocean don't have much going on. And yet, as Sacha Coesel , th
6h
Okinawa researcher suspended for faking data denies committing misconduct
Ye Zhang, who as we reported yesterday is serving a six-month suspension from her post at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), in Japan, says she did not commit misconduct, as the school contends. In response to a query from Retraction Watch, Zhang, a materials scientist, said she did not agree with … Continue reading
6h
The White House Says That Space Force Has Its "Full Support"
New Boss The incoming Biden administration may have gotten off on the wrong foot with the United States military's youngest service branch. During a press conference on Tuesday, White House press secretary Jen Psaki appeared to make a dismissive comment about the Space Force when asked about the new military branch. "Wow, Space Force. It's the plane of today," she told reporters , a likely refere
8h
New radar tech takes unbelievably detailed moon images from Earth
A new, high-resolution image of the moon has been produced using radar astronomy. Objects as small as five meters wide are clearly visible. The image was part of a proof of concept test — a larger transmitter may soon be built. A successful test of a new radio transmitter by the National Science Foundation's Green Bank Observatory (GBO), the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and Raythe
8h
Dynamic 3D printing process features a light-driven twist
The speed of light has come to 3D printing. Northwestern University engineers have developed a new method that uses light to improve 3D printing speed and precision while also, in combination with a high-precision robot arm, providing the freedom to move, rotate or dilate each layer as the structure is being built. The method introduces the 'on-the-fly' ability to manipulate the original design la
8h
Poll shows inequality in older adults' ability to isolate a COVID-positive person at home
An important way to slow COVID-19 spread is for people who have tested positive to isolate themselves from the other people they live with. But a new poll suggests that nearly one in five older adults don't have the ability to do this, and highlights disparities by race, ethnicity, income and health. It also shows significant inequality in another key aspect of the pandemic: the ability to get out
8h
One Pfizer/BioNTech jab gives '90% immunity' from Covid after 21 days
New analysis runs counter to earlier study which suggested one dose may not give adequate protection Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One dose of the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine gives people about 90% protection from Covid by 21 days, according to an analysis of Israel's mass vaccination programme. The data analysis, carried out by researchers from the University of East
9h
What are some theories on the mental representation of language?
I was wondering about theories in cognitive science about language acquisition. In particular, how do cognitive scientists think language is represented in the brain? My intuition would be visual and spatial processes, but I'm curious about the diversity of competing theories out there. A very brief overview is sufficient; I can read up on them on my own. submitted by /u/Blutorangensaft [link] [c
9h
Vape Explodes, Knocking Out Man's Teeth
A man's e-cigarette exploded in his mouth, shattering several of his teeth and sending him to the hospital. Doctors at Queen's Medical Centre at Nottingham University Hospital held the 19-year-old man at the intensive are unit for about a day before sending him home, according to MEDizzy . But the patient left with several fewer teeth than he came in with, as the shattered bone was deemed irrepar
9h
Hypoxia, a feature inside solid cancer tumors, reprograms methylation of ribosomal RNAs
Hypoxia — where a tissue is deprived of an adequate supply of oxygen — is a feature inside solid cancer tumors that renders them highly invasive and resistant to treatment. Researchers now report that chronic hypoxia, surprisingly, upregulates RNA polymerase I activity and alters the methylation patterns on ribosomal RNAs. These altered epigenetic marks on the ribosomal RNAs appear to create a p
9h
New piezoelectric material remains effective to high temperatures
Piezoelectric materials hold great promise as sensors and as energy harvesters but are normally much less effective at high temperatures, limiting their use in environments such as engines or space exploration. However, a new piezoelectric device developed by a team of researchers from Penn State and QorTek remains highly effective at elevated temperatures.
9h
Feed Fido fresh human-grade dog food to scoop less poop
For decades, kibble has been our go-to diet for dogs. But the dog food marketplace has exploded in recent years, with grain-free, fresh, and now human-grade offerings crowding the shelves. All commercial dog foods must meet standards for complete and balanced nutrition, so how do consumers know what to choose?
9h
Scientists discover plants' roadblock to specialty oil production
Hundreds of naturally occurring specialty fatty acids (building blocks of oils) have potential for use as raw materials for making lubricants, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and more—if they could be produced at large scale by crop plants. But attempts to put genes for making these specialty building blocks into crops have had the opposite effect: Seeds from plants with genes added to make specialty f
9h
Scientists discover plants' roadblock to specialty oil production
Hundreds of naturally occurring specialty fatty acids (building blocks of oils) have potential for use as raw materials for making lubricants, plastics, pharmaceuticals, and more—if they could be produced at large scale by crop plants. But attempts to put genes for making these specialty building blocks into crops have had the opposite effect: Seeds from plants with genes added to make specialty f
9h
State-funded pre-K may enhance math achievement
In the first longitudinal study to follow Georgia pre-K students through middle school, Stacey Neuharth-Pritchett, associate dean for academic programs and professor in UGA's Mary Frances Early College of Education, found that participating in pre-K programs positively predicted mathematical achievement in students through seventh grade.
9h
This huge Xerox printer can create metal parts for the US Navy
The printer is called the ElemX. (Xerox/) Xerox's new printer is 9 feet wide, 7 feet tall, and reaches an internal temperature of more than 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit. It's not an inkjet, of course—it's a 3D printer that can produce bespoke metal components. The Naval Postgraduate School, an grad institution for Naval officers and others, is the first place to put one of these massive Xerox machine
9h
This Incredible Toy Teaches Kids Coding Without the Need for Screens
Educational toys aren't what they used to be. The days of flashcards, building blocks, and workbooks are as archaic as the lessons they taught. These days, if you want your child to have a competitive chance at a successful future, you have to prepare them with programs that will enrich the STEM curriculum. In fact, a recent study concluded that young children are more than capable to engage in t
9h
New Photos Show Half-Finished SpaceX Super Heavy Booster
Super Heavy According to new drone shots from its testing facilities in Boca Chica, Texas, SpaceX is making progress on building the first prototype of its Super Heavy rocket booster. According to Teslarati 's estimates , the prototype is roughly halfway built already. The gigantic 230-foot booster is meant to eventually ferry the company's Starship spacecraft into orbit. Starship and booster tog
9h
First-in-human clinical trial confirms HIV vaccine approach by IAVI and Scripps Research
A phase 1 clinical trial testing a novel vaccine approach to prevent HIV has produced promising results, IAVI and Scripps Research announced today. The vaccine showed success in stimulating production of rare immune cells needed to start the process of generating antibodies against the fast-mutating virus; the targeted response was detected in 97 percent of participants who received the vaccine.
