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ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

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The Biden Administration Pledges to Address the Semiconductor Shortage

GlobalFoundries wafer Early on Thursday, a group of US chip designers and manufacturers sent a letter to the White House, asking that the government include "substantial funding for incentives for semiconductor manufacturing" as part of the overall COVID-19 economic recovery plan. The Biden Administration has now pledged to take action to help remedy the situation by "identifying choke points in

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Wired

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This Cryptocurrency Is Really Burning a Hole in My Pocket

This week, we discuss crypto's role in the future of shopping. When can we to use it to buy everything from Nikes to Teslas?

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Scientific American Content

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Climate Change Could Shred Guitars Known for Shredding

It is the wood that the rock greats have sworn by—swamp ash, in the form of their Fender Telecaster and Stratocaster guitars—for over 70 years. If you've ever listened to rock, you've… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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How bacteria sleep through antibiotic attacks

Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment even without antibiotic resistance by slowing down their metabolism and going into a type of deep sleep. A research team funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation reveals the changes bacteria undergo to reach this "persister" state.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Researchers have broken the code for cell communication

Knowledge on how cells communicate is an important key to understanding many biological systems and diseases. A research team led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg has now used a unique combination of methods to map the mechanism behind cellular communication. Their findings can potentially improve understanding of the underlying mechanism behind type 2 diabetes.

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Phys.org

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Detecting single molecules and diagnosing diseases with a smartphone

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers show that the light emitted by a single molecule can be detected with a low-cost optical setup. Their prototype could facilitate medical diagnostics.

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Phys.org

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Moray eels thrive on coral reefs close to people—overfishing of other predators, like sharks, may be the cause

Coral reefs that are in close proximity to larger populations of people tend to have fewer sharks and other fish due to higher fishing pressure. But new research shows there's one group of predators that's the exception—moray eels.

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Phys.org

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How bacteria sleep through antibiotic attacks

Bacteria can survive antibiotic treatment even without antibiotic resistance by slowing down their metabolism and going into a type of deep sleep. A research team funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation reveals the changes bacteria undergo to reach this "persister" state.

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Phys.org

100+

Researchers have broken the code for cell communication

Knowledge on how cells communicate is an important key to understanding many biological systems and diseases. A research team led by researchers at the University of Gothenburg has now used a unique combination of methods to map the mechanism behind cellular communication. Their findings can potentially improve understanding of the underlying mechanism behind type 2 diabetes.

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Phys.org

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Nanospheres measure the forces of cell motors

Motor proteins generate the forces for essential mechanical processes in our body. On a scale of nanometers—a millionth of a millimeter—motor proteins, for example, power our muscles or transport material within our cells. Such movements, invisible to the naked eye, can be made visible by Erik Schäffer: the professor of Cellular Nanoscience at the University of Tübingen develops special force micr

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BBC News – Science & Environment

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Weather: 'Fantastic' ice formations line Welsh roadsides

They are thought to be formed by cars driving though puddles and spraying trees in icy conditions.

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Scientific American Content

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How to Stop Doomscrolling News and Social Media

"Doomscroll Reminder Lady" Karen K. Ho explains how to step away from the screen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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BBC News – Science & Environment

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Cumbria coal mine: What is the controversy about?

Cumbrian councillors are reviewing their support for a controversial coal mine near Whitehaven.

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Retraction Watch

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Eleven papers corrected after nutrition prof fails to disclose patent, company ties

Eight journals have corrected a total of eleven papers after one of the authors failed to list potential financial conflicts of interest. Two additional journals have also told Retraction Watch that they plan to issue corrections, which will bring the total to 13 or more. Stuart Phillips is a professor and director of the Centre … Continue reading

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Green tea compound aids tumor-suppressing, DNA-repairing protein

An antioxidant found in green tea may increase levels of p53, a natural anti-cancer protein, known as the "guardian of the genome" for its ability to repair DNA damage or destroy cancerous cells.

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MIT Technology Review

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Chicago thinks Zocdoc can help solve its vaccine chaos

During the first week of February, a winter storm blew through Chicago, leaving piles of snow before subzero temperatures set in. Eve Bloomgarden, an endocrinologist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital, got a call from a worried patient who was scheduled to receive a covid-19 vaccine that week. She was preparing to brave the weather—and drive for the first time since the start of the pandemic—becau

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ScienceAlert – Latest

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Astronomers Find a Fascinating Cluster of Stars Filled With Small Black Holes

Surprise!

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Science

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We need a remedy for the vaccine data epidemic

Scientific research into coronavirus has accelerated but the onslaught of information can be overwhelming

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ScienceDaily

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Hubble uncovers concentration of small black holes

Scientists were expecting to find an intermediate-mass black hole at the heart of the globular cluster NGC 6397, but instead they found evidence of a concentration of smaller black holes lurking there. New data from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have led to the first measurement of the extent of a collection of black holes in a core-collapsed globular cluster.

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Popular Science | RSS

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Microplastics are everywhere. Here's what that means for our health.

Plastic bottles eventually degrade into microplastics, because plastic is forever. (Pixabay/) Even in some of the most remote places on Earth, a fine rain of human-made debris pollutes the land and oceans. These microplastics are virtually everywhere—but the impacts to our health are still murky. In an article published today in the journal Science , researchers stressed that building an understa

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ScienceDaily

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The songs of fin whales offer new avenue for seismic studies of the oceanic crust

The songs of fin whales can be used for seismic imaging of the oceanic crust, providing scientists a novel alternative to conventional surveying.

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Scientific American Content

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More Climate Executive Orders Could Be Coming, McCarthy Says

The former EPA Administrator says the Biden Administration will also work with Congress to advance climate policies — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientific American Content

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Reflections on the 20th Anniversary of the First Publication of the Human Genome

A new wave of research is needed to make ample use of humanity's "most wondrous map" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Big Think

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Could a human enter a black hole to study it?

– Pulkeet, age 12, Bahadurgarh, Haryana, India To solve the mysteries of black holes, a human should just venture into one. However, there is a rather complicated catch: A human can do this only if the respective black hole is supermassive and isolated, and if the person entering the black hole does not expect to report the findings to anyone in the entire universe. We are both physicists who st

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Science Magazine

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Genes for life on land evolved earlier in fish

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Science Magazine

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Different origins for similar brain circuits

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Science Magazine

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Single-domain antibodies make a difference

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Science Magazine

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Communicating clocks shape circadian homeostasis

Circadian clocks temporally coordinate physiology and align it with geophysical time, which enables diverse life-forms to anticipate daily environmental cycles. In complex organisms, clock function originates from the molecular oscillator within each cell and builds upward anatomically into an organism-wide system. Recent advances have transformed our understanding of how clocks are connected to

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ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

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Astronomers Detect Another Possible Exoplanet Right Next Door

This artist's impression shows the planet orbiting the Sun-like star HD 85512 in the southern constellation of Vela (The Sail). This planet is one of sixteen super-Earths discovered by the HARPS instrument on the 3.6-metre telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory. This planet is about 3.6 times as massive as the Earth lis at the edge of the habitable zone around the star, where liquid water, and p

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Phys.org

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Hubble uncovers concentration of small black holes

Globular clusters are extremely dense stellar systems, in which stars are packed closely together. They are also typically very old—the globular cluster that is the focus of this study, NGC 6397, is almost as old as the Universe itself. It resides 7800 light-years away, making it one of the closest globular clusters to Earth. Because of its very dense nucleus, it is known as a core-collapsed clust

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Phys.org

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'Swirlonic' super particles baffle physicists

In recent years, active, self-propelled particles have received growing interest amongst the scientific community. Examples of active particles and their systems are numerous and very diverse, ranging from bacterium films to flocks of birds or human crowds. These systems can demonstrate unusual behavior, which is challenging to understand or model.

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Phys.org

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A new way of forming planets

In the last 25 years, scientists have discovered over 4000 planets beyond the borders of our solar system. From relatively small rock and water worlds to blisteringly hot gas giants, the planets display a remarkable variety. This variety is not unexpected. The sophisticated computer models, with which scientists study the formation of planets, also spawn very different planets. What the models hav

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Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

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Forskare: Masstestning kan vara mest ekonomiskt

En bredare och mer frekvent provtagning av covid-19 kan gynna ekonomin. Det föreslår amerikanska forskare i en ny studie.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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To help keep cats from killing wildlife, add more meat and play to their day

Domestic cats are a major threat to wild species, including birds and small mammals. But researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 11, 2021 now have evidence that some simple strategies can help to reduce cats' environmental impact without restricting their freedom. Their studies show that domestic cats hunt less when owners feed them a diet including plenty of meat proteins

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Big Think

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New animation shows a billion years of continental drift

A new way of looking at plate tectonics offers evidence for how the world looked up to a billion years ago. By focusing on plate boundaries rather than the continents and land itself, it avoids the pitfalls of other methods. The model doesn't account for everything but is still a great step forward in our understanding of continental drift. Anyone who's ever considered why South America and Afric

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Science & technology

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Studying cancer genomes gene by gene could improve treatment

It is a new approach to precision medicine

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Science & technology

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Building sustainable cities with wooden skyscrapers

The AAAS heard how cities with lower carbon emissions could be built

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

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New wearable device turns the body into a battery

A team of engineers has developed a new device that you can wear like a ring or bracelet and that harvests energy from your own body heat.

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Popular Science | RSS

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Can Louisiana's COVID surge trace back to one Mardi Gras reveler?

The usual Mardi Gras festivities have been put on hold in New Orleans. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. Mardi Gras, held on February 25 of last year, was one of New Orleans' last normal moments before the pandemic. COVID-19 was already confirmed in the Seattle area, but the federal government had yet to warn other states of the danger. Robert Garry, a virologist who

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ScienceDaily

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New wearable device turns the body into a battery

A team of engineers has developed a new device that you can wear like a ring or bracelet and that harvests energy from your own body heat.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Depression in male mice passed down to offspring in RNA

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China has found that depression in male mice can be passed down to their offspring through RNA. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments they conducted with depression in male mice and their offspring.

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Phys.org

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Depression in male mice passed down to offspring in RNA

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in China has found that depression in male mice can be passed down to their offspring through RNA. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes experiments they conducted with depression in male mice and their offspring.

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Phys.org

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Study identifies significance of atmospheric rivers for New Zealand

A University of Otago study has provided the first detailed analysis of atmospheric rivers and their impact on New Zealand weather events.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Rare congenital malformation caused by epigenetic mechanism in previously mysterious genome sequences

An international team of researchers discovered a rare genetic disease characterized by severe malformations of the limbs. As the scientists describe in the journal Nature, the condition is caused by a newly identified epigenetic mechanism involving sequences of the genome with previously unknown function. This process could also explain the cause of other congenital diseases.

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Phys.org

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Rare congenital malformation caused by epigenetic mechanism in previously mysterious genome sequences

An international team of researchers discovered a rare genetic disease characterized by severe malformations of the limbs. As the scientists describe in the journal Nature, the condition is caused by a newly identified epigenetic mechanism involving sequences of the genome with previously unknown function. This process could also explain the cause of other congenital diseases.

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Science

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What's the latest on the Covid vaccines? Q&A

FT science editor Clive Cookson and US pharma correspondent Hannah Kuchler answer your questions

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Scientific American News

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Why COVID Vaccines Are Taking So Long to Reach You

Bottlenecks in supply chains and difficult appointment-registration systems are slowing distribution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientific American Content

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Why COVID Vaccines Are Taking So Long to Reach You

Bottlenecks in supply chains and difficult appointment-registration systems are slowing distribution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Bringing bad proteins back into the fold

A study led by UT Southwestern has identified a mechanism that controls the activity of proteins known as chaperones, which guide proteins to fold into the right shapes. The findings, published online today in Nature Communications, could shed light on hundreds of degenerative and neurodegenerative diseases caused by protein misfolding, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's, potential

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

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MIT Technology Review

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The UK's covid app made a serious difference during the winter surge

The news: Researchers in the UK have calculated that its contact tracing app may have prevented around 600,000 cases of covid-19 . The announcement is good news for the system—which underwent serious teething problems —and a step forward for exposure notification systems more generally. What they found: The study, by a team of Oxford researchers, modeled the impact of 1.5 million notifications th

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Phys.org

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Nanoparticle gel unites oil and water in manufacturing-friendly approach

Oil and water may not mix, but adding the right nanoparticles to the recipe can convert these two immiscible fluids into an exotic gel with uses ranging from batteries to water filters to tint-changing smart windows. A new approach to creating this unusual class of soft materials could carry them out of the laboratory and into the marketplace.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

The strange social structure of tiny fish called emerald coral gobies may be explained by family loyalty, new research shows.

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Phys.org

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Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

The strange social structure of tiny fish called emerald coral gobies may be explained by family loyalty, new research shows.

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Phys.org

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New turntable-like catalytic reactor promises more sustainable chemical manufacturing

A new catalytic reactor that can create chemical compounds more quickly, cheaply and in a more sustainable way has won funding from Innovate UK.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues – something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change. The results have been published in the scientific journal iScience .

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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The Lancet: New report details devastating impact of the Trump administration's health-harming policies, calls for sweeping reforms

The first comprehensive assessment of the health effects of Donald Trump's presidency is published today in The Lancet revealing devastating impacts on every aspect of health in the USA. The Lancet Commission on Public Policy and Health in the Trump Era [1] also traces the policy failures that preceded and fueled Trump's ascent and left the USA lagging behind other high-income nations on life expe

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ScienceDaily

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On the origin of our species

New research suggests that genetic and fossil records will not reveal a single point where modern humans originated.

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Discover Magazine

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More Than 40% of Languages Are at Risk of Fading Away Completely

Thousands of languages are considered endangered. Preservation requires documenting vocabulary and teaching new speakers before it's too late.

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ScienceDaily

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Ancient seashell resonates after 18,000 years

Almost 80 years after its discovery, a large shell from the ornate Marsoulas Cave in the Pyrenees has been studied by a multidisciplinary team: it is believed to be the oldest wind instrument of its type.

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ScienceDaily

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Why plant diversity is so important for bee diversity

A study in southern England reveals why bumble bees and honey bees thrive despite foraging on the same flowers.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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'Farfarout'! Solar system's most distant planetoid confirmed

Astronomers have confirmed a planetoid that is almost four times farther from the Sun than Pluto, making it the most distant object ever observed in our solar system.

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Popular Science | RSS

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This surprisingly common flight issue contributed to Kobe Bryant's helicopter crash

Whether in a helicopter or airplane, a pilot's inner ear can give them faulty information. (Photo by Richard Felix on Unsplash/) In the minutes before the Sikorsky helicopter carrying Kobe Bryant and seven other passengers crashed in Calabasas, California, its pilot made a left turn. Despite initially climbing upwards, the helicopter then descended, continuing that left turn, and crashed into ter

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Hidden conflict in the mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia

The mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia, the nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that make their home in legume root nodules and create nutrient-rich fertilizer for them, is one of the most well-known and agronomically important examples of symbiosis. New research from Dr. Kenjiro Quides, a Postdoctoral Teaching and Research Fellow in the Grand Challenges Initiative at Chapman

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Phys.org

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Hidden conflict in the mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia

The mutually beneficial relationship between legumes and rhizobia, the nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that make their home in legume root nodules and create nutrient-rich fertilizer for them, is one of the most well-known and agronomically important examples of symbiosis. New research from Dr. Kenjiro Quides, a Postdoctoral Teaching and Research Fellow in the Grand Challenges Initiative at Chapman

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ScienceDaily

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Paid maternity leave has long-term health benefits

A study of women who were new mothers in the late 1970s found that those who were given longer, paid maternity leave lived healthier lives as they entered middle age.

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Popular Science | RSS

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One big hiccup in US efforts to distribute COVID-19 vaccines? Poor internet access.

Many US states have set up online pre-registration and appointments for the COVID-19 vaccine. But that's certain to leave out certain populations. (Igor Tishenko//) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. Tamra Burns Loeb is an interim adjunct associate professor at the UCLA Center for Culture, Trauma, and Mental Health Disparities. AJ Adkins-Jackson is a research fellow at Massachus

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Wired

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16 Valentine's Day Deals for Your Sweetheart (or Yourself)

From a bouquet of flowers to sex tech, you can save on gifts for your special someone.

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Science Advances current issue

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Overfishing and habitat loss drive range contraction of iconic marine fishes to near extinction

Extinctions on land are often inferred from sparse sightings over time, but this technique is ill-suited for wide-ranging species. We develop a space-for-time approach to track the spatial contraction and drivers of decline of sawfishes. These iconic and endangered shark-like rays were once found in warm, coastal waters of 90 nations and are now presumed extinct in more than half ( n = 46). Using

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Popular Science | RSS

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Tech-savvy fashion forecasters already know what you'll be wearing in two years

Look out for cutout dresses, tops, and everything on the runways and the streets. (Alonso Reyes//) Sometimes it feels like new fashion trends just pop up out of nowhere. In reality, though, these fads are usually the product of months or even years of careful observation and planning by behind-the-scenes actors: trend forecasters. These craze-setters take note of fashion shows and celebrity looks

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Viden

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Tyrkiet vil til Månen: Derfor slutter flere og flere lande sig til rumkapløbet

Rumfarten er der, hvor fremtidens økonomiske magt ligger, siger dansk forsker.

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Phys.org

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Research shows emissions of banned ozone-depleting substance are back on the decline

Global emissions of a potent substance notorious for depleting the Earth's ozone layer—the protective barrier which absorbs the Sun's harmful UV rays—have fallen rapidly and are now back on the decline, according to new research.

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Phys.org

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Silicon chip provides low cost solution to help machines see the world clearly

Researchers in Southampton and San Francisco have developed the first compact 3-D LiDAR imaging system that can match and exceed the performance and accuracy of most advanced, mechanical systems currently used.

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Singularity Hub

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Bitcoin's Blowing Up, and That's Good News for Human Rights. Here's Why

Bitcoin's value reached an all-time high this week after Tesla announced it had bought $1.5 billion worth of the cryptocurrency. After its launch in early 2009, Bitcoin has gone through a lot of ups and downs. Some of its biggest price swings were in 2017 and 2018, when a steep rise followed by an 84 percent decline brought plenty of hype and headlines. After a quiet period, the last three months

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Phys.org

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First-ever observation of multi-photon Fano effect could lead to boost in quantum computing

In the first study of its kind, published by Nature Communications, an international team of researchers led by the University of Surrey has proven the existence of the fabled multi-photon Fano effect in an experiment.

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ScienceDaily

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Shining a light on the true value of solar power

Utility companies have worried that solar panels drive up electric costs for the people who don't have panels. Renewable energy researchers show the opposite is actually true — grid-tied solar photovoltaic (PV) owners are actually subsidizing their non-PV neighbors.

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ScienceDaily

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Male sex, BMI, smoking and depression all increase biological age

A 'biological age' score predicts that being male, overweight, a smoker and having depression all contribute to biological aging, a new study reports.

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Phys.org

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The golden age of social science

Some of the most challenging problems facing our world, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, require not just one field of expertise but a unified interdisciplinary approach. Or so explains a team of social scientists at Caltech in a new report published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Likening the report to an op-ed piece, the lead author Anastasia Buyalskaya says that sh

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The Atlantic

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The Atlantic Daily: We Mourn for All We Do Not Know

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Today, we introduce the first installment of a new project on American history, Black life, and the resilience of memory. It's called "Inheritance." "For so many Black Americans, history is a dea

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Wired

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Game Subscriptions Are On the Rise. Indies Could Suffer

Curated video game ecosystems pose an uncertain future for those outside the blockbuster bubble.

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Phys.org

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Quantum effects help minimize communication flaws

Noise limits the performance of modern quantum technologies. However, particles traveling in a superposition of paths can bypass noise in communication. A collaboration between the Universities of Hong-Kong, Grenoble and Vienna, as well as the Austrian Academy of Sciences, under the lead of Philip Walther, reveals novel techniques to reduce noise in quantum communication. The results, published in

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Phys.org

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ESA's Solar Orbiter ducks behind the sun

Name: Solar Orbiter, or "Solo' as the mission control team fondly call it, is one of the European Space Agency's pluckiest missions and is now cruising toward the sun.

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Wired

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Beijing's Ban on Clubhouse Won't Deter Some Listeners

The audio app hosted discussions on sensitive topics such as Taiwan and Uighurs before it was removed from the App Store. Some users have found workarounds.

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Wired

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How to Make Your Music Streaming a Little More Social

Share playlists, listen with friends remotely, and stay connected with these tips.

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Ingeniøren

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Data fra Israel: Vaccine kan mindske smittespredningen

Nye data fra Israel viser, at vaccinen fra Pfizer og BioNTech nedsætter virusbelastningen, hvilket vidner om, at vaccinen kan mindske spredningen af COVID-19.

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Phys.org

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Chinese spacecraft nearing Mars, world's 2nd in 2 days

A Chinese spacecraft appears poised to enter orbit around Mars, one day after an orbiter from the United Arab Emirates did so and about a week ahead of an American attempt to put down another spacecraft on the surface of the red planet.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Function identified of 'mystery protein' that kills brain cells of people with Parkinson's

Scientists have made a 'vital step' towards understanding the origins of Parkinson's Disease – the fastest growing neurological condition in the world.A study published in Nature Communications today (Wednesday 10 February) presents a compelling new evidence about what a key protein called alpha-synuclein actually does in neurons in the brain.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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German farmers rail against insect protection plans

The German government is set to unveil legislation on Wednesday to halt a dramatic decline in insect populations, but farmers are up in arms over measures they say threaten their livelihoods.

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Phys.org

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German farmers rail against insect protection plans

The German government is set unveil legislation on Wednesday to halt a dramatic decline in insect populations, but farmers are up in arms over measures they say threaten their livelihoods.

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ScienceDaily

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Friends matter: Giraffes that group with others live longer

Adult female giraffes who spend time in larger groups with other females live longer than less sociable individuals. The effects of sociability on survival outweigh other factors such as environment or human presence, a study of giraffes in Tanzania has shown.

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Ingeniøren

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Professor-dom over 5 motorvejsforslag: Her bør skattekronerne prioriteres

PLUS. Mens en økonomisk rentabel Frederikssundsmotorvej har været på tegnebrættet i årevis uden at bliver etableret, taler politikerne nu varmt om en Hærvejsmotorvej op gennem Jylland. Men det er der ikke meget ræson i, siger professor.

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Phys.org

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Friends matter: Giraffes that group with others live longer

A research team led by Monica Bond, research associate at the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies of the University of Zurich (UZH), studied giraffes in Tanzania for five years. The biologists examined the relative effects of sociability, the natural environment, and human factors on survival of the mega-herbivore. They have now shown that adult female giraffes living in l

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Friends matter: Giraffes that group with others live longer

A research team led by Monica Bond, research associate at the Department of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies of the University of Zurich (UZH), studied giraffes in Tanzania for five years. The biologists examined the relative effects of sociability, the natural environment, and human factors on survival of the mega-herbivore. They have now shown that adult female giraffes living in l

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Discover Magazine

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Astronauts Get Sick, Too. Here's the Tech That Could Grow Medicine on Mars

Shipping drugs to the Red Planet would be costly and impractical. But what if the astronauts could grow their own pharmacy once they got there?

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Phys.org

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Can super-Earth interior dynamics set the table for habitability?

New research led by Carnegie's Yingwei Fei provides a framework for understanding the interiors of super-Earths—rocky exoplanets between 1.5 and 2 times the size of our home planet—which is a prerequisite to assess their potential for habitability. Planets of this size are among the most abundant in exoplanetary systems. The paper is published in Nature Communications.

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Phys.org

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NASA's first mission to the trojan asteroids installs its final scientific instrument

With less than a year to launch, NASA's Lucy mission's third and final scientific instrument has been integrated onto the spacecraft.

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ScienceDaily

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Relaxed precautions, not climate, the biggest factor driving wintertime COVID-19 outbreaks

Wintertime outbreaks of COVID-19 have been largely driven by whether people adhere to control measures such as mask wearing and social distancing, according to a new study. Climate and a lack of population immunity are playing smaller roles during the pandemic phase of the virus, but will become more impactful as infections slow.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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Starling success traced to rapid adaptation

Love them or hate them, there's no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird. A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines this non-native species from the inside out. What exactly happened at the genetic level as the starling population exploded from just 80 birds released in New York City's Central Park in 1890, peaking at an estimated 200 million breeding adults spread

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Phys.org

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Starling success traced to rapid adaptation

Love them or hate them, there's no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird. A new study from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology examines this non-native species from the inside out. What exactly happened at the genetic level as the starling population exploded from just 80 birds released in New York City's Central Park in 1890, peaking at an estimated 200 million breeding adults spread

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Phys.org

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Turkey unveils space program including 2023 moon mission

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan unveiled an ambitious 10-year space program for his country Tuesday that includes missions to the moon, sending Turkish astronauts into space and developing internationally viable satellite systems.

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Phys.org

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'Defective' carbon simplifies hydrogen peroxide production

Rice University researchers have created a "defective" catalyst that simplifies the generation of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Ancient Amazonian farmers fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it

Ancient Amazonian communities fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it from conflict, excavations show.

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ScienceDaily

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School closures may not reduce coronavirus deaths as much as expected

School closures, the loss of public spaces, and having to work remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic have caused major disruptions in people's lives all over the world. After running thousands of simulations of the pandemic response in New York City with variations in social distancing behavior, researchers suggest a reduction in fatal coronavirus cases can be achieved without the need for so m

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Science | The Guardian

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UK space industry: engineering apprenticeships set for takeoff

A new course – the space engineering technician apprenticeship – offers the chance to join an expanding industry For young people eager to launch into the world of work, career horizons are expanding to infinity and beyond. The next generation of space engineers began training last month through a new apprenticeship scheme. The space engineering technician apprenticeship is the first to be recogn

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Science

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Britain wakes up to the power of border controls

Tough new regime stands and falls by quality of policing

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ScienceDaily

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Antiviral proves effective at preventing, treating COVID-19 in lab

Using a new research model containing human lung tissue, scientists showed that the broad spectrum, experimental drug EIDD-2801 proved effective at preventing and treating SARS-CoV-2 infection.

11d

Phys.org

100+

Great white shark numbers up significantly in Monterey Bay

Researchers have discovered a "dramatic increase" in the number of great white sharks swimming in Monterey Bay in recent years, including an area off Santa Cruz County where a surfer was killed last year, according to a new study published Tuesday.

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Phys.org

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The evolution of red color vision in lycaenid butterflies linked to coordinated rhodopsin tuning

The colors in a flower patch appear completely different to a bear, a honeybee, a butterfly and humans. The ability to see these colors is generated by specific properties of opsins—light-sensitive proteins in the retina of our eyes. The number of opsins expressed and the molecular structure of the receptor proteins determines the colors we see.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

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The evolution of red color vision in lycaenid butterflies linked to coordinated rhodopsin tuning

The colors in a flower patch appear completely different to a bear, a honeybee, a butterfly and humans. The ability to see these colors is generated by specific properties of opsins—light-sensitive proteins in the retina of our eyes. The number of opsins expressed and the molecular structure of the receptor proteins determines the colors we see.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

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Global tree intrinsic water use efficiency is enhanced by increased atmospheric CO2 and modulated by climate and plant functional types [Ecology]

We conducted a meta-analysis of carbon and oxygen isotopes from tree ring chronologies representing 34 species across 10 biomes to better understand the environmental drivers and physiological mechanisms leading to historical changes in tree intrinsic water use efficiency (iWUE), or the ratio of net photosynthesis (Anet) to stomatal conductance (gs),…

11d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

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{beta}-Adrenergic control of sarcolemmal CaV1.2 abundance by small GTPase Rab proteins [Physiology]

The number and activity of Cav1.2 channels in the cardiomyocyte sarcolemma tunes the magnitude of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and myocardial contraction. β-Adrenergic receptor (βAR) activation stimulates sarcolemmal insertion of CaV1.2. This supplements the preexisting sarcolemmal CaV1.2 population, forming large "superclusters" wherein neighboring channels undergo enhanced cooperative-gating behavi

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

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A new role for joint mobility in reconstructing vertebrate locomotor evolution [Evolution]

Reconstructions of movement in extinct animals are critical to our understanding of major transformations in vertebrate locomotor evolution. Estimates of joint range of motion (ROM) have long been used to exclude anatomically impossible joint poses from hypothesized gait cycles. Here we demonstrate how comparative ROM data can be harnessed in…

11d

ScienceDaily

100+

How accurate are first impressions on a first date?

The high stakes of first dates require would-be partners to make and interpret first impressions. But, can we rely on these first impressions to accurately assess someone's personality? According to researchers, the answer is yes, although it may be more difficult than in more casual settings.

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Phys.org

100+

School closures may not reduce coronavirus deaths as much as expected: study

School closures, the loss of public spaces, and having to work remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic have caused major disruptions in people's social lives all over the world.

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Phys.org

100+

Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of color

In nature, as in everyday life, we are surrounded by resonance—the phenomenon that describes how each object has a frequency that it prefers to vibrate at. The note of a guitar string and the sound of Big Ben chiming are examples of resonance.

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Phys.org

100+

2,700yearold face cream for men found in Chinese dig site

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in Germany, has found evidence of a 2,700‐year‐old face cream for men at a Chinese dig site. In their paper published in the journal Archaeometry, the group describes items they found at the dig site and the face cream they discovered.

11d

Phys.org

100+

Super-Earth atmospheres probed at Sandia's Z machine

The huge forces generated by the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories are being used to replicate the gravitational pressures on so-called "super-Earths" to determine which might maintain atmospheres that could support life.

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Phys.org

100+

Turtles 'in horrible shape' with grim future due to rising sea levels

About 60% of the world's turtle species are considered threatened or endangered, making them one of the most vulnerable groups of animals on the planet.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Turtles 'in horrible shape' with grim future due to rising sea levels

About 60% of the world's turtle species are considered threatened or endangered, making them one of the most vulnerable groups of animals on the planet.

11d

Phys.org

100+

Galaxy Mrk 335 examined with AstroSat

Using the AstroSat spacecraft, Indian astronomers have performed multiwavelength observations of a Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy known as Mrk 335. Results of this investigation, presented in a paper published February 1 on the arXiv preprint server, deliver crucial information about the emission from this source.

11d

Phys.org

100+

All in the head? Brains adapt to support new species

Scientists studying forest dwelling butterflies in Central and South America have discovered that changes in the way animals perceive and process information from their environment can support the emergence of new species. The study led by the University of Bristol, and published today [9 February] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), has implications for how new species

11d

Phys.org

100+

Scientists measure temperature under shock conditions

Temperature is tough to measure, especially in shock compression experiments. A big challenge is having to account for thermal transport—the flow of energy in the form of heat.