9h
Was 'Oumuamua a rock or an alien scout? Harvard astronomer talks controversial hypothesis in new book
'Oumuamua is the first known object we've observed coming to our solar system from somewhere beyond it. Most experts think it was just a very odd rock, but not everyone is so sure. Harvard astronomer Ari Loeb says the evidence is more consistent with it having been a light-sail spacecraft. If we became especially interested in another solar system and wanted to send an exploratory craft, how woul
9h
Duckbill dinosaur's skull solves long-standing crest mystery
A newly-discovered, exceptionally well-preserved skull of the duckbill dinosaur Parasaurolophus answers questions about its signature crest and family tree. Parasaurolophus is instantly recognizable due to the giant crest that starts at its nose and arches back over the top of its head. But recovered specimens haven't had skulls that preserved the iconic crest very well—until now. Parasaurolophus
10h
Digital health divide runs deep in older racial and ethnic minorities
Results of a study qualitatively exploring reasons for digital health information disparity reveal a deep digital health divide that has important implications for helping older adults with COVID-19 vaccinations. Participants who were older, less educated, economically disadvantaged and from ethnic groups (African American, Afro-Caribbean or Hispanic American) were up to five times less likely to
10h
Robinhood Is Down to 1/5 Stars on Google Play
Second Wave Once again, the now-infamous stock trading app Robinhood finds itself with an utterly abysmal rating on the Google Play Store. And this time, Google isn't going to save it, a company spokesperson told The Verge . Robinhood has become profoundly unpopular as of late, especially after it restricted users from buying shares in companies like GameStop and AMC in response to the Wall Stree
10h
Multiseriate cortical sclerenchyma enhance root penetration in compacted soils [Agricultural Sciences]
Mechanical impedance limits soil exploration and resource capture by plant roots. We examine the role of root anatomy in regulating plant adaptation to mechanical impedance and identify a root anatomical phene in maize (Zea mays) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) associated with penetration of hard soil: Multiseriate cortical sclerenchyma (MCS). We…
10h
Macrophages inhibit and enhance endometriosis depending on their origin [Immunology and Inflammation]
Macrophages are intimately involved in the pathophysiology of endometriosis, a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by the growth of endometrial-like tissue (lesions) outside the uterus. By combining genetic and pharmacological monocyte and macrophage depletion strategies we determined the ontogeny and function of macrophages in a mouse model of induced endometriosis. We…
10h
SLFN11 promotes CDT1 degradation by CUL4 in response to replicative DNA damage, while its absence leads to synthetic lethality with ATR/CHK1 inhibitors [Medical Sciences]
Schlafen-11 (SLFN11) inactivation in ∼50% of cancer cells confers broad chemoresistance. To identify therapeutic targets and underlying molecular mechanisms for overcoming chemoresistance, we performed an unbiased genome-wide RNAi screen in SLFN11-WT and -knockout (KO) cells. We found that inactivation of Ataxia Telangiectasia- and Rad3-related (ATR), CHK1, BRCA2, and RPA1 overcome…
10h
A unified theory for organic matter accumulation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Organic matter constitutes a key reservoir in global elemental cycles. However, our understanding of the dynamics of organic matter and its accumulation remains incomplete. Seemingly disparate hypotheses have been proposed to explain organic matter accumulation: the slow degradation of intrinsically recalcitrant substrates, the depletion to concentrations that inhibit microbial consumption,…
10h
Pattern formation and polarity sorting of driven actin filaments on lipid membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Collective motion of active matter is ubiquitously observed, ranging from propelled colloids to flocks of bird, and often features the formation of complex structures composed of agents moving coherently. However, it remains extremely challenging to predict emergent patterns from the binary interaction between agents, especially as only a limited number…
10h
Evolutionary dynamics at the tumor edge reveal metabolic imaging biomarkers [Applied Mathematics]
Human cancers are biologically and morphologically heterogeneous. A variety of clonal populations emerge within these neoplasms and their interaction leads to complex spatiotemporal dynamics during tumor growth. We studied the reshaping of metabolic activity in human cancers by means of continuous and discrete mathematical models and matched the results to…
10h
ARMC12 regulates spatiotemporal mitochondrial dynamics during spermiogenesis and is required for male fertility [Developmental Biology]
The mammalian sperm midpiece has a unique double-helical structure called the mitochondrial sheath that wraps tightly around the axoneme. Despite the remarkable organization of the mitochondrial sheath, the molecular mechanisms involved in mitochondrial sheath formation are unclear. In the process of screening testis-enriched genes for functions in mice, we identified…
10h
Kidney intercalated cells and the transcription factor FOXi1 drive cystogenesis in tuberous sclerosis complex [Medical Sciences]
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2 genes and affects multiple organs, including kidney, lung, and brain. In the kidney, TSC presents with the enlargement of benign tumors (angiomyolipomata) and cysts, which eventually leads to kidney failure. The factors promoting cyst formation and tumor…
10h
Cooperativity between the orthosteric and allosteric ligand binding sites of ROR{gamma}t [Biochemistry]
Cooperative ligand binding is an important phenomenon in biological systems where ligand binding influences the binding of another ligand at an alternative site of the protein via an intramolecular network of interactions. The underlying mechanisms behind cooperative binding remain poorly understood, primarily due to the lack of structural data of…
10h
An mtDNA mutant mouse demonstrates that mitochondrial deficiency can result in autism endophenotypes [Neuroscience]
Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterized by a deficit in social communication, pathologic repetitive behaviors, restricted interests, and electroencephalogram (EEG) aberrations. While exhaustive analysis of nuclear DNA (nDNA) variation has revealed hundreds of copy number variants (CNVs) and loss-of-function (LOF) mutations, no unifying hypothesis as to the pathophysiology of ASD…
10h
Comparative analysis of embryo proper and suspensor transcriptomes in plant embryos with different morphologies [Plant Biology]
An important question is what genes govern the differentiation of plant embryos into suspensor and embryo proper regions following fertilization and division of the zygote. We compared embryo proper and suspensor transcriptomes of four plants that vary in embryo morphology within the suspensor region. We determined that genes encoding enzymes…
10h
Mechanistic transmission modeling of COVID-19 on the Diamond Princess cruise ship demonstrates the importance of aerosol transmission [Environmental Sciences]
Several lines of existing evidence support the possibility of airborne transmission of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, quantitative information on the relative importance of transmission pathways of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) remains limited. To evaluate the relative importance of multiple transmission routes for SARS-CoV-2, we developed a…
10h
Modeling SARS-CoV-2 viral kinetics and association with mortality in hospitalized patients from the French COVID cohort [Medical Sciences]
The characterization of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) viral kinetics in hospitalized patients and its association with mortality is unknown. We analyzed death and nasopharyngeal viral kinetics in 655 hospitalized patients from the prospective French COVID cohort. The model predicted a median peak viral load that coincided with…
10h
Mapping proteolytic neo-N termini at the surface of living cells [Biochemistry]
N terminomics is a powerful strategy for profiling proteolytic neo-N termini, but its application to cell surface proteolysis has been limited by the low relative abundance of plasma membrane proteins. Here we apply plasma membrane-targeted subtiligase variants (subtiligase-TM) to efficiently and specifically capture cell surface N termini in live cells….
10h
Vaccine Centers in Cathedrals, Stadiums, and Parking Lots
As more vaccines against COVID-19 become available and distribution keeps ramping up, governments and health-care institutions worldwide have set up centers to deliver as many vaccinations as possible. Gymnasiums, sports venues, and existing clinics have been readied, and early candidates are now passing through. Efforts are already underway in some areas to reach vulnerable populations living in
10h
Nanotech plastic packaging could leach silver into some types of foods and beverages
Antimicrobial packaging is being developed to extend the shelf life and safety of foods and beverages. However, there is concern about the transfer of potentially harmful materials, such as silver nanoparticles, from these types of containers to consumables. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces illustrate that silver embedded in an antimicrobial plastic can leave the ma
10h
Intranasal influenza vaccine spurs strong immune response in Phase 1 study
An experimental single-dose, intranasal influenza vaccine was safe and produced a durable immune response when tested in a Phase 1 study. The investigational vaccine, called Ad4-H5-VTN, is a recombinant, replicating adenovirus vaccine designed to spur antibodies to hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of influenza viruses that attaches to human cells.
10h
The Arctic Ocean was covered by a shelf ice and filled with freshwater
The Arctic Ocean was covered by up to 900 m thick shelf ice and was filled entirely with freshwater at least twice in the last 150,000 years. This surprising finding is the result of long-term research. With a detailed analysis of the composition of marine deposits, the scientists could demonstrate that the Arctic Ocean as well as the Nordic Seas did not contain sea-salt in at least two glacial pe
10h
Signal transfer in proteins across multiple time scales
Consider for a moment a tree swaying in the wind. How long does it take for the movement of a twig to reach the trunk of the tree? How is this motion actually transmitted through the tree? Researchers are transferring this kind of question to the analysis of proteins — which are the molecular machinery of cells.
10h
New ink jet approach offers simple way to print microdisk lasers for biosensing
Researchers have developed a unique inkjet printing method for fabricating tiny biocompatible polymer microdisk lasers for biosensing applications. The approach enables production of both the laser and sensor in a room temperature, open-air environment, potentially enabling new uses of biosensing technologies for health monitoring and disease diagnostics.
11h
Drone and landsat imagery shows long-term change in vegetation cover along intermittent river
In the Namib Desert in southwestern Africa, the Kuiseb River, an ephemeral river which is dry most of the year, plays a vital role to the region. It provides most of the vegetation to the area and serves as a home for the local indigenous people, and migration corridor for many animals. The overall vegetation cover increased by 33% between 1984 and 2019, according to a Dartmouth study published in
11h
Fungus that eats fungus could help coffee farmers
Coffee rust is a parasitic fungus and a big problem for coffee growers around the world. A study in the birthplace of coffee—Ethiopia—shows that another fungus seems to have the capacity to supress the rust outbreaks in this landscape.
11h
A team of climatologists is studying how to minimize errors in observed climate trend
The instrumental climate record is the cultural heritage of humankind, the result of the diligent work of many generations of people all over the world. However, the changes in the way in which temperature is measured, as well as the environment in which weather stations are located can produce spurious trends. An international study carried out by researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili
11h
MIT Scientists Hack Spinach Plants to Send Emails
Circling Back MIT scientists are showing off engineered cyborg spinach plants that they say are capable of sending emails to their creators. The spinach doesn't have much on its mind, so it's thankfully not filling inboxes with idle chit-chat. Instead, it sticks to more crucial communications, Yahoo News reports , like sending out alerts whenever the carbon nanotubes built into its leaves detect
11h
Marmoset monkeys eavesdrop and understand conversations between other marmosets
Humans continuously observe and evaluate interactions between third parties to decide with whom to interact in the future. But it is difficult to measure what information animals gain when they eavesdrop on vocal interactions between conspecifics: If they do understand such conversations, they do not necessarily exhibit behavioral expressions that can be easily observed. To overcome this hurdle, a
11h
Marmoset monkeys eavesdrop and understand conversations between other marmosets
Humans continuously observe and evaluate interactions between third parties to decide with whom to interact in the future. But it is difficult to measure what information animals gain when they eavesdrop on vocal interactions between conspecifics: If they do understand such conversations, they do not necessarily exhibit behavioral expressions that can be easily observed. To overcome this hurdle, a
11h
Fewer Americans Are Getting COVID-19 Tests
During the early stages of the pandemic, the big story in the United States was testing: The federal government's initial failure to produce a working test and scale up its production meant that the country struggled for months to keep up with the virus's spread. In May, the Harvard Global Health Institute estimated that the U.S. needed to perform 1 million tests a day to contain the outbreak by
11h
BU study: New vaginal film, MB66, is safe
Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Mapp Biopharmaceutical have now found that MB66, a vaginal film product containing monoclonal antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex viruses types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and 2), is safe and effective.