11d

Phys.org

100+

Quantum causal loops

Normally, causal influence is assumed to go only one way—from cause to effect—and never back from the effect to the cause—the ringing of a bell does not cause the pressing of the button that triggered it. Now, researchers from the University of Oxford and the Université libre de Bruxelles have developed a theory of causality in quantum theory, according to which cause-effect relations can sometime

11d

Viden

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150 meldt savnet efter gletsjer-kollaps: Katastrofen kan skyldes klimaforandringer

Temperaturstigninger gør den slags naturkatastrofer mere sandsynlige.

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Scientific American Content

100+

Humans Are Pretty Lousy Lie Detectors

Whenever we hear someone speak, we form an opinion about their believability. But our eyes and ears can lead us astray — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

The Atlantic

100+

I Survived Cancer, and Then I Needed to Remember How to Live

"E veryone who is born holds dual citizenship, in the kingdom of the well and in the kingdom of the sick," Susan Sontag wrote in Illness as Metaphor . "Although we all prefer to use only the good passport, sooner or later each of us is obliged, at least for a spell, to identify ourselves as citizens of that other place." By the time I reached my last day of treatment for leukemia, in the autumn o

11d

The Atlantic

100

Homeroom: How Can I Get My Child to Finish Her Work?

Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, My seventh grader, Lucy, says that she's "done" with her homework when she's not. The tough thing is that she actually seems to believe she has completed her work. She checks it off in her planner, and submit

11d

Popular Science | RSS

100+

Bee theft is almost a perfect crime—but there's a new sheriff in town

Bee theft is almost a perfect crime. (The Voorhes/) The bee thieves come at night, swooping in and bugging out quicker than the wings of the insects they steal. And they always leave tracks. Ray Olivarez knew this much, but he still expected a routine visit when he drove to his apiary in California's Central Valley one brisk midwinter afternoon in 2016. As he parked, though, an uneasiness fell ov

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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New study finds climate change shrinks and shifts juvenile white shark range

Unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks at the northern end of Monterey Bay signal a significant shift in the young white sharks' range. Researchers conclude the northward range shift demonstrates the young sharks are being subjected to a loss of suitable thermal habitat, meaning water temperatures within their preferred temperature range are becoming harder to find.

11d

Science | The Guardian

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Covid mortality in England still higher for some ethnic minorities, study finds

People from Bangladeshi and Pakistani backgrounds faring worse than black people in second wave of pandemic Evidence that ethnic minorities are at elevated risk of contracting and dying from Covid-19 compared with their white counterparts is well established . But a new sweeping analysis in England shows that between the first and second waves of the pandemic in 2020, death rates in black communi

11d

The Atlantic

100

Ghosts in Schools

… a human body would not make it to the seafloor intact * NO LOITERING IN THE WATER They whisper like fish. The police in schools like fish … the atoms of the people who were thrown overboard— * Sometimes my lungs feel like stones in the hypnagogic hour—that watery room between wakefulness & sleep * The faint formation of land in the distance— that's when horror struck in the mind of the African

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Science | The Guardian

100+

What can the evolutionary history of turtles tell us about their future? – podcast

Turtles have been around for more than 200m years, and can be found almost everywhere on the planet. Yet, they are surprisingly uniform and many species around today are facing an uncertain future – at risk from trade, habitat destruction and the climate crisis. Looking at a new study investigating the evolutionary history of turtles, Age of Extinction reporter Phoebe Weston talks to Prof Bob Tho

11d

Science

100+

South Africa forced to overhaul vaccine plan over variant fears

Concerns over AstraZeneca efficacy against mutation prompt about-turn with global repercussions

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ScienceDaily

100+

1918 pandemic second wave had fatal consequences

In a pandemic, delayed reactions and a decentralized approach by the authorities at the start of a follow-up wave can lead to longer-lasting, more severe and more fatal consequences, a new study has found. Researchers compared the influenza pandemic of 1918 and 1919 in the Canton of Bern with the coronavirus pandemic of 2020.

11d

ScienceDaily

100+

Synchronization of brain hemispheres changes what we hear

Most of the time, our brain receives different input from each of our ears, but we nevertheless perceive speech as unified sounds. This process takes place through synchronization of the areas of the brain involved with the help of gamma waves, neurolinguists have now discovered. Their findings may lead to new treatment approaches for tinnitus.

11d

MIT Technology Review

100+

These might be the best places for future Mars colonists to look for ice

If we ever start an extraterrestrial colony on Mars, we'll need water for a host of essential services, and most obviously for something to drink. But while there's plenty of water ice at the planet's poles, the elevation is too high and there's limited access to sunlight for power. So we'll want to look for ice we can dig out from under the surface at lower latitudes. A new study published in Na

12d

Big Think

100+

How the pandemic has affected mental health internet searches

According to a new study , there was an influx of internet searches for mental health symptoms during the beginning of the pandemic, and this has slowly trended downwards. Researchers looked at whether mitigation policies correlated with Google searches for terms associated with depression and anxiety between January and June of 2020. Additionally, they monitored search terms for in-home activiti

12d

ScienceDaily

100+

Deepfake detectors can be defeated, computer scientists show for the first time

Systems designed to detect deepfakes — videos that manipulate real-life footage via artificial intelligence — can be deceived, computer scientists have shown. Researchers showed detectors can be defeated by inserting inputs called adversarial examples into every video frame. The adversarial examples are slightly manipulated inputs which cause artificial intelligence systems such as machine learn

12d

Phys.org

100+

New technique used to discover how galaxies grow

For decades, space and ground telescopes have provided us with spectacular images of galaxies. These building blocks of the universe usually contain several million to over a trillion stars and can range in size from a few thousand to several hundred thousand light-years across. What we typically see in an image of a galaxy are the stars, gas and dust that constitute these sprawling systems.

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

100+

Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes

Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research.

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Phys.org

100+

Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes

Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research.

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Phys.org

100+

Fast-growing parts of Africa see a surprise: less air pollution from seasonal fires

Often, when populations and economies boom, so does air pollution—a product of increased fossil-fuel consumption by vehicles, industry and households. This has been true across much of Africa, where air pollution recently surpassed AIDS as the leading cause of premature death. But researchers have discovered at least a temporary bright spot: dangerous nitrogen oxides, byproducts of combustion, are

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Man-made borders threaten wildlife as climate changes

Walls and fences designed to secure national borders could make it difficult for almost 700 mammal species to adapt to climate change, according to new research.

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Science | The Guardian

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The Guardian view on coexisting with Covid: new vaccines needed fast | Editorial

There is a race between viral variants and vaccines – and for humanity's sake the latter must win Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage No one would blame Boris Johnson for wanting Covid-19 to be wiped out. The reality is that the disease is here to stay. New, more transmissible, variants have exposed the limits of trying to achieve herd immunity through vaccination . Sars

12d

Science

100+

What we know about the most troublesome Covid mutations

E484K, the genetic change in the variant first identified in South Africa, is affecting the efficacy of some vaccines

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Phys.org

100+

The role of midsized phytoplankton in Earth's biological pump

Every spring, phytoplankton blooms flourish across the ocean. The single-celled, photosynthetic organisms pull carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and produce oxygen—part of a carbon sequestration system known as the biological pump.

12d

Phys.org

100+

Rare blast's remains discovered in Milky Way's center

Astronomers may have found our galaxy's first example of an unusual kind of stellar explosion. This discovery, made with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, adds to the understanding of how some stars shatter and seed the universe with elements critical for life on Earth.

12d

Popular Science | RSS

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Why South Africa stopped using the AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine

This coronavirus update brought to you by masks—you should wear one! (Nicky/Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. Another week goes by in the depths of the COVID-19 pandemic. It's been a rough road so far, but if there is one brightening light at the end of the tunnel, it's that vaccinations are continuing to push forward. Progress remains slow and uneven, especially coun

12d

ScienceDaily

100+

Neural roots/origins of alcoholism identified

The physical origin of alcohol addiction has been located in a network of the human brain that regulates our response to danger, according to a researchers.

12d

ScienceDaily

100+

Cells are collective thinkers

Cells, like humans, cast votes to make decisions as a group. But how do they know what to vote for? Researchers have uncovered how cells actively seek information in order to make faster and better collective decisions to coordinate the growth of new blood vessels. This provides a new basis for understanding intelligence in cells.

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

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Brain changed by caffeine in utero, study finds

New research finds caffeine consumed during pregnancy can change important brain pathways that could lead to behavioral problems later in life. Researchers in the Del Monte Institute for Neuroscience at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) analyzed thousands of brain scans of nine and ten-year-olds, and revealed changes in the brain structure in children who were exposed to caffeine i

12d

ScienceDaily

100+

Sophisticated lung-on-chip created

Researchers have developed a second-generation lung-on-chip model with life-size dimension alveoli in a stretchable membrane, made of purely biological material. The new model reproduces key aspects of the lung tissue architecture not found in previous lungs-on-chip. This opens up new possibilities for basic pneumological research, understanding lung pathologies, drug screening and precision medic

12d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

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Synthetic protein quality control system in bacteria

On Feb 5th, Seoul National University, College of Engineering (Dean Kookheon Char) announced that Professor Sang Woo Seo's research team (Dr. Jina Yang and Mr. Yong Hee Han) at the School of Chemical and Biological Engineering has developed a synthetic protein quality control system to enhance full-length translation in bacteria. This technology is expected to increase the efficiency of the produc

12d

Phys.org

100+

Synthetic protein quality control system in bacteria

On Feb 5th, Seoul National University, College of Engineering (Dean Kookheon Char) announced that Professor Sang Woo Seo's research team (Dr. Jina Yang and Mr. Yong Hee Han) at the School of Chemical and Biological Engineering has developed a synthetic protein quality control system to enhance full-length translation in bacteria. This technology is expected to increase the efficiency of the produc

12d

Phys.org

100+

Ancient owl vomit helps researchers unpack prehistoric bone secrets

Curtin University researchers studying one of the oldest collections of ancient animal bones in the world have used DNA still present in the bones to identify 17 animal species, including two rodents previously not known to be in the collection.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Ancient owl vomit helps researchers unpack prehistoric bone secrets

Curtin University researchers studying one of the oldest collections of ancient animal bones in the world have used DNA still present in the bones to identify 17 animal species, including two rodents previously not known to be in the collection.

12d

ScienceDaily

100+

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may increase Alzheimer's disease risk

Higher blood pressure at night than in daytime may be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in older men.

12d

Phys.org

100+

These distant 'baby' black holes seem to be misbehaving—and experts are perplexed

Radio images of the sky have revealed hundreds of "baby" and supermassive black holes in distant galaxies, with the galaxies' light bouncing around in unexpected ways.

12d

Singularity Hub

100+

Connecting Distant Qubits Just Brought Distributed Quantum Computing Closer

Quantum computers could change the world, but first we need to work out how to build ones that are big enough to live up to this potential. A new breakthrough in the ability to connect distant qubits could show a way forward. Most of the headline-grabbing progress on quantum computing so far has been led by companies like Google and IBM who are trying to build massive, cryogenically-cooled quantu

12d

ScienceDaily

100+

Study links exposure to nighttime artificial lights with elevated thyroid cancer risk

People living in regions with high levels of outdoor artificial light at night may face a higher risk of developing thyroid cancer.

12d

Phys.org

100+

Implementing a quantum approximate optimization algorithm on a 53-qubit NISQ device

A large team of researchers working with Google Inc. and affiliated with a host of institutions in the U.S., one in Germany and one in the Netherlands has implemented a quantum approximate optimization algorithm (QAOA) on a 53-qubit noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) device. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics,, the group describes their method of studying the performance o

12d

Phys.org

100+

Complete characterization of the full mitochondrial kinome

The human cellular kinome contains over 500 kinases, accounting for almost 2% of all our genes. It is currently impossible to gauge the phosphorylation status, or even phosphorylation potential, of the entire proteome of any cell. Mitochondria, on the other hand, use just 25 kinases. Moreover, their entire proteome contains only 1,136 proteins, at least according to the latest version of the Mitoc

12d

Wired

100+

Tips on How to Snag a PlayStation 5 (Good Luck!)

Months after launch, Sony's latest console is proving difficult to find for many. We've got some tips on how to score one.

12d

Phys.org

100+

Decoding the age of the ice at Mars' north pole

Mars' north pole contains a large ice cap made up of many layers of frozen water. Like ice cores on Earth, those layers offer a tantalizing record of climate on Mars over the past several million years. The first step in decoding that climate record is to figure out how those layers form and how old each one might be—a difficult task to perform from orbit.

12d

Phys.org

100+

Recognizing liars from the sound of their voice

Faster speech rate, greater intensity in the middle of the word, and falling pitch at the end of the word: That is the prosody to adopt if one wants to come across as reliable and honest to one's listeners.

12d

Phys.org

100+

Wearable plasmonic-metasurface sensor for universal molecular fingerprint detection on biointerfaces

Wearable sensing technology is an essential link in personalized medicine, where researchers must track multiple analytes inside the body simultaneously, to obtain a complete picture of human health. In a new report on Science Advances, Yingli Wang and a team of scientists in biosystems, engineering and information science at the University of Cambridge and Zhejiang University in the U.K. and Chin

12d

Phys.org

100+

Modelling HIV fusion

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has used robust computer simulations to understand how HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, fuses with the host cell membrane. Published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, the study focuses on a process called gp41–mediated membrane fusion.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Modelling HIV fusion

An interdisciplinary team of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science (IISc) has used robust computer simulations to understand how HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, fuses with the host cell membrane. Published in the Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, the study focuses on a process called gp41–mediated membrane fusion.

12d

Science

100+

Fresh Ebola outbreak feared in Democratic Republic of Congo

New case emerges as country battles second wave of coronavirus that is stronger than first

12d

Phys.org

100+

Dinosaur frills were likely the result of sexual selection

Why dinosaurs evolved such a huge diversity of crests and frills on their skulls has long been an enigma.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Dinosaur frills were likely the result of sexual selection

Why dinosaurs evolved such a huge diversity of crests and frills on their skulls has long been an enigma.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

100+

Researchers find peptide that treats, prevents killer citrus disease

New research affirms a unique peptide found in an Australian plant can destroy the No. 1 killer of citrus trees worldwide and help prevent infection.

12d

Phys.org

100+

Researchers find peptide that treats, prevents killer citrus disease

New research affirms a unique peptide found in an Australian plant can destroy the No. 1 killer of citrus trees worldwide and help prevent infection.

12d

Big Think

99

Turns out those aren't the apostle St James's bones after all

New research in Rome has found that bones purported to be from St. James the Less are impossible. The femoral bone fragments date to somewhere between 214 and 340 CE—a few centuries off the mark. The analysis was conducted on bone fragments, oil, and mummy remains in the Basilica dei Santa Apostoli. The most psychologically riveting undiscovered archaeology in the Western world remains "proof" of

2d

ScienceDaily

99

Existing heart failure drug may treat potential COVID-19 long-hauler symptom, study suggests

A new clinical trial suggests that ivabradine may be effective in treating postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome, a potential COVID-19 long-hauler symptom.

4d

Scientific American Content

99

The Human Genome and the Making of a Skeptical Biologist

Thoughts on scientific ambition and progress, 20 years after the first draft of the genome was completed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8d

Phys.org

99

COVID has reached Antarctica. Scientists are extremely concerned for its wildlife

In December, Antarctica lost its status as the last continent free of COVID-19 when 36 people at the Chilean Bernardo O'Higgins research station tested positive. The station's isolation from other bases and fewer researchers in the continent means the outbreak is now likely contained.

9d

Future(s) Studies

99

Tim Berners-Lee's plan to save the internet: give us back control of our data – An effort to return the internet to the golden age that existed before its current incarnation as Web 2.0 – characterized by invasive data harvesting by governments and corporations.

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

98

Is odor the secret to bats' sex appeal?

When falling in love, humans often pay attention to looks. Many non-human animals also choose a sexual partner based on appearance. Male birds may sport flashy feathers to attract females, lionesses prefer lions with thicker manes and colorful male guppies with large spots attract the most females. But bats are active in the dark. How do they attract mates? Mariana Muñoz-Romo, a senior Latin Ameri

2d

Phys.org

98

Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side

When there is a choice, wolves in Mongolia prefer to feed on wild animals rather than grazing livestock. This is the discovery by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Senckenberg Museum Görlitz. Previous studies had shown that the diet of wolves in inland Central Asia consists mainly of grazing livestock, which could lead to increasing conflict between nomadic livestock herders

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ScienceDaily

98

Differences in walking patterns could predict type of cognitive decline in older adults

Researchers are studying how different patterns in the way older adults walk could more accurately diagnose different types of dementia and identify Alzheimer's disease.

3d

Phys.org

98

Stanford model accounts for behavioral changes during epidemics

The morning news reports a rise in coronavirus infections in your area. Taking in this information, you decide to skip your daily coffee run or put off your grocery trip for another week. Although many of us have probably experienced some version of these adaptive responses to coronavirus, the whims and vagaries of human nature are not easily captured by epidemiological models, which tend to portr

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

98

Stanford model accounts for behavioral changes during epidemics

The morning news reports a rise in coronavirus infections in your area. Taking in this information, you decide to skip your daily coffee run or put off your grocery trip for another week. Although many of us have probably experienced some version of these adaptive responses to coronavirus, the whims and vagaries of human nature are not easily captured by epidemiological models, which tend to portr

10d

Phys.org

98

Coal and COVID-19: How the pandemic is accelerating the end of fossil power generation

COVID-19 has not only caused a temporary drop in global CO2 emissions, it has also reduced the share of power generated by burning coal—a trend that could, in fact, outlast the pandemic. This is the key result of a new study by a team of economists based in Potsdam and Berlin that looked at COVID-19's impact on the energy system and demand for electricity. Their findings show that the pandemic, wh

12d

The Atlantic

97

The Atlantic Daily: The Real Scandal of Ted Cruz's Vacation

Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . When the snow came, the state of Texas failed. Its self-maintained power grid stopped working—and its politicians seemed to do the same: Senator Ted Cruz flew to Cancún, Mexico, with his family,

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Popular Science | RSS

97

Everything you need to know to start a fire

You don't need a giant stack of firewood to feel the burn. (Marc Renken/Unsplash/) With winter weather pummeling the nation this week, warming up by a fire becomes more of a necessity than a comfort. But stoking a strong flame will take more than a piece of wood and a matchstick, especially when the ground is covered in ice and snow. Thankfully, there are plenty of ways to spark a flame. Whether

2d

ScienceDaily

97

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young

Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women.

4d

The Atlantic

97

The Books Briefing: Overlooked Stories of Black American Life

In Black Genealogy , the historian Charles L. Blockson tells the story of Edward "Ned" Hector, a Black soldier who fought in the American Revolution. Several years ago, a man named Noah Lewis came across Hector's story and decided that children needed to hear it. So, as the Atlantic staff writer Clint Smith reports , Lewis began acting as Hector in presentations for children and schools. He is no

8d

ScienceDaily

97

Six previously FDA-approved drugs appear promising against SARS-CoV-2 in laboratory testing

Researchers havve discovered that six drugs previously approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for other indications could be repurposed to treat or prevent COVID-19.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

96

Differential biosynthesis and cellular permeability explain longitudinal gibberellin gradients in growing roots [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Control over cell growth by mobile regulators underlies much of eukaryotic morphogenesis. In plant roots, cell division and elongation are separated into distinct longitudinal zones and both division and elongation are influenced by the growth regulatory hormone gibberellin (GA). Previously, a multicellular mathematical model predicted a GA maximum at the…

2d

Scientific American Content

96

Brain Cells Blinking in Rhythm May Hold Clues to Alzheimer's Disease

Pulses of light and sound helped mice predisposed to the disease. They hope to investigate the potential therapy for humans with neurons created in a petri dish — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Science Magazine

96

United States rushes to fill void in viral sequencing

[no content]

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ScienceDaily

96

Tiny population of neurons may have big role in depression

Scientists report the first evidence that, not short-term stress, like a series of tough college exams, rather chronic, unpredictable stress like that which erupts in our personal and professional lives, induces changes in the function of AgRP neurons that may contribute to depression.

9d

Scientific American Content

96

A Visual Guide to the New Coronavirus Variants

The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus seems to be suddenly acquiring mutations at a rapid rate. The most worrying variants, first discovered in South Africa and Brazil, increase the virus's contagiousness… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Wired

95

Storm Delays for Vaccines, Expanded Sequencing, and More News

Catch up on the most important updates from this week.

1d

Phys.org

95

Space Force sounds like a joke thanks to pop culture—that could be a problem for an important military branch

The U.S. Space Force has a serious role to play in the modern world. Its stated mission is to train and equip personnel to defend U.S. interests in space. Given the increasing military and economic importance of space, the USSF is likely to grow in importance.

1d

Phys.org

95

Engineers solve mystery of structure-property relation in emission control catalysts

Environmental conservation and future sustainability require innovation from chemical engineers, from adjustments to the microscopic structure of materials to changing how large-scale industrial production is done. One pressing challenge is how to mitigate environmentally polluting nitric oxides (NOx) emitted from automobile engines and industries.

2d

Scientific American Content

95

Virtual Conferences Aren't as Accessible as You Might Think

They have some advantages for people with disabilities—but plenty of problems as well — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d

Big Think

95

BDSM therapy: Are there therapeutic and relational benefits to being submissive?

BDSM is an acronym encompassing a variety of sexual practices that include: bondage/discipline, dominance/submission, and sadism/masochism. The practice of BDSM usually consists of partners taking on specific roles in which one partner is dominant and the other is submissive. BDSM practitioners (individuals who frequently engage in BDSM play) can experience various mental health benefits from eng

4d

Discover Magazine

95

Shame and the Rise of the Social Media Outrage Machine

This ancient social emotion has always been complex. The internet poured fuel on it. Then came social media.

8d

Popular Science | RSS

94

The Blackmagic 6K Pro is the budget camera filmmakers have been waiting for

The angled viewfinder is an available add-on to make the camera feel more like a DSLR-style mirrorless camera. (Blackmagic Design /) By now, you've seen cameras—even those attached to smartphones—with specs boasting the ability to shoot 8K footage. It's an impressive number and it looks great on marketing material, and it does comes in handy for some specific purposes. But for many pro and high-e

1d

Future(s) Studies

94

Bill Gates: Rich nations should shift entirely to synthetic beef.

submitted by /u/filosoful [link] [comments]

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

94

Novel analytical tools developed by SMART key to next-generation agriculture

Researchers from the Disruptive & Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision (DiSTAP) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) of Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (TLL), highlight the potential of rapid and non-destructive analytical tools that provide tissue-cell or organelle-specific in

10d

Phys.org

94

Novel analytical tools developed by SMART key to next-generation agriculture

Researchers from the Disruptive & Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision (DiSTAP) Interdisciplinary Research Group (IRG) of Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, and Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory (TLL), highlight the potential of rapid and non-destructive analytical tools that provide tissue-cell or organelle-specific in

10d

ScienceDaily

94

Severe undercounting of COVID-19 cases in U.S., other countries estimated via model

A new machine-learning framework uses reported test results and death rates to calculate estimates of the actual number of current COVID-19 infections within all 50 U.S. states and 50 countries.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

93

Migratory birds track climate across the year

As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range. The work is published Feb. 17 in Ecology Letters.

2d

ScienceDaily

93

New possibilities to prevent sudden cardiac death

An assistant professor of biomedical sciences has developed a better understanding of the pathological characteristics behind arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy, as well as promising avenues for prevention.

2d

ScienceDaily

93

New surgery may enable better control of prosthetic limbs

Researchers and surgeons have devised a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees better control their residual muscles and receive sensory feedback. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as reduction of limb pain, the researchers say.

5d

New Scientist

93

Was it just luck that our species survived and the Denisovans didn't?

For millennia, our species advanced in lockstep with the Denisovans and it is hard to work out from archaeological finds why they disappeared from the planet while we now dominate it

7d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

93

Limited transmission of Covid-19 from open schools but teachers were affected

In Sweden, upper-secondary schools moved online while lower-secondary schools remained open during the spring of 2020. A comparison of parents with children in the final year of lower-secondary and first year of upper-secondary school shows that keeping the former open had limited consequences for the overall transmission of the virus. However, the infection rate doubled among lower-secondary teac

8d

Viden

93

5 forslag skal sætte strøm til en million elbiler: Transportministeren har allerede trukket stikket på det første

Super billig strøm til elbilister, en trængselsafgift og flere ladestandere langs motorvejene er blandt forslagene i ny rapport fra Elbilkommissionen.

8d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

93

China's Tianwen-1 Spacecraft Arrives in Orbit of Mars

Mars from Hubble: Astronomers took advantage of a rare close approach by Mars in 2001. When the Red Planet was just 43 million miles away, Hubble snapped this picture with the WFPC2. It has a surface resolution of just 10 miles. This is the best image we've gotten of Mars that didn't involve sending a robot there. Space around Mars is much busier than usual right now. The red planet made a close

10d

Discover Magazine

93

People Went Crazy for Almond Milk in the Middle Ages

Almond milk was a staple in medieval European cooking, especially during Lent. The ingredient appears in cookbooks starting in the 1200s. Going back even earlier, almond milk was listed as a cough remedy in an 8th century Islamic medical text.

11d

ScienceDaily

93

Wearable devices can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis, study finds

Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, according to a new study.

11d

Phys.org

93

La Nina climate cycle has peaked: UN

The 2020-2021 La Nina phenomenon has passed its peak, the UN weather agency said Tuesday, but its impact on temperatures, rain and storm patterns is set to continue.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

92

Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products

Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacter

1d

Phys.org

92

Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products

Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacter

1d

Livescience.com

92

Disastrous Houston blackouts captured from space

More than one million people lost power in the Houston area.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

92

Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side

When there is a choice, wolves in Mongolia prefer to feed on wild animals rather than grazing livestock. This is the discovery by a research team from the University of Göttingen and the Senckenberg Museum Görlitz. Previous studies had shown that the diet of wolves in inland Central Asia consists mainly of grazing livestock, which could lead to increasing conflict between nomadic livestock herders

2d

ScienceDaily

92

Scientists develop blood test to predict environmental harms to children

Scientists have developed a method using a DNA biomarker to easily screen pregnant women for harmful prenatal environmental contaminants like air pollution linked to childhood illness and developmental disorders. This approach has the potential to prevent childhood developmental disorders and chronic illness through the early identification of children at risk.

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

92

More trees do not always create a cooler planet, Clark University geographer finds

New research by Christopher A. Williams, an environmental scientist and professor in Clark University's Graduate School of Geography, reveals that deforestation in the U.S. does not always cause planetary warming, as is commonly assumed; instead, in some places, it actually cools the planet. A peer-reviewed study by Williams and his team, "Climate Impacts of U.S. Forest Loss Span Net Warming to Ne

8d

ScienceDaily

92

Pre-COVID subway air polluted from DC to Boston, but New York region's is the worst, study finds

Commuters now have yet another reason to avoid packing themselves into subway stations. New York City's transit system exposes riders to more inhaled pollutants than any other metropolitan subway system in the Northeastern United States, a new study finds. Yet even its 'cleaner' neighbors struggle with enough toxins to give health-conscious travelers pause.

10d

ScienceDaily

92

Challenges of animal ownership during the pandemic should be considered alongside the potential benefits, study shows

Animal owners frequently report concerns and worries relating to caring for their animal during the pandemic, new research suggests. The study also revealed owners had increased their appreciation of their animals during the first lockdown phase. The notion that people 'could not live without' their animals and that they were a 'godsend' or a 'lifeline' in the pandemic was frequently expressed.

11d

Phys.org

91

Physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation

An international team led by Professor Yilin Wu, Associate Professor of the Department of Physics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has made a novel conceptual advance in the field of active matter science. The team discovered a new route in which the self-organization of active fluids in space and time can be controlled by a single material property called viscoelasticity. This new fi

1d

Phys.org

91

Decade-long study shows half of all rivers in the world heavily impacted by humans

A team of researchers from several institutions in France and China has conducted a decade-long study of the degree of human impact on river systems around the world over the past two centuries. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their study and what their findings revealed.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

91

How sessile seahorses speciated and dispersed across the world's oceans in 25 million years

Seahorses are extremely poor swimmers. Surprisingly, however, they can be found in all of the world's oceans. On the basis of almost 360 different seahorse genomes, a group of researchers studied how these special fish were able to spread so suc-cessfully worldwide. Based on an evolutionary tree of 21 species it was possible to reconstruct the dispersal routes of seahorses worldwide and to explain

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

91

Biotech fit for the Red Planet

Astrobiologists from the University of Bremen show for the first time that a N2/CO2-rich low-pressure atmosphere, water, and nutrients from Mars-like dust are sufficient for Cyanobacterium-Based Life-Support Systems, making it easier for future astronauts to produce food and other resources.

4d

ScienceDaily

91

Cheap, potent pathway to pandemic therapeutics

By capitalizing on a convergence of chemical, biological and artificial intelligence advances, scientists have developed an unusually fast and efficient method for discovering tiny antibody fragments with big potential for development into therapeutics against deadly diseases.

5d

Science Magazine

91

Structure-guided multivalent nanobodies block SARS-CoV-2 infection and suppress mutational escape

The pandemic caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) continues to spread, with devastating consequences. For passive immunization efforts, nanobodies have size and cost advantages over conventional antibodies. In this study, we generated four neutralizing nanobodies that target the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. We used x-ray crystallograph

9d

Phys.org

91

Rapid ice retreat during last deglaciation parallels current melt rates

10,000 km2 of ice disappeared in a blink of an eye from an ice sheet in the Storfjorden Through offshore Svalbard, a new study shows. This dramatic break off was preceded by a rapid melt of 2.5 kilometers of ice a year. This parallels the current melt rates in Antarctica and Greenland and worries the scientists behind the study.

10d

Phys.org

91

ESA and UNOOSA illustrate space debris problem

Space debris is an issue of global concern that threatens our continued use of near-Earth space for the benefit of humankind.

10d

Discover Magazine

90

What Your Sense of Humor Says About Your Mental Health

According to researchers, humor comes in four types. Which of these you lean towards can act as a window into your psychological well-being.

1d

Wired

90

Lenovo's Desktop PC Has Plenty of Beauty, Not Enough Brawn

This all-in-one desktop PC has a clever, eye-catching design, but its meager performance doesn't earn kudos.

2d

Discover Magazine

90

How Hot Will Climate Change Make the Earth By the Year 2100?

Our planet gets a little warmer every year. But the extent of global warming is still up to us to decide.

5d

ScienceDaily

90

Birds can 'read' the Earth's magnetic signature well enough to get back on course

Birdwatchers get excited when 'rare' migratory birds makes landfall having been blown beyond their normal range. But these are rare for a reason; most birds that have made the journey before are able to correct for large displacements and find their final destination. Now new research shows how birds displaced in this way are able to navigate back to their migratory route and gives us an insight i

8d

Wired

90

Our Picks From Outdoor Winter Clearance Sales Going on Now

The best time to buy is when the season is winding down. It's not just cold-weather picks, but backpacks, headlamps, sporks, and more.

8d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

90

Links between pollution and cancer in wild animals: what can we learn?

This recent review combines the information available on cancer occurrences in aquatic and semi-aquatic animals. Cancer is one of the pollution-induced diseases that should be at the centre of attention in ecological and evolutionary research. Authors suggest physiological mechanisms that link pollution and cancer, determine which types of aquatic animals are more vulnerable to pollution-induced c

10d

Scientific American Content

90

Bromances Could Lead to More Romances for Male Hyenas

Spotted hyena males do not fight for mates, so how are certain males shut out of the mating game? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10d

ScienceDaily

89

Mitochondrial function can play significant part in serious disease

Disorders of the cells' energy supply can cause a number of serious diseases, but also seem to be connected to ageing. More research is needed on mitochondrial function to find future treatments. A new study shows how an important molecule inside the mitochondria affects their function in mice and fruit flies. The study adds valuable knowledge on formerly relatively unexplored protein modification

1d

Phys.org

89

Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria

A major pathway for carbon sequestration in the ocean is the growth, aggregation and sinking of phytoplankton—unicellular microalgae like diatoms. Just like plants on land, phytoplankton sequester carbon from atmospheric carbon dioxide. When algae cells aggregate, they sink and take the sequestered carbon with them to the ocean floor. This so called biological carbon pump accounts for about 70 per

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

89

Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria

A major pathway for carbon sequestration in the ocean is the growth, aggregation and sinking of phytoplankton—unicellular microalgae like diatoms. Just like plants on land, phytoplankton sequester carbon from atmospheric carbon dioxide. When algae cells aggregate, they sink and take the sequestered carbon with them to the ocean floor. This so called biological carbon pump accounts for about 70 per

1d

Wired

89

The Love Triangle Is a Sex Toy With a Pleasurable Price

This adorable little device is actually a powerful two-in-one suction toy and vibrator.

1d

ScienceDaily

89

World's oldest DNA reveals how mammoths evolved

An international team has sequenced DNA recovered from mammoth remains that are up to 1.2 million years old. The analyses show that the Columbian mammoth that inhabited North America during the last ice age was a hybrid between the woolly mammoth and a previously unknown genetic lineage of mammoth. The study provides new insights into when and how fast mammoths became adapted to cold climate.

3d

Big Think

89

10 pieces of wisdom from Roman emperors

Rome's famed emperors have seen a resurgence thanks to Stoicism, but many philosophies date back to the Empire. While the range of rulers vary from tyrannical despots to benevolent political forces, they all have something to say. These 10 quotes seem suited to our modern political situation in America and beyond right now. While the Roman Empire lasted for roughly 300 years, the extended family

3d

Phys.org

89

Invasive flies prefer untouched territory when laying eggs

A recent study finds that the invasive spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) prefers to lay its eggs in places that no other spotted wing flies have visited. The finding raises questions about how the flies can tell whether a piece of fruit is virgin territory—and what that might mean for pest control.

5d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

89

Invasive flies prefer untouched territory when laying eggs

A recent study finds that the invasive spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) prefers to lay its eggs in places that no other spotted wing flies have visited. The finding raises questions about how the flies can tell whether a piece of fruit is virgin territory—and what that might mean for pest control.

5d

Scientific American

89

Bromances Could Lead to More Romances for Male Hyenas

Spotted hyena males do not fight for mates, so how are certain males shut out of the mating game? — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10d

ScienceDaily

89

Radiative cooling and solar heating from one system, no electricity needed

A new study describes a new technology that provides both radiative cooling and solar heating, all is one system and without using electricity or fuel. It could help impoverished communities, reduce cooling and heating costs, lower CO2 emissions.

12d

ScienceDaily

88

How a longevity gene protects brain stem cells from stress

A gene linked to unusually long lifespans in humans protects brain stem cells from the harmful effects of stress, according to a new study.

1d

Ingeniøren

88

Touchdown: Nasa-rover landede kun 35 meter fra nærmeste klipper

Under et minut efter touchdown blev bekræftet lykkedes det Nasa at modtage de første billeder fra roveren Perseverance, der ser ud til at have gennemført en fejlfri landing.

2d

The Scientist RSS

88

Organoids Repair Bile Ducts

Researchers determined that when introduced into damaged mouse or donated human livers, these lab-grown tissues could integrate into bile ducts and function normally.

2d

Ingeniøren

88

Forskning blandt 18.000 par: Luftforurening øger risiko for infertilitet med op mod 20 procent

Forskere fra Peking University i Beijing har undersøgt konsekvensen af daglig udsættelse for et moderat højere niveau af luftforurening med fine partikler, PM2,5.

2d

Phys.org

88

Mystery of four-horned goats and sheep finally solved

Some members of the Bovidae family have additional horns. In fact, a few local breeds of sheep, which have been selected by many generations of breeders, are known for their multiple horns. Some goats may spontaneously develop an extra pair of horns as well, particularly in the Alps. Evidence of the existence of these animals, known as polycerate, goes back several centuries, for example, the tran

3d

Futurism

88

A Virtual Phone Number Lets You Connect With Anyone While Keeping Your Real Number Private

Today, when it comes to technology, privacy is harder and harder to come by. This is increasingly true for our phone numbers, which are constant targets for spammers, scammers, and other undesirable elements. That said, you won't get very far in the modern world without giving out your phone number. Luckily, a virtual phone number can help keep you in touch with the outside world while at the sam

5d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

88

'Gamechanger' drug for treating obesity cuts body weight by 20%

One third (35%) of people who took a new drug for treating obesity lost more than one-fifth of their total body weight, according to a major global study involving UCL researchers.

10d

Sciencemag

88

How You Make an Adenovirus Vaccine

The other day I had a look at the process used to make the mRNA vaccines, so I thought it would be a good idea to do the same for the adenovirus vector ones, such as J&J, Oxford/AstraZeneca, CanSino, Gamaleya et al . It's a different system, with its own advantages and disadvantages, and that's the broad story of scale-up manufacturing all the way: tradeoffs at every turn. It's always tough to br

12d

ScienceDaily

88

Ditching the car for walking or biking just one day a week cuts carbon footprint

Swapping the car for walking, cycling and e-biking even just one day a week makes a significant impact on personal carbon emissions in cities.

12d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

87

Activation of NF-{kappa}B and p300/CBP potentiates cancer chemoimmunotherapy through induction of MHC-I antigen presentation [Immunology and Inflammation]

Many cancers evade immune rejection by suppressing major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) antigen processing and presentation (AgPP). Such cancers do not respond to immune checkpoint inhibitor therapies (ICIT) such as PD-1/PD-L1 [PD-(L)1] blockade. Certain chemotherapeutic drugs augment tumor control by PD-(L)1 inhibitors through potentiation of T-cell priming but whether and…

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

87

COVID has reached Antarctica. Scientists are extremely concerned for its wildlife

In December, Antarctica lost its status as the last continent free of COVID-19 when 36 people at the Chilean Bernardo O'Higgins research station tested positive. The station's isolation from other bases and fewer researchers in the continent means the outbreak is now likely contained.

9d

ScienceDaily

87

Poorer mental health smolders after deadly, devastating wildfire

Researchers report that climate change is a chronic mental health stressor, and promotes a variety of mental health problems. The 2018 Camp Fire is a case study.

11d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

87

Wearable devices can detect COVID-19 symptoms and predict diagnosis, study finds

Wearable devices can identify COVID-19 cases earlier than traditional diagnostic methods and can help track and improve management of the disease, according to a new study.

11d

ScienceDaily

86

The body produces new satiety factor during prolonged exercise

Researchers confirm that the hormone GDF15 is released in response to vigorous exercise, but likely not in sufficient quantity to affect behavior or appetite. These findings add nuance to a hormone that is currently under scrutiny for its potential as an anti-obesity medication.

4d

Popular Science | RSS

86

Best weighted blanket: Sleep like a baby with our comfy bedding picks

Stay calm and collected under a weighted blanket. (Gregory Pappas via Unsplash/) Over the past few years, weighted blankets have become increasingly popular for supporting healthy sleep habits . Although weighted blankets are still relatively new to consumers, they have been used for years by occupational therapists to treat sensory issues in people with autism, ADHD, and generalized anxiety diso

8d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

86

Sophisticated lung-on-chip created

Researchers have developed a second-generation lung-on-chip model with life-size dimension alveoli in a stretchable membrane, made of purely biological material. The new model reproduces key aspects of the lung tissue architecture not found in previous lungs-on-chip. This opens up new possibilities for basic pneumological research, understanding lung pathologies, drug screening and precision medic

12d

Science

85

Sweden eyes tighter Covid measures as third wave looms

Government proposal would close shopping centres, gyms and restaurants for the first time

3d

ScienceDaily

85

Earliest signs of an immune response found in developing embryos

Researchers reveal that newly formed embryos clear dying cells to maximize their chances of survival. It is the earliest display of an innate immune response found in vertebrate animals to date. The findings may aid future efforts to understand why some embryos fail to form in the earliest stages of development, and lead to new clinical efforts in treating infertility or early miscarriages.

9d

ScienceDaily

85

Emerging robotics technology may lead to better buildings in less time

Emerging robotics technology may soon help construction companies and contractors create buildings in less time at higher quality and at lower costs. Innovators developed and are testing a novel construction robotic system that uses an innovative mechanical design with advances in computer vision sensing technology to work in a construction setting.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

85

Researchers advance simple and inexpensive diagnostic blood test

In diagnostic medicine, biopsies, where a sample of tissue is extracted for analysis, is a common tool for the detection of many conditions. But this approach has several drawbacks—it can be painful, doesn't always extract the diseased tissue, and can only be used in a sufficiently advanced disease stage, making it, in some cases, too late for intervention. These concerns have encouraged researche

12d

Science

84

US will not send vaccines to developing countries until supply improves

Biden administration says priority is 'vaccinating Americans' in rejection of French proposal

2d

Phys.org

84

'7 minutes of terror': Perserverance rover's nail-biting landing phase

Seven months after blast-off, NASA's Mars 2020 mission will have to negotiate its shortest and most intense phase on Thursday: the "seven minutes of terror" it takes to slam the brakes and land the Perseverance rover on a narrow target on the planet's surface.

2d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

84

Ny studie: Så talar du trovärdigt

Hur vi använder rösten avgör om den som lyssnar tror på det vi säger eller inte. Det konstaterar forskare i en ny studie om hur olika melodier i språket uppfattas.

3d

ScienceDaily

84

Enormous ancient fish discovered by accident

Fossilised remains of a fish that grew as big as a great white shark and the largest of its type ever found have been discovered by accident.

4d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

84

New surgery may enable better control of prosthetic limbs

Researchers and surgeons have devised a new type of amputation surgery that can help amputees better control their residual muscles and receive sensory feedback. This restored sense of proprioception should translate to better control of prosthetic limbs, as well as reduction of limb pain, the researchers say.

5d

NPR

84

Tracking New Coronavirus Variants In The U.S.

Scientists have identified new coronavirus variants popping up around the U.S. Ailsa Chang speaks with Vaughn Cooper about how well the U.S. is equipped to track the emergence of these new strains.

5d

ScienceDaily

84

Star-shaped brain cells may be linked to stuttering

Astrocytes — star-shaped cells in the brain that are actively involved in brain function — may play an important role in stuttering, a study led by an expert on stuttering has found. The study also suggests that treatment with the medication risperidone leads to increased activity of the striatum in persons who stutter.

7d

ScienceDaily

84

Identifying risk factors for elevated anxiety in young adults during COVID-19 pandemic

A new study has identified early risk factors that predicted heightened anxiety in young adults during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The findings from the study could help predict who is at greatest risk of developing anxiety during stressful life events in early adulthood and inform prevention and intervention efforts.

7d

Phys.org

84

New mosquito species found in South Florida. It's an aggressive biter, of course.

South Florida appears to be home to yet another new invasive species—this one a mosquito that was last officially documented in the Florida Keys 75 years ago.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

84

New mosquito species found in South Florida. It's an aggressive biter, of course.

South Florida appears to be home to yet another new invasive species—this one a mosquito that was last officially documented in the Florida Keys 75 years ago.

10d

The Atlantic

84

An Emotional Framework for Understanding the End of the Pandemic

GETTY / ARSH RAZIUDDIN / THE ATLANTIC My earliest memories are connected by a sense of fear without the threat of harm. I remember being frightened by news stories, dark basements, and even a painting by a family friend. I was an imaginative kid, and these memories are ones of invented dread: A tabloid photo of a burning building once shook me up for a week, though I had never even seen a fire. I

10d

ScienceDaily

84

Robots sense human touch using camera and shadows

Researchers have created a low-cost method for soft, deformable robots to detect a range of physical interactions, from pats to punches to hugs, without relying on touch at all. Instead, a USB camera located inside the robot captures the shadow movements of hand gestures on the robot's skin and classifies them with machine-learning software.

12d

Phys.org

84

Researchers advance simple and inexpensive diagnostic blood test

In diagnostic medicine, biopsies, where a sample of tissue is extracted for analysis, is a common tool for the detection of many conditions. But this approach has several drawbacks—it can be painful, doesn't always extract the diseased tissue, and can only be used in a sufficiently advanced disease stage, making it, in some cases, too late for intervention. These concerns have encouraged researche

12d

Phys.org

83

Shale gas development in Pennsylvania increases exposure of some to air pollutants

Air pollution levels may have exceeded air quality standards during the development of some Marcellus Shale natural gas wells in Pennsylvania, potentially impacting more than 36,000 people in one year alone during the drilling boom, according to Penn State scientists.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

83

Unusual breeding behavior reported in treefrogs for the first time

Paranapiacaba Treefrogs (Bokermannohyla astartea) mate and lay spawn in small pools of water inside the tanks of bromeliad plants, Leo Ramos Malagoli from the Universidade Estadual Paulista in Brazil and colleagues report in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The 3cm-long tadpoles must then make their way to a stream to complete development. The study, publishing February 17, is the first to report

3d

ScienceDaily

83

Crocodile evolution rebooted by Ice Age glaciations

Crocodiles are resilient animals from a lineage that has survived for over 200 million years. Skilled swimmers, crocodiles can travel long distances and live in freshwater to marine environments. But they can't roam far overland. American crocodiles (Crocodylus acutus) are found in the Caribbean and Pacific coasts of the Neotropics but they arrived in the Pacific before Panama existed, according t

3d

Phys.org

83

Melting dusty ice may have carved Martian gullies

By analyzing the occurrences of exposed dusty ice on Mars using data from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, ASU planetary scientists Aditya Khuller and Philip Christensen have found the lowest latitude detection of dusty water ice on Mars.

5d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

83

New improved dog reference genome will aid a new generation of investigation

Researchers at Uppsala University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have used new methods for DNA sequencing and annotation to build a new, and more complete, dog reference genome. This tool will serve as the foundation for a new era of research, helping scientists to better understand the link between DNA and disease, in dogs and in their human friends. The research is presented

10d

ScienceDaily

83

Study of supergiant star Betelgeuse unveils the cause of its pulsations

Betelgeuse is normally one of the brightest, most recognizable stars of the winter sky, marking the left shoulder of the constellation Orion. But lately, it has been behaving strangely: an unprecedentedly large drop in its brightness has been observed in early 2020, which has prompted speculation that Betelgeuse may be about to explode.

12d

Phys.org

83

Cells are collective thinkers

Cells, like humans, cast votes to make decisions as a group. But how do they know what to vote for? Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and King's College London have uncovered how cells actively seek information in order to make faster and better collective decisions to coordinate the growth of new blood vessels. This provides a new basis for understanding intelligence in cells.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

83

Cells are collective thinkers

Cells, like humans, cast votes to make decisions as a group. But how do they know what to vote for? Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute and King's College London have uncovered how cells actively seek information in order to make faster and better collective decisions to coordinate the growth of new blood vessels. This provides a new basis for understanding intelligence in cells.

12d

Wired

82

The 18 Best Weekend Deals on Masks, Headphones, and MacBooks

If you're looking to stay warm or just need a bit of self-care, check out these discounts.

12h

Phys.org

82

Europe is recruiting astronauts: Here's what it takes to become one

For the first time in 11 years, the European Space Agency (Esa) is recruiting new astronauts. Applications will open on the 31 March 2021 for eight weeks, followed by a six-stage selection process to identify the next generation of European astronauts.

3d

Singularity Hub

82

Massive National Health Study Looks to Tailor Your Diet to Your Genetic Makeup

Like taxes and death, nutrition is something we can't escape. Eating should be easy. Yet it's also massively confusing, prone to misinformation, and utterly personal. Take competitive eaters who regularly chow down on thousands of calories without gaining weight. Compare them to people who pack on pounds just looking at a French fry. Or compare people who can tolerate any food to those who are se

4d

Phys.org

82

Capturing free-space optical light for high-speed Wi-Fi

Visible and infrared light can carry more data than radio waves, but has always been confined to a hard-wired, fiber-optic cable. Working with Facebook's Connectivity Lab, a Duke research team has now made a major advance toward the dream of ditching the fiber in fiber optics.

9d

Popular Science | RSS

82

Air pollution in US subway stations is disturbingly high

Globally, about 168 million people rode metro systems per day in 2017. (Pixabay/) Air pollution in subway systems across the Northeastern United States is unsettlingly high, scientists reported on February 10 in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. The researchers sampled the air at subway stations across the New York, Boston, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. metropolitan areas and fo

9d

Phys.org

82

New improved dog reference genome will aid a new generation of investigation

Researchers at Uppsala University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have used new methods for DNA sequencing and annotation to build a new, and more complete, dog reference genome. This tool will serve as the foundation for a new era of research, helping scientists to better understand the link between DNA and disease, in dogs and in their human friends. The research is presented

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

82

Combination therapy with radiation shows promise in treating glioblastoma

In a study of mice, researchers at the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have identified a new approach that combines an anti-psychotic drug, a statin used to lower high cholesterol levels, and radiation to improve the overall survival in mice with glioblastoma

11d

Phys.org

82

Embry-Riddle alumna helps unravel key mysteries of rare stars

Within the constellation Cygnus, an elderly star and its massive companion are having one last hurrah, flinging off mass at an incredible rate before they explode as supernovae and collapse into a black hole.

11d

Science | The Guardian

81

How to reconcile after a family rift

Estrangement is surprisingly common – so how can the injured parties put their differences aside? Harry and Meghan have apparently severed links with the royal family and moved halfway across the globe. Nicole Kidman has been allegedly snubbed by her two eldest Scientologist children. Angelina Jolie has a difficult relationship with her father Jon Voight – it probably doesn't help that he's Donal

7h

ScienceDaily

81

The original antigenic sin: How childhood infections could shape pandemics

A child's first influenza infection shapes their immunity to future airborne flu viruses – including emerging pandemic strains. But not all flu strains spur the same initial immune defense, according to new findings published today. The results are relevant to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the senior author, who says they may explain age-based distributions of SARS-CoV-2 disease severity and

1d

Phys.org

81

Juno just saw a spacerock crash into Jupiter

Timing is extraordinarily important in many aspects of astronomy. If an astronomer or their instrument is looking the wrong way at the wrong time, they could miss something spectacular. Alternatively, there are moments when our instruments capture something unexpected in regions of space that we were searching for something else. That is exactly what happened recently when a team of scientists, le

2d

ScienceDaily

81

NASA's TESS discovers new worlds in a river of young stars

Astronomers have discovered a trio of hot worlds larger than Earth orbiting a much younger version of our Sun called TOI 451. The system resides in the recently discovered Pisces-Eridanus stream, a collection of stars less than 3% the age of our solar system that stretches across one-third of the sky.

7d

NPR

81

What A Brain Organoid Grown With Neanderthal DNA Tells Us About Modern Humans

A brain organoid grown with Neanderthal DNA reveals how evolution shaped the brains of modern humans and adds to evidence that brain differences helped us survive while our human cousins went extinct.

9d

ScienceDaily

81

Drug is promising against pancreatic and breast cancers

The drug is effective at treating pancreatic cancer and prolonging survival in mice, according to a new study. A second study shows the drug is also effective against triple-negative breast cancer, a fast-growing and hard-to-treat type of breast cancer that carries a poor prognosis. Clinical trials are set to begin in 2021.

10d

60-Second Science

81

Bromances Could Lead to More Romances for Male Hyenas

Spotted hyena males do not fight for mates, so how are certain males shut out of the mating game?

10d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

81

Potential health and economic impacts of dexamethasone treatment for patients with COVID-19

Nature Communications, Published online: 10 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21134-2 Dexamethasone has been shown to have survival benefits for critically ill patients hospitalised with COVID-19 in the UK. Here, the authors estimated the number of lives that could be saved through a UK and global roll out of the drug and demonstrate that it is a cost-effective option.

10d

ScienceDaily

81

Rare blast's remains discovered in Milky Way's center

Astronomers may have found our Galaxy's first example of an unusual kind of stellar explosion. This discovery adds to the understanding of how some stars shatter and seed the universe with elements critical for life on Earth.

12d

Phys.org

81

Image: Hubble sees a stellar furnace

An orange glow radiates from the center of NGC 1792, the heart of this stellar furnace. Captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, this intimate view of NGC 1792 gives us some insight into this galactic powerhouse. The vast swathes of tell-tale blue seen throughout the galaxy indicate areas that are full of young, hot stars, and it is in the shades of orange, seen nearer the center, that the

12d

Scientific American Content

80

Physicists Need to Be More Careful with How They Name Things

The popular term "quantum supremacy," which refers to quantum computers outperforming classical ones, has inescapable racist overtones — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7h

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

80

Ny forskning: Det går att kommunicera med en person som drömmer

Svara på frågor och lösa mattetal samtidigt som man drömmer är möjligt, enligt en ny studie.

19h

ScienceDaily

80

Never-before-seen antibody binding, informing liver cancer, antibody design

In structural biology, some molecules are so unusual they can only be captured with a unique set of tools. That's precisely how a team defined how antibodies can recognize a compound called phosphohistidine — a highly unstable molecule that has been found to play a central role in some forms of cancer.

2d

Phys.org

80

Earth just had its 7th-warmest January on record

True to trend, Mother Earth kicked off 2021 with a balmy January that ranked 7th-warmest in the temperature record, according to scientists with NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information.

5d

Phys.org

80

Perseverance will make sure it has a safe landing

To casual observers, landing a rover on Mars can seem kind of like old news, believe it or not, especially after all of NASA's successes. But many are likely not aware of the so-called "Mars Curse." The fact is, many of the spacecraft that attempt to land there fail and crash.

8d

Scientific American Content

80

Why It's So Hard to Make Antiviral Drugs for COVID and Other Diseases

Antibiotics abound, but virus-fighting drugs are harder to come by. Fortunately, scientists are getting better at making and finding them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

Phys.org

80

A brief history: What we know so far about fast radio bursts across the universe

Fast radio bursts are one of the great mysteries of the universe. Since their discovery, we have learned a great deal about these intense millisecond-duration pulses.

9d

ScienceDaily

80

Computational medicine: Moving from uncertainty to precision

An innovative partnership takes aim at medicine down to the individual level by applying state-of-the-art computation to medical care.

10d

ScienceDaily

80

People with dementia at higher risk for COVID-19, study finds

Researchers found that patients with dementia were at a significantly increased risk for COVID-19 — and the risk was higher still for African Americans with dementia.

11d

Scientific American News

80

Humans Are Pretty Lousy Lie Detectors

Whenever we hear someone speak, we form an opinion about their believability. But our eyes and ears can lead us astray — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

11d

ScienceDaily

80

Distinctness of mental disorders traced to differences in gene readouts

A new study suggests that differences in the expression of gene transcripts – readouts copied from DNA that help maintain and build our cells – may hold the key to understanding how mental disorders with shared genetic risk factors result in different patterns of onset, symptoms, course of illness, and treatment responses.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

80

Climate change: Erratic weather slows down the economy

If temperature varies strongly from day to day, the economy grows less. Through these seemingly small variations climate change may have strong effects on economic growth. This shows data analyzed by researchers from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), Columbia University and the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC). In a new study in Nature C

12d

Phys.org

80

'Multiplying' light could be key to ultra-powerful optical computers

An important class of challenging computational problems, with applications in graph theory, neural networks, artificial intelligence and error-correcting codes can be solved by multiplying light signals, according to researchers from the University of Cambridge and Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology in Russia.

12d

Popular Science | RSS

79

Ramping up COVID-19 vaccine production is harder than it seems

mRNA vaccines are technically easier to mass produce, but its never been done on this massive scale before. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. After a rocky start, the COVID-19 vaccine rollout has been improving over the past several weeks. More than 14 million Americans are now fully vaccinated against COVID-19, with the number rising each day. How quickly vaccine ma

1d

ScienceDaily

79

Genetics may play role in determining immunity to COVID-19

Researchers report that individual immune response to SARS-CoV-2 may be limited by a set of variable genes that code for cell surface proteins essential for the adaptive immune system. The finding may help explain why COVID-19 immunity varies by individual.

1d

Phys.org

79

Fish diet heats up marine biodiversity hotspot

Scientists have discovered a never-before-seen biodiversity pattern of coral reef fishes that suggests some fishes might be exceptionally vulnerable to environmental change.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

79

Fish diet heats up marine biodiversity hotspot

Scientists have discovered a never-before-seen biodiversity pattern of coral reef fishes that suggests some fishes might be exceptionally vulnerable to environmental change.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

79

Mystery of four-horned goats and sheep finally solved

Some members of the Bovidae family have additional horns. In fact, a few local breeds of sheep, which have been selected by many generations of breeders, are known for their multiple horns. Some goats may spontaneously develop an extra pair of horns as well, particularly in the Alps. Evidence of the existence of these animals, known as polycerate, goes back several centuries, for example, the tran

3d

ScienceDaily

79

FRESH 3D-printing platform paves way for tissues, organs

Research into 3D bioprinting has grown rapidly in recent years as scientists seek to re-create the structure and function of complex biological systems from human tissues to entire organs. Researchers now provide perspective on the Freefrom Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels 3D bioprinting approach, which solves the issue of gravity and distortion by printing within a yield-stress support

4d

ScienceDaily

79

Study sheds light on how people cope with health challenges and medical debt

A recent qualitative study sheds light on how people cope with health and financial challenges, highlighting the important role that communication plays in these coping strategies.

4d

Phys.org

79

Climate change likely drove the extinction of North America's largest animals

A new study published in Nature Communications suggests that the extinction of North America's largest mammals was not driven by overhunting by rapidly expanding human populations following their entrance into the Americas. Instead, the findings, based on a new statistical modelling approach, suggest that populations of large mammals fluctuated in response to climate change, with drastic decreases

4d

Phys.org

79

Blind shrimps, translucent snails: the 11 mysterious new species we found in potential fracking sites

There aren't many parts of the world where you can discover a completely new assemblage of living creatures. But after sampling underground water in a remote, arid region of northern Australia, we discovered at least 11, and probably more, new species of stygofauna.

4d

Scientific American News

79

How to Stop Doomscrolling News and Social Media

"Doomscroll Reminder Lady" Karen K. Ho explains how to step away from the screen — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8d

ScienceDaily

79

Study finds even the common house sparrow is declining

A new study aims to clarify the status of the non-native European House Sparrow, using 21 years of citizen science data.

9d

Phys.org

79

Vibrating 2-D materials

Current electronic components in computers, mobile phones and many other devices are based on microstructured silicon carriers. However, this technology has almost reached its physical limits and the smallest possible structure sizes.

9d

Science | The Guardian

79

Covid-19: love in lockdown – podcast

Valentine's Day is fast approaching, and for many couples this year will feel very different. Lockdowns, social distancing, and self-isolation have forced those in relationships to choose whether to be together all the time, or stay apart for potentially months on end. Linda Geddes speaks to Dr Deborah Bailey-Rodriguez about how couples have navigated their relationships during the pandemic Conti

9d

Livescience.com

78

Still no evidence of COVID-19 transmission from food, FDA says

The FDA statement pours cold water on a theory that the novel coronavirus emerged outside China and was brought in on imported frozen food.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

78

Spotted lanternfly: Research accelerates in effort to contain invasive pest

When the spotted lanternfly arrived in the US, it was immediately recognized for the threat it posed to native plants and crops, and a community of researchers and experts in science, agriculture, and government sprang into action. A new collection showcases the growing body of research helping us understand the spotted lanternfly's biology and how to contain it. The collection features 25 article

2d

Phys.org

78

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex

Cells of organisms are organized in subcellular compartments that consist of many individual molecules. How these single proteins are organized on the molecular level remains unclear, because suitable analytical methods are still missing. Researchers at the University of Münster together with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Munich, Germany) have established a new techniqu

4d

MIT Technology Review

78

Bill Gates and the problem with climate solutionism

In his new book, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster , Bill Gates takes a technology-­centered approach to understanding the climate crisis. Gates begins with the 51 billion tons of greenhouse gases that people create every year. He slices this pollution into sectors by the size of their footprints—working his way from electricity, manufacturing, and agriculture to transportation and buildings. Throu

4d

Phys.org

78

Wood-eating cockroach couples take turns eating each other's wings after mating

A pair of researchers at Kyushu University in Japan, has found that at least one kind of wood-eating cockroach engages in mutual wing eating after mating. In their paper published in the journal Ethology, Haruka Osaki and Eiiti Kasuya describe how they happened to notice chewed-off wings in a species of cockroach and what they found when they brought some into their lab to study.

5d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

78

Wood-eating cockroach couples take turns eating each other's wings after mating

A pair of researchers at Kyushu University in Japan, has found that at least one kind of wood-eating cockroach engages in mutual wing eating after mating. In their paper published in the journal Ethology, Haruka Osaki and Eiiti Kasuya describe how they happened to notice chewed-off wings in a species of cockroach and what they found when they brought some into their lab to study.

5d

Future(s) Studies

78

'Oil is dead, renewables are the future': why I'm training to become a wind turbine technician

submitted by /u/jobhelperapp [link] [comments]

8d

Science

78

Do we need a Netflix for antibiotics?

FT's Andrew Jack analyses new subscription models to pay for breakthrough medicines

10d

ScienceDaily

78

Fast-growing parts of Africa see a surprise: Less air pollution from seasonal fires

In Africa, air pollution recently surpassed AIDS as the leading cause of premature death. But researchers have discovered at least a temporary bright spot: dangerous nitrogen oxides, byproducts of combustion, are declining across the north equatorial part of the continent. The reason: a decline in the longtime practice of setting of dry-season fires to manage land.

12d

ScienceDaily

78

Uncovering how some corals resist bleaching

Colorful coral reefs have suffered from 'bleaching' due to climate change, but researchers have now uncovered why some were resistant to this effect in the hopes to preserve these oceanic wonders.