11h
Impact of spokesperson identity on sharing of public health messages
Participants in an international survey study reported greater willingness to reshare a call for social distancing if the message was endorsed by well-known immunology expert Anthony Fauci, rather than a government spokesperson or celebrity. Ahmad Abu-Akel of the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, and colleagues Andreas Spitz and Robert West of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, repor
11h
Insulin can be stored out of refrigeration in hot settings!
Patients with diabetes must keep a supply of insulin which must respect the cold chain. However not every household has a refrigerator. This forces people living with diabetes to go to hospital on a daily basis. MSF and UNIGE test insulin storage at temperatures ranging from 25°C to 37°C. The findings demonstrate that the stability of insulin stored under these conditions is the same as that of co
11h
Martian landslides caused by underground salts and melting ice?
A team of researchers led by SETI Institute Senior Research Scientist Janice Bishop, a member of the SETI Institute NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) team, has come up with a theory about what is causing landslides on the surface of Mars. They hypothesize that ice melting in the near-surface regolith is causing changes at the surface that make it vulnerable to dust storms and wind. As a result, th
11h
Noninvasive imaging and quantification of bile salt hydrolase activity: From bacteria to humans
The microbiome-produced enzyme bile salt hydrolase (BSH) plays a central role in human health, but its function remains unclear due to the lack of suitable methods for measuring its activity. Here, we have developed a novel optical tool based on ultrasensitive bioluminescent imaging and demonstrated that this assay can be used for quick and cost-effective quantification of BSH activity across a b
11h
INFORM: INFrared-based ORganizational Measurements of tumor and its microenvironment to predict patient survival
The structure and organization of a tumor and its microenvironment are often associated with cancer outcomes due to spatially varying molecular composition and signaling. A persistent challenge is to use this physical and chemical spatial organization to understand cancer progression. Here, we present a high-definition infrared imaging–based organizational measurement framework (INFORM) that leve
11h
The rise of compound warm-season droughts in Europe
Drought is one of the main threats to food security and ecosystem productivity. During the past decades, Europe has experienced a series of droughts that caused substantial socioeconomic losses and environmental impacts. A key question is whether there are some similar characteristics in these droughts, especially when compared to the droughts that occurred further in the past. Answering this que
11h
Immune synapse instructs epigenomic and transcriptomic functional reprogramming in dendritic cells
Understanding the fate of dendritic cells (DCs) after productive immune synapses (postsynaptic DCs) with T cells during antigen presentation has been largely neglected in favor of deciphering the nuances of T cell activation and memory generation. Here, we describe that postsynaptic DCs switch their transcriptomic signature, correlating with epigenomic changes including DNA accessibility and hist
11h
Laminin {gamma}2-mediating T cell exclusion attenuates response to anti-PD-1 therapy
PD-1/PD-L1 blockade therapies provide notable clinical benefits for patients with advanced cancers, but the factors influencing the effectiveness of the treatment remain incompletely cataloged. Here, the up-regulation of laminin 2 (Ln-2) predicted the attenuated efficacy of anti–PD-1 drugs and was associated with unfavorable outcomes in patients with lung cancer or esophageal cancer. Furthermore,
11h
Do marmosets understand others conversations? A thermography approach
What information animals derive from eavesdropping on interactions between conspecifics, and whether they assign value to it, is difficult to assess because overt behavioral reactions are often lacking. An inside perspective of how observers perceive and process such interactions is thus paramount. Here, we investigate what happens in the mind of marmoset monkeys when they hear playbacks of posit
11h
KIF13A motors are regulated by Rab22A to function as weak dimers inside the cell
Endocytic recycling is a complex itinerary, critical for many cellular processes. Membrane tubulation is a hallmark of recycling endosomes (REs), mediated by KIF13A, a kinesin-3 family motor. Understanding the regulatory mechanism of KIF13A in RE tubulation and cargo recycling is of fundamental importance but is overlooked. Here, we report a unique mechanism of KIF13A dimerization modulated by Ra
11h
Autism-linked gene FoxP1 selectively regulates the cultural transmission of learned vocalizations
Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are characterized by impaired learning of social skills and language. Memories of how parents and other social models behave are used to guide behavioral learning. How ASD-linked genes affect the intertwined aspects of observational learning and behavioral imitation is not known. Here, we examine how disrupted expression of the ASD gene FOXP1, which causes severe
11h
Neural network involving medial orbitofrontal cortex and dorsal periaqueductal gray regulation in human alcohol abuse
Prompted by recent evidence of neural circuitry in rodent models, functional magnetic resonance imaging and functional connectivity analyses were conducted for a large adolescent population at two ages, together with alcohol abuse measures, to characterize a neural network that may underlie the onset of alcoholism. A network centered on the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC), as well as including
11h
Scalable representation of time in the hippocampus
Hippocampal "time cells" encode specific moments of temporally organized experiences that may support hippocampal functions for episodic memory. However, little is known about the reorganization of the temporal representation of time cells during changes in temporal structures of episodes. We investigated CA1 neuronal activity during temporal bisection tasks, in which the sets of time intervals t
11h
High-resolution 3D imaging uncovers organ-specific vascular control of tissue aging
Blood vessels provide supportive microenvironments for maintaining tissue functions. Age-associated vascular changes and their relation to tissue aging and pathology are poorly understood. Here, we perform 3D imaging of young and aging vascular beds. Multiple organs in mice and humans demonstrate an age-dependent decline in vessel density and pericyte numbers, while highly remodeling tissues such
11h
Multicomponent reaction-derived covalent inhibitor space
The area of covalent inhibitors is gaining momentum due to recently introduced clinical drugs, but libraries of these compounds are scarce. Multicomponent reaction (MCR) chemistry is well known for its easy access to a very large and diverse chemical space. Here, we show that MCRs are highly suitable to generate libraries of electrophiles based on different scaffolds and three-dimensional shapes
11h
A single-nucleotide change underlies the genetic assimilation of a plastic trait
Genetic assimilation—the evolutionary process by which an environmentally induced phenotype is made constitutive—represents a fundamental concept in evolutionary biology. Thought to reflect adaptive phenotypic plasticity, matricidal hatching in nematodes is triggered by maternal nutrient deprivation to allow for protection or resource provisioning of offspring. Here, we report natural Caenorhabdi
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Self-powered electro-tactile system for virtual tactile experiences
Tactile sensation plays important roles in virtual reality and augmented reality systems. Here, a self-powered, painless, and highly sensitive electro-tactile (ET) system for achieving virtual tactile experiences is proposed on the basis of triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) and ET interface formed of ball-shaped electrode array. Electrostatic discharge triggered by TENG can induce notable ET sti
11h
Martian subsurface cryosalt expansion and collapse as trigger for landslides
On Mars, seasonal martian flow features known as recurring slope lineae (RSL) are prevalent on sun-facing slopes and are associated with salts. On Earth, subsurface interactions of gypsum with chlorides and oxychlorine salts wreak havoc: instigating sinkholes, cave collapse, debris flows, and upheave. Here, we illustrate (i) the disruptive potential of sulfate-chloride reactions in laboratory soi
11h
Leveraging systems biology for predicting modulators of inflammation in patients with COVID-19
Dysregulations in the inflammatory response of the body to pathogens could progress toward a hyperinflammatory condition amplified by positive feedback loops and associated with increased severity and mortality. Hence, there is a need for identifying therapeutic targets to modulate this pathological immune response. Here, we propose a single cell–based computational methodology for predicting pro
11h
A diagnostic host response biosignature for COVID-19 from RNA profiling of nasal swabs and blood
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19), has emerged as the cause of a global pandemic. We used RNA sequencing to analyze 286 nasopharyngeal (NP) swab and 53 whole-blood (WB) samples from 333 patients with COVID-19 and controls. Overall, a muted immune response was observed in COVID-19 relative to other infections (influenza, ot
11h
High-performance combinatorial optimization based on classical mechanics
Quickly obtaining optimal solutions of combinatorial optimization problems has tremendous value but is extremely difficult. Thus, various kinds of machines specially designed for combinatorial optimization have recently been proposed and developed. Toward the realization of higher-performance machines, here, we propose an algorithm based on classical mechanics, which is obtained by modifying a pr
11h
Recruitment of archaeal DTD is a key event toward the emergence of land plants
Streptophyte algae emerged as a land plant with adaptations that eventually led to terrestrialization. Land plants encounter a range of biotic and abiotic stresses that elicit anaerobic stress responses. Here, we show that acetaldehyde, a toxic metabolite of anaerobic stress, targets and generates ethyl adducts on aminoacyl-tRNA, a central component of the translation machinery. However, elongati
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On-demand biomanufacturing of protective conjugate vaccines
Conjugate vaccines are among the most effective methods for preventing bacterial infections. However, existing manufacturing approaches limit access to conjugate vaccines due to centralized production and cold chain distribution requirements. To address these limitations, we developed a modular technology for in vitro conjugate vaccine expression (iVAX) in portable, freeze-dried lysates from deto
11h
Digital light 3D printing of customized bioresorbable airway stents with elastomeric properties
Central airway obstruction is a life-threatening disorder causing a high physical and psychological burden to patients. Standard-of-care airway stents are silicone tubes, which provide immediate relief but are prone to migration. Thus, they require additional surgeries to be removed, which may cause tissue damage. Customized bioresorbable airway stents produced by 3D printing would be highly need
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Vaccine optimization for COVID-19: Who to vaccinate first?