12d

Science

77

UK to launch £800m science research agency

'Aria', which was championed by former Boris Johnson aide Dominic Cummings, set to open in 2022

2d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

77

Interview: NASA's Adam Steltzner Talks Perseverance and Why We Shouldn't Colonize Mars

Perseverance rover in JPL Spacecraft Assembly Facility. (NASA/JPL-CALTECH ) NASA's Perseverance rover is set to touch down on Mars this week, and we had the opportunity to talk to one of the people who had a hand in bringing this mission to fruition. Adam Steltzner is the chief engineer of the Mars 2020 project at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), and he designed the rover's ambitious sampl

3d

ScienceDaily

77

Graphene 'nano-origami' creates tiniest microchips yet

Experimental physicists have developed the smallest microchips ever – 100 times smaller than conventional microchips. They believe that this next generation of microchips could lead to computers and phones running thousands of times faster.

4d

Scientific American Content

77

How Hackers Tried to Add Dangerous Lye into a City's Water Supply

A cybersecurity expert explains how safety systems stopped the attack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8d

Phys.org

77

How microplastics in the soil contribute to environmental pollution

Plastic, with its unabated global production, is a major and persistent contributor to environmental pollution. In fact, the accumulation of plastic debris in our environment is only expected to increase in the future. "Microplastics" (MP)—plastic debris

9d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

77

Pooping out miracles: scientists reveal mechanism behind fecal microbiota transplantation

In a study published in Gastroenterology – Researchers at Osaka City University and The Institute for Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, in collaboration with Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, report the intestinal bacterial and viral metagenome information from the fecal samples of patients with recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI). This comprehensive analysis reveals

10d

Phys.org

77

Bond-selective reactions observed during molecular collisions

A team of researchers from Germany and the U.K. has found that bond-selective reactions can be observed during certain molecular collisions. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes experiments they conducted that involved firing a large molecule at a wall of copper and what they discovered by doing so.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

77

Antidepressants pose risk for the survival of fish

Fish populations around the world are at risk due to growing levels of pharmaceutical contamination in waterways, according to an international team of researchers from Monash University, the University of Western Australia (UWA), the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and New York University.

10d

Phys.org

77

Antidepressants pose risk for the survival of fish

Fish populations around the world are at risk due to growing levels of pharmaceutical contamination in waterways, according to an international team of researchers from Monash University, the University of Western Australia (UWA), the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, and New York University.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

76

Comet from edge of solar system killed the dinosaurs: study

Sixty-six million years ago, a huge celestial object struck off the coast of what is now Mexico, triggering a catastrophic "impact winter" that eventually wiped out three-quarters of life on Earth, including the dinosaurs.

4d

Phys.org

76

Microbes could pose health, ecosystem risks when rain brings them to Earth

Human health and ecosystems could be affected by microbes including cyanobacteria and algae that hitch rides in clouds and enter soil, lakes, oceans and other environments when it rains, according to a Rutgers co-authored study.

4d

ScienceDaily

76

Light used to detect quantum information stored in 100,000 nuclear quantum bits

Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behavior, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud.

5d

Phys.org

76

Red Sea coral reefs 'under threat' from Israel-UAE oil deal

Israeli environmentalists are warning that a UAE-Israeli oil pipeline deal threatens unique Red Sea coral reefs and could lead to "the next ecological disaster".

5d

ScienceDaily

76

Spontaneous quantum error correction demonstrated

Physicists take a step toward building a fault-tolerant quantum computer. They have realized a novel type of QEC where the quantum errors are spontaneously corrected.

9d

ScienceDaily

76

Researchers uncover hidden hunting tactics of wolves in Minnesota's Northwoods

Researchers show that wolves have evolved ambush hunting tactics specifically tailored for catching and killing beavers. The study challenges the classic concept that wolves are solely cursorial predators. Instead, wolf-hunting strategies appear highly flexible, and they are able to switch between hunting modes (cursorial and ambush hunting) depending on their prey.

10d

The Atlantic

76

The Atlantic introduces "Inheritance": A project about American history, Black life, and the resilience of memory

Too much knowledge has been lost, too many stories distorted, too many people forgotten. We mourn for all we do not know. Yet the vision and resilience of Black America are shaping this nation. Our future demands that we unbury the past. Beginning today, The Atlantic is launching " Inheritance ," a multiyear journalism and tech project that will endeavor to fill the blank pages of Black history:

11d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

76

Robots sense human touch using camera and shadows

Researchers have created a low-cost method for soft, deformable robots to detect a range of physical interactions, from pats to punches to hugs, without relying on touch at all. Instead, a USB camera located inside the robot captures the shadow movements of hand gestures on the robot's skin and classifies them with machine-learning software.

12d

Discover Magazine

76

How Indigenous Oral Tradition Is Guiding Archaeology and Uncovering Climate History in Alaska

Scientific research and indigenous oral traditions have long been separated. But increased interaction is bringing new insight into the past.

12d

Phys.org

75

Sounding rocket CLASP2 elucidates solar magnetic field

Cooperative operations between a solar observation satellite and a sounding-rocket telescope have measured the magnetic field strength in the photosphere and chromosphere above an active solar plage region. This is the first time that the magnetic field in the chromosphere has been charted all the way up its top. This finding brings us closer to understanding how energy is transferred between laye

1d

ScienceDaily

75

Protein linked to Alzheimer's, strokes cleared from brain blood vessels

Amyloid deposits in the brain increase the risk of dementia and strokes. Researchers have identified an antibody that clears amyloid deposits from the brain without raising the risk of brain bleeds.

2d

The Scientist RSS

75

Dogs are Teaching Machines to Sniff Out Cancer

In a proof-of-concept study, researchers used dogs' diagnoses of prostate cancer to inform a machine learning algorithm with the goal of one day detecting cancers with canine-level accuracy.

2d

Phys.org

75

Heavy snowfall, gales as winter storm hits Middle East

Snow blanketed parts of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan and Israel on Wednesday, covering areas it has not reached in years, disrupting traffic and postponing vaccination campaigns against COVID-19 and even exams at some universities.

3d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

75

FRESH 3D-printing platform paves way for tissues, organs

Research into 3D bioprinting has grown rapidly in recent years as scientists seek to re-create the structure and function of complex biological systems from human tissues to entire organs. Researchers now provide perspective on the Freefrom Reversible Embedding of Suspended Hydrogels 3D bioprinting approach, which solves the issue of gravity and distortion by printing within a yield-stress support

4d

Livescience.com

75

Prior infection with common cold viruses won't protect against COVID-19

For months, scientists have wondered whether past exposure to seasonal coronaviruses that cause common colds might prevent people from getting a severe case COVID-19.

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

75

Researchers uncover biochemical rules between RNA-protein interactions and expressions

A team of Case Western Reserve University researchers has found a way to measure key characteristics of proteins that bind to RNA in cells—a discovery that could improve our understanding of how gene function is disturbed in cancer, neurodegenerative disorders or infections.

10d

Phys.org

75

Researchers uncover biochemical rules between RNA-protein interactions and expressions

A team of Case Western Reserve University researchers has found a way to measure key characteristics of proteins that bind to RNA in cells—a discovery that could improve our understanding of how gene function is disturbed in cancer, neurodegenerative disorders or infections.

10d

ScienceDaily

75

AI can predict early death risk

Researchers have found that a computer algorithm developed using echocardiogram videos of the heart can predict mortality within a year. The algorithm — an example of what is known as machine learning, or artificial intelligence (AI) — outperformed other clinically used predictors, including pooled cohort equations and the Seattle Heart Failure score.

10d

Phys.org

75

Heated debate on lizard sex

Sex is a complicated affair for Australia's Jacky Dragon lizard.

11d

Phys.org

75

X-ray emission from dark matter

About eighty-five percent of the matter in the cosmos emits neither light nor any other known kind of radiation as far as is known, and hence is called dark matter. One of its other notable qualities is that it only interacts with other matter via gravity; it carries no electromagnetic charge, for example. Dark matter is also called "dark" because it is mysterious. It is not composed of atoms or t

12d

Phys.org

74

Researchers have proved that that ozone is effective in disinfecting coronavirus

Studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 remains active on aerosols and surfaces for between several hours and several days, depending on the nature of the surface and environmental conditions. Presently, researchers from Tel Aviv University have demonstrated that ozone, which has already long been used as an antibacterial and antiviral agent in water treatment, effectively sanitizes surfaces against Co

3d

ScienceDaily

74

Answer quickly to be believed

When people pause before replying to a question, even for just a few seconds, their answers are perceived to be less sincere and credible than if they had replied immediately, according to new research.

4d

Viden

74

Marie er popmusiker og lydforsker: Sådan erstatter hun suset fra koncerterne

Nephew-musikeren anbefaler blandt andet at lægge vejen forbi en kirke.

9d

Phys.org

74

UAE's 'Hope' probe enters Mars orbit in first for Arab world

The United Arab Emirates' "Hope" probe on Monday successfully entered Mars' orbit, making history as the Arab world's first interplanetary mission.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

73

Unique feeding behavior of Asian kukri snakes gutting frogs and toads

After describing a unique behavior in the Small-banded Kukri Snake (Oligodon fasciolatus) last September, two new studies, also led by Henrik Bringsøe, are now reporting the same gruesome feeding strategy in another two species: the Taiwanese Kukri Snake (Oligodon formosanus) and the Ocellated Kukri Snake (Oligodon ocellatus). In their research across Asia, the scientists also observed and contemp

2d

ScienceDaily

73

3D microscopy clarifies understanding of body's immune response to obesity

Researchers who focus on fat know that some adipose tissue is more prone to inflammation-related comorbidities than others, but the reasons why are not well understood. Thanks to a new analytical technique, scientists are getting a clearer view of the microenvironments found within adipose tissue associated with obesity. This advance may illuminate why some adipose tissues are more prone to inflam

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

73

Climate change likely drove the extinction of North America's largest animals

A new study published in Nature Communications suggests that the extinction of North America's largest mammals was not driven by overhunting by rapidly expanding human populations following their entrance into the Americas. Instead, the findings, based on a new statistical modelling approach, suggest that populations of large mammals fluctuated in response to climate change, with drastic decreases

4d

ScienceDaily

73

Scientist proposes a new timeline for Mars terrains

A scientist has updated Mars chronology models to find that terrains shaped by ancient water activity on the planet's surface may be hundreds of millions of years older than previously thought. This new chronology for Mars, based on the latest dynamical models for the formation and evolution of the solar system, is particularly significant as the days count down until NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance

9d

Phys.org

73

Which conspiracy theory do you believe in?

Joe Biden is the new president of the United States, although half of the country's Republicans believe he stole the election. A lot of people believe conspiracy theories on the other side of the Atlantic. But they aren't only found there.

9d

Discover Magazine

73

The Singularity Might Redefine What It Means to Be Human and Machine

Someday soon, computers could attain superintelligence and revolt. But futurist Nick Bostrom sees a future that's far less grim.

12d

ScienceDaily

73

Researchers find peptide that treats, prevents killer citrus disease

New research affirms a unique peptide found in an Australian plant can destroy the No. 1 killer of citrus trees worldwide and help prevent infection.

12d

Phys.org

73

Newly developed material could lead to lighter, safer car designs

A new form of 3-D-printed material made by combining commonly-used plastics with carbon nanotubes is tougher and lighter than similar forms of aluminium, scientists say.

12d

BBC News – Science & Environment

73

MPs criticise government home insulation programme

The Green Homes Grant system is overwhelmed by calls, the Environmental Audit Committee says.

12d

Phys.org

72

New method converts methane in natural gas to methanol at room temperature

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered a way to convert the methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature.

1d

Phys.org

72

Unique feeding behavior of Asian kukri snakes gutting frogs and toads

After describing a unique behavior in the Small-banded Kukri Snake (Oligodon fasciolatus) last September, two new studies, also led by Henrik Bringsøe, are now reporting the same gruesome feeding strategy in another two species: the Taiwanese Kukri Snake (Oligodon formosanus) and the Ocellated Kukri Snake (Oligodon ocellatus). In their research across Asia, the scientists also observed and contemp

2d

ScienceDaily

72

New highly radioactive particles found in Fukushima

The 10 year anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident occurs in March. Recent work documents new, large (> 300 micrometers), highly radioactive particles that were released from one of the damaged Fukushima reactors.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

72

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex

Cells of organisms are organized in subcellular compartments that consist of many individual molecules. How these single proteins are organized on the molecular level remains unclear, because suitable analytical methods are still missing. Researchers at the University of Münster together with colleagues from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (Munich, Germany) have established a new techniqu

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

72

Blind shrimps, translucent snails: the 11 mysterious new species we found in potential fracking sites

There aren't many parts of the world where you can discover a completely new assemblage of living creatures. But after sampling underground water in a remote, arid region of northern Australia, we discovered at least 11, and probably more, new species of stygofauna.

4d

ScienceDaily

72

Aspirin preferred to prevent blood clots in kids after heart surgery, study suggests

Aspirin should be favoured over warfarin to prevent blood clotting in children who undergo a surgery that replumbs their hearts, according to a new study.

5d

Phys.org

72

Increasing forest diversity insufficient in the face of extreme drought events

Trees of different species tend to compete less with each other in the use of forest resources. That is why forest diversity may exert a beneficial effect on their productivity stability when facing climate changes. But does this solution always work? A research group led by the Complutense University of Madrid in which the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has participated confirms this be

8d

Phys.org

72

Here's the best place for explorers to harvest ice on Mars

Water ice, especially any located in the sub-surface, has long been a focal point of Mars exploration efforts. Reasons abound as to why—from the need to grow plants to the need to create more rocket fuel to blast off the planet for a round trip. Most of that effort has focused on the poles of the planet, where most of the water ice has been found.

9d

ScienceDaily

72

Type 2 diabetes: Drugs initially increase glucose production

Although SGLT-2 inhibitors are central to the treatment of diabetes, their exact mode of action was hitherto unknown. A study shows that there is a direct correlation between the elimination of glucose via the kidneys and new glucose production in the liver.

12d

Phys.org

72

Demonstrating driven space-time crystals at room temperature

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in Germany and Poland has demonstrated driven space-time crystals at room temperature. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes applying theories surrounding space-time crystals to magnons and how doing so allowed them to exploit electron spin in a way that could prove useful in information techn

12d

The Atlantic

71

The Moment Britain's Army Knew It Was Lost

This is a story about the nadir, the end of days. Monday, March 24, 2008, marked five years to the month after the British army arrived in Iraq, preaching to the Americans their apparent expertise in counterinsurgency operations and understanding of the manifold ways of, in the historical British upper-class vernacular, "the Arab." This is the story of how that complacency—the claimed legacy of i

12h

ScienceDaily

71

Identifying 'ugly ducklings' to catch skin cancer earlier

A deep learning-based system enables dermatologist-level identification of suspicious skin lesions from smartphone photos, allowing better screening.

2d

ScienceDaily

71

Climate change and fire suppression

The unprecedented and deadly blazes that engulfed the American West in 2020 attest to the increasing number, size and severity of wildfires in the region. And while scientists predict the climate crisis will exacerbate this situation, there's still much discussion around its contributing factors.

3d

Science | The Guardian

71

'This was a life-saver': ex-smoker learned she had lung cancer after joining study

Case study: Judy Miller, 74, applied to take part in research into detection of lung cancer CT scan catches 70% of lung cancers at early stage, NHS study finds When Judy Miller got a letter in the post calling for former smokers to take part in a study, she never expected what came next. Taking part in the research, which examined whether lung cancer could be detected years before it would otherw

6d

Phys.org

71

Scientists create liquid crystals that look a lot like their solid counterparts

A team at the University of Colorado Boulder has designed new kinds of liquid crystals that mirror the complex structures of some solid crystals—a major step forward in building flowing materials that can match the colorful diversity of forms seen in minerals and gems, from lazulite to topaz.

10d

Phys.org

70

Seeing stable topology using instabilities

We are most familiar with the four conventional phases of matter: solid, liquid, gas, and plasma. Changes between two phases, known as phase transitions, are marked by abrupt changes in material properties such as density. In recent decades a wide body of physics research has been devoted to discovering new unconventional phases of matter, which typically emerge at ultra-low temperatures or in spe

1d

Phys.org

70

LHC/ATLAS: A unique observation of particle pair creation in photon-photon collisions

Creation of matter in an interaction of two photons belongs to a class of very rare phenomena. From the data of the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, collected with the new AFP proton detectors at the highest energies available to-date, a more accurate—and more interesting—picture of the phenomena occurring during photon collisions is emerging.

2d

Popular Science | RSS

70

Toys and science gifts for kids of all ages

Start your child off on the right foot… with science! ( stem.T4L via Unsplash/) You know that glazed look in a child's eyes when they've been zonked out on their electronic devices for too long? There is a time and place for a little zoning out, of course, and parents don't complain too much about a few hours of quiet while the kids are placated with zombies or candy gems. But, of course, there

3d

ScienceDaily

70

TV and film 'thump' is not effective alternative to CPR, Warwick researchers demonstrate

A technique frequently portrayed in dramatic resuscitation scenes in television and film is among several alternative methods to CPR that have shown no benefit in saving lives in a new review.

4d

Science

70

Vaccinations mean vacations, at least for some

Hopeful tourists and agencies bank on strict travel rules being relaxed before summer

8d

ScienceDaily

70

Dragonflies perform upside down backflips to right themselves

High speed cameras and CGI technology have revealed the inbuilt righting mechanisms used by dragonflies when they are thrown off balance.

10d

ScienceDaily

70

Advanced simulations reveal how air conditioning spreads COVID-19 aerosols

A restaurant outbreak in China was widely reported as strong evidence of airflow-induced transmission of COVID-19, but it lacked a detailed investigation about exactly how transmission occurred. Researchers report using advanced simulation methods to capture the complex flows that occur when the cold airflow from air conditioners interacts with the hot plume from a dining table and the transport o

11d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

70

Anthropogenic climate change is worsening North American pollen seasons [Sustainability Science]

Airborne pollen has major respiratory health impacts and anthropogenic climate change may increase pollen concentrations and extend pollen seasons. While greenhouse and field studies indicate that pollen concentrations are correlated with temperature, a formal detection and attribution of the role of anthropogenic climate change in continental pollen seasons is urgently…

11d

ScienceDaily

70

Use of goldenseal may compromise glucose control in diabetics on metformin

Diabetic patients taking the natural product goldenseal while taking the prescription drug metformin may be unwittingly sabotaging their efforts to maintain healthy blood glucose levels. Metformin — the world's most-prescribed oral glucose-lowering medication — was included in a cocktail of selected drugs given to participants in a clinical study. The study found that after six days of taking go

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

69

The Lancet: USA failing to reach populations most in need of HIV prevention and treatment services as epidemic grows in the South and rural areas

The USA continues to lag behind other G-7 nations when it comes to controlling its HIV epidemic and is the only high-income country among the top 10 most HIV-affected countries worldwide. The majority of HIV infections are now concentrated in the South and rural areas, where women and minorities are disproportionately affected; a disparity that has also been seen in the COVID-19 pandemic which has

1d

ScienceDaily

69

Skies of blue: Recycling carbon emissions to useful chemicals and reducing global warming

Researchers optimize a novel process for the efficient conversion of carbon emissions into useful chemicals like acetate using microbes

2d

ScienceDaily

69

Researchers uncover altered brain connectivity after prolonged anesthesia

A body of evidence supports the association between prolonged anesthesia and cognitive impairment, but a new study is among the first to address the effect of the procedure on neural connections.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

69

Researchers unveil detailed genome of invasive malaria mosquito

Despite the broad notoriety of sharks, snakes, scorpions and other formidable creatures, mosquitoes remain the deadliest animal on the planet… by far. Mosquito-transmitted malaria remains the number one worldwide killer among vector-borne diseases, claiming more than 400,000 human lives in 2019.

4d

Phys.org

69

Researchers unveil detailed genome of invasive malaria mosquito

Despite the broad notoriety of sharks, snakes, scorpions and other formidable creatures, mosquitoes remain the deadliest animal on the planet… by far. Mosquito-transmitted malaria remains the number one worldwide killer among vector-borne diseases, claiming more than 400,000 human lives in 2019.

4d

Phys.org

69

Producing more sustainable hydrogen with composite polymer dots

Hydrogen for energy use can be extracted in an environmentally friendly way from water and sunlight, using photocatalytic composite polymer nanoparticles developed by researchers at Uppsala University. In laboratory tests, these 'polymer dots' showed promising performance and stability alike. The study has been published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.

8d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

69

Protected areas see continued deforestation but at a reduced rate, research shows

A survey of more than 18,000 land parcels spanning 2 million square miles across 63 countries shows that a "protected area" designation reduces the rate of deforestation but does not prevent it.

9d

Phys.org

69

Protected areas see continued deforestation but at a reduced rate, research shows

A survey of more than 18,000 land parcels spanning 2 million square miles across 63 countries shows that a "protected area" designation reduces the rate of deforestation but does not prevent it.

9d

Viden

69

Myndigheder bombarderer Amazon for at få indblik i, hvad vi siger til Alexa

I 2020 steg antallet af anmodninger om udlevering af private brugerdata med 800 procent.

9d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

68

42,000-year-old trees allow more accurate analysis of last Earth's magnetic field reversal

The last complete reversal of the Earth's magnetic field, the so-called Laschamps event, took place 42,000 years ago. Radiocarbon analyses of the remains of kauri trees from New Zealand now make it possible for the first time to precisely time and analyse this event and its associated effects, as well as to calibrate geological archives such as sediment and ice cores from this period. Simulations

1d

Phys.org

68

Researchers flip the switch to make microsensors super sensitive to biomolecules

A team led by researchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering have found a new way of enhancing the performance of electrochemical micro-sensors. This discovery could lead to the detection of biomolecules, such as dopamine, at lower concentrations than is possible today. Their findings are described in a paper published in the journal Biosensors and Bioelectronics.

2d

ScienceDaily

68

New skin patch brings us closer to wearable, all-in-one health monitor

Engineers have developed a soft, stretchy skin patch that can be worn on the neck to continuously track blood pressure and heart rate while measuring the wearer's levels of glucose as well as lactate, alcohol or caffeine. It is the first wearable device that monitors cardiovascular signals and multiple biochemical levels in the human body at the same time.

5d

Phys.org

68

Two-dimensional superconductivity and anisotropic transport at potassium tantalate interfaces

Unique electronic structures found at materials interfaces can allow unconventional quantum states to emerge. In a new report on Science, Changjiang Liu and a research team at the Argonne National Laboratory, University of Illinois and the Chinese Academy of Sciences detailed the discovery of superconductivity in electron gases formed at the interfaces between potassium tantalate (KTaO3) and insul

5d

Discover Magazine

68

The Man Who Thought AIDS Was All In The Mind

I look at one of the most remarkable articles in the history of psychology

6d

Big Think

68

7 dimensions of depression, explained

According to the World Health Organization, more than 264 million people suffer from depression. It is the leading cause of disability and, at its worst, can lead to suicide. Unfortunately, depression is often misunderstood or ignored until it is too late. Psychologist Daniel Goleman, comedian Pete Holmes, neuroscientist Emeran Mayer, psychiatrist Drew Ramsey, and more outline several of the soci

6d

Future(s) Studies

68

The future of the food supply chain lives on a rooftop in Montreal – No pesticides, herbicides, or fungicides. Composting their green waste. Selling direct-to-consumer the same day the food is harvested. Capturing and reusing rainwater. Reusable packaging. Uses 50% less energy too!

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

6d

New Scientist

68

Sunlight could power micro-aircraft flying above the stratosphere

The mesosphere – the atmospheric layer 50 to 80km above the ground – is out of bounds to normal aircraft, but millimetre-sized devices could fly there powered by sunlight

7d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

68

Increasing forest diversity insufficient in the face of extreme drought events

Trees of different species tend to compete less with each other in the use of forest resources. That is why forest diversity may exert a beneficial effect on their productivity stability when facing climate changes. But does this solution always work? A research group led by the Complutense University of Madrid in which the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has participated confirms this be

8d

Phys.org

68

Rebuilding soil microbiomes in high-tunnel agricultural systems focus of study

The presence of high salt and nitrogen concentrations in high-tunnel soils may make it more challenging to rebuild a healthy soil microbiome following a soil-clearing event, according to microbial ecologists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

9d

Phys.org

68

Plastic ingestion by fish a growing problem

The consumption of plastic by marine animals is an increasingly pervasive problem, with litter turning up in the bellies of wildlife as varied as mammals, birds, turtles and fish. However, according to a research review by ecologists at Stanford University's Hopkins Marine Station and Ph.D. student Alex McInturf at UC Davis, the problem is impacting species unevenly, with some more susceptible to

10d

ScienceDaily

68

Tumor-suppressor protein dynamics determine if tissues survive radiation

Exposure to radiation can wreak indiscriminate havoc on cells, tissues, and organs. Curiously, however, some tissues are more vulnerable to radiation damage than others. A new study now finds that cellular survival after radiation exposure depends on behavior of the tumor-suppressor protein p53 over time. In vulnerable tissues, p53 levels go up and remain high, leading to cell death. In tissues th

11d

Phys.org

68

Researchers produce tiny nanoparticles and reveal their inner structure for the first time

Tiny nanoparticles can be furnished with dyes and could be used for new imaging techniques, as chemists and physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) show in a recent study. The researchers have also been the first to fully determine the particles' internal structure. Their results were published in the renowned journal Angewandte Chemie.

12d

Science | The Guardian

67

'I could physically feel the germs on me': how Covid is a double-edged sword for those with OCD

For some the pandemic has worsened their symptoms, but others say social distancing and hygiene measures have made life easier Luka Buchanan has always been consumed by the fear of contamination and germs, washing their hands until they were raw, and terrified the food they ate would poison them. Diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder at age 19, Buchanan, who uses they/them pronouns, spent

5h

Science

67

Pets grounded by pandemic as flights are cut and costs soar

With flight numbers halved and essential cargo prioritised, pet transport companies are struggling to reunite animals with owners

1d

ScienceDaily

67

First black hole ever detected is more massive than we thought

New observations of the first black hole ever detected have led astronomers to question what they know about the Universe's most mysterious objects. The research shows the system known as Cygnus X-1 contains the most massive stellar-mass black hole ever detected without the use of gravitational waves.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

67

An efficient method for separating O-18 from O-16, essential for use in cancer treatment

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) plays a major role in the early detection of various types of cancer. A research group led by Specially Appointed Professor Katsumi Kaneko of the Research Initiative for Supra-Materials (RISM), Shinshu University have discovered a method to separate oxygen-18 from oxygen-16, an essential isotope for PET diagnosis, at high speed and high efficiency. The results of

2d

Phys.org

67

Using plasma technology to feed the world

Using state-of-the-art plasma technology to make cheap fertilizer for small farmers may sound like magic, but it has now become reality. Researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have built a small plasma-powered plant that produces nitrogen-based liquid fertilizer only using sun, water and air. "The plant is easy to set up, sustainable and very efficient," says TU/e researcher Faus

2d

Phys.org

67

Capturing the contours of live cells with novel nanoimaging technique using graphene

With every passing day, human technology becomes more refined and we become slightly better equipped to look deeper into biological processes and molecular and cellular structures, thereby gaining greater understanding of mechanisms underlying diseases such as cancer, Alzheimer's, and others.

3d

Retraction Watch

67

'Conference organizers have ignored this:' How common is plagiarism and duplication in abstracts?

Harold "Skip" Garner has worn many hats over the course of his career, including plasma physicist, biologist, and administrator. One of his interests is plagiarism and duplication the scientific literature, and he and colleagues developed a tool called eTBLAST that compares text passages to what has already been published to flag potential overlap. A new … Continue reading

4d

ScienceDaily

67

Sawfish face global extinction unless overfishing is curbed

Sawfish have disappeared from half of the world's coastal waters and the distinctive shark-like rays face complete extinction due to overfishing, according to a new study.

9d

Phys.org

67

Neutrinos, atomic clocks and an experiment to detect a time dilation

Griffith University researchers are conducting an experiment at ANSTO that will test a revolutionary physics theory that time reversal symmetry-breaking by neutrinos might cause a time dilation at the quantum scale.

12d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

66

Se ryggsäcken som laddar mobilen när du rör dig

Vad gör du om du får slut på ström mitt ute i vildmarken? Kinesiska forskare har kommit på en lösning.

7d

Ingeniøren

66

Færre til at betale gildet: Økonomi truer gasnettets fremtid

PLUS. Faldende naturgasforbrug presser økonomien i det danske gassystem. Det forstærker behovet for en afklaring af, hvad gasnettet skal bruges til på lidt længere sigt.

8d

Phys.org

66

Scientists significantly improved coal-burning efficiency

A team of Russian scientists from NUST MISIS, Tomsk Polytechnic University (TPU) and Boreskov Institute of Catalysis has suggested a new approach to modifying the combustion behavior of coal. The addition of copper salts reduces the content of unburnt carbon in ash residue by 3.1 times and CO content in the gaseous combustion products by 40%, the scientists found. The research was published in Fue

10d

Phys.org

66

High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian inland waters

Rivers and lakes at high latitudes are considered to be major sources for greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, but these losses are poorly constrained. In a study published in Nature Communications, Umeå University researchers and collaborators quantify carbon emissions from rivers and lakes across Western Siberia, finding that emission are high and exceed carbon export to the Arctic Ocean.

11d

Singularity Hub

65

The First Endangered American Animal Has Been Cloned

Last summer a horse named Kurt was born in Texas. Kurt wasn't just any horse—he was a clone made from DNA that had been frozen for 40 years and came from an endangered wild horse species from Central Asia. Kurt was—and still is—pretty special. But now he's got some competition for the title of "most amazing endangered animal cloned from frozen DNA." The new contender is a black-footed ferret name

1d

ScienceDaily

65

Increasingly fragmented tiger populations may require 'genetic rescue'

A new study reveals the lasting genetic impacts of increased isolation among different tiger subpopulations.

2d

Science

65

Saving the planet is a software challenge too

It is ironic that Bill Gates, foremost among techno-optimists, bets that revolutionary new hardware can do the job

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

65

Irregular sleep schedules connected to bad moods and depression, study shows

Irregular sleep schedules can affect mood and risk of developing symptoms of depression according to a study of first-year medical residents that used Fitbits and smartphones.

2d

Futurism

65

This Simple Home Water Test Tells You Exactly What's in Your Drinking Water

Tap water is supposed to be safe to drink. However, for a number of different reasons, that is not always the case. Maybe you live in an old house with questionable plumbing . Maybe you're worried industrial or agricultural waste may be seeping into the water supply where you live. Maybe a recent natural disaster or power outage has caused a temporary water plant failure . Or maybe your local and

3d

ScienceDaily

65

On the quest for other Earths

An international research team has developed a new method for directly imaging smaller planets in the habitable zone of a neighboring star system. This opens up new possibilities in the search for extraterrestrial life.