Vaccines, when available, will likely become our best tool to control the COVID-19 pandemic. Even in the most optimistic scenarios, vaccine shortages will likely occur. Using an age-stratified mathematical model paired with optimization algorithms, we determined optimal vaccine allocation for four different metrics (deaths, symptomatic infections, and maximum non-ICU and ICU hospitalizations) und
11h
Life changes influence physical activity
Life changes influence the amount of physical activity in a person, according to a recent study. The birth of children and a change of residence, marital status and place of work all influence the number of steps of men and women in different ways.
11h
European hibernating bats cope with white-nose syndrome which kills North American bats
Fungal diseases are a major threat to wildlife, sometimes resulting in significant population declines or even causing the extirpation of populations or species. White-nose syndrome, caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has become a major cause of death for millions of hibernating bats in North America. European bats survive when infected by the same fungus during hiberna
11h
13-year analysis sheds new light on wheat crop disease patterns in Ethiopia
A new study of wheat rust—a fungal disease that can harm wheat crops—identifies previously unknown long-term trends and hotspots for wheat rust outbreaks in Ethiopia. A team of modelers from the University of Cambridge and the Universität Hamburg, along with surveillance experts from CIMMYT, EIAR and agricultural universities in Ethiopia, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE
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Covid coughing study suggests NHS staff at far greater risk than thought
Exclusive: Health service urged to rethink safety for frontline staff and provide better PPE and ventilation Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The NHS has been urged to rethink safety for thousands of frontline staff after new research suggested that Covid patients' coughing is putting them at far greater risk of catching the virus than previously thought. The study fo
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Mars's mascara-like streaks may be caused by slush and landslides
The Red Planet's dark streaks could be evidence of water, landslides, or now… both? (NASA/JPL/UArizona/) Mars appears to be weeping with the seasons. As the days grow warmer in the Martian summer, hundreds of thousands of dark streaks stain the planet's cliffs and craters, only to fade away until the following year. After more than a decade of controversy, a laboratory experiment may finally have
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Consider these everlasting roses to keep on display for an entire year
Valentine's Day Gifts (Stack Commerce/) Roses are great, especially for Valentine's Day, but those that come from a florist or traditional sources usually don't last more than a week. This holiday, why not consider roses that have been specially preserved to last a year or longer, giving your partner, friend or family member a reminder of your love all year. Here are a selection of preserved, fre
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Biodiversity is its own catalyst — to a point
For decades, scientists have wrestled with rival theories to explain how interactions between species, like competition, influence biodiversity. Tracking microbial life across the planet, researchers from McGill University show that biodiversity does in fact foster further diversity in microbiomes that are initially less diverse. However, diversity rates plateau with increased competition for surv
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What the Biden-Harris administration means for chemistry
The inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris marks a new era for science policy in the U.S. and beyond. The new administration has inherited a global pandemic and worsening climate change, among other science-related issues. A cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, delves into what this means for chemists and chemistry as a w
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Can fixing protein synthesis rescue memory from Alzheimer's?
Researchers have identified a potential means to address the loss of cognitive function due to Alzheimer's disease by targeting protein synthesis in mice. The findings reveal that synthetic pharmaceuticals could rescue the activity of brain cells needed for memory formation. "This work is the first to show that reversing impaired protein synthesis in brains afflicted by Alzheimer's disease throug
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13-year analysis sheds new light on wheat crop disease patterns in Ethiopia
A new study of wheat rust—a fungal disease that can harm wheat crops—identifies previously unknown long-term trends and hotspots for wheat rust outbreaks in Ethiopia. A team of modelers from the University of Cambridge and the Universität Hamburg, along with surveillance experts from CIMMYT, EIAR and agricultural universities in Ethiopia, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE
11h
Surgeons Give Man New Face and Hands
Joe DiMeo, a 22-year-old from New Jersey, recently underwent an extremely rare face and hands transplant, the Associated Press reports — a testament to the advancements of modern medicine. After being badly burned in a car crash in 2018, DiMeo spent months in a medically induced coma and had to have 20 reconstructive surgeries and skin grafts. But the most recent operation carried out at the NYU
11h
How Zika virus is transmitted from mother to fetus during pregnancy
A preclinical study has discovered a new mechanism for how Zika virus can pass from mothers to their children during pregnancy – a process known as vertical transmission. The researchers showed, for the first time, that specialized maternal cells lining the uterus (decidual cells) act as reservoirs for trimester-dependent transmission of the virus through the placenta.
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Drone and landsat imagery shows long-term change in vegetation cover along intermittent river
In the Namib Desert in southwestern Africa, the Kuiseb River, an ephemeral river which is dry most of the year, plays a vital role to the region. It provides most of the vegetation to the area and serves as a home for the local indigenous people, and migration corridor for many animals. The overall vegetation cover increased by 33% between 1984 and 2019, according to a Dartmouth study published in
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Nanotech plastic packaging could leach silver into some types of foods and beverages
Antimicrobial packaging is being developed to extend the shelf life and safety of foods and beverages. However, there is concern about the transfer of potentially harmful materials, such as silver nanoparticles, from these types of containers to consumables. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces illustrate that silver embedded in an antimicrobial plastic can leave the ma
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Altruism would undermine UK vaccine strategy | Letters
Donating your jab would undermine the rationale behind the prioritisation scheme, writes John Main. Plus letters from Ruth Eversley and Linda Murgatroyd It would be noble to give your vaccine slot to others ( Letters , 2 February), but it would undermine the rationale behind the prioritisation scheme. The elderly and vulnerable are hugely more likely to get seriously ill if they catch Covid and r
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The high price of broadband is keeping people offline during the pandemic
Before his 190-square-foot apartment in San Francisco's Tenderloin district was connected to the internet, Marvis Phillips depended on a friend with a laptop for his prolific letter-writing campaigns. Phillips, a community organizer, wrote each note by hand and mailed them, then his friend typed and sent the missives, via email and online comment forms, to the city supervisors, planning commissio
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Scientists believe studies by colleagues are more prone to biases than their own studies
The properties of human mind affect the quality of scientific knowledge through the insertion of unconscious cognitive biases. Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that the current level of awareness about research biases is generally low among ecology scientists. Underestimation of the risks associated with unconscious cognitive biases prevents avoiding these risks in a sc
12h
Sneakerheads, not hypebeasts: Defining a sneaker-driven sub-culture
Sneakers can be about style, history and even community. A new study reveals that for "Sneakerheads," sneakers are an important facet of their identities, particularly for African-American men who grew up in the 1970s and '80s coveting sneakers popularized by hip-hop stars and basketball legends.
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This High Tech Air Purifier Is Incredibly Powerful, Incredibly Quiet, and Remarkably Eco-Friendly
Every day you breathe in untold microscopic particles floating in the air. Dust, bacteria, mold, and other contaminants are often invisible to the naked eye but, can accumulate in your lungs and cause respiratory issues and other ailments. If you're concerned about the quality of the air you breathe in your home or office, an air purifier is a great way to improve the situation. And the Airdog X5
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Study finds consensus for arming school resource officers, division on arming teachers and other staff
In the wake of repeated school shootings across the United States, today's youth have been called the mass shooting generation. A new study examined public support for arming school employees. The study found consensus for arming school resource officers, but division over whether to arm teachers and nonteaching staff. The research has clear implications for policy, including the possibility that
12h
The Ocean Is Rising Faster Than Anyone Feared
High Tide Bad news for the roughly 40 percent of humanity that lives near a coastline: A study shows that the sea level is rising faster than even the most pessimistic climate change models predicted. Scientists from the University of Copenhagen and Norway's Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research came up with a new way to measure the sea level's sensitivity to increasing temperature, which they pub
12h
Evidence backs Darwin's theory about 'runt' flowers
Charles Darwin had the right idea about a type of self-pollination called cleistogamy in flowers, researchers find. Some plant species actually produce two types of flowers : "normal" ones that look great, and "runts" that are small, never open, and—rather than attract pollinating insects—instead pollinate themselves. In a study in Current Biology , Daniel Schoen of McGill University and Simon Jo
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Sensor patch tracks pressure points in prosthetic limbs
A soft, flexible sensor system could help map problematic pressure points in the socket of an amputee's prosthetic limb, researchers report. The lightweight, soft textile-based sensor prototype patch incorporates a lattice of conductive yarns and is connected to a tiny computer. Researchers tested the system on a prosthetic limb and in walking experiments with two human volunteers and discovered
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Quantum tunneling in graphene advances the age of terahertz wireless communications
Scientists from MIPT, Moscow Pedagogical State University and the University of Manchester have created a highly sensitive terahertz detector based on the effect of quantum-mechanical tunneling in graphene. The sensitivity of the device is already superior to commercially available analogs based on semiconductors and superconductors, which opens up prospects for applications of the graphene detect
12h
Fish in warming Scottish seas grow faster but reach a smaller size
Researchers have found new evidence that global warming is affecting the size of commercial fish species, documenting for the first time that juvenile fish are getting bigger, as well as confirming that adult fish are getting smaller as sea temperatures rise. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology.
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Preventive anti-clotting therapy does not boost survival of critically ill COVID patients
Although abnormal blood clotting has been identified as one of the primary causes of death from COVID-19, early treatment in an intensive care unit with therapeutic anticoagulation (anti-clotting) for adults who are critically ill with COVID-19 does not appear to improve chances of survival, and could do more harm than good by increasing the risk for major bleeding, a multicenter research group ca
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The business of bees
The economic value of insect pollinators was $34 billion in the U.S. in 2012, much higher than previously thought, according to researchers at the University of Pittsburgh and Penn State University. The team also found that areas that are economically most reliant on insect pollinators are the same areas where pollinator habitat and forage quality are poor.
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How modern robots are developed
Robots are interesting to neuroscience and neuroscience is interesting to robots – this is what the article 'Neuroengineering challenges of fusing robotics and neuroscience' was about in the journal Science Robotics. Such collaborative development contributes to progress in both fields, bringing us closer to developing more advanced android robots and a deeper understanding of the structure of the
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Computerized adaptive screener may help identify youth at risk for suicide
Researchers funded by NIMH have developed a computerized adaptive screener to identify youth at risk for attempting suicide. The screener, called the computerized adaptive screen for suicidal youth, consists of 11 questions on average and correctly identified 82.4% of youth who went on to attempt suicide in the three months following screening. The results suggest this screener could serve as an e
12h
Fish in warming Scottish seas grow faster but reach a smaller size
Researchers have found new evidence that global warming is affecting the size of commercial fish species, documenting for the first time that juvenile fish are getting bigger, as well as confirming that adult fish are getting smaller as sea temperatures rise. The findings are published in the British Ecological Society's Journal of Applied Ecology.
12h
Astronomers Find Over 1,200 Dark Matter Hot Spots
Sky Survey Scientists recently identified a whopping 1,210 new possible gravitational lenses — phenomena likely caused by enormous clumps of dark matter — thanks to artificial intelligence trained to hunt for them. Gravitational lenses, or ring-like illusions that happen when a star or galaxy's light is warped by dark matter's gravitational pull, can act as beacons that help us understand and map
13h
Intranasal influenza vaccine spurs strong immune response in Phase 1 study
An experimental single-dose, intranasal influenza vaccine was safe and produced a durable immune response when tested in a Phase 1 study published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation . The investigational vaccine, called Ad4-H5-VTN, is a recombinant, replicating adenovirus vaccine designed to spur antibodies to hemagglutinin, a protein found on the surface of influenza viruses that attaches t
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COVID-19 vaccination for patients with Parkinson's disease recommended
Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthcare professionals caring for them have expressed concerns about the COVID-19 vaccine's efficacy and safety in the specific context of PD and its symptomatic treatment. In a commentary just published in the Journal of Parkinson's Disease, a set of experts addresses these concerns from an evidence-based perspective. Their conclusion is that COVID-19
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Skin-resident innate lymphoid cells converge on a pathogenic effector state
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03188-w In studies using mouse models of psoriasis, a spectrum of innate lymphoid cell types is reconfigured and converges via multiple trajectories on a type 3-like state, demonstrating the range and flexibility of innate lymphoid cell responses in the skin.
13h
Scientists believe studies by colleagues are more prone to biases than their own studies
The properties of human mind affect the quality of scientific knowledge through the insertion of unconscious cognitive biases. Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland, have found that the current level of awareness about research biases is generally low among ecology scientists. Underestimation of the risks associated with unconscious cognitive biases prevents avoiding these risks in a sc
13h
Study finds consensus for arming school resource officers, division on arming teachers and other staff
A new study examined public support for arming school employees. The study found consensus for arming school resource officers, but division over whether to arm teachers and nonteaching staff. The research has clear implications for policy, including the possibility that support for arming school staff may diminish over time as young people (who are less supportive) make up a larger share of voter
13h
An innovative and non-destructive strategy to analyse material from Mars
The UPV/EHU's IBeA research group, which includes experts in Raman spectroscopy, is currently analysing meteorites with the aim of developing non-destructive analytical strategies for upcoming explorations of Mars materials by the Perseverance rover, shortly due to arrive at the red planet. The strategies will also be used to examine materials collected by the Rosalind Franklin rover and returned
13h
Intensity not paramount for physical training during cancer therapy
People receiving treatment for cancer are known to feel better with physical training. But does it make any difference how vigorously they exercise? A new study by researchers at Uppsala University shows that whether the training is intensive or rather less strenuous, its effect is roughly the same. The results are published in the journal Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports .
13h
Tesla Will Recall 134,000+ Vehicles Affected by Inevitable eMMC Failure
Tesla will recall every Model S and Model X vehicle that shipped with an 8GB eMMC NAND flash chip. Affected vehicles were produced between 2012-2018 (Model S) and 2016-2018 (Model X). Those produced after 2018 are configured with additional storage capacity and will not fail in the same fashion. Any Model S or Model X with an 8GB Media Control Unit (MCU) will eventually fail , as we covered last
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The UK and South African Covid-19 variants are cause for vigilance, not panic | Julian Tang
Even a partially protective vaccine may reduce the risk of more severe illness. But that doesn't mean we can let our guard down Julian Tang is a clinical virologist and honorary associate professor at the University of Leicester Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage It's hard to believe, but Covid-19 has been with us for more than a year , and like the rest of us, it is be
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How Our Relationships Affect What We Eat
In my first serious long-term relationship, my ex hated three things that I loved—salmon, spicy food, and runny egg yolks. Food was often a bone of contention. I was a chef then and found it soul-crushing when my ex chose a Kraft Singles grilled cheese sandwich and a bowl of Campbell's tomato soup over the many meals I made. Once, after what I thought was a successful housewarming dinner party, I
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Study updates safer options for fall armyworm control in Africa
CABI scientists have updated the first major study of potential biological controls that could be used in the fight against the devastating fall armyworm in Africa. The research offers new insight into evidence of their efficacy in the field and increased availability as commercial products.
13h
Thanks to machine learning, the future of catalyst research is now
To date, research in the field of combinatorial catalysts has relied on serendipitous discoveries of catalyst combinations. Now, scientists from Japan have streamlined a protocol that combines random sampling, high-throughput experimentation, and data science to identify synergistic combinations of catalysts. With this breakthrough, the researchers hope to remove the limits placed on research by r
13h
The Head of NASA Says He's Not Quite Sure About SpaceX's Starship
Time Crunch Steve Jurczyk, the new acting administrator of NASA, has supported SpaceX for years . But when it comes to SpaceX's Starship, the spacecraft designed to bring humans into Earth's orbit and even to the Moon and Mars, Jurczyk says he's not quite sure how it's going to fit into NASA's plans. The problem, he said, is that it's been hard to pin SpaceX down on specific timelines. That's a c
13h
Quantum tunneling in graphene advances the age of terahertz wireless communications
Scientists from MIPT, Moscow Pedagogical State University and the University of Manchester have created a highly sensitive terahertz detector based on the effect of quantum-mechanical tunneling in graphene. The sensitivity of the device is already superior to commercially available analogs based on semiconductors and superconductors, which opens up prospects for applications of the graphene detect
13h
CDDEP's report 'The State of the World's Antibiotics' highlights the growing threat of AMR
Researchers at CDDEP have released, The State of the World's Antibiotics in 2021, which presents extensive data on global antimicrobial use and resistance as well as drivers and correlates of antimicrobial resistance, based on CDDEP's extensive research and data collection through ResistanceMap (www.resistancemap.org), a global repository that has been widely used by researchers, policymakers, and
13h
"Ghost particle" ML model permits full quantum description of the solvated electron
Pinning down the nature of bulk hydrated electrons has proven difficult experimentally because of their short lifetime and high reactivity. Theoretical exploration has been limited by the high level of electronic structure theory needed to achieve predictive accuracy. Now, joint work from teams at the University of Zurich and EPFL has resulted in a highly accurate machine-learning model inexpensiv
13h
Scientists observe strange behavior in universe's strongest magnets
In a new study, scientists describe a magnetar's bizarre behavior. Magnetars are neutron stars with extremely powerful magnetic fields. The strange space objects also emit radio bursts that reach Earth. Astronomers recently witnessed very strange behavior from a magnetar, a peculiar kind of rotating neutron star that also happens to be one of the strongest magnets in the universe. Magnetars are e
14h
How will psychiatrists administer psychedelic treatments?
Psychedelic therapy is predicted to become a $7 billion industry by 2027. Emerging research on psilocybin, MDMA, ibogaine, and LSD is showing a lot of promise in treating a variety of conditions. Therapists will not be able to write a script and send patients on their way, which will create a new training model. Psychedelic therapy is imminent. Within six years, the market for this new wave of th
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Oxford AstraZeneca Data, Again
We have some more data to mull over with the Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine. The situation so far has been pretty confused, with various efficacy numbers appearing from different people in different venues. It's fair to say that the rollout of the clinical data has not gone smoothly, and that it's done the effort no favors. As many will recall, the current big questions are whether a lower first dose
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Soil bacteria hormone discovery provides fertile ground for new antibiotics
The discovery of how hormone-like molecules turn on antibiotic production in soil bacteria could unlock the untapped opportunities for medicines that are under our very feet.An international team of scientists working at the University of Warwick, UK, and Monash University, Australia, have determined the molecular basis of a biological mechanism that could enable more efficient and cost-effective
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Discoveries at the edge of the periodic table: first ever measurements of einsteinium
Since element 99 – einsteinium – was discovered in 1952 at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study character
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Mysterious einsteinium spills its secrets
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00306-6 Exploring the properties of a vanishingly-rare man-made element, and the AI that generates new mathematical conjectures.