3d

Phys.org

65

Comet from edge of solar system killed the dinosaurs: study

Sixty-six million years ago, a huge celestial object struck off the coast of what is now Mexico, triggering a catastrophic "impact winter" that eventually wiped out three-quarters of life on Earth, including the dinosaurs.

4d

ScienceDaily

65

The smallest galaxies in our universe bring more about dark matter to light

Our universe is dominated by a mysterious matter known as dark matter. Its name comes from the fact that dark matter does not absorb, reflect or emit electromagnetic radiation, making it difficult to detect.

4d

ScienceDaily

65

NIH experts discuss SARS-CoV-2 viral variants

The rise of significant variants of SARS-CoV-2 has attracted the attention of health and science experts worldwide. In a new editorial, experts outline how these variants have arisen, concerns about whether vaccines currently authorized for use will continue to protect against new variants, and the need for a global approach to fighting SARS-CoV-2 as it spreads and acquires additional mutations.

8d

Phys.org

65

Biodiversity protects bee communities from disease

Photos

8d

Phys.org

65

Take me to your leader: Space diplomacy 101

Space has long been seen as the domain of scientists and engineers, but space also needs diplomacy.

9d

ScienceDaily

65

Can super-Earth interior dynamics set the table for habitability?

New research provides a framework for understanding the interiors of super-Earths — rocky exoplanets between 1.5 and 2 times the size of our home planet — which is a prerequisite to assess their potential for habitability. Planets of this size are among the most abundant in exoplanetary systems.

10d

Viden

64

Frankrig beskylder russisk cyberhær for stort angreb: 'Det samme kan sagtens ramme Danmark'

Cyberhæren 'sandormen' tilhører den russiske efterretningstjeneste GRU.

13h

Popular Science | RSS

64

Best portable WiFi: Five things to consider when you want internet connection anywhere

Work from anywhere. (Standsome Worklifestyle via Unsplash/) We are living in the age of the "Internet of Things." Nearly every device from your phones to your lamps to your toothbrush has WiFi capabilities, and the interconnected IoT network almost requires you to be always on, all the time. Rather than overloading your cellular data plan or hoping that if you wander around long enough you'll stu

1d

Phys.org

64

COVID-19: Future targets for treatments rapidly identified with new computer simulations

Researchers have detailed a mechanism in the distinctive corona of COVID-19 that could help scientists to rapidly find new treatments for the virus, and quickly test whether existing treatments are likely to work with mutated versions as they develop.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

64

COVID-19: Future targets for treatments rapidly identified with new computer simulations

Researchers have detailed a mechanism in the distinctive corona of COVID-19 that could help scientists to rapidly find new treatments for the virus, and quickly test whether existing treatments are likely to work with mutated versions as they develop.

1d

ScienceDaily

64

Discovery illuminates how thyroid hormone 'dims' metabolism

Basic biology finding on thyroid hormone function could lead to new treatments for obesity, diabetes and related disorders

2d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

64

Planet Nine Hypothesis Takes a Major Hit in New Study

Nobody has found Planet Nine yet, but at least we've almost figured out where to look. Image: NASA It used to be easy to know how many planets there were: nine. It had been nine planets for an entire generation before scientists started rethinking what counts as a planet. Pluto is out, but some astronomers believe there's a real ninth planet lurking out there. Others aren't convinced, and the deb

2d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

64

This robot doesn't need any electronics

Engineers have created a four-legged soft robot that doesn't need any electronics to work. The robot only needs a constant source of pressurized air for all its functions, including its controls and locomotion systems.

2d

Nyheder – Forskning – Videnskab

64

Er vi alene? KU-forskere holder vejret i spænding før Mars-landing

Forskere fra Københavns Universitet bidrager med flere vigtige elementer til missionen, når…

3d

ScienceDaily

64

Muscle factor that controls fat metabolism identified

Researchers have found that skeletal muscle significantly affects how the body stores and metabolizes fat.

4d

Popular Science | RSS

64

Learn to use picture-in-picture on all your devices

If you've ever wanted to consume even more content, well, here's your chance. (Markus Spiske/Unsplash/) Picture-in-picture (PiP) lets you keep an eye on videos while you're doing something else in another app—and it's available on more devices than you might think. From smartphones to laptops, you can carry on watching in one app while you load up a different one. It's a neat trick to have at you

6d

ScienceDaily

64

Scientists manipulate magnets at the atomic scale

Fast and energy-efficient future data processing technologies are on the horizon after an international team of scientists successfully manipulated magnets at the atomic level.

7d

ScienceDaily

64

Smartphone app to change your personality

How quickly can personality traits be modified? An international research team has shown that daily use of a smartphone app can lead to desired personality changes within three months. And three months after the daily interventions, the changes are still noticeable.

8d

ScienceDaily

64

Algorithm that performs as accurately as dermatologists

A study has now been presented that boosts the evidence for using AI solutions in skin cancer diagnostics. With an algorithm they devised themselves, scientists show the capacity of technology to perform at the same level as dermatologists in assessing the severity of skin melanoma.

8d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

64

Cod behave differently in noisy environments

Underwater noise from seismic surveys affects the behavior of Atlantic cod. These are the results of research by Leiden biologists in collaboration with colleagues from Belgium. During such surveys the fish are less active than usual and their circadian rhythm is disrupted; soon after exposure they appear to leave the area more quickly. This could have an effect on the species. The study is publis

8d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

64

Handgun ownership associated with firearm suicide

Among firearm-owning individuals who died by suicide, handgun ownership was associated with greater odds of having died by self-inflicted gunshot wound rather than by another method, according to a Rutgers researcher.

9d

Phys.org

64

Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

64

Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

9d

Phys.org

64

Why overfishing leads to smaller cod

Overfishing, hunting and intensive agriculture and forestry can sometimes contribute to plants and animals becoming endangered. New research from Lund University in Sweden and University of Toronto can now show why this leads to entire populations becoming smaller in size, as well as reproducing earlier. The study is published in the journal PNAS.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

64

Why overfishing leads to smaller cod

Overfishing, hunting and intensive agriculture and forestry can sometimes contribute to plants and animals becoming endangered. New research from Lund University in Sweden and University of Toronto can now show why this leads to entire populations becoming smaller in size, as well as reproducing earlier. The study is published in the journal PNAS.

10d

ScienceDaily

64

Ecological interactions as a driver of evolution

In a recent study, an international team of researchers including TUD botanist Prof. Stefan Wanke has investigated the origin of the mega-diversity of herbivorous insects. These account for a quarter of terrestrial diversity. The results of the study were recently published in the international journal Nature Communications. There the scientists show that the evolutionary success of insects may be

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

64

Heated debate on lizard sex

Sex is a complicated affair for Australia's Jacky Dragon lizard.

11d

ScienceDaily

64

AI researchers ask: What's going on inside the black box?

Brain-like artificial networks are often referred to as a 'black box' because researchers do not know how they learn and make predictions. Researchers reported a way to peek inside the box and identify key features on which the computer relies, particularly when trying to identify complex DNA sequences.

12d

ScienceDaily

64

Machine learning could aid mental health diagnoses

A way of using machine learning to more accurately identify patients with a mix of psychotic and depressive symptoms has been developed.

12d

Phys.org

64

Better understanding the reasons behind Arctic amplified warming

It's clear that rising greenhouse gas emissions are the main driver of global warming. But on a regional level, several other factors are at play. That's especially true in the Arctic—a massive oceanic region around the North Pole which is warming two to three times faster than the rest of the planet. One consequence of the melting of the Arctic ice cap is a reduction in albedo, which is the capac

12d

The Atlantic

63

The Books Briefing: The Works That Changed Our Understanding of America

A government of the people, by the people, and for the people: That was the idea behind the American experiment. But there has always been tension between the idea and the reality. Inspired by great works of American inquiry, The Atlantic and WNYC Studios earlier this month launched a new podcast, The Experiment : stories from an unfinished country. Literary works such as a speech from Eleanor Ho

1d

ScienceDaily

63

Cataracts: New model explains origins of the eye condition

Cataracts are the most common eye ailment in humans. However, the exact processes leading to this condition are not fully understood. A team of researchers has now discovered that the composition of the protein solution plays a decisive role. Their conclusions are contrary to prevailing opinion in the field.

3d

Retraction Watch

63

The one that got away: Researchers retract fish genome paper after species mix-up

A group of researchers in Canada has retracted their 2018 paper on the gene sequence of the Arctic charr — a particularly hearty member of the Salmonidae family that includes salmon and trout — after discovering that the sample they'd used for their analysis was from a different kind of fish. The paper, "The Arctic … Continue reading

5d

Phys.org

63

Cod behave differently in noisy environments

Underwater noise from seismic surveys affects the behavior of Atlantic cod. These are the results of research by Leiden biologists in collaboration with colleagues from Belgium. During such surveys the fish are less active than usual and their circadian rhythm is disrupted; soon after exposure they appear to leave the area more quickly. This could have an effect on the species. The study is publis

8d

Phys.org

63

A plant's nutrient-sensing abilities can modulate its response to environmental stress

Understanding how plants respond to stressful environmental conditions is crucial to developing effective strategies for protecting important agricultural crops from a changing climate. New research led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang, Shouling, Xu, and Yang Bi reveals an important process by which plants switch between amplified and dampened stress responses. Their work is published by Nature Communic

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

63

A plant's nutrient-sensing abilities can modulate its response to environmental stress

Understanding how plants respond to stressful environmental conditions is crucial to developing effective strategies for protecting important agricultural crops from a changing climate. New research led by Carnegie's Zhiyong Wang, Shouling, Xu, and Yang Bi reveals an important process by which plants switch between amplified and dampened stress responses. Their work is published by Nature Communic

9d

ScienceDaily

63

Unusual DNA folding increases the rates of mutations

DNA sequences that can fold into shapes other than the classic double helix tend to have higher mutation rates than other regions in the human genome. New research shows that the elevated mutation rate in these sequences plays a major role in determining regional variation in mutation rates across the genome.

10d

Phys.org

63

Silicon waveguides move us closer to faster, light-based logic circuits

IBM researchers have succeeded in guiding visible light through a silicon wire efficiently, an important milestone in the exploration towards a new breed of faster, more efficient logic circuits.

12d

Phys.org

62

Life as we do not know it: Astrobiology and the Mars 2020 mission

Life as we know it has never been found anywhere in our solar system or universe, other than on Earth. But that does not necessarily mean it is not out there.

3d

Phys.org

62

New Australian fossil lizard

Some of Australia's most famous animals—wombat, platypus, kangaroos and the extinct marsupial tiger thylacine—have been traced back to their fossil ancestors in remarkable finds in central South Australia.

4d

ScienceDaily

62

Aging offshore wind turbines could stunt growth of renewable energy sector

A new study highlights the urgent need for the UK's Government and renewable energy industries to give vital attention to decommissioning offshore wind turbines approaching their end of live expectancy by 2025. The research reveals that the UK must decommission approximately 300 and 1600 early-model offshore wind turbines by 2025 and 2030, respectively.

4d

ScienceDaily

62

Women have a lower range of 'normal' blood pressure than men

A new study shows that women have a lower 'normal' blood pressure range compared to men.

4d

Phys.org

62

Evolution's game of rock-paper-scissors

If B is better than A, and C is better than B, it follows by the transitive property that C is better than A. And, yet, this is not always the case. Every kid is familiar with the Rock-Paper-Scissors game—the epitome of nontransitivity in which there is no clear hierarchy among the three choices, despite each two-way interaction having a clear winner: Paper beats Rock, Scissors beats Paper, and Ro

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

62

Evolution's game of rock-paper-scissors

If B is better than A, and C is better than B, it follows by the transitive property that C is better than A. And, yet, this is not always the case. Every kid is familiar with the Rock-Paper-Scissors game—the epitome of nontransitivity in which there is no clear hierarchy among the three choices, despite each two-way interaction having a clear winner: Paper beats Rock, Scissors beats Paper, and Ro

4d

New Scientist

62

Some mouse sperm try to sabotage rivals in race to fertilise the egg

Mouse sperm carrying a certain genetic variant known as the t haplotype move faster and straighter than others – and it turns out they are trying to sabotaging their rivals

7d

The Atlantic

62

"Inheritance": A Live Virtual Event

"Inheritance" is The Atlantic 's new project about American history, Black life, and the resilience of memory. In a live virtual event, The Atlantic will gather leading writers to discuss how Black history has been buried—and what unearthing it will look like. The event will feature the Atlantic editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg , staff writer Adam Harris , senior editor Vann R. Newkirk II , contr

11d

ScienceDaily

61

Study finds no gender discrimination when leaders use confident language

People tend to listen to big talkers, whether they are women or men. Still, more women prefer not to use assertive language, according to a new study. Participants in an experiment more often followed advice of people using assertive 'cheap talk,' statements that cannot be verified as true.

1d

ScienceDaily

61

Radiological images confirm 'COVID-19 can cause the body to attack itself'

Muscle soreness and achy joints are common symptoms among COVID-19 patients. But for some people, symptoms are more severe, long lasting and even bizarre, including rheumatoid arthritis flares, autoimmune myositis or 'COVID toes.' A new has confirmed and illustrated the causes of these symptoms through radiological imaging.

1d

Discover Magazine

61

The Star Hopping Strategy that Could One Day Save Humanity

By the time the Sun turns into a Red Giant, humanity will need to have settled elsewhere. Here's how.

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

61

Cytoglobin: key player in preventing liver disease

Researchers have discovered that the use of Cytoglobin (CYGB) as an intravenous drug could delay liver fibrosis progression in mice. CYGB, discovered in 2001 by Professor Norifumi Kawada, is present in hepatic stellate cells, the cells that produce fibrotic molecules such as collagens when the liver has acute or chronic inflammation induced by different etiologies. The enhancement of CYGB on these

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

61

New study reveals biodiversity important at regional scales

New research shows that biodiversity is important not just at the traditional scale of short-term plot experiments—in which ecologists monitor the health of a single meadow, forest grove, or pond after manipulating its species counts—but when measured over decades and across regional landscapes as well. The findings can help guide conservation planning and enhance efforts to make human communities

9d

ScienceDaily

61

A rare observation of a vampire bat adopting an unrelated pup

The death of a vampire bat 19 days after giving birth presented scientists studying the animals in 2019 with an unexpected chance to observe a rare event: a female bat's adoption of an unrelated baby.

9d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

61

Opinion: A better approach for dealing with reproducibility and replicability in science [Social Sciences]

Science impacts our daily lives and guides national and international policies (1). Thus, results of scientific studies are of paramount importance; yet, there are concerns that many studies are not reproducible or replicable (2). To address these concerns, the National Research Council conducted a Consensus Study [NASEM 2019 (3)] that…

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

61

All the coronavirus in the world could fit inside a Coke can with plenty of room to spare

When I was asked to calculate the total volume of SARS-CoV-2 in the world for the BBC Radio 4 show More or Less, I will admit I had no idea what the answer would be. My wife suggested it would be the size of an Olympic swimming pool. "Either that or a teaspoon," she said. "It's usually one or the other with these sorts of questions."

10d

ScienceDaily

60

Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students

New nationwide survey data uncovers college students' current mental health challenges and needs.

4h

ScienceDaily

60

A speed limit also applies in the quantum world

Even in the world of the smallest particles with their own special rules, things cannot proceed infinitely fast. Physicists have now shown what the speed limit is for complex quantum operations. The results are important for the realization of quantum computers, among other things.

1d

Science

60

Johnson puts final touches to easing of England lockdown

Prime minister expected to reopen schools and alow care home visits from March 8 followed by shops and then hospitality

1d

ScienceDaily

60

New tech aims to tackle 'disseminated intravascular coagulation' blood disorder

Researchers have developed a new tool for addressing disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) – a blood disorder that proves fatal in many patients. The technology has not yet entered clinical trials, but in vivo studies using rat models and in vitro models using blood from DIC patients highlight the tech's potential.

3d

ScienceDaily

60

Unintended consequences of state, opioid policies

Study reveals the unintended and negative consequences of policies designed to reduce the supply of opioids in the population for overdose.

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

60

Antibiotic could be repurposed and added to tuberculosis treatment arsenal

Research has found fidaxomicin, an antibiotic usually used to treat bowel infections, prevents growth of resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb) in the lab.

3d

Popular Science | RSS

60

We've barely made a dent in vaccinating the world against COVID-19

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, still has a huge reservoir of unvaccinated or partially-vaccinated people to infect. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. As COVID-19 vaccinations become more accessible in wealthy countries, most developing nations are still waiting for their first doses to arrive. Slow rates of global vaccinations could give the virus more t

3d

Phys.org

60

NASA wants to fly a helicopter on Mars for the first time

More than a century after the first powered flight on Earth, NASA intends to prove it's possible to replicate the feat on another world.

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

60

Water is a probable vector for mammalian virus transmission

Water is a necessity for all life but its availability can be limited. In geographical areas experiencing dry seasons, animals congregate near the few freshwater sources, often reaching large densities. At these sites many animals from different species come to the same spots to drink, potentially operating as key locations for pathogen transmission within and between species. An international tea

5d

Phys.org

60

Water is a probable vector for mammalian virus transmission

Water is a necessity for all life but its availability can be limited. In geographical areas experiencing dry seasons, animals congregate near the few freshwater sources, often reaching large densities. At these sites many animals from different species come to the same spots to drink, potentially operating as key locations for pathogen transmission within and between species. An international tea

5d

Scientific American Content

60

How President Biden Can Deliver on His Vaccine Promise to Communities of Color

It will require the federal government to use a scientific, data-driven system for identifying those most in need — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

7d

Phys.org

60

New study reveals biodiversity important at regional scales

New research shows that biodiversity is important not just at the traditional scale of short-term plot experiments—in which ecologists monitor the health of a single meadow, forest grove, or pond after manipulating its species counts—but when measured over decades and across regional landscapes as well. The findings can help guide conservation planning and enhance efforts to make human communities

9d

Discover Magazine

60

Quantum Computer Chips Manufactured Using Mass-Market Industrial Fabrication Techniques

Intel engineers have solved the quality control challenge for mass production of quantum computers.

9d

Science Magazine

60

Tracking the UK SARS-CoV-2 outbreak

[no content]

9d

Wired

60

Aurora Partners With Toyota on Self-Driving Sienna Taxis

Toyota Aurora Denso

  •  

The autonomous vehicle startup purchased Uber's struggling self-driving technology division in December.

9d

Phys.org

60

All the coronavirus in the world could fit inside a Coke can with plenty of room to spare

When I was asked to calculate the total volume of SARS-CoV-2 in the world for the BBC Radio 4 show More or Less, I will admit I had no idea what the answer would be. My wife suggested it would be the size of an Olympic swimming pool. "Either that or a teaspoon," she said. "It's usually one or the other with these sorts of questions."

10d

ScienceDaily

60

New method for asymmetric N,N-acetal synthesis promises advances in drug development

Chiral N,N-acetals are an important component of several bioactive drugs and medicines. Owing to this, chemical reactions that lead to high-purity yield of the desired 'enantiomeric' form are highly sought after. In a new study, scientists demonstrate high selectivity formation of N,N-acetals from reactions between 2-aminobenzamide and various diketones in presence of bis(imidazoline)-phosphoric a

11d

ScienceDaily

60

MARLIT, artificial intelligence against marine litter

A new algorithm designed with deep learning techniques will enable the detection and quantification of floating plastics in the sea with a reliability over 80 percent, according to a new study.

11d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

60

MARLIT, artificial intelligence against marine litter

A new algorithm designed with deep learning techniques will enable the detection and quantification of floating plastics in the sea with a reliability over 80 percent, according to a new study.

11d

Phys.org

60

SINGLE: An open-source software package to identify the atomic-resolution structure of nanocrystals

Materials scientists typically use solution-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to reveal the unique physiochemical properties of three-dimensional (3-D) structures of nanocrystals. In a new report on Science Advances, Cyril F. Reboul and a research team at the Monash University, Australia, Seoul National University, South Korea, and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory U.S., develop

11d

Phys.org

60

Ecological interactions as a driver of evolution

In a recent study, an international team of researchers including TUD botanist Prof. Stefan Wanke has investigated the origin of the mega-diversity of herbivorous insects. These account for a quarter of terrestrial diversity. The results of the study were recently published in the international journal Nature Communications. There the scientists show that the evolutionary success of insects may be

11d

ScienceDaily

60

Halt cell recycling to treat cancer

Targeting and changing autophagy, otherwise known as cell recycling, has been linked to helping control or diminish certain cancers. Now, researchers have shown that completely halting this process in a very aggressive form of breast cancer may improve outcomes for patients one day.

12d

ScienceDaily

59

Life of a pure Martian design

Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient crustal materials from Mars has now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material.

1d

Popular Science | RSS

59

Everything you need to know to start leatherworking

Make your own wallet and your own ASMR at the same time. (Anna Tarazevich / Pexels/) If you've fallen into the leatherworking ASMR TikTok vortex , you might be thinking about getting into the craft yourself. After all, leather is just very expensive paper, right? Just cut it up, glue it together, and voilá! You have a nice wallet you can brag to your friends about. What more is there to it? A lot

1d

Scientific American Content

59

Biden Channels FDR on STEM Policy

The president's letter to his new science advisor emphasizes the crucial role science plays in our society—much as Roosevelt did in a similar missive in 1944 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

2d

Phys.org

59

NASA rover attempting most difficult Martian touchdown yet

Spacecraft aiming to land on Mars have skipped past the planet, burned up on entry, smashed into the surface, and made it down amid a fierce dust storm only to spit out a single fuzzy gray picture before dying.

3d

Phys.org

59

Falling to Earth takes a long time

Our planet's atmosphere reduces the energy of satellites in orbit (on Earth, this would be like reducing their speed, but in space, it's complex!). This then brings them back down to Earth.

3d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

59

Här går bin till attack – skyddar bybornas grödor från hungriga elefanter

Hungriga elefanter i Moçambique hotar bybor och deras grödor i jakt på mat. Nu drivs de bort med hjälp av aggressiva bin. – Vi arbetar tillsammans med naturen för att skrämma elefanterna, så att de inte går dit där det finns människor, säger ekologen Dominique Gonçalves.

6d

Discover Magazine

59

What Is Hyperloop and When Will It Be Ready?

Early tests show that hyperloop technology can work quickly and safely. Is it coming to a city near you anytime soon? Here's everything you need to know about the super speed train.

7d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

59

The genomics of ecological flexibility, large brains, and long lives in capuchin monkeys revealed with fecalFACS [Anthropology]

Ecological flexibility, extended lifespans, and large brains have long intrigued evolutionary biologists, and comparative genomics offers an efficient and effective tool for generating new insights into the evolution of such traits. Studies of capuchin monkeys are particularly well situated to shed light on the selective pressures and genetic underpinnings of…

9d

Science Magazine

59

News at a glance

[no content]

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

59

Infectious disease causes long-term changes to frog's microbiome

Just as beneficial microbes in the human gut can be affected by antibiotics, diet interventions and other disturbances, the microbiomes of other animals can also be upset. In a rare study published this week, Andrea Jani, a researcher with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), determined the skin microbiome of an endangered frog was altered wh

9d

Phys.org

59

Infectious disease causes long-term changes to frog's microbiome

Just as beneficial microbes in the human gut can be affected by antibiotics, diet interventions and other disturbances, the microbiomes of other animals can also be upset. In a rare study published this week, Andrea Jani, a researcher with the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST), determined the skin microbiome of an endangered frog was altered wh

9d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

59

Prolonged anesthesia alters brain synaptic architecture [Neuroscience]

Prolonged medically induced coma (pMIC) is carried out routinely in intensive care medicine. pMIC leads to cognitive impairment, yet the underlying neuromorphological correlates are still unknown, as no direct studies of MIC exceeding ∼6 h on neural circuits exist. Here, we establish pMIC (up to 24 h) in adolescent and…

10d

ScienceDaily

59

Astronomers offer possible explanation for elusive dark-matter-free galaxies

Astronomers have found that some dwarf galaxies may today appear to be dark-matter free even though they formed as galaxies dominated by dark matter in the past.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

59

Great white shark numbers up significantly in Monterey Bay

Researchers have discovered a "dramatic increase" in the number of great white sharks swimming in Monterey Bay in recent years, including an area off Santa Cruz County where a surfer was killed last year, according to a new study published Tuesday.

11d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

59

Klimatförändringarna bidrar till fler arter av fladdermöss i Yunnan

Klimatförändringarna kan ha bidragit till att livsmiljön i Yunnan i södra Kina har blivit mer lämplig för fladdermöss, enligt en ny studie. Yunnan har tidigare pekats ut som en möjlig ursprungsplats för det virus som senare kom att orsaka covid-19.

11d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

58

Researchers have proved that that ozone is effective in disinfecting coronavirus

Studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 remains active on aerosols and surfaces for between several hours and several days, depending on the nature of the surface and environmental conditions. Presently, researchers from Tel Aviv University have demonstrated that ozone, which has already long been used as an antibacterial and antiviral agent in water treatment, effectively sanitizes surfaces against Co

3d

Phys.org

58

In response to Stephen Colbert, professor says 'spice it up'

To provoke more interest and excitement for students and lecturers alike, a professor from Florida Atlantic University's College of Engineering and Computer Science is spicing up the study of complex differential mathematical equations using relevant history of algebra. In a paper published in the Journal of Humanistic Mathematics, Isaac Elishakoff, Ph.D., provides a refreshing perspective and a s

3d

ScienceDaily

58

Promising biomarkers to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury

Certain plasma microRNAs could serve as diagnostic biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury, a new study shows. The biomarkers were discovered in an animal model and they were successfully used also to diagnose mild traumatic brain injury in a subgroup of patients.

4d

ScienceDaily

58

More deaths in England and Scotland may be due to obesity and excess body fat than smoking

Obesity and excess body fat may have contributed to more deaths in England and Scotland than smoking since 2014, according to new research.

8d

Phys.org

58

Coca-Cola to sell soda in 100% recycled plastic in US

Coca-Cola will soon begin selling sodas in completely recycled plastic in the United States for the first time, the beverage giant said Tuesday.

11d

ScienceDaily

57

How sessile seahorses managed to speciate and disperse across the world's oceans

Seahorses are extremely poor swimmers. Surprisingly, however, they can be found in all of the world´s oceans. On the basis of almost 360 different seahorse genomes, a group of researchers studied how these special fish were able to spread so successfully worldwide. Based on an evolutionary tree of 21 species it was possible to reconstruct the dispersal routes of seahorses worldwide and to explain

2d

ScienceDaily

57

Researchers develop algorithm to find possible misdiagnosis

Researchers have developed an algorithm that can identify patients who may have been wrongly diagnosed. With the help of digital disease history, the algorithm is able to register disease trajectories that differ so much from normal trajectories that there may be a misdiagnosis. The algorithm has been developed on the basis of data from several hundreds of thousands of COPD patients.

4d

Popular Science | RSS

57

Lego's new toy lets kids make music videos in augmented reality

Lego Vidiyo AR UM Music

  •  

Lego has tried making augmented reality toys that rely on a smartphone app to add digital action to real-world brick creations on several occasions before—with varying success. The problem is, the AR aspects of play can feel tacked-on rather than an integral part of the overall Lego experience. The company's new Vidiyo product, however, focuses squarely on using AR to encourage kids to make inter

4d

Discover Magazine

57

Earth Is Off to a Relatively Cool Start in 2021

Emphasis on the word 'relatively': Globally, last month was still among the 10 warmest Januaries on record

8d

Scientific American News

57

How Hackers Tried to Add Dangerous Lye into a City's Water Supply

A cybersecurity expert explains how safety systems stopped the attack — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8d

Phys.org

57

Narcissists have the most crowdfunding success, research reveals

Entrepreneurs that display the right level of narcissism are more likely to secure crowdfunding investment, new research from Trinity Business School reveals.

9d

Phys.org

57

Nanothermometry to improve anticancer strategies

In hyperthermia treatments, the temperature is raised above physiological levels to induce the death of cancerous cells. The local application of hyperthermia is key for a successful treatment and to reduce damage to the healthy surrounding tissues. Going down to the nanoscale, nanoparticles can be used in hyperthermia treatments acting as nanoheaters and triggering cellular damage and/or inducing

11d

Science | Smithsonian Magazine

57

Exploring Mars

Space agencies are launching new missions outfitted with revolutionary technologies, including the Perseverance rover, to learn more about the Red Planet

11d

ScienceDaily

57

'Magnetic graphene' forms a new kind of magnetism

Researchers have identified a new form of magnetism in so-called magnetic graphene, which could point the way toward understanding superconductivity in this unusual type of material.

12d

Ingeniøren

56

Mørketal i fødevaregiganters klimaregnskab: Oplyser kun en tredjedel af udledningen

PLUS. Det er ikke imod reglerne, når Danish Crown ikke rapporterer værdikædeemissioner. Og det er problematisk, lyder det fra professor, som efterlyser skærpede krav.

3d

ScienceDaily

56

Individual differences in Achilles tendon shape can affect susceptibility to injury

Individual variation in the shape and structure of the Achilles tendon may influence our susceptibility to injury later in life.

3d

ScienceDaily

56

Let the immune cell see the virus: Scientists discover unique way to target common virus

Scientists have discovered a unique way to target a common virus that affects one in 200 newborn babies in the UK but for which there is only limited treatments available.

4d

ScienceDaily

56

Secret to how cholera adapts to temperature revealed

Scientists have discovered an essential protein in cholera-causing bacteria that allows them to adapt to changes in temperature, according to a new study.

4d

ScienceDaily

56

Small 'window of opportunity' for best recovery after stroke

An international study has shown, for the first time, that the capacity of the human brain to recover and rewire itself peaks around two weeks after a stroke and diminishes over time.

4d

Phys.org

56

A glimpse into the formation of the mitoribosome

SciLifeLab Fellow Alexey Amunts and his team together with researchers from the Czech Academy of Sciences report an assembly intermediate of the ribosome in mitochondria. It reveals 22 associated factors that cooperatively organize the biogenesis process.

4d

Phys.org

56

Moiré patterns facilitate discovery of novel insulating phases

Materials having excess electrons are typically conductors. However, moiré patterns—interference patterns that typically arise when one object with a repetitive pattern is placed over another with a similar pattern—can suppress electrical conductivity, a study led by physicists at the University of California, Riverside, has found.

5d

The Atlantic

56

The Wicked Virtuosity of Patricia Lockwood

This article was published online on February 13, 2021. O n an Instagram account that I like, an illustrator publishes little four-panel drawings of smooth-headed aliens doing normal human things. Two aliens with bodies like slim light bulbs encounter each other against a bubblegum-pink background. One is sitting in a chair, reading a book; the other is just poking its head in, as if to say hello

7d

ScienceDaily

56

Placing cosmological constraints on quantum gravity phenomenology

Researchers have used well-established cosmological observations to place tighter constraints on the quadratic model of the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, while discrediting the linear model.

9d

Future(s) Studies

56

Denver is joining a growing number of cities to add an additional task force to respond to 911 calls involving mental health emergencies and other non violent offences.

submitted by /u/anythreewords [link] [comments]

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

56

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore intermingle across equator but remain separate stocks

Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers at Oregon State University have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from.

10d

Phys.org

56

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore intermingle across equator but remain separate stocks

Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers at Oregon State University have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from.

10d

Phys.org

56

Scientists create flexible biocompatible cilia that can be controlled by a magnet

Researchers at the University of Campinas's Chemistry Institute (IQ-UNICAMP) in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, have developed a template-free technique to fabricate cilia of different sizes that mimic biological functions and have multiple applications, from directing fluids in microchannels to loading material into a cell, for example. The highly flexible cilia are based on polymer-coated iron o

11d

Phys.org

56

Ancient Amazonian farmers fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it

Ancient Amazonian communities fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it from conflict, excavations show.

11d

ScienceDaily

56

History of vaccines offers lessons on COVID-19 for pregnant women

Pregnant women, who are at increased risk of preterm birth or pregnancy loss if they develop a severe case of COVID-19, need the best possible guidance on whether they should receive a COVID-19 vaccine, according to a new article. That guidance can take lessons from what is already known about other vaccines given during pregnancy.

11d

Undark Magazine

55

Rabies Is Terrifying but Rare. Are We Overtreating It?

Each year, an estimated 55,000 Americans receive prophylactic rabies shots. But studies suggest that many of these treatments are unnecessary, and they rely on older techniques that waste precious vaccine. All this may be preventing lifesaving help from getting to the people who need it most.

2d

Sciencemag

55

Antibody-Dependent Enhancement and the Coronavirus Vaccines

I'm getting a lot of queries about antibody-dependent enhancement these days, and I can only assume that's because there's a lot of talk about this making the rounds of various social media platforms. Many of the people who are contacting me sound a lot more worried than I would have thought, so that prompts me to follow up on the post I did on the subject back in December. What's ADE, Again? Fir

8d

Science Advances current issue

55

Controlled levitation of nanostructured thin films for sun-powered near-space flight

We report light-driven levitation of macroscopic polymer films with nanostructured surface as candidates for long-duration near-space flight. We levitated centimeter-scale disks made of commercial 0.5-micron-thick mylar film coated with carbon nanotubes on one side. When illuminated with light intensity comparable to natural sunlight, the polymer disk heats up and interacts with incident gas mole

8d

Scientific American

55

The Human Genome and the Making of a Skeptical Biologist

Thoughts on scientific ambition and progress, 20 years after the first draft of the genome was completed — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

8d

Phys.org

55

Drone-based photogrammetry: A reliable and low-cost method for estimating plant biomass

Remote sensing technology has become a vital tool for scientists over the past several decades for monitoring changes in land use, ice cover, and vegetation across the globe. Satellite imagery, however, is typically available at only coarse resolutions, allowing only for the analysis of broad trends over large areas. Remote-controlled drones are an increasingly affordable alternative for researche

8d

ScienceDaily

55

A 'skeletal age' calculator to predict bone fracture risk

Researchers have developed a model to predict the biological age of bones that may improve the management of osteoporotic fractures.

11d

Phys.org

55

Early Indian monsoon forecasts could benefit farmers

Farmers in India should be provided with early forecasts of expected variations in the monsoon season in order to reduce crop losses, scientists say.

11d

Phys.org

54

'Perseverance will get you anywhere': After 300-million-mile journey, NASA's Mars rover shares Twitter updates

"I'm safe on Mars" isn't a tweet you see every day.

1d

Phys.org

54

Report: Pandemic put U.S. on track to meet Paris climate goals

The pandemic knocked the U.S. back on track to meet its targets in the Paris climate accord, and renewable energy saw a record-setting level of deployment in 2020 as coal consumption dwindled, figures from an independent report released Thursday show, while transportation emissions are expected to jump as the country gets the virus under control.

2d

ScienceDaily

54

Swirlonic super particles baffle physicists

In recent years, active, self-propelled particles have received growing interest amongst the scientific community. The 'swirlon' – a novel state of active matter – displayed a stunning behavior whereby instead of moving with acceleration, the quasi-particle groups moved with a constant velocity, proportional to the applied force and in the same direction of the force. This conduct seemingly violat

8d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

54

An Achilles' heel for wheat rust infection

Researchers have found a gene in wheat that acts to promote rust fungal infection.

9d

Phys.org

54

An Achilles' heel for wheat rust infection

Researchers have found a gene in wheat that acts to promote rust fungal infection.

9d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

53

Rymdsonden Perseverence har landat på Mars

Över hälften av alla försök att nå planeten har misslyckats, men i kväll lyckades rymdsonden Perseverance landa på Mars.

9h

ScienceDaily

53

The hidden dance of roots revealed

New time-lapse videos capture something that's too slow for our eyes to see: the growing tips of plant roots make corkscrew-like motions, waggling and winding in a helical path as they burrow into the soil. By using time-lapse footage, along with a root-like robot to test ideas, researchers have gained new insights into how and why rice root tips twirl as they grow.

23h

Phys.org

53

Researchers developing drugs to enable longer space missions

The University of Adelaide is sending pills to the International Space Station (ISS) to determine if it will be possible to produce medicine in space to enable longer-term space missions.

1d

Nature

53

Eight priorities for calculating the social cost of carbon

Nature, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00441-0 Advice to the Biden administration as it seeks to account for mounting losses from storms, wildfires and other climate impacts.

1d

ScienceDaily

53

Quantum collaboration gives new gravity to the mysteries of the universe

Scientists have used cutting-edge research in quantum computation and quantum technology to pioneer a radical new approach to determining how our Universe works at its most fundamental level.

2d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

53

Sant eller falskt: Kan starka ljud orsaka laviner?

Många stavar sig fram genom skidbackarna nu under sportlovet, och när fler personer vistas kring bergstopparna ökar också risken för laviner. Men allt vi tror oss veta om laviner kanske inte stämmer? Vi bad en lavinexpert reda ut frågetecknena.

2d

NPR

53

Million-Year-Old DNA Samples Pulled From Mammoth Teeth

Scientists were able to recover DNA more than a million years old from the teeth of Siberian mammoths. A genetic analysis gives clues to the subsequent rise of mammoths in North America.

3d

Viden

53

Godt humør og mere tryghed: Vi er gladere på jobbet, når der er lige mange mænd og kvinder

Især mænd har det svært på arbejdspladser, der er domineret af mænd.

8d

Science Magazine

53

Asking the right questions about race and policing

[no content]

9d

ScienceDaily

53

Astronomers uncover mysterious origins of 'super-Earths'

Mini-Neptunes and super-Earths up to four times the size of our own are the most common exoplanets orbiting stars beyond our solar system. Until now, super-Earths were thought to be the rocky cores of mini-Neptunes whose gassy atmospheres were blown away. Astronomers show that some of these exoplanets never had gaseous atmospheres to begin with, shedding new light on their mysterious origins.

9d

Sciencemag

53

Does Prior Exposure to Coronaviruses Protect You?

There's a new paper out that clears up some of our thinking about the current pandemic and what protection people might have had before the latest coronavirus showed up. As so many people know by now, there are a lot of coronaviruses running around out there, and they are responsible for a small-but-real fraction of "common cold" type illnesses every year. Here's the CDC page on that topic, and h

10d

Science

53

AstraZeneca agrees German manufacturing deal to fill vaccine gap

Agreement with IDT Biologika will boost capacity and help Europe's supply shortages

10d

Phys.org

53

Stable armchairlike hexazine ring in tungsten hexanitride

Tungsten hexanitride with armchairlike hexazine N6 ring has been synthesized by a group of scientists led by Dr. Jin Liu and his former postdoc Nilesh Salke at HPSTAR (Center for High Pressure Science & Technology Advanced Research). WN6 is a promising high-energy-density and super-hard material. Their findings are published in the recent issue of Physical Review Letters.

10d

ScienceDaily

53

Baby vampire bat adopted by mom's best friend

The strong relationship formed between two female adult vampire bats may have motivated one of the bats to adopt the other's baby.

10d

Popular Science | RSS

53

Google's new Green Room feature gets you camera-ready before video meetings

Google Meet's Green Room gives you a much better look at yourself before hopping in with your pals and coworkers. (Google /) It's totally normal to feel a little anxiety before pressing that "join meeting" button on your latest video conference. Since the COVID-19 pandemic thrust us into the era of social distancing, a steady stream video chats starting with the same round robin game of "can ever

12d

The Scientist RSS

52

Dogs Pass Test for Awareness of Their Own Bodies: Study

Pets asked by their owners to pick up an object attached to a mat they were sitting on understood they needed to move in order to complete the task, researchers report.

2d

Phys.org

52

SLAC's new X-ray laser data system will process a million images a second

When upgrades to the X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are complete, the powerful new machine will capture up to 1 terabyte of data per second; that's a data rate equivalent to streaming about one thousand full-length movies in just a single second, and analyzing every frame of each movie as they zoom past in this super-fast-forward mode.

2d

ScienceDaily

52

Lakes isolated beneath Antarctic ice could be more amenable to life than thought

Lakes underneath the Antarctic ice sheet could be more hospitable than previously thought, allowing them to host more microbial life.

2d

ScienceDaily

52

Genotoxic E. coli 'caught in the act'

Researchers reveal transformation of colon organoids in vitro. Escherichia coli bacteria are constitutive members of the human gut microbiota. However, some strains produce a genotoxin called colibactin, which is implicated in the development of colorectal cancer.

3d

ScienceDaily

52

Study links prolonged sedentary time to distractibility in adults with obesity, overweight

Scientists used accelerometers to track daily activity levels for a week in 89 adults with obesity or overweight and, in a series of tests, measured their ability to multitask and maintain their attention despite distractions. The study revealed that individuals who spent more sedentary time in bouts lasting 20 minutes or more were less able to overcome distractions.

3d

ScienceDaily

52

Partners' company helps us stay connected during pandemic

A pair of studies reveal that living with a romantic partner helps people feel more socially connected during COVID-19. But no other pandemic-era social dynamic carries notable benefits, the researchers found.

3d

ScienceDaily

52

Planetary scientists discover evidence for a reduced atmosphere on ancient Mars

The transition from a reduced planet to an oxidized planet is referred to as the Great Oxidation Event or GOE. This transition was a central part of our planet's evolution, and fundamentally linked to the evolution of life here — specifically to the prevalence of photosynthesis that produced oxygen. Planetary geologists have discovered that Mars underwent a great oxygenation event of its own — b

4d

Viden

52

Forbrugerorganisation klager over TikTok: 'De beskytter ikke vores børn'

Europæisk forbrugerorganisation anklager TikTok for brud for EU-forbrugerrettigheder, skjult reklame og upassende indhold.

4d

ScienceDaily

52

Brief survey tool tracks symptoms, aids in evaluating effectiveness of treatment

Researchers have developed and validated, SymTrak-8, a short questionnaire to help patients report symptoms and assist healthcare providers in assessing the severity of symptoms, and in monitoring and adjusting treatment accordingly.

4d

ScienceDaily

52

Study explores neurocognitive basis of bias against people who look different

A new brain-and-behavior study clarifies how the 'anomalous-is-bad' stereotype manifests, and implicates a brain region called the amygdala as one of the likely mediators of this stereotype.

7d

ScienceDaily

52

Why portraying humans as healthy machines can backfire

Confronting consumers with expectations to be 'machine-like' be risky if not aligned with their abilities.

8d

ScienceDaily

52

New CRISPR tech targets human genome's complex code

Rice bioengineers harness the CRISPR/Cas9 system to program histones, the support proteins that wrap up and control human DNA, to manipulate gene activation and phosphorylation. The new technology enables innovative ways to find and manipulate genes and pathways responsible for diseases.

10d

ScienceDaily

52

Hot nano-chisel used to create artificial bones in a Petri dish

Scientists detail a system allowing them to sculpt, in a biocompatible material, the exact structure of the bone tissue, with features smaller than the size of a single protein — a billion times smaller than a meter.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

52

Researchers uncover hidden hunting tactics of wolves in Minnesota's Northwoods

Wolves are arguably the most well-studied large predators in the world, yet new research shows there is still a lot to learn about their hunting tactics. Typically, wolves hunt large mammals like moose, deer, and bison in packs by outrunning, outlasting, and exhausting their prey. However, throughout the dense boreal forests in North America and Eurasia, during the summer wolves often hunt beavers

11d

Phys.org

52

Scientists at work: New recordings of ultrasonic seal calls hint at sonar-like abilities

I'm sitting on the edge of a hole drilled through 15 feet of Antarctic sea ice, about to descend into the frigid ocean of the southernmost dive site in the world. I wear nearly 100 pounds of gear—a drysuit and gloves, multiple layers of insulation, scuba tank and regulators, lights, equipment, fins and over 40 pounds of lead to counteract all that added buoyancy.

11d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

51

The inflated significance of neutral genetic diversity in conservation genetics [Evolution]

The current rate of species extinction is rapidly approaching unprecedented highs, and life on Earth presently faces a sixth mass extinction event driven by anthropogenic activity, climate change, and ecological collapse. The field of conservation genetics aims at preserving species by using their levels of genetic diversity, usually measured as…

1d

Singularity Hub

51

'7 Minutes of Terror': The Technology Perseverance Will Need to Survive Landing on Mars

NASA Perseverance Mars

  •  

This month has been a busy one for Mars exploration. Several countries sent missions to the red planet in June last year, taking advantage of a launch window. Most have now arrived after their eight-month voyage. Within the next few days, NASA will perform a direct entry of the Martian atmosphere to land the Perseverance rover in Mars's Jezero Crater. Perseverance, about the size of a car , is th

2d

Phys.org

51

Fishes contribute roughly 1.65 billion tons of carbon in feces and other matter annually

Scientists have little understanding of the role fishes play in the global carbon cycle linked to climate change, but a Rutgers-led study found that carbon in feces, respiration and other excretions from fishes—roughly 1.65 billion tons annually—make up about 16 percent of the total carbon that sinks below the ocean's upper layers.

3d

Popular Science | RSS

51

Facing COVID-19 variants, vaccine makers are weighing how to tweak their designs

Virologists and public health researchers are continuing to identify new variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19. Vaccine makers need to keep a close watch on these variants to ensure their vaccines still work against the new variants. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. Scientists began working on vaccines against COVID-19 just over a year ago. But in

4d

Phys.org

51

Study finds alligator hearts keep beating no matter what

Mammals and cold-blooded alligators share a common four-chamber heart structure—unique among reptiles—but that's where the similarities end. Unlike humans and other mammals, whose hearts can fibrillate under stress, alligators have built-in antiarrhythmic protection. The findings from new research were reported Jan. 27 in the journal Integrative Organismal Biology.

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

51

A glimpse into the formation of the mitoribosome

SciLifeLab Fellow Alexey Amunts and his team together with researchers from the Czech Academy of Sciences report an assembly intermediate of the ribosome in mitochondria. It reveals 22 associated factors that cooperatively organize the biogenesis process.

4d

Ingeniøren

51

Ekspert: Bøde på 100.000 kroner til ILVA kan gøre Danmark til et europæisk GDPR-ly

Landets første GDPR-bøde blev kun en brøkdel af, hvad anklagemyndigheden havde krævet. Det er overraskende for en så alvorlig sag, og kan bane en uheldig vej for Danmark, siger formand for Rådet Digital Sikkerhed, Henning Mortensen.

4d

Scientific American

51

Reflections on the 20th Anniversary of the First Publication of the Human Genome

A new wave of research is needed to make ample use of humanity's "most wondrous map" — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

9d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

51

Intel Sues Former Employee For Alleged Theft of Xeon Data

Intel announces its 3rd Gen Intel Xeon Scalable processors on June 18, 2020. The processors extend Intel's investment in built-in AI acceleration through the integration of bfloat16 support into the processor's unique Intel DL Boost technology. (Credit: Intel Corporation) Stealing data on your way out the door is a great way to guarantee consequences — a lesson that various individuals in Silicon

11d

Ingeniøren

50

Overblik: Her er de vigtige tidspunkter under Mars-landing

Under landingen af roveren Perseverance får Nasa løbende besked om de forskellige højdepunkter er gået godt. Hvilke det er – og hvornår de sker, kan du læse om her.

2d

Popular Science | RSS

50

Best dog coats: Pet clothes to keep any dog warm

Make sure your dog has the appropriate jacket for any type of weather. (Jake Green via Unsplash/) When searching for the best dog coats for keeping your pet warm in winter, it's important to pick a design that complements your pooch's body shape and fur type without impeding their comfort, safety, or freedom of movement. Just as with winter coats and rain jackets for humans, there are many styles

3d

Phys.org

50

Study produces a detailed chemical profile of Delhi's air pollution sources

Exposure to air pollution causes around 1.1 million deaths per year across India—this problem is thought to be most severe in Delhi. The steady upswing in India's population and energy consumption is a significant factor in the air pollution problem. Delhi's population of 30 million contributes 15 times the World Health Organisation's recommended values of the annual average levels of the fine par

3d

Phys.org

50

Neonicotinoid pesticide residues found in Irish honey

Researchers from Trinity and Dublin City University found that Irish honey contained residues of neonicotinoid insecticides.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

50

Neonicotinoid pesticide residues found in Irish honey

Researchers from Trinity and Dublin City University found that Irish honey contained residues of neonicotinoid insecticides.

3d

Livescience.com

50

What is the cosmological constant?

What we know about the history and properties of "Einstein's biggest mistake," the cosmological constant

4d

Science

50

EU prepares research funding boost as it confronts virus variants

Ursula von der Leyen to set out new vaccine strategy following criticism over rollout

4d

Phys.org

50

Collagen structures get the royal reveal

Collagen is the king of biological proteins, and now it has a SCEPTTr.

4d

ScienceDaily

50

Neanderthals and Homo sapiens used identical Nubian technology

New analysis of a fossil tooth and stone tools from Shukbah Cave reveals Neanderthals used stone tool technologies thought to have been unique to modern humans.

5d

Science

50

Why the world needs a Covid-19 exit strategy

The public needs to know when, how and how quickly restrictions will be lifted

8d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

50

50 years since decimalisation: A very British compromise

February 15 2021 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the United Kingdom's switch to using decimal currency, and researcher Andy Cook has looked into this often-overlooked historical event for his PhD with the University of Huddersfield.

8d

Phys.org

50

Goddard's Core Flight software chosen for NASA's Lunar Gateway

NASA is improving a flight software system to help create and certify essential software for the lunar Gateway.

8d

Ingeniøren

50

Tesla lufter planer om egne ladestandere i større danske byer

Elbilproducenten Tesla vil etablere selskabets egne ladestandere "omkring centrum af Aarhus, Aalborg og København".

10d

Phys.org

50

Researchers uncover hidden hunting tactics of wolves in Minnesota's Northwoods

Wolves are arguably the most well-studied large predators in the world, yet new research shows there is still a lot to learn about their hunting tactics. Typically, wolves hunt large mammals like moose, deer, and bison in packs by outrunning, outlasting, and exhausting their prey. However, throughout the dense boreal forests in North America and Eurasia, during the summer wolves often hunt beavers

11d

Phys.org

50

Collapsed glaciers increase Third Pole uncertainties: Downstream lakes may merge within a decade

Glaciers are not only melting, but also collapsing in the Third Pole region. In 2016, two glaciers in the western Third Pole's Aru Mountains collapsed, one after another. The first collapse caused nine human casualties and the loss of hundreds of livestock. However, that may not be the end of the catastrophe.

11d

Phys.org

50

Understanding catalytic couplings: not all synergies are simple

Negishi cross-coupling reactions have been widely used to form C-C bonds since the 1970s and are often perceived as the result of two metals, zinc and palladium/nickel, working in synergy. But like all relationships, there is more under the surface. Ph.D. student Craig Day and Dr. Rosie Somerville from the Martin group at ICIQ have delved into the Negishi cross-coupling of aryl esters using nickel

12d

Undark Magazine

49

The Undark Interview: A Conversation With Charles Vidich

Public health and bioterrorism expert Charles Vidich spent a decade working on quarantine policy. Now, in his aptly-timed book "Germs at Bay," Vidich discusses the nation's long struggle to fight infectious diseases, with an emphasis on early Boston, whose quarantine strategies were copied by other cities.

1d

ScienceDaily

49

Slow motion precursors give earthquakes the fast slip

At a glacier near the South Pole, earth scientists have found evidence of a quiet, slow-motion fault slip that triggers strong, fast-slip earthquakes many miles away.

3d

ScienceDaily

49

Alligator hearts keep beating no matter what

A new study finds that an alligator heart will not fibrillate when exposed to drastic temperature changes, unlike a rabbit (mammal) heart, which is critically vulnerable to heart trauma under those conditions. The research could help better understand how the heart works and what can cause a deadly arrhythmia – which fundamentally happens when the heart doesn't pump blood correctly any longer.

4d

forskning.se

49

Miljövänligare vätgas med liten polymerprick

Vätgas för energianvändning kan utvinnas ur vatten och solljus med hjälp av fotokatalysatorer. Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har utvecklat sammansatta polymerpartiklar i nanostorlek som gör framställningen mer miljövänligt. De pyttesmå polymerprickarna fördelar sig jämnt i vatten, vilket ökar reaktionsytan och mer ljus kan lagras i form av vätgas. Hur vi ska kunna tillgodose framtidens efterfr

5d

ScienceDaily

49

Potential new treatment for fatal childhood brain cancer

A new research paper reveals a potential revolutionary drug combination that could become an effective treatment for the incurable brain cancer known as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG).

7d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

49

Drone-based photogrammetry: A reliable and low-cost method for estimating plant biomass

Remote sensing technology has become a vital tool for scientists over the past several decades for monitoring changes in land use, ice cover, and vegetation across the globe. Satellite imagery, however, is typically available at only coarse resolutions, allowing only for the analysis of broad trends over large areas. Remote-controlled drones are an increasingly affordable alternative for researche

8d

ScienceDaily

49

Silicon chip provides low cost solution to help machines see the world clearly

Researchers have developed the first compact 3D LiDAR imaging system that can match and exceed the performance and accuracy of most advanced, mechanical systems currently used.

9d

ScienceDaily

49

The pandemic lockdown leads to cleaner city air across Canada, paper reveals

Researchers found that emission levels dropped dramatically over the course of the pandemic. They measured downtown air quality monitoring station data from eight Canadian cities and compared their concentration levels of nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide between February and August 2020 to the figures recorded over the same period in 2018 and 2019. They also used satellite imag

11d

Phys.org

49

Fifty years ago, a major earthquake shifted the course of seismology in SoCal

The 1971 San Fernando quake led the USGS and Caltech to join forces, expanding seismic monitoring through the region

11d

Phys.org

49

Tricky terrain: Helping to assure a safe rover landing

After a nearly seven-month journey to Mars, NASA's Perseverance rover is slated to land at the Red Planet's Jezero Crater Feb. 18, 2021, a rugged expanse chosen for its scientific research and sample collection possibilities.

12d

Phys.org

49

Potential for misuse of climate data a threat to business and financial markets

The findings are published in the prestigious journal, Nature Climate Change, and calls on businesses, the financial services industry and regulators to work more closely with climate scientists.

12d

Phys.org

49

New nationwide survey shows MAGA supporters' beliefs about the pandemic, the election and the insurrection

In the wake of the Capitol riot and on the eve of former President Trump's second impeachment trial, new data from the University of Washington reveals the attitudes and beliefs that are growing within the Republican Party.

12d

ScienceDaily

48

Evidence of protein folding at site of intracellular droplets

Researchers have found that elevated concentrations of proteins within the droplets triggered a folding event, increasing the potential for protein aggregation — or misfolding — which has been linked to neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

1d

ScienceDaily

48

Migratory birds track climate across the year

As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range.

1d

Phys.org

48

Spin Hall effect of light achieved with near 100% efficiency

A POSTECH-KAIST joint research team has successfully developed a technique to reach near-unity efficiency of SHEL by using an artificially-designed metasurface.

1d

ScienceDaily

48

Quantum computing: When ignorance is wanted

Quantum technologies for computers open up new concepts of preserving the privacy of input and output data of a computation. Scientists have shown that optical quantum systems are not only particularly suitable for some quantum computations, but can also effectively encrypt the associated input and output data.

1d

ScienceDaily

48

Irregular sleep schedules connected to bad moods and depression, study shows

Irregular sleep schedules can affect mood and risk of developing symptoms of depression according to a study of first-year medical residents that used Fitbits and smartphones.

1d

ScienceDaily

48

Medication keeps more patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis in remission than steroids

Avacopan, which targets a receptor that attracts the cells that cause inflammation, was shown to be more effective at keeping patients in remission for a year than prednisone.

2d

ScienceDaily

48

Edible holograms could someday decorate foods

Holograms are everywhere, from driver's licenses to credit cards to product packaging. And now, edible holograms could someday enhance foods. Researchers have developed a laser-based method to print nanostructured holograms on dried corn syrup films. The edible holograms could also be used to ensure food safety, label a product or indicate sugar content, the researchers say.

2d

ScienceDaily

48

You snooze, you lose – with some sleep trackers

Wearable sleep tracking devices – from Fitbit to Apple Watch to never-heard-of brands stashed away in the electronics clearance bin – have infiltrated the market at a rapid pace in recent years. And like any consumer products, not all sleep trackers are created equal, according to neuroscientists.

2d

ScienceDaily

48

Combination treatment for common glioma type shows promise in mice

Gliomas are common brain tumors that comprise about one third of all cancers of the nervous system. Researchers tested a novel combination treatment approach on mice with tumors with characteristics similar to human astrocytomas and found tumor regression in 60 percent of the mice treated. These encouraging results could be the first step toward developing a treatment for this type of brain cancer

3d

ScienceDaily

48

How icebergs really melt — and what this could mean for climate change

Iceberg melt is responsible for about half the fresh water entering the ocean from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Accurately modelling how it enters is important for understanding potential impact on ocean circulation.

3d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

48

Switching to firm contracts may prevent natural gas fuel shortages at US power plants

New research now indicates that these fuel shortages are not due to failures of pipelines and that in certain areas of the country a change in how gas is purchased can significantly reduce generator outages.

4d

ScienceDaily

48

A groundbreaking solution? Polymers can protect buildings from large fault ruptures

Researchers have developed a solution to protect buildings sitting on deep foundations from earthquakes resulting in surface fault ruptures. Their findings show a composite foundation system using inexpensive polymer materials can significantly improve the safety of infrastructure and substantially decrease fatality and damage due to large ground deformations.

4d

ScienceDaily

48

Campylobacter strains exchange genes, can become more virulent and antibiotic resistant

Campylobacter bacteria persist throughout poultry production, and two of the most common strains are exchanging genetic material, which could result in more antibiotic-resistant and infectious Campylobacter strains.

4d

ScienceDaily

48

To improve immunotherapy, researchers look to shift immune cells' access to sugar

New research suggests that a way to improve immunotherapy is by altering immune cells' access to sugar.

4d

ScienceDaily

48

Supercomputer turns back cosmic clock

Astronomers have tested a method for reconstructing the state of the early Universe by applying it to 4000 simulated universes using the ATERUI II supercomputer. They found that together with new observations the method can set better constraints on inflation, one of the most enigmatic events in the history of the Universe. The method can shorten the observation time required to distinguish betwee

4d

ScienceDaily

48

Large-scale study finds genetic testing technology falsely detects very rare variants

A technology that is widely used by commercial genetic testing companies is 'extremely unreliable' in detecting very rare variants, meaning results suggesting individuals carry rare disease-causing genetic variants are usually wrong, according to new research.

4d

Discover Magazine

48

Most People Aren't Climate Scientists. We Should Talk About Climate Change Anyway

Most Americans don't talk about climate change. But many experts think that getting communities involved in climate science is the best path forward.

5d

Phys.org

48

CSIRO identifies plants most at risk after Black Summer megafires

Australia's 2019-2020 Black Summer bushfires severely impacted hundreds of plant species. While the prospects of recovery for most appear to be good, some species remain vulnerable, according to research published by Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and the Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research.

5d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

48

CSIRO identifies plants most at risk after Black Summer megafires

Australia's 2019-2020 Black Summer bushfires severely impacted hundreds of plant species. While the prospects of recovery for most appear to be good, some species remain vulnerable, according to research published by Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, and the Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research.

5d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

48

New prostate cancer test could avoid unnecessary biopsies

A urine test could have avoided one third of unnecessary prostate cancer biopsies while failing to detect only a small number of cancers, according to a validation study that included more than 1,500 patients.

7d

Phys.org

48

Tiny cacao flowers and fickle midges are part of a pollination puzzle that limits chocolate production

It's almost impossible to imagine a world without chocolate. Yet cacao trees, which are the source of chocolate, are vulnerable.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

48

Tiny cacao flowers and fickle midges are part of a pollination puzzle that limits chocolate production

It's almost impossible to imagine a world without chocolate. Yet cacao trees, which are the source of chocolate, are vulnerable.

10d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

48

Hot nano-chisel used to create artificial bones in a Petri dish

Scientists detail a system allowing them to sculpt, in a biocompatible material, the exact structure of the bone tissue, with features smaller than the size of a single protein — a billion times smaller than a meter.

10d

ScienceDaily

48

Training to wisely navigate social conflicts

People are able to approach social conflicts more wisely if they have trained themselves in advance by practicing a distanced self-talk technique, referring to themselves with third-person pronouns such as 'she' or 'they' rather than the first-person pronouns of 'me' or 'I.'

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

48

Scientists at work: New recordings of ultrasonic seal calls hint at sonar-like abilities

I'm sitting on the edge of a hole drilled through 15 feet of Antarctic sea ice, about to descend into the frigid ocean of the southernmost dive site in the world. I wear nearly 100 pounds of gear—a drysuit and gloves, multiple layers of insulation, scuba tank and regulators, lights, equipment, fins and over 40 pounds of lead to counteract all that added buoyancy.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

48

Ecological interactions as a driver of evolution

In a recent study, an international team of researchers including TUD botanist Prof. Stefan Wanke has investigated the origin of the mega-diversity of herbivorous insects. These account for a quarter of terrestrial diversity. The results of the study were recently published in the international journal Nature Communications. There the scientists show that the evolutionary success of insects may be

11d

ScienceDaily

48

New drug target for Ebola, Marburg viruses

Researchers have identified a previously unknown site on the filovirus glycoprotein to which small drug molecules can bind and prevent infection — blocking both sites may be a more effective treatment while reducing the risk of side effects.