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Bayesian reaction optimization as a tool for chemical synthesis
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03213-y Bayesian optimization is applied in chemical synthesis towards the optimization of various organic reactions and is found to outperform scientists in both average optimization efficiency and consistency.
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A gene–environment-induced epigenetic program initiates tumorigenesis
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03147-x In mouse models of pancreatic cancer, a cooperative interaction between tissue damage and Kras gene mutation rapidly induces cancer-associated chromatin states in pre-malignant tissue, leading to gene dysregulation and neoplastic transformation.
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Molecular basis for control of antibiotic production by a bacterial hormone
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03195-x X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy structures of the transcriptional repressor of the methylomycin gene cluster, MmfR, reveal the molecular basis for regulation of antibiotic biosynthesis by AHFCA hormones in Actinobacteria.
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Function and regulation of the divisome for mitochondrial fission
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03214-x The functional and regulatory aspects of the 'mitochondrial divisome' are separated into core and accessory machinery, thus providing a mechanistic understanding of the process of mitochondrial fission.
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Antiferromagnetic half-skyrmions and bimerons at room temperature
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03219-6 A family of topological antiferromagnetic spin textures is realized at room temperature in α-Fe2O3, and their reversible and field-free stabilization using a Kibble–Zurek-like temperature cycling is demonstrated.
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Glacial episodes of a freshwater Arctic Ocean covered by a thick ice shelf
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03186-y Unexpected intervals of low 230Th concentration in marine sediment cores are explained by considering that during at least two such periods, the Arctic Ocean and Nordic seas were composed entirely of fresh water and covered by a thick ice shelf.
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BRCA1 and RNAi factors promote repair mediated by small RNAs and PALB2–RAD52
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03150-2 Single-stranded, DNA-damage-associated small RNAs generated by a BRCA1–RNA-interference complex promote PALB2–RAD52-mediated DNA repair at transcriptional termination pause sites that contain R-loops and are rich in single-stranded DNA breaks in both quiescent and proliferating cells.
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Developing fibrillated cellulose as a sustainable technological material
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03167-7 Opportunities for the application of fibrillated cellulose materials—which can be extracted from renewable resources—and broader manufacturing issues of scale-up, sustainability and synergy with the paper-making industry are discussed.
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IgA transcytosis and antigen recognition govern ovarian cancer immunity
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03144-0 In patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer, robust and protective humoral responses are dominated by B-cell-derived polyclonal IgA that binds to polymeric IgA receptors that are universally expressed on ovarian cancer cells.
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Machine learning made easy for optimizing chemical reactions
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00209-6 An accessible machine-learning tool has been developed that can accelerate the optimization of a wide range of synthetic reactions — and reveals how cognitive bias might have undermined optimization by humans.
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Mutation alters chromatin changes during injury response to drive cancer
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00211-y Cancer-associated mutations promote the formation of pancreatic tumours after tissue injury, but how this occurs is unclear. Changes to chromatin in injured cells with such mutations explain this predisposition to malignancy.
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An epigenetic tipping point in cancer comes under the microscope
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00002-5 Two studies show that some cancers are driven by genetic changes in the NSD3 protein that alter its enzymatic activity. Biochemical and structural characterization hints at a route to pharmacological reversal.
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FAA Says It Will Investigate SpaceX's Latest Starship Explosion
FAA Drama SpaceX's second massive Starship prototype, dubbed SN9, exploded in a gigantic fireball after another hard landing on Tuesday afternoon — and the Federal Aviation Administration is not happy about it. The FAA is officially investigating the explosion, according to a new statement it issued last night. The agency said in the statement that it will "oversee the investigation of [Tuesday's
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The space tourism we were promised is finally here—sort of
SpaceX weathered through the onset of the covid-19 pandemic last year to become the first private company to launch astronauts into space using a commercial spacecraft. It's poised to build on that success with another huge milestone before 2021 is over. On Monday, the company announced plans to launch the first "all-civilian" mission into orbit by the end of the year. Called Inspiration4, the mi
14h
European hibernating bats cope with white-nose syndrome which kills North American bats
Fungal diseases are a major threat to wildlife, sometimes resulting in significant population declines or even causing the extirpation of populations or species. White-nose syndrome, caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has become a major cause of death for hibernating bats in North America. European bats survive when infected by the same fungus during hibernation. What a
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A revolutionary approach to increasing crop yield in rice
A group of scientists led by Drs Toshinori Kinoshita and Maoxing Zhang (Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules,Nagoya University, Japan) and Dr. Yiyong Zhu (Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Solid Organic Waste Utilization, Nanjing Agricultural University, China) have developed a method which, by increasing the numbers of a plasma membrane proton pump gene in rice, simultaneously incr
14h
On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
Oxygen is essential for human life, but within the body, certain biological environmental conditions can transform oxygen into aggressively reactive molecules called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can damage DNA, RNA, and proteins. Normally, the body relies on molecules called antioxidants to convert ROS into less dangerous chemical species through a process called reduction. But unhealthy l
14h
European hibernating bats cope with white-nose syndrome which kills North American bats
Fungal diseases are a major threat to wildlife, sometimes resulting in significant population declines or even causing the extirpation of populations or species. White-nose syndrome, caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has become a major cause of death for hibernating bats in North America. European bats survive when infected by the same fungus during hibernation. What a
14h
A revolutionary approach to increasing crop yield in rice
A group of scientists led by Drs Toshinori Kinoshita and Maoxing Zhang (Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules,Nagoya University, Japan) and Dr. Yiyong Zhu (Jiangsu Collaborative Innovation Center for Solid Organic Waste Utilization, Nanjing Agricultural University, China) have developed a method which, by increasing the numbers of a plasma membrane proton pump gene in rice, simultaneously incr
14h
This fast French military boat can crawl from water to land without wheels
Those caterpillar treads fold back up into the boat for speedy travel when it's in the water. (Iguana Yachts/) A French amphibious boat that employs caterpillar treads instead of wheels has seduced the U.S. Navy. In late 2020 it bought two of them, called Iguana Interceptors, for shallow-water surveillance missions. Amphibious boats are certainly not a new concept. In the 20th century, notably du
14h
From rust to riches: Computing goes green—or is that brown?
Current silicon-based computing technology is energy-inefficient. Information and communications technology is projected to use over 20% of global electricity production by 2030. So finding ways to decarbonise technology is an obvious target for energy savings. Professor Paolo Radaelli from Oxford's Department of Physics, working with Diamond Light Source, the U.K."s national synchrotron, has been
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The Arctic Ocean was covered by a shelf ice and filled with freshwater
The Arctic Ocean was covered by up to 900-meter-thick shelf ice and was filled entirely with freshwater at least twice in the last 150,000 years. This surprising finding, reported in the latest issue of the journal Nature, is the result of long-term research by scientists from the Alfred Wegener Institute and the MARUM. With a detailed analysis of the composition of marine deposits, the scientists
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Discoveries at the edge of the periodic table: First ever measurements of einsteinium
Since element 99—einsteinium—was discovered in 1952 at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) from the debris of the first hydrogen bomb, scientists have performed very few experiments with it because it is so hard to create and is exceptionally radioactive. A team of Berkeley Lab chemists has overcome these obstacles to report the first study characterizin
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From waste heat to electrical power: A new generation of thermomagnetic generators
Use of waste heat contributes largely to sustainable energy supply. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and T?hoku University in Japan have now come much closer to their goal of converting waste heat into electrical power at small temperature differences. As reported in Joule, electrical power per footprint of thermomagnetic generators based on Heusler alloy films has been increa
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Life changes influence physical activity
Life changes influence the amount of physical activity in a person, according to a recent study by the University of Jyväskylä. The birth of children and a change of residence, marital status and place of work all influence the number of steps of men and women in different ways.
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Thanks to machine learning, the future of catalyst research is now!
To date, research in the field of combinatorial catalysts has relied on serendipitous discoveries of catalyst combinations. Now, scientists from Japan have streamlined a protocol that combines random sampling, high-throughput experimentation, and data science to identify synergistic combinations of catalysts. With this breakthrough, the researchers hope to remove the limits placed on research by r
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Some Proteins Change Their Folds to Perform Different Jobs
Proteins are molecular origami at its finest. Classically, a protein is imagined as a chain of amino acids that folds into a single stable configuration, one that evolution has selected over the ages for a particular function. But in the last few years, biophysicists have learned how numerous and extraordinary the exceptions to that rule are — including some two-faced proteins that can refold as
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'I Expected a Bidding War. We Did Not Get That.'
Shaka King's new film, Judas and the Black Messiah , is both a prestige picture and a pulpy thriller. It's a biographical portrait of the Illinois Black Panther chairman Fred Hampton (played by Daniel Kaluuya), who by the age of 21 had become a major figure in the national party and founded the Rainbow Coalition movement. But much of the movie's focus is on William O'Neal (Lakeith Stanfield): the
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Quality of muon beams
A new technique has taken the first images of muon particle beams. Scientists plan to use it to assess the quality of these beams, which are being used more and more in advanced imaging applications.
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This ancient fish-crocodile mashup snared its prey using a key adaptation
Tiktaalik was technically a fish but also came equipped with a flattened head and distinctive fins, which are more characteristic of an animal that splits its time between water and land. (Nature; Daeschler /) Around 375 million years ago, the ancient fish known as Tiktaalik roseae , equipped with lobe-shaped fins that it could use to prop itself up, scooted through the shallow waters of present-
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Why do 'Kevins' vote for far-right parties?
Kevin (1), Cindy and other 'Anglo' first names are especially popular in some areas of France and Germany. These also happen to be the regions where far-right parties are very successful. The link: working-class whites, inspired by English-language pop culture and disaffected from mainstream politics. We need to talk about Kevin. No, this is not about that book . This is about why areas of German
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European hibernating bats cope with white-nose syndrome which kills North American bats
Fungal diseases are a major threat to wildlife, sometimes resulting in significant population declines or even causing the extirpation of populations or species. White-nose syndrome, caused by the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has become a major cause of death for millions of hibernating bats in North America. European bats survive when infected by the same fungus during hiberna
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Modern anti-cancer drugs work via tiny molecular motions
Modern immunotherapeutic anti-cancer drugs support a natural mechanism of the immune system to inhibit the growth of cancer cells. They dock onto a specific receptor of the killer cell and prevent it from being switched off by the cancer cells. In a molecular dynamics study scientists from MedUni Vienna and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences (Boku) Vienna, have analysed
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Artificial skin brings robots closer to 'touching' human lives
Modern-day robots are often required to interact with humans intelligently and efficiently, which can be enabled by providing them the ability to perceive touch. However, previous attempts at mimicking human skin have involved bulky and complex electronics, wiring, and a risk of damage. In a recent study, researchers from Japan sidestep these difficulties by constructing a 3D vision-guided artific
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Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study. The results have been published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters.
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Social interactions after isolation may counteract cravings
Social interaction may help reverse food and cigarette cravings triggered by being in social isolation, a UNSW study in rats has found.The study, published in Scientific Reports , used an animal model of drug addiction to show that a return to social interaction gives the same result as living in a rich, stimulating environment in reducing cravings for both sugar and nicotine rewards.
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Israel leads the world in vaccination rates, but a key group is missing from the data
Israel has been touted for vaccinating more than a quarter of its residents at top speed. But those rates don't consider lower rates of vaccination in the West Bank. (Paul Prescott/Deposit Photos/) Yara M. Asi is a post-doctoral scholar in Health Management and Informatics at the University of Central Florida. This story originally featured on The Conversation . As nations scramble to vaccinate p
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Huge methane emission rise follows extreme rainfall in East Africa
A 30-year high in East African rainfall during 2018 and 2019 resulted in rising water levels and widespread flooding. The new study shows that emissions of methane—the second most important greenhouse gas—from flooded East African wetlands were substantially larger following these extreme rainfall events.
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Is this the end of the A-68A iceberg?
Satellite images have revealed that the once colossal A-68A iceberg has had yet another shattering experience. Several large cracks were spotted in the berg last week and it has since broken into multiple pieces. These little icebergs could indicate the end of A-68A's environmental threat to South Georgia.
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Dynamics of radiocesium in forests after the Fukushima disaster: Concerns and some hope
After the Chernobyl disaster of 1986, the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (FDNPP) disaster was the second worst nuclear incident in history. Its consequences were tremendous for the Japanese people and now, almost a decade later, they can still be felt both there and in the rest of the world. One of the main consequences of the event is the release of large amounts of cesium-137 (137Cs)
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When worldviews collide: Why science needs to be taught differently
America's distrust in science in 2021 can be traced back to the separation of science from the humanities that begun with the Enlightenment in 1715. The cold centrality of 'reason above all else' left a spiritual void and created the public perception of scientists as emotionally void, data-crunching machines. The way science is taught at schools today separates scientists and citizens into two t
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Load-reducing backpack powers electronics by harvesting energy from walking
Hikers, soldiers and school children all know the burden of a heavy backpack. But now, researchers have developed a prototype that not only makes loads feel about 20% lighter, but also harvests energy from human movements to power small electronics. The new backpack could be especially useful for athletes, explorers and disaster rescuers who work in remote areas without electricity, the researcher
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New stem cell therapy in dogs — a breakthrough in veterinary medicine
Scientists have developed a novel method to induce stem cell generation from the blood samples of dogs. Through this technique, the scientists hope to advance regenerative therapies in veterinary medicine. This would mean that, in the near future, veterinarians might be able to reverse conditions in dogs that were previously thought incurable.
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On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
A phenomenon called 'oxidative stress' is seen in affected organs during the early stages of certain difficult-to-treat diseases like cancer and kidney dysfunction. Detecting oxidative stress could thus enable early diagnosis and preventive treatments. But, the in vivo measurement of oxidative stress caused by both oxidation and reduction has historically been difficult. Now, scientists have devel
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Elon Musk: "Criticisms Were Accurate" About Tesla Build Quality
Quality Control Auto manufacturing consultant Sandy Munro, a former Ford engineer, has never minced words in his reviews of Tesla's quality control. In a now-famous review of the company's Model 3 uploaded to YouTube in 2018, the critic likened the fit and finish issues of Tesla's vehicles to "flaws we would see on a Kia in the '90s or something." He also described panel gaps — misaligned pieces
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Traces of antidepressants and painkillers found in crustaceans
Researchers from SINTEF, the Norwegian Polar Institute and the University Centre in Svalbard have collected samples from Arctic crustaceans close to the settlement of Ny-Ålesund on the west coast of Spitsbergen. During the spring and summer, they discovered a number of drugs in a variety of different concentrations.
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Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study. The results have been published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters.
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Researchers investigate signal transfer in proteins across multiple time scales
Consider for a moment a tree swaying in the wind. How long does it take for the movement of a twig to reach the trunk of the tree? How is this motion actually transmitted through the tree? Researchers at the University of Freiburg are transferring this kind of question to the analysis of proteins—which are the molecular machinery of cells.
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The UPV/EHU prepares to analyse material from Mars using non-destructive analytical methods
The UPV/EHU's IBeA research group, which includes experts in Raman spectroscopy, is currently analyzing meteorites with the aim of developing non-destructive analytical strategies for upcoming explorations of Mars materials by the Perseverance rover, shortly due to arrive at the red planet. The strategies will also be used to examine materials collected by the Rosalind Franklin rover and returned
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This Hive-Like House Is 3D Printed, Carbon-Neutral, and Made of Clay
3D printing homes was a really big deal a few years ago; the idea was novel, unprecedented, and crushed records for the cost and time it took to build a livable house. Now 3D printed homes, while not yet prosaic and still pretty wow-worthy, have certainly become more commonplace, with all sorts of variations: prototypes meant for Mars , two-story apartment buildings , entire communities ; it seem
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Newtown's Congresswoman Takes on Marjorie Taylor Greene
J ahana Hayes stood before her history class at John F. Kennedy High School in Waterbury, Connecticut, trying to assuage her students' fears. Someone had started shooting at an elementary school 18 miles away; Hayes's students were scrolling through texts and social media, trying to understand what was going on. She tried to keep everyone calm—to put the students first—even as she was still proce
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UK passes 10m Covid vaccination milestone
About 15% of population has been offered first jab, as experts call for focus on hotspots Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain has given a first dose of a coronavirus vaccine to more than 10 million people, as public health experts call on ministers to target future vaccinations in hotspots where the disease is threatening to run out of control. Official figures f
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In vitro study helps explain how Zika virus passes from mother to fetus during pregnancy
A preclinical study by a University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine team has discovered a new mechanism for how Zika virus can pass from mothers to their children during pregnancy – a process known as vertical transmission. The researchers showed, for the first time, that specialized maternal cells lining the uterus (decidual cells) act as reservoirs for trimester-dependent tra
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Flower diversity may mitigate insecticide effects on wild bees
A higher diversity of flowering plants increases the breeding success of wild bees and may help compensate for the negative effects of insecticides. This is what researchers from the Universities of Göttingen and Hohenheim, as well as the Julius Kühn Institute, have found in a large-scale experimental study. The results have been published in the scientific journal Ecology Letters.
15h
On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
A phenomenon called 'oxidative stress' is seen in affected organs during the early stages of certain difficult-to-treat diseases like cancer and kidney dysfunction. Detecting oxidative stress could thus enable early diagnosis and preventive treatments. But, the in vivo measurement of oxidative stress caused by both oxidation and reduction has historically been difficult. Now, scientists have devel
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How the cell binds the virus: SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope. In contrast to the more conventional electron microscopy, the samples do not need a thin metal coating in helium ion microscopy. This allows interactions between the coronaviruses and their host cell to be observed particularly clearly. The s
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How the cell binds the virus: SARS-CoV-2 under the helium ion microscope for the first time
Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Physics have succeeded for the first time in imaging the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus with a helium ion microscope. In contrast to the more conventional electron microscopy, the samples do not need a thin metal coating in helium ion microscopy. This allows interactions between the coronaviruses and their host cell to be observed particularly clearly. The s
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AI finds more than 1,200 gravitational lensing candidates
A research team with participation by Berkeley Lab physicists has used artificial intelligence to identify more than 1,200 possible gravitational lenses—objects that can be powerful markers for the distribution of dark matter. The count, if all of the candidates turn out to be lenses, would more than double the number of known gravitational lenses.