12d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

48

New method developed for 'up-sizing' mini organs used in medical research

A team of engineers and scientists has developed a method of 'multiplying' organoids: miniature collections of cells that mimic the behaviour of various organs and are promising tools for the study of human biology and disease.

12d

ScienceDaily

48

New method developed for 'up-sizing' mini organs used in medical research

A team of engineers and scientists has developed a method of 'multiplying' organoids: miniature collections of cells that mimic the behaviour of various organs and are promising tools for the study of human biology and disease.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

47

New snake species and genus discovered in Myanmar

Mud snakes (family Homalopsidae) live in wetlands across Southeast Asia. Their habitats include natural swamps and open lands flooded during the rainy season, typically rice paddies. Scientists of the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt and the East Yangon University have now discovered a new species in a wetland near the university campus. "We collected four individuals with short tails d

1d

Phys.org

47

Ozone pollution levels dropped early in pandemic

During spring and summer of 2020, ozone at 1-8 kilometers (0.6-5 miles) above Earth's surface fell by 7% on average across the Northern Hemisphere, a new study finds. The decrease is likely explained by curtailed transportation due to COVID-19 quarantines, according to the report, published in Geophysical Research Letters.

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Phys.org

47

Touchdown: NASA's Perseverance rover ready to search for life on Mars

After seven months in space, NASA's Perseverance rover overcame a tense landing phase with a series of perfectly executed maneuvers to gently float down to the Martian soil Thursday and embark on its mission to search for signs of past life.

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ScienceDaily

47

Proton therapy induces biologic response to attack treatment-resistant cancers

Researchers have developed a novel proton therapy technique to more specifically target cancer cells that resist other forms of treatment. The technique is called LEAP, an acronym for 'biologically enhanced particle therapy.'

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Discover Magazine

47

Why Are There No Crash Test Dummies That Represent Average Women?

Most vehicle-crash safety tests use a female dummy that's 4-foot-11 and 108 pounds. But she's still based on the male body type, and she isn't put in the driver's seat for front-impact starred-safety tests.

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Popular Science | RSS

47

Best home office printer: Complete your home office setup

No matter what you need to print, these printers have you covered. (Evelyn Geissler via Unsplash/) If you're looking for the best home office printer, you'll want the quality of a higher-end printer, but in a more compact and budget-friendly package. Quality printers should be efficient with their ink usage, so you'll never run out of ink even if you're printing out long reports, photo prints, or

7d

Phys.org

47

ExoMars discovers new gas and traces water loss on Mars

Sea salt embedded in the dusty surface of Mars and lofted into the planet's atmosphere has led to the discovery of hydrogen chloride—the first time the ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has detected a new gas. The spacecraft is also providing new information about how Mars is losing its water.

9d

Phys.org

47

Nanoscale imaging method offers insight into alloyed nanoparticle synthesis

Catalysts, often metal nanoparticles, are involved in the production of over 80% of commercial products such as plastics, fuels and pharmaceuticals. Computational methods aid in designing nanoparticle catalysts consisting of mixtures of metals, called alloyed nanoparticles, with high reaction activity and selectivity. However, producing alloyed nanoparticles with arbitrary composition in the lab d

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Popular Science | RSS

47

Best heated vest: Beat the cold weather with the right winter gear

For when your jacket just won't cut it. (Jaime Dantas via Unsplash/) Grumble less this winter by investing in the right gear to keep you warm and comfortable. Innovations in winter weather gear like heated jackets and clothing are designed to bring amazing warmth without cumbersome extra layers. The best heated vests will give you an extra boost of warmth and comfort, and even allow you to custom

11d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

47

Critical role of Aquaporin-1 and telocytes in infantile hemangioma response to propranolol beta blockade [Cell Biology]

Propranolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor (ADRB) antagonist, is the first-line therapy for severe infantile hemangiomas (IH). Since the incidental discovery of propranolol efficacy in IH, preclinical and clinical investigations have shown evidence of adjuvant propranolol response in some malignant tumors. However, the mechanism for propranolol antitumor effect is still largely…

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

47

Tourism mainly responsible for marine litter on Mediterranean beaches

A study by the ICTA-UAB warns that tourism generates 80% of the marine litter accumulating on the beaches of the Mediterranean islands in summer.For researchers, the global COVID19 pandemic may be an opportunity to rethink the model of sustainable tourism.

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ScienceDaily

46

Discovery of biomarker could help predict Alzheimer's years before symptoms emerge

A unique brain protein measured in the blood could be used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease decades before symptoms develop, according to new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research.

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ScienceDaily

46

Impact of COVID-19 in Africa 'vastly underestimated', warn researchers

The impact of COVID-19 in Africa has been vastly underestimated, warn researchers in a new study that showed that COVID-19 deaths accounted for 15 to 20 percent of all sampled deaths — many more than official reports suggest and contradicting the widely held view that COVID-19 has largely skipped Africa and had little impact.

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Phys.org

46

Sicilian village cleans up ash, stones from Mt Etna eruption

Residents and municipal teams worked Wednesday to clean up a Sicilian village near Mount Etna after Europe's most active volcano spewed lava, ashes and volcanic stones.

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Viden

46

LÆS SVARENE 'Du vinder en smule ved at løbe i stedet for at gå i efterforbrændingen'

Eksperterne Charlotte Bøving og Claus Hechmann svarede på spørgsmål.

3d

Phys.org

46

Plastic recycling results in rare metals being found in children's toys and food packaging

Some of the planet's rarest metals—used in the manufacture of smartphones and other electrical equipment—are increasingly being found in everyday consumer plastics, according to new research.

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Science | The Guardian

46

Starwatch: Mars and Aldebaran flank the waxing half moon

The red planet, although faded since last year's magnificence, will still appear as bright as the eye of Taurus This week boasts a picturesque combination of celestial objects with Taurus, the bull, as the backdrop adding even more interest. Continue reading…

5d

Ingeniøren

46

Kommission anbefaler trængselsafgift i København – men ministeren afviser

PLUS. Roadpricing er en forholdsvis nem mulighed for at kunne bekæmpe trængsel i hovedstaden. Sådan lyder det i dag fra den såkaldte Eldrup-kommission. Teknologien er allerede på plads.

8d

Phys.org

46

Research highlights ways to protect astronaut cardiovascular health from space radiation

Space: the final frontier. What's stopping us from exploring it? Well, lots of things, but one of the major issues is space radiation, and the effects it can have on astronaut health during long voyages. A new review in the open-access journal Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine explores what we know about the ways that space radiation can negatively affect cardiovascular health, and discusses me

8d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

46

Rising water temperatures could be a death sentence for Pacific salmon

In the Pacific Northwest, several species of salmon are in danger of extinction. The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office has released a report on the state of salmon populations in the state's watersheds—and the findings predict a grim future.

9d

Phys.org

46

Rising water temperatures could be a death sentence for Pacific salmon

In the Pacific Northwest, several species of salmon are in danger of extinction. The Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office has released a report on the state of salmon populations in the state's watersheds—and the findings predict a grim future.

9d

Future(s) Studies

46

There's Actually No Good Reason for Us All to Go Back to the Office (Tell Your Boss)

submitted by /u/JoelBlackout [link] [comments]

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ScienceDaily

46

Human eye beats machine in archaeological color identification test

A ruler and scale can tell archaeologists the size and weight of a fragment of pottery – but identifying its precise color can depend on individual perception. So, when a handheld color-matching gadget came on the market, scientists hoped it offered a consistent way of determining color, free of human bias.

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

46

Peanut allergy affects even more U.S. adults than children

Peanut allergy affects at least 4.5 million adults in the U.S., many of whom report developing their first allergy symptoms during adulthood. Although three out of four Americans with peanut allergy are over 17 years old, peanut allergy is often considered a predominantly pediatric concern. There are currently no FDA-approved therapies for patients with adult-onset food allergy.

11d

Retraction Watch

46

Why "good PhD students are worth gold!" A grad student finds an error

Researchers in the Netherlands have retracted and replaced a 2015 paper on attention after discovering a coding error that reversed their finding. Initially titled "Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation over Left Dorsolateral pFC on the Attentional Blink Depend on Individual Baseline Performance," the paper appeared in the Journal of Clinical Neuroscience and was written … Continue re

12d

ScienceDaily

45

Animal evolution: glimpses of ancient environments

Zoologists report the discovery of a trove of fossil fly larvae, and an intriguing caterpillar, encapsulated in samples of amber that are tens of millions of years old.

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Phys.org

45

US officially back in Paris accord, vows climate action

US Paris Climate Accord

  •  

The United States on Friday officially returned to the Paris climate accord, with President Joe Biden vowing to make the fight against global warming a top priority.

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Discover Magazine

45

Continental Drift: A Revolutionary Theory That Was Once Considered Pseudoscience

In the early 20th century, one man withstood a lifetime of ridicule to uphold the revolutionary idea that land masses move.

1d

Phys.org

45

Mitochondria: New data sheds light on genesis of our body's powerhouses

Scientists uncover for the first time how the body's energy makers are made using Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) at eBIC within Diamond which is based in Oxfordshire.

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Science & technology

45

Scientists decode the genome of million-year-old mammoths

Pushing the limits of a technique that has revolutionised palaeontology

2d

Phys.org

45

Bosnia village with link to Mars enthralled by rover landing

Bosnian villagers are preparing to gather in front of a video screen in the yard of their community's only school to watch NASA's Mars rover attempt a difficult landing Thursday in a crater on the red planet named after their small village.

3d

Phys.org

45

Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide with a platinum-gold nanoparticle catalyst

Hydrogen peroxide diluted in water is used as a disinfectant to treat wounds. It is widely used across the industry as an eco-friendly oxidizing agent for removing impurities from semiconductors, for waste treatment, and other applications. Currently, it is mainly produced by the sequential hydrogenation and oxidation of anthraquinone (AQ). However, this process is not only energy intensive and re

4d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

45

CPAP treatment increases physical activity in adults with sleep apnea, heart disease

A new study found that treating obstructive sleep apnea with CPAP therapy increased self-reported physical activity in adults with a history of heart disease.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

45

Study finds alligator hearts keep beating no matter what

Mammals and cold-blooded alligators share a common four-chamber heart structure—unique among reptiles—but that's where the similarities end. Unlike humans and other mammals, whose hearts can fibrillate under stress, alligators have built-in antiarrhythmic protection. The findings from new research were reported Jan. 27 in the journal Integrative Organismal Biology.

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Phys.org

45

China faces substantially hotter summers and winters by 2050

Temperatures in China may increase dramatically within the next three decades as the country begins to feel the effects of global greenhouse gas emissions, new research has shown.

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Undark Magazine

45

Solitary Confinement May Worsen Covid-19 Transmission in Prisons

In prisons, punitive isolation may increase Covid-19 transmission because it deters prisoners from reporting symptoms and seeking treatment. Yet, during the first Covid-19 peak in April, there was a 500 percent increase in solitary confinement. Physicians are calling for the practice to change.

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Science Advances current issue

45

Mitovesicles are a novel population of extracellular vesicles of mitochondrial origin altered in Down syndrome

Mitochondrial dysfunction is an established hallmark of aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Using a high-resolution density gradient separation of extracellular vesicles (EVs) isolated from murine and human DS and diploid control brains, we identify and characterize a previously unknown population of double-membraned EVs containing multip

8d

Science | Smithsonian Magazine

45

Six Ways to Celebrate Perseverance This February

Be a part of NASA's Perseverance rover landing this February with these six ways to celebrate the mission to Mars

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Science Magazine

45

A revealing flaw

[no content]

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forskning.se

45

Sämre livskvalité med tappat luktsinne

Att tappa luktsinnet, exempelvis i samband med covid-19, skapar en rad problem för den som drabbas. Viktminskning, nedstämdhet och försämrade sociala relationer är några av konsekvenserna som bidrar till en försämrad livskvalité. Det är vanligt att personer med covid-19 rapporterar att de har tappat förmågan att känna lukter. Steven Nordin är professor i psykologi vid Umeå universitet och har stu

10d

Ingeniøren

45

Njals Tårn: Svage søjler sår tvivl om holdbarheden af nyt fundament

PLUS. Ifølge ekspert er det formentlig nødvendigt at forstærke svage søjler i Njals Tårn. Det sætter Bach Gruppens nye fundamentsplan under pres.

11d

ScienceDaily

45

Molecular sleuthing identifies and corrects major flaws in blood-brain barrier model

A type of cell derived from human stem cells that has been widely used for brain research and drug development may have been leading researchers astray for years, according to a new study.

12d

Phys.org

45

Researchers develop flexible crystal, paving the way for more efficient bendable electronics

A team of researchers led by Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than its competitors, opening the way to better micro machines.

12d

ScienceDaily

45

Marmoset monkeys have personalities too

In humans, differences in personalities have been evident since the ancient times. Personality in animals has long been ignored, but recently this question has received increasing research interest as it has been realized that personality has evolutionary and ecological significance. Behavioral biologists have now designed and used a set of tasks to assess personality of common marmosets.

12d

Popular Science | RSS

45

Best all-in-one printer: Upgrade your home office with these multitasking machines

Cover all you work needs with one appliance . (Israel Andrade via Unsplash/) Nowadays, technology is all about consolidation, and a printer is no exception. An all-in-one printer is a great way to save space, stay productive, and maybe have a little fun along the way. These powerful machines are great for home and office use. You can use these gadgets to not only print but scan, copy, and fax you

12d

ScienceDaily

44

Spin hall effect of light with near 100% efficiency

A research team has successfully developed a technique to reach near-unity efficiency of SHEL by using an artificially-designed metasurface.

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ScienceDaily

44

Researchers uncover new information on the effects of antidepressants

The findings of a new study challenge the prevailing thinking on the primary role of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in the effects of antidepressants.

1d

ScienceDaily

44

Swimming upstream on sound waves

Scientists have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionizing the field of medicine.

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ScienceDaily

44

Origin of life: Did Darwinian evolution begin before life itself?

A study done by physicists demonstrates that fundamental characteristics of polymeric molecules, such as their subunit composition, are sufficient to trigger selection processes in a plausible prebiotic setting.

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Scientific American Content

44

How Will the Coronavirus Evolve?

If we're lucky, mutations will make SARS-CoV-2 less lethal, as happened with the 1918 flu—but there's no guarantee of that — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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ScienceDaily

44

Shale gas development in PA increases exposure of some to air pollutants

Air pollution levels may have exceeded air quality standards during the development of some Marcellus Shale natural gas wells in Pennsylvania, potentially impacting more than 36,000 people in one year alone during the drilling boom, according to scientists.

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ScienceDaily

44

Blueprint for fault-tolerant qubits

Building a quantum computer is a challenging task because of the fragility of quantum bits. To deal with this problem, various types of active error correction techniques have been developed. In contrast, researchers have now proposed a design for an inherently fault protected circuit with passive error correction that could significantly accelerate the construction of a quantum computer with a la

1d

Phys.org

44

Has Earth been visited by an alien spaceship? Harvard Professor Avi Loeb vs. everybody else

A highly unusual object was spotted traveling through the solar system in 2017. Given a Hawaiian name,ʻOumuamua, it was small and elongated—a few hundred meters by a few tens of meters, traveling at a speed fast enough to escape the Sun's gravity and move into interstellar space.

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ScienceDaily

44

Do sweat it! Wearable microfluidic sensor to measure lactate concentration in real time

Lactate, a compound present in sweat, is an important biomarker to quantify during exercise. However, available wearable sensors can cause skin irritation, which calls for the use of different materials. In a recent study, scientists have developed a soft and nonirritating microfluidic sensor for the real-time measurement of lactate concentration in sweat. This wearable device will help monitor th

2d

ScienceDaily

44

How inflammatory signalling molecules contribute to carcinogenesis

Researchers have managed to identify a previously unknown molecular connection between an inflammatory signalling molecule and one of the main oncogenes.

3d

ScienceDaily

44

Making swimming pools safer by reducing chlorine disinfection byproducts

Swimming in indoor or outdoor pools is a healthy form of exercise and recreation for many people. However, studies have linked compounds that arise from chlorine disinfection of the pools to respiratory problems, including asthma, in avid swimmers. Now, researchers have found that using a complementary form of disinfection, known as copper-silver ionization (CSI), can decrease disinfection byprodu

3d

Phys.org

44

Quick identification of high-performance, multi-element catalysts

Many electrochemical reactions go through several steps. Each should be optimized on a catalyst surface if possible, but different requirements apply to each step. "Since previous catalysts usually had only one optimized functionality, one could only make the best compromise possible, and energy losses could not be avoided," explains Professor Wolfgang Schuhmann from the Center for Electrochemistr

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ScienceDaily

44

Antibody-based COVID-19 treatments work best in concert with immune cells

Antibody-based drugs have been authorized for emergency use in COVID-19 patients by the Food and Drug Administration. Researchers have discovered that the ability to interact with other elements of the immune system is an indispensable part of the effectiveness of such antibodies. The findings could help improve the design of the next generation of antibody-based COVID-19 drugs.

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ScienceDaily

44

Star employees get most of the credit – and blame

Working with a 'star' employee – someone who demonstrates exceptional performance and enjoys broad visibility relative to industry peers – offers both risks and rewards, according to new research.

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ScienceDaily

44

A sharper look at the interior of semiconductors

A research team has developed a high-resolution imaging method based on extreme short-wave UV light. It can be used to examine internal structures in semiconductors non-destructively, and with nanometer precision.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

44

Luminescent windows generate energy from inside and out

Engineers design and build windowpanes that redirect sunlight or illumination from indoors to edge-band solar cells.

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The Scientist RSS

44

High Profile Developmental Biologist Lewis Wolpert Dies at 91

Wolpert, who conducted research at University College London, was known for his work on morphogenesis and pattern development in embryos and for his multiple books and broadcast appearances.

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ScienceDaily

44

Switching to firm contracts may prevent natural gas fuel shortages at US power plants

New research now indicates that these fuel shortages are not due to failures of pipelines and that in certain areas of the country a change in how gas is purchased can significantly reduce generator outages.

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ScienceDaily

44

Counterintuitive approach may improve eyewitness identification

Experts have devised a novel approach to selecting photos for police lineups that helps witnesses identify culprits more reliably.

4d

ScienceDaily

44

Photosynthetic bacteria-based cancer optotheranostics

Natural purple photosynthetic bacteria (PPSB) can play a key role as a highly active cancer immunotheranostics agent that uses the bio-optical-window I and II near-infrared (NIR) light. PPSB have high tumor specificity and non-pathogenicity. Active anticancer efficacy and powerful multi-functions such as NIR-I-to-NIR-II fluorescence, photothermal conversion, reactive oxygen species generation, and

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

44

Climate change forces rethinking of conservation biology planning

For more than a decade, governments in countries across the world have made significant progress to expand their protected areas network to conserve the planet's biodiversity. According to a new study published in the journal Global Change Biology, the locations of these protected areas do not take into account the potential long-term effects of climate change in these protected areas.

4d

Phys.org

44

Climate change forces rethinking of conservation biology planning

For more than a decade, governments in countries across the world have made significant progress to expand their protected areas network to conserve the planet's biodiversity. According to a new study published in the journal Global Change Biology, the locations of these protected areas do not take into account the potential long-term effects of climate change in these protected areas.

4d

ScienceDaily

44

First humans in Tasmania must have seen spectacular auroras

A small sub-alpine lake in western Tasmania has helped establish that 41,000 years ago Australia experienced the Laschamp geomagnetic excursion and that Tasmanian, Aboriginals, would've seen it.

4d

ScienceDaily

44

Tropical paper wasps babysit for neighbors

Wasps provide crucial support to their extended families by babysitting at neighboring nests, according to new research.

5d

Phys.org

44

Researchers demonstrate self-sterilizing polymers work against SARS-CoV-2

Researchers from North Carolina State University, Boston University and Kraton Corporation have demonstrated a family of self-sterilizing polymers that are effective at inactivating coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2—the virus that causes COVID-19. The work opens the door to a suite of applications that could help to reduce the transmission of COVID-19 and other diseases.

5d

ScienceDaily

44

Higher elevation birds sport thicker down

A new study examines feathers across 249 species of Himalayan songbirds, finding that birds at higher elevations have more of fluffy down than lower elevation birds. Finding such a clear pattern across many species underscores how important feathers are to birds' ability to adapt to their environments. Furthermore, finding that birds from colder environments tend to have more down may one day help

5d

ScienceDaily

44

Invasive flies prefer untouched territory when laying eggs

A recent study finds that the invasive spotted wing drosophila (Drosophila suzukii) prefers to lay its eggs in places that no other spotted wing flies have visited. The finding raises questions about how the flies can tell whether a piece of fruit is virgin territory – and what that might mean for pest control.

5d

Phys.org

44

The keys to a major boost for hybrid wheat breeding

A new study, led by researchers from The University of Western Australia and scientists and expert plant breeders from Limagrain is set to revolutionize the future of wheat production, with three genes identified that will enable the breeding of hybrid wheat crops that promise higher yields and better disease and environmental tolerance.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

44

The keys to a major boost for hybrid wheat breeding

A new study, led by researchers from The University of Western Australia and scientists and expert plant breeders from Limagrain is set to revolutionize the future of wheat production, with three genes identified that will enable the breeding of hybrid wheat crops that promise higher yields and better disease and environmental tolerance.

5d

Phys.org

44

Managing crab and lobster catches could offer long-term benefits

The UK's commercial fishing industry is currently experiencing a number of serious challenges.

5d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

44

Managing crab and lobster catches could offer long-term benefits

The UK's commercial fishing industry is currently experiencing a number of serious challenges.

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Science | The Guardian

44

Don Hunter obituary

My brother-in-law Don Hunter, who has died aged 93, was a physicist who worked on some of the first electronic computers at Cambridge University and later helped set up one of the first major computer software companies in the UK. Don worked as a research assistant in the Mathematical Laboratory in Cambridge from 1949 until 1952. There he was involved in pioneering work on the electronic delay st

6d

ScienceDaily

44

Applying quantum computing to a particle process

Researchers used a quantum computer to successfully simulate an aspect of particle collisions that is typically neglected in high-energy physics experiments, such as those that occur at CERN's Large Hadron Collider.

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Popular Science | RSS

44

5 workout gear upgrades that are actually worth it

Your muscles deserve better than your ratty old workout gear. deck yourself out in the right duds and you'll upgrade both your performance and your style. (Amanda Ringstad/) Sure, you can work out in those floppy old sweatpants and a promotional T-shirt for a fun run that happened when The Office was still on the air, but you're doing your muscles a disservice. Stepping up your gym attire can mak

8d

ScienceDaily

44

Wake-up call for neural stem cells

A brain enzyme activates dormant neural stem cells, revealing how defects in its gene could lead to neurodevelopmental disorders.

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Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

44

Världsunik svensk studie ska jämföra covidvacciners effektivitet

Region Uppsala och forskare vid Uppsala universitet har senaste halvåret planerat för en studie där man jämför de godkända covid-19 vaccinernas effektivitet under vaccinationsprogrammets gång. Om planerna godkänns blir det första gången man gör en randomiserad studie som jämför vaccinerna med varandra.

8d

Phys.org

44

Iridium-catalyzed Z-retentive asymmetric allylic substitution reactions

In synthetic organic chemistry, Z-olefins are a challenging synthetic target to produce in the lab due to their relative thermodynamic instability. The Z-olefins form an unsaturated compound with a CnH2n formula that can be readily isomerized. Analogous reactions used to synthesize optically active Z-olefin products are rare. In a new report now published on Science, Ru Jiang and a research team a

9d

Ingeniøren

44

Forbud mod gamle brændeovne sænker kun partikelforureningen marginalt

PLUS. Hvis vi skal leve op til EU-krav om at halvere partikeludledningen i Danmark, skal vi satse på, at brændefyringen fortsat falder.

9d

ScienceDaily

44

'Defective' carbon simplifies hydrogen peroxide production

Scientists introduce a new catalyst to reduce oxygen to widely used hydrogen peroxide. The process sidesteps complex and expensive processes that generate toxic organic byproducts and large amounts of wastewater.

10d

Phys.org

44

Smaller, more power devices possible with new technique

Shrinking semiconductors even further would enable a whole new silicon revolution. But because that's impossible, the next best hope is integrating semiconductors with 2-D atomically-thin materials, such as graphene, upon which circuits can be created on an incredibly small scale. A research team reports a new method to make this notoriously difficult combination work on an industrial scale.

10d

Retraction Watch

44

20 ways to spot the work of paper mills

Last year, Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology found itself on the receiving end of what its editor Roland Seifert called a "massive attack of fraudulent papers" that were the product of paper mills. In response Seifert — who says the journal ultimately will have retracted 10 of those articles and stopped another 30 from being published … Continue reading

11d

ScienceDaily

44

3D printing polymers

Researchers have developed the first 3D-printable 'bottlebrush' elastomer. The new material results in printed objects that have unusual softness and elasticity — mechanical properties that closely resemble those of human tissue.

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ScienceDaily

44

Diversity of genetic changes that cause inherited kidney disease

A study has described genetic changes in patients with the most common form of hereditary kidney disease that affects an estimated 12.5 million people worldwide. The research, which focussed on Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in Ireland, provides insights into PKD that will assist doctors and patients in the management of this of inherited condition.

12d

Phys.org

43

Was there ever life on Mars? NASA's Perseverance rover wants to find out

Seven months in space, a mission that was decades in the making and cost billions of dollars, all to answer the question: was there ever life on Mars?

2d

Phys.org

43

Nanotechnologies reduce friction and improve durability of materials

A team of scientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI and Immanuel Kant Baltic State Federal University suggested using innovative thin films to considerably reduce friction and thus increase the durability of surfaces in mechanisms. This discovery can be important for many fields, from medicine to space technologies.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

43

Scientists create a framework to test the predictions of biological optimality theories, including evolution

Evolution adapts and optimizes organisms to their ecological niche. This could be used to predict how an organism evolves, but how can such predictions be rigorously tested?

4d

Phys.org

43

American plant could have huge benefits for UK diet and the environment

Scientists have found that a plant native to America has potential to be grown in the UK, bringing with it huge benefits for a balanced, sustainable diet.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

43

American plant could have huge benefits for UK diet and the environment

Scientists have found that a plant native to America has potential to be grown in the UK, bringing with it huge benefits for a balanced, sustainable diet.

5d

Nautilus

43

A Simple Way to Reduce Cognitive Bias – Facts So Romantic

It's encouraging to know that merely paying attention to the details of your environment can make you a little more rational. Illustration by yulianas / Shutterstock Would you like to be more rational? Of course you would. Who doesn't want to behave and think more reasonably? Good news: New research , from Harvard psychologist Ellen Langer, suggests mindfulness, or at least an aspect of it, can h

7d

ScienceDaily

43

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit

We tend to avoid choosing apples with brown spots, assuming that they taste bad. But if we are to end food waste, we'll need to upend that assumption. Researcher emphasizes that there's nothing wrong with oddly shaped or slightly bruised apples.

12d

Livescience.com

42

Now that Perseverance has landed on Mars, what will the rover do inside Jezero Crater?

Looking at the engineering and science behind selecting samples for NASA's Perseverance rover.

1d

Phys.org

42

New snake species and genus discovered in Myanmar

Mud snakes (family Homalopsidae) live in wetlands across Southeast Asia. Their habitats include natural swamps and open lands flooded during the rainy season, typically rice paddies. Scientists of the Senckenberg Research Institute in Frankfurt and the East Yangon University have now discovered a new species in a wetland near the university campus. "We collected four individuals with short tails d

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Big Think

42

4 tips for college students to avoid procrastinating with their online work

If you take classes online, chances are you probably procrastinate from time to time. Research shows that more than 70% of college students procrastinate, with about 20% consistently doing it all the time. Procrastination is putting off starting or finishing a task despite knowing that it will seriously compromise the quality of your work – for instance, putting off a major class project until th

2d

Phys.org

42

Giant predatory worms roamed the seafloor until 5.3 million years ago

An international study in which the University of Granada participated—recently published in the journal Scientific Reports—has identified a new fossil record of giant predatory worms in the northeast of Taiwan (China), in marine sediments from the Miocene Age (between 23 and 5.3 million years ago)

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

42

Giant predatory worms roamed the seafloor until 5.3 million years ago

An international study in which the University of Granada participated—recently published in the journal Scientific Reports—has identified a new fossil record of giant predatory worms in the northeast of Taiwan (China), in marine sediments from the Miocene Age (between 23 and 5.3 million years ago)

2d

Phys.org

42

Signals in optical band can be used as probe to detect atmosphere escape of hot Jupiters

YAN Dongdong, GUO Jianheng and Xing Lei from Yunnan Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, collaborating with Huang Chenliang from University of Arizona, deduced that there is an expanding and escaping thermal neutral hydrogen atmosphere around hot Jupiter WASP-121b by simulating the optical transmission spectrum (Hα) of this exoplanet. The study was published in The Astrophysical Journ

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Science

42

Indian companies urge New Delhi to let them help with vaccine drive

State-controlled campaign falters on software glitches and limited capacity

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ScienceDaily

42

Shrubs and soils: A hot topic in the cool tundra

As the climate warms in the Arctic, shrubs expand towards higher latitudes and altitudes. Researchers investigated the impacts of dwarf shrubs on tundra soils in the sub-Arctic Fennoscandia.

4d

Phys.org

42

Scientists create a framework to test the predictions of biological optimality theories, including evolution

Evolution adapts and optimizes organisms to their ecological niche. This could be used to predict how an organism evolves, but how can such predictions be rigorously tested?

4d

NPR

42

A Look At The New U.S. Coronavirus Variants

In recent months, we've learned about several new variants of the coronavirus that have popped up in the U.S. Scientists recently reported seven new and distinct variants.

5d

Phys.org

42

Is the Brunt Ice Shelf on the brink?

In early 2019, all eyes were fixed on the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, where a massive iceberg, around the size of Greater London, appeared poised to break off. Almost two years later, the berg is desperately clinging on, although current data indicate calving is imminent. A new crack, spotted in images captured by the Copernicus Sentinel missions, now suggests the potential for calving of multi

8d

NeuroLogica Blog

42

Solar Power is Cost Effective

There are many reasons to switch to a source of energy that is clean and renewable, such as rooftop solar for homes. The most obvious is that renewable energy reduces your carbon footprint. I still will here people cite misinformation that making solar panels produces more carbon than they save, but this is simply not true. Lifetime analysis of both carbon footprint and energy efficiency indicate

9d

ScienceDaily

41

Cone snail venom shows potential for treating severe malaria

Using venom from a cone snail, a new study suggests these conotoxins may potentially treat malaria. The study provides important leads toward the development of new and cost-effective anti-adhesion or blockade-therapy drugs aimed at counteracting the pathology of severe malaria. Similarly, mitigation of emerging diseases like COVID-19 also could benefit from conotoxins as potential inhibitors of p

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

41

Mitochondria: New data sheds light on genesis of our body's powerhouses

Scientists uncover for the first time how the body's energy makers are made using Cryo-Electron Microscopy (cryo-EM) at eBIC within Diamond which is based in Oxfordshire.