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Dynamics of radiocesium in forests after the Fukushima disaster: Concerns and some hope
The 2011 nuclear disaster at Fukushima, Japan caused a great amount of radioactive cesium to spread to nearby forests. Now, in a chapter in the latest technical document of the International Atomic Energy Agency, researchers from Japan, in collaboration with experts in Europe, explore the dynamic flow of these radionuclides in forest ecosystems. Their compilation of data and analyses on radiocesiu
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Blink! The link between aerobic fitness and cognition
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found evidence that spontaneous eye blink activity, which reflects activity in the dopaminergic system, explains the connection between fitness and cognitive function. This is the first study to indicate that dopamine has an essential role in linking aerobic fitness and cognition. These findings open the door to new research regarding the mechanisms
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First images of muon beams
A new technique has taken the first images of muon particle beams. Nagoya University scientists designed the imaging technique with colleagues in Osaka University and KEK, Japan. They plan to use it to assess the quality of these beams, which are being used more and more in advanced imaging applications.
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Indigenous knowledge during a pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic caused by the emergent coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 has forced nations to radically overhaul their healthcare systems in order to cope with the new pressures of millions of sick people. Innovation is still needed, especially in Africa. New research published in the International Journal of Technological Learning, Innovation and Development, suggests that indigenous knowledge could
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Brain-related visual problems may affect one in 30 primary school children
A brain-related visual impairment, which until recently was thought to be rare, may affect one in every 30 children according to new research investigating the prevalence of Cerebral Visual Impairment [CVI]. The findings aim to raise awareness of CVI among parents and teachers to help them identify signs of the condition earlier.
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Temperature fluctuations over a 20-year period affect ostrich fertility traits
A team of researchers from, Lund University, the University of Stellenbosch and the Western Cape Department of Agriculture for South Africa has learned more about how animals cope with rising temperatures by studying ostriches living in South Africa. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes studying multiple attributes of reproduction in ostriches over a 2
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MESSENGER saw a meteoroid strike Mercury
Telescopes have captured meteoroids hitting the Moon and several spacecraft imaged Comet Shoemaker–Levy 9 smacking into Jupiter in 1994. But impacts as they happen on another rocky world have never been observed.
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Temperature fluctuations over a 20-year period affect ostrich fertility traits
A team of researchers from, Lund University, the University of Stellenbosch and the Western Cape Department of Agriculture for South Africa has learned more about how animals cope with rising temperatures by studying ostriches living in South Africa. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group describes studying multiple attributes of reproduction in ostriches over a 2
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What does 'luminosity' mean in particle physics?
Even on the hottest and driest days, rays from the sun are too weak to ignite a fire. But with a magnifying glass (or, in some unfortunate cases, a glass garden ornament), you can focus sunlight into a beam bright enough to set tinder ablaze.
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Vector-borne diseases shaped human history and reveal race disparities
Vector-borne diseases (VBDs), such as plague, malaria and yellow fever, have significantly shaped society and culture, according to an international team of researchers. In a study published in Ecology Letters on Jan. 27, the team used historical evidence interpreted through an ecological lens to illustrate how VBDs have influenced human history, with particular attention to how VBDs have reinforc
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Digital health divide runs deep in older racial and ethnic minorities
Results of a study qualitatively exploring reasons for digital health information disparity reveal a deep digital health divide that has important implications for helping older adults with COVID-19 vaccinations. Participants who were older, less educated, economically disadvantaged and from ethnic groups (African American, Afro-Caribbean or Hispanic American) were up to five times less likely to
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UBC study highlights the best style and fabrics for COVID-19 face masks
In the race to stop the spread of COVID-19, a three-layer cloth mask that fits well can effectively filter COVID particles, says a group of UBC researchers.After testing several different mask styles and 41 types of fabrics, they found that a mask consisting of two layers of low-thread-count quilting cotton plus a three-ply dried baby wipe filter was as effective as a commercial non-surgical mask
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New process can extend lifetime of metals
Stronger, lighter, cheaper materials are the name of the game in advanced manufacturing. Keeping costs down on materials that are equally, if not more, effective than previous ones is how businesses get ahead—and, theoretically, when consumers win.
16h
Surviving turbulent times: Lessons from the phytoplankton
Physicists from the University of Luxembourg, together with scientists from Sweden, Israel and Switzerland, have established mechanistic links between physiological stress and migratory behavior in aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms in the face of turbulence.
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Report urges overall strategy for national security and climate crisis
The Center for Ethics and the Rule of Law (CERL) and Annenberg Public Policy Center have released "Lessons from the Arctic: The Need for Intersectoral Climate Security Policy," a report on critical climate-change security issues with recommendations written by Alexandra A.K. Meise, a senior fellow at CERL.
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13.8: Why we're here
13.8 is relaunching on Big Think today! Visit 13.8 every week to join physicists Adam Frank and Marcelo Gleiser as they tackle the big, serious, silly, and small questions in science. What will you learn at 13.8? Adam and Marcelo will look critically at straight-up science news, from life in the universe and cognitive science to particle physics and everything that blows their minds. They're also
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Extreme UV laser shows generation of atmospheric pollutant
An advanced laser technique has allowed researchers to observe, in real-time, the decomposition of a pollutant into atmospheric nitrous acid, which plays a key role in the formation of ozone and photochemical smog. The technique, described by Hokkaido University researchers in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, could be used in a wide range of applications.
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A case of whiskey during COVID
A case study of a U.S. whiskey company examines the business operations from grain to glass with particular focus on the company's downstream supply chain and how the global coronavirus pandemic has affected risks, efficiencies, and modes of distribution.
16h
America's New Vision of Astronauts
The mission had gone smoothly from start to finish. "Thanks for flying SpaceX," an engineer said as the spaceship splashed back down to Earth, prompting laughs in the mission-control room. SpaceX's passengers, Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken, were experienced spacefarers, trained and employed by NASA, but they were the first people the private company had launched into orbit. The line was heavy with
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The End of the Indian Idea
For the past several years, warnings have been sounded about democracy in India—whether they be about the fate of the country's minorities, its courts, its intellectuals. These worries steadily build, before erupting into some major protest, taking over the popular consciousness, both domestically and abroad. For the past several years, India's government has steadily chipped away at the edifice
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Neurons: 'String of lights' indicates excitation propagation
A type of novel molecular voltage sensor makes it possible to watch nerve cells at work. The principle of the method has been known for some time. However, researchers at the University of Bonn and the University of California in Los Angeles have now succeeded in significantly improving it. It allows the propagation of electrical signals in living nerve cells to be observed with high temporal and
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LGB med students more likely to experience burnout
Medical students who identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual are more likely than their heterosexual peers to experience burnout, research finds. Studies have shown that nearly half of all medical students in the US report symptoms of burnout , a long-term reaction to stress characterized by emotional exhaustion, cynicism, and feelings of decreased personal accomplishment. Beyond the personal toll,
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Researchers investigate the brightest cluster galaxy in MACS 1931.8-2635
Using Very Large Telescope (VLT) and Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), researchers from the University of Vienna, Austria, and elsewhere have investigated the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in a massive galaxy cluster known as MACS 1931.8-2635. Results of the study, published January 28 on arXiv.org, deliver important information about the nature of this BCG.
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Neural activity controls mitochondrial transfer of RNA modifiers to the nucleus
In a recent paper in RNA Biology, researchers show that mitochondria translocate their key RNA methyltransferase enzyme, TRMT1, into host cell nuclei in response to neural activity. This subcellular relocalization of key RNA modifiers suggests a new understanding of how neurons plastically reconfigure their nuclei as network dynamics change.
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Neural activity controls mitochondrial transfer of RNA modifiers to the nucleus
In a recent paper in RNA Biology, researchers show that mitochondria translocate their key RNA methyltransferase enzyme, TRMT1, into host cell nuclei in response to neural activity. This subcellular relocalization of key RNA modifiers suggests a new understanding of how neurons plastically reconfigure their nuclei as network dynamics change.
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Spiders use pre-tensioned silk to hoist prey off the ground
A pair of researchers at the University of Trento has found that some spiders use pre-tensioned silk to hoist prey off the ground. In their paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Gabriele Greco and Nicola Pugno describe experiments with two species of spiders, Steatoda paykulliana and Steatodatriangulosa.
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SpaceX Plans First All-Civilian Spaceflight This Year
The Dragon 2 capsule autonomously docking at the ISS in March 2019. The history of civilian human spaceflight is brief, but SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is going to have to change that if he's ever going to realize his dream of colonizing Mars. We're not there yet, but SpaceX is taking a step in that direction announcing the first all-civilian spaceflight . Musk is partnering with Shift4 Payments CEO Jar
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Light years
Nature, Published online: 03 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00265-y There's no place like home.
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On the dot: Novel quantum sensor provides new approach to early diagnosis via imaging
A phenomenon called 'oxidative stress' is seen in affected organs during the early stages of certain difficult-to-treat diseases like cancer and kidney dysfunction. Detecting oxidative stress could thus enable early diagnosis and preventive treatments. But, the in vivo measurement of oxidative stress caused by both oxidation and reduction has historically been difficult. Now, scientists have devel
16h

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