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New Scientist

41

AI can use the veins on your hand like fingerprints to identify you

Veins in the back of your hand are as unique as fingerprints and can be used to identify you without specialist hardware

7d

Phys.org

41

Air pollution caused 1 out of 5 deaths in 2018—that's more than 8 million, study says

Microscopic, and sometimes larger, particles of soot, smoke and dust that spew out of gas-guzzling factories, ships, cars and aircraft are responsible for 18% of total global deaths in 2018—that equals more than 8 million people, a new study found.

9d

Phys.org

41

Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues—something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change. The results have been published in the scientific journal iScience.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

41

Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues—something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change. The results have been published in the scientific journal iScience.

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Scientific American Content

41

Society's End-of-Life Problem

Americans have unequal access to the benefits of advance care planning — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

10d

ScienceDaily

41

21 per cent of all citations go to the elite

In the last 15 years, elite researchers have increased their share of citations from 14 to 21 per cent, new research shows. The uneven distribution can have negative consequences for research.

11d

ScienceDaily

41

How cells recycle the machinery that drives their motility?

Research groups have discovered a new molecular mechanism that promotes cell migration. The discovery sheds light on the mechanisms that drive uncontrolled movement of cancer cells, and also revises the 'text book view' of cell migration.

11d

Phys.org

41

Researchers use hot nano-chisel to create artificial bones in a Petri dish

A holy grail for orthopedic research is a method for not only creating artificial bone tissue that precisely matches the real thing, but does so in such microscopic detail that it includes tiny structures potentially important for stem cell differentiation, which is key to bone regeneration.

11d

Phys.org

41

Quality education essential to closing the growing global skills gap

With rapid educational expansion in many developing countries, much progress has been made in terms of access to education. According to a new IIASA-led study, being in school is however not the same as learning and this expansion in quantity may come at the expense of quality, with the possible negative implications of the current COVID-19 pandemic on schooling possibly exacerbating the situation

12d

ScienceDaily

40

Study suggests link between DNA and marriage satisfaction in newlyweds

Psychologists suggest a link between DNA and traits beneficial to bonding and satisfaction in first years of marriage.

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ScienceDaily

40

COVID-19: Future targets for treatments rapidly identified with new computer simulations

Researchers have detailed a mechanism in the distinctive corona of COVID-19 that could help scientists to rapidly find new treatments for the virus, and quickly test whether existing treatments are likely to work with mutated versions as they develop.

1d

Phys.org

40

New study contradicts pseudoscientific beliefs about the influence of the moon on agriculture

A research team from the Botanical Garden and Department of Experimental and Social Sciences Education of the Faculty of Teacher Training of the University of Valencia warns of the risk of pseudoscience in relation with myths or beliefs about the influence of the moon on agriculture. The findings of this scientific review of over 100 papers (including scientific articles, papers and higher educati

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ScienceDaily

40

New route to forming complex crystals

When materials reach extremely small size scales, strange things begin to happen. One of those phenomena is the formation of mesocrystals.

2d

ScienceDaily

40

Researchers develop tiny sensor for measuring subtle pressure changes inside the body

Researchers have developed an extremely sensitive miniaturized optical fiber sensor that could one day be used to measure small pressure changes in the body.

2d

Phys.org

40

Climate change and fire suppression

The unprecedented and deadly blazes that engulfed the American West in 2020 attest to the increasing number, size and severity of wildfires in the region. And while scientists predict the climate crisis will exacerbate this situation, there's still much discussion around its contributing factors.

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ScienceDaily

40

The market advantage of a feminine brand name

Linguistically feminine brand names are perceived by consumers as warmer and are therefore better liked and more frequently chosen.

3d

ScienceDaily

40

Plastic recycling results in rare metals being found in children's toys and food packaging

Scientists tested a range of new and used products – including children's toys, office equipment and cosmetic containers – and found they contained quantities of rare earth elements.

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ScienceDaily

40

Thermal energy storage with new solution meant to ease grid stress

Scientists have developed a simple way to better evaluate the potential of novel materials to store or release heat on demand in your home, office, or other building in a way that more efficiently manages the building's energy use.

3d

Phys.org

40

Greece races to restore power grid as cold snap recedes

Crews in Greece on Wednesday raced to restore power to tens of thousands of homes as a severe cold front receded after bringing heavy snowfall and gale-force winds that left three dead.

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ScienceDaily

40

Early step toward leukemia drug therapy

The team has discovered that for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, there is a dopamine receptor pathway that becomes abnormally activated in the cancer stem cells. This inspired the clinical investigation of a dopamine receptor-inhibiting drug thioridazine as a new therapy for patients, and their focus on adult AML has revealed encouraging results.

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ScienceDaily

40

Can evolution be predicted?

Evolution adapts and optimizes organisms to their ecological niche. This could be used to predict how an organism evolves, but how can such predictions be rigorously tested? Researchers have now created a mathematical framework to do exactly that.

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ScienceDaily

40

Luminescent windows generate energy from inside and out

Engineers design and build windowpanes that redirect sunlight or illumination from indoors to edge-band solar cells.

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ScienceDaily

40

Breakthrough in the fight against spruce bark beetles

For the first time, a research team has mapped out exactly what happens when spruce bark beetles use their sense of smell to find trees and partners to reproduce with. The hope is that the results will lead to better pest control and protection of the forest in the future.

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Popular Science | RSS

40

Best vacuum for pet hair: Get a fur-free home with these powerful dustbusters

No matter how much hair, these vacuums have you covered. (Jamie Street via Unsplash/) Pet hair is one of the only downsides to owning a pet. Whether it's dust bunnies on hard surfaces, stray hairs on soft furnishings, or a layer of fluff on pretty much everything you own, there are very few dogs and cats that don't shed hair at all. And while there are various solutions—from restricting the areas

4d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

40

Structured sequences emerge from random pool when replicated by templated ligation [Evolution]

The central question in the origin of life is to understand how structure can emerge from randomness. The Eigen theory of replication states, for sequences that are copied one base at a time, that the replication fidelity has to surpass an error threshold to avoid that replicated specific sequences become…

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ScienceDaily

40

TB study reveals potential targets to treat and control infection

Researchers may have found a new pathway to treat and control tuberculosis (TB), the disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Using single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNAseq), a next-generation sequencing technology, scientists were able to further define the mechanisms that lead to TB infection and latency.

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forskning.se

40

Miljögifter påverkar grodors barn och barnbarn

Det hormonstörande bekämpningsmedlet linuron drabbar inte bara de grodor som exponerats för ämnet som yngel, utan även deras barn och barnbarn. Barnen får en minskad kroppsvikt och sänkt fertilitet. Barnbarnen däremot ökar i kroppsvikt och får en störd ämnesomsättning. – Resultaten visar att djur som skadats av miljöfarliga ämnen kan föra över dessa effekter till kommande generationer vilket demo

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Phys.org

40

Sloshing quantum fluids of light and matter to probe superfluidity

The 'sloshing' of a quantum fluid comprised of light and matter reveals superfluid properties.

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Phys.org

40

Experimental demonstration of measurement-dependent realities possible, researcher says

Shoe shops sell a variety of shoe sizes to accommodate a variety of foot sizes—but what if both the shoe and foot size depended on how it was measured? Recent developments in quantum theory suggest that the available values of a physical quantity, such as a foot size, can depend on the type of measurement used to determine them. If feet were governed by the laws of quantum mechanics, foot size wou

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Science

40

Trump's vaccine tsar launches European biotech roll-up

Moncef Slaoui promises to use lessons of Operation Warp Speed to take on Big Pharma

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ScienceDaily

40

Managing crab and lobster catches could offer long-term benefits

A study has found that managing the density of crab and lobster pots at an optimum level increases the quality of catch, benefits the marine environment and makes the industry more sustainable in the long term.

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Viden

40

Mere end en øjebæ fra 80'erne? Derfor er paraboler stadig uundværlige

Den første parabol blev opfundet helt tilbage i 1500-tallet.

6d

ScienceDaily

40

Diving into the mysteries of mate selection

In your quest for true love and that elusive happily ever after, are you waiting for the 'right' person to come along, or do you find yourself going for the cutest guy or girl in the room, hoping things will work out? Do you leave your options open, hoping to 'trade-up' at the next opportunity, or do you invest in your relationship with an eye on the cost-benefits analysis?

7d

ScienceDaily

40

Study may lead to solutions for overeating

The 10-member team made discoveries about a specific area of the brain tied to recollection and the desire to seek and consume food. It could lead to a way to inhibit the desire to overeat.

7d

Science

40

Climate graphic of the week: Saharan dust coats the ski slopes

Larger quantities of particles than usual deposited during annual weather phenomenon

7d

ScienceDaily

40

Genomic test helps estimate risk of prostate cancer metastasis, death

A commercially available genomic test may help oncologists better determine which patients with recurrent prostate cancer may benefit from hormone therapy, according to new research.

8d

Phys.org

40

'Sex, lasers and male competition:' fruit flies win genetic race with rivals

Scientists have accepted natural selection as a driver of evolution for more than 160 years, thanks to Charles Darwin.

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ScienceDaily

40

Small mammals climb higher to flee warming temperatures in the Rockies

The golden-mantled ground squirrel is one of the most photographed animals in the Rocky Mountains. It's also joining many other species of rodents and shrews in Colorado that are making an ominous trek: They're climbing uphill to escape from climate change.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

40

Solar awnings over parking lots help companies and customers

Engineers look into the untapped potential of parking lots in a study that investigates the energy-related benefits of developing charging stations powered with solar canopies built into the parking infrastructure of large-scale retailers.

8d

Phys.org

40

ESA Mars orbiters support NASA Perseverance landing

NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover is due to land on the Red Planet at 21:43 CET on 18 February 2021. In order to communicate with Earth from its landing site in Jezero Crater, the rover will rely on spacecraft orbiting Mars to relay the images and other data it collects back to Earth and pass on the commands from engineers beamed across space in the other direction.

8d

Phys.org

40

Three storms have dumped snow on Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea

The words "snow" and "Hawai'i" are not often mentioned in the same paragraph—or even on the same vacation. But snow does fall in Hawai'i almost every year, and 2021 has seen a deep cold front drop snow on the summits of Mauna Loa and Mauna Kea on the Big Island at least three times in the past few weeks—as well as on Haleakala on Maui. This means there are currently in snowcaps on Hawai'i's three

8d

ScienceDaily

40

Vaporised crusts of Earth-like planets found in dying stars

Remnants of planets with Earth-like crusts have been discovered in the atmospheres of four nearby white dwarf stars by astronomers, offering a glimpse of the planets that may have once orbited them up to billions of years ago.

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The Scientist RSS

40

Spectrum Reporting Prompts New Review of Common Drug

The review of more than two dozen studies finds aripiprazole has side effects and does not change core autism features, but parents report improvements in self-injury, tantrums, and other challenging behaviors.

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ScienceDaily

40

Virtual reality helping to treat fear of heights

Researchers have developed a virtual reality app for smartphones to reduce fear of heights. Now, they have conducted a clinical trial to study its efficacy. Trial participants who spent a total of four hours training with the app at home showed an improvement in their ability to handle real height situations.

9d

Phys.org

40

New ways to 'see' under melting Antarctic ice shelves for more accurate climate modelling

A breakthrough by Australian climate modeling researchers has led to a deeper understanding of the micro-scale processes that melt Antarctic ice shelves from below.

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Phys.org

40

As new probes reach Mars, here's what we know so far from trips to the red planet

Three new spacecraft are due to arrive at Mars this month, ending their seven-month journey through space.

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ScienceDaily

40

COVID-19 vs. conservation: How the northern white rhino rescue programme overcame challenges

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the life of people everywhere and affected economic, cultural, social and political processes. Research and conservation are not exempt from these negative effects, whereas positive consequences of an 'anthropause' on the environment are controversially discussed.

11d

ScienceDaily

40

High greenhouse gas emissions from Siberian Inland Waters

Rivers and lakes at high latitudes are considered to be major sources for greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, but these losses are poorly constrained. Researchers quantify carbon emissions from rivers and lakes across Western Siberia, finding that emission are high and exceed carbon export to the Arctic Ocean.

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ScienceDaily

40

Limiting warming to 2 degrees Celsius requires emissions reductions 80% above Paris Agreement targets

Even if all countries meet their Paris Agreement goals for reducing emissions, Earth has only a 5% chance of staying below 2 C warming this century, a 2017 study showed. But reductions about 80% more ambitious, or an average of 1.8% drop in emissions per year rather than 1% per year, would be enough to meet the agreement's stated goal, analysis shows.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

40

Regular walnut consumption may reduce negative outcomes of H. pylori infection

A new animal study, published in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition , suggests regular walnut consumption may be a promising intervention for reducing negative outcomes associated with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, a widespread bacterial infection that affects more than half of the world's population.

11d

ScienceDaily

40

Mean or nice? These traits could make or break a child's friendships

While it's logical to assume that children who are mean have friendships characterized by growing strife and that children who are nice report little of the same, these assumptions haven't been tested in real-world friendships. A study of elementary-school children is the first to examine the extent to which being 'nice' and being 'mean' shape changes in friend perceptions of their relationship. R

11d

Phys.org

40

Jupiter's Trojan asteroids offer surprises

A new study out this month suggests that Jupiter's Trojan asteroids may be more peculiar than previously thought. The Trojan asteroids are rocky objects which orbit the sun just ahead of and just behind the gas giant, in gravitational sweet spots known as Lagrange points. The swarm ahead of Jupiter, known as the L4 (Greek) group, is slightly larger than the L5 (Trojan) swarm behind, but until now,

11d

Phys.org

40

New factor in the carbon cycle of the Southern Ocean identified

Plankton are small organisms that drift with the currents in the seas and oceans. Despite their small size, they play an important planetary role due to their immense quantity. Photosynthesizing plankton, known as phytoplankton, for example, produce half of the oxygen in the atmosphere while binding huge amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2). Since the Southern Ocean around Antarctica is very rich in nu

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

40

Addressing breastfeeding disparities for African American mothers

An abundance of data underscore the importance of breastfeeding and human milk for the optimal health of infants, children, mothers, and society. But while breastfeeding initiation rates have increased to more than 80% in the US, a disparity exists for African American mothers and infants. In this group, breastfeeding is initiated only about 69% of the time.

12d

ScienceDaily

40

Mixed and matched: Integrating metal-organic frameworks into polymers for CO2 separation

Polymer matrices can be combined with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to enhance their performance for CO2 separation. However, it is challenging to find compatible interactions between MOFs and polymers for this purpose. Now, an international team of scientists has developed a simple strategy to incorporate zirconium-based MOFs into a polymer matrix via covalent bonds. The resulting membranes sho

12d

ScienceDaily

40

New clues to how SARS-CoV-2 infects cells

The molecular details of how SARS-CoV-2 enters cells and infects them are still not clear. Researchers have identified receptors that could be important players in the process.

12d

ScienceDaily

40

HIV: An innovative therapeutic breakthrough to optimize the immune system

Prompted by the need to improve conventional treatments for people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), a team has identified a therapeutic approach to restore the effectiveness of immune cells.

12d

ScienceDaily

39

'Classic triad' of symptoms misses positive COVID-19 cases, study finds

Extending the symptoms that trigger a PCR test for COVID-19 could help detect around a third more cases of the disease, new research shows.

1d

Ingeniøren

39

Plaster med tre sensorer skal måle kronisk syges tilstand

Et nyt plaster kan som det første af sin slags overvåge blodtryk og hjertefrekvens samt måle niveauer for blandt andet glukose og alkohol.

4d

Phys.org

39

How icebergs really melt—and what this could mean for climate change

Icebergs are melting faster than current models describe, according to a new study by mathematicians at the University of Sydney. The researchers have proposed a new model to more accurately represent the melt speed of icebergs into oceans.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

39

Comet or asteroid: What killed the dinosaurs and where did it come from?

It forever changed history when it crashed into Earth about 66 million years ago. The Chicxulub impactor, as it's known, left behind a crater off the coast of Mexico that spans 93 miles and runs 12 miles deep.

5d

Phys.org

39

Want to hire more women? Expand your short list

As more male-dominated industries look for ways to hire women, new Cornell University research offers employers a simple solution—make your initial job candidate short list longer.

9d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

39

Play and meaty food reduce hunting by cats

Domestic cats hunt wildlife less if owners play with them daily and feed them a meat-rich food, new research shows.

9d

ScienceDaily

38

Global study of 48 cities finds nature sanitizes 41.7 million tons of human waste a year

Researchers found that nature provides at least 18% of sanitation services in 48 cities worldwide, according to researchers in the United Kingdom and India. The study estimates that more than 2 million cubic meters of the cities' human waste is processed each year without engineered infrastructure. This includes pit latrine waste that gradually filters through the soil — a natural process that cl

1d

Phys.org

38

Mars rovers safe from lightning strikes, research finds

If experiments done in small bottles in a University of Oregon lab are accurate, the friction of colliding Martian dust particles are unlikely to generate big electrical storms or threaten the newly arrived exploration vehicles or, eventually, human visitors.

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Phys.org

38

The intensity of sunlight over decades related to ultra-fine, man-made dirt particles

Based on the long-term Potsdam radiation time series, ETH Professor Martin Wild and his collaborators have shown that variations in the intensity of sunlight over decades are down to ultra-fine, man-made dirt particles in the atmosphere.

2d

Ingeniøren

38

Sibiriske mammuttænder slår rekord: Dna-analyser gennembryder millionårs-muren

Svenske forskere har analyseret dna fra de første behårede mammutter, og hvad der ligner en hidtil ukendt mammutart, der levede for mere end en million år siden.

3d

Popular Science | RSS

38

Best snow boots: Trudge confidently through snowfall

Make sure you've got the right boots when you go out on your next adventure in the snow. (Katie McBroom via Unsplash/) To stay warm throughout the winter, you need to make sure you cover all your extremities: head, neck, fingers, and toes. Whether you're about to trudge through 18 inches of fresh snowfall or there is a bone-chilling wind rolling through, signaling flurries ahead, it's a good idea

3d

ScienceDaily

38

Perceiving predators: Understanding how plants 'sense' herbivore attack

Plants are known to possess solid immune response mechanisms. One such response is 'sensing' attack by herbivorous animals. Researchers discuss 'elicitors' — the molecules that initiate plant defense mechanisms against herbivore attack. He highlights the major types of elicitors and the underlying cellular signaling, and states that this could spur research on organic farming practices that could

3d

ScienceDaily

38

Solution to puzzling phenomenon may open door to improved Cold Spray efficiency

An international team of researchers has solved a puzzling phenomenon whereby strangely beautiful, vortex-like structures appear between materials deposited onto engineering components used in multiple settings – from space shuttles to household items and everyday transport vehicles The discovery may ultimately improve the efficiency of the 'Cold Spray' (CS) deposition process from which these str

4d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

38

COVID-19 linked to potentially dangerous eye abnormalities

Researchers using MRI have found significant abnormalities in the eyes of some people with severe COVID-19, according to a new study. The study results support the need for eye screening in these patients to provide appropriate treatment and management of potentially severe ophthalmological manifestations of COVID-19.

4d

Phys.org

38

A combined map of almost 15,000 dust storms on Mars

Data in the world of astronomy is spread out in so many different places. There are archives for instruments on individual spacecraft and telescopes. Sometimes all that is needed to get new insight out of old data is to collect it all together and analyze a whole set rather than isolated instances. That is exactly what happened recently when a team from the Harvard Center for Astrophysics collecte

4d

Phys.org

38

Greek travel chaos after heavy snowfall

Greek travellers faced major disruption to road and sea transport on Monday after strong winds and heavy snowfall that have made conditions even more miserable in the country's migrant camps.

5d

The Atlantic

38

The Commons

The Last Children of Down Syndrome Prenatal testing is changing who gets born and who doesn't, Sarah Zhang wrote in the December issue. This is just the beginning. "The Last Children of Down Syndrome" was well written, thought-provoking, and emotional. I did not have prenatal testing, and at the age of 29 I gave birth to a son with Down syndrome. It was a shock, to say the least. I am so glad tha

5d

Viden

38

'Hey folkens. Vi er testet positive': Tom Hanks' corona-åbenhed fik folk til at ændre adfærd

Skuespillerens corona-opslag på sociale medier fik folk til at søge mere information og tage flere forholdsregler.

8d

Undark Magazine

38

Book Review: In Praise of Breathing

Pulmonologist Michael J. Stephen's "Breath Taking" is a broad view of everything related to respiration, from the history of pulmonary medicine to the importance of environmental health. And in the midst of a respiratory pandemic, Stephen reflects on the communal nature of air and global health threats alike.

8d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

38

Promising new approach to stop growth of brain cancer cells

Inhibiting a key enzyme that controls a large network of proteins important in cell division and growth paves the way for a new class of drugs that could stop glioblastoma, a deadly brain cancer, from growing.

8d

Phys.org

38

Brazil presents disputed nature conservation scheme for Amazon region

Following fierce criticism over its environmental and climate policies, the Brazilian government on Wednesday presented a controversial program for the preservation of nature reserves in the Amazon region.

9d

Future(s) Studies

38

Farmers Are Having to Hack Their Own Tractors Just to Make Repairs – Owners are turning to hacked software from Eastern Europe as farm equipment companies won't license it to them directly.

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

38

New improved dog reference genome will aid a new generation of investigation

Researchers at Uppsala University and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences have used new methods for DNA sequencing and annotation to build a new, and more complete, dog reference genome. This tool will serve as the foundation for a new era of research, helping scientists to better understand the link between DNA and disease, in dogs and in their human friends. The research is presented

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

38

New method for asymmetric N,N-acetal synthesis promises advances in drug development

Chiral N,N-acetals are an important component of several bioactive drugs and medicines. Owing to this, chemical reactions that lead to high-purity yield of the desired 'enantiomeric' form are highly sought after. In a new study, scientists from Japan demonstrate high selectivity formation of N,N-acetals from reactions between 2-aminobenzamide and various diketones in presence of bis(imidazoline)-p

11d

Phys.org

38

The quantum advantage: a novel demonstration

Is a quantum machine really more efficient than a conventional machine for performing calculations? Demonstrating this 'advantage' experimentally is particularly complex and a major research challenge around the world.

12d

NPR

37

Wisconsin Biologist Charged In Caviar Scam

The top sturgeon biologist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and several others have been charged with crimes related to an illegal sturgeon caviar bartering ring.

11h

ScienceDaily

37

Scientists identify over 140,000 virus species in the human gut

Viruses are the most numerous biological entities on the planet. Now researchers have identified over 140,000 viral species living in the human gut, more than half of which have never been seen before.

1d

Phys.org

37

New research shows parents are major producers of child sexual abuse material

Child sexual abuse material—images and videos of kids being sexually abused—is a growing international problem. Almost 70 million reports of this material were made to US authorities in 2019. That figure rose still further in 2020, as the COVID pandemic drove children and adults to spend more time online

1d

ScienceDaily

37

Learning from prostate cancer-detecting dogs to improve diagnostic tests

New research demonstrates the ability of dogs to detect aggressive prostate cancer from urine samples and suggests that an artificial neural network could learn from this olfactory ability, with an eye toward replicating it in novel detection tools.

1d

Phys.org

37

Blueprint for fault-tolerant qubits

Building a universal quantum computer is a challenging task because of the fragility of quantum bits, or qubits for short. To deal with this problem, various types of error correction have been developed. Conventional methods do this by active correction techniques. In contrast, researchers led by Prof. David DiVincenzo from Forschungszentrum Jülich and RWTH Aachen University, together with partne

2d

Nautilus

37

Why Making Our Brains Noisier Feels Good – Issue 96: Rewired

Not since World War II has there been as great a threat to mental health as the current COVID-19 pandemic, according to Aiden James. The challenges to our mental health won't "stop when the virus is under control and there are few people in hospital," the president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists in the United Kingdom told The Guardian recently. "You've got to fund the long-term consequence

2d

Phys.org

37

This is what happens to spacecraft when they re-enter the Earth's atmosphere

When one of the Russian Progress resupply ships undocks from the International Space Station, timing is everything. The Progress needs to fire its engines at just the right time to instigate the deorbit burn in order for the ship to enter the atmosphere at just the right place so that its destructive re-entry occurs over the Pacific Ocean. That way, any potential surviving bits and pieces that mig

3d

Phys.org

37

The effect of natural disasters on charitable and criminal activity

The human condition is riddled with extreme events, which bring chaos into our lives. Natural disasters leave a trail of destruction, causing direct and horrible pain and suffering—costing lives, creating injuries, destroying houses, livelihoods, crops and broken infrastructures. While extensive research has been conducted on the economic and public healthcare costs of these types of disasters aro

4d

Phys.org

37

Image: At the rim of a crater

This image features the southeast wall of a small crater located a few hundred kilometers to the north of the giant Hellas impact basin on Mars. The complete crater itself is about 12 km in diameter; this image shows a 5 x 10 km area.

5d

Phys.org

37

Endangered baby right whale found dead on Florida beach

The plight of endangered right whales took another sad turn Saturday, when a baby whale, possibly two months old, washed ashore dead on a Florida beach with telltale signs of being struck by a boat.

6d

ScienceDaily

37

How do our memories take shape?

Your brain is constantly evaluating which aspects of your experiences to either remember for later, ignore, or forget. Researchers have developed a new approach for studying these aspects of memory, by creating a computer program that turns sequences of events from a video into unique geometric shapes, which can be compared to the shapes of how people recounted the events. The study provides insig

7d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

37

Disease epidemic possibly caused population collapse in Central Africa 1600-1400 years ago

Bantu-speaking communities in the Congo rainforest underwent a major population collapse 1600-1400 years ago, probably due to a prolonged disease epidemic, and that significant resettlement did not restart until around 1000 years ago. These findings revise the population history of than seven present-day African countries and challenges the belief that the settlement of Central Africa by Bantu-spe

8d

Undark Magazine

37

Across the U.S., the Battle to Get Kids Back in School

The city of Chicago reached a deal with its teachers union this week to resume in-person instruction. With vaccination rates increasing across the country and the CDC poised to release new guidelines Friday, parents and policymakers will likely continue their scrutiny of school reopenings in the coming days.

8d

Phys.org

37

Study finds even the common house sparrow is declining

The European House Sparrow has a story to tell about survival in the modern world. In parts of its native range in Europe, House Sparrow numbers are down by nearly 60%. Their fate in the U.S. and Canada is less well known. A new study by Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientists aims to clarify the status of this non-native species, using 21 years of citizen science data from the Cornell Lab's Project

9d

Phys.org

37

Engineers 3-D-print a miniaturized spectrometer

The miniaturization of spectroscopic measurement devices opens novel information channels in medical science and consumer electronics. Scientists of the University of Stuttgart, Germany, developed a 3-D-printed miniature spectrometer with a volume of 100 by 100 by 300 μm3 and a spectral resolution of up to 10 nm in the visible range. This spectrometer can be manufactured directly onto camera senso

11d

Phys.org

37

Researchers create plastic film that suppresses the coronavirus

A consortium comprised by companies Braskem, AplFilm and Nanox and the UFSCar (Brazil) and Jaume I of Castellón (Spain) universities have released a plastic film capable of deactivating 99.99% of the new coronavirus in 15 minutes. The new product called AlpFilm Protect PVC is already available on the market.

12d

Phys.org

37

Researchers create low-cost, AI-powered device to measure optical spectra

A team of researchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering has demonstrated a new approach to an old problem: measuring spectra of light, also known as spectroscopy. By leveraging scalable, cost-effective nano-fabrication techniques, as well as AI-driven algorithms, they built and tested a system that is more compact than conventional spectrometers, while also offering additional design advan

12d

Science & technology

36

Electricity can be transmitted through the air

A New Zealand firm is trying to make an old idea work commercially

8h

Phys.org

36

Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students

A survey by a Boston University researcher of nearly 33,000 college students across the country reveals the prevalence of depression and anxiety in young people continues to increase, now reaching its highest levels, a sign of the mounting stress factors due to the coronavirus pandemic, political unrest, and systemic racism and inequality.

1d

ScienceDaily

36

Tuberculosis: New biomarker indicates individual treatment duration

The treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is long and demanding. In particular, in cases of resistant tuberculosis, the WHO generally recommends a standard treatment duration of at least 18 months, as there are no reliable biomarkers for an early termination. Scientists have now succeeded in identifying a biomarker that points to an individual end of therapy based on the activity of 22 genes. In many cas

1d

ScienceDaily

36

Atomic nuclei in the quantum swing

The extremely precise control of nuclear excitations opens up possibilities of ultra-precise atomic clocks and powerful nuclear batteries.

1d

ScienceDaily

36

Chatter between cell populations drives progression of gastrointestinal tumors

Researchers identified new therapeutic targets for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) that could lead to new treatment options for patients.

1d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

Lab-grown 'mini-bile ducts' used to repair human livers in regenerative medicine first

Scientists have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids – often referred to as 'mini-organs' – in the lab and shown that these can be used to repair damaged human livers. This is the first time that the technique has been used on human organs.

1d

ScienceDaily

36

Metabolic mutations help bacteria resist drug treatment

Researchers have identified a new class of mutations that help bacteria develop antibiotic resistance. In a study of E. coli, they discovered that mutations to genes involved in metabolism can help bacteria to evade the toxic effects of several different antibiotics.

1d

Phys.org

36

An evolutionary method for reprogramming proteases

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. has developed an evolutionary method for reprogramming proteases. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how their technique works and how well it performed when tested. Pål Stenmark, with Stockholm University has published a Perspectives piece in the same journal issue outlining efforts to re-eng

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

36

An evolutionary method for reprogramming proteases

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. has developed an evolutionary method for reprogramming proteases. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how their technique works and how well it performed when tested. Pål Stenmark, with Stockholm University has published a Perspectives piece in the same journal issue outlining efforts to re-eng

1d

ScienceDaily

36

Antibody response may drive COVID-19 outcomes

Researchers show that levels of specific antibodies developed in the immune response may influence COVID-19 outcomes in both children and adults.

1d

ScienceDaily

36

Human impact on solar radiation levels for decades

Based on the long-term Potsdam radiation time series, researchers have shown that variations in the intensity of sunlight over decades are down to ultra-fine, human-made dirt particles in the atmosphere.

1d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

Magnetic attraction: Breakthrough test for malaria

After nearly a decade of research, a new test that detects the magnetic properties of malaria-infected blood could soon be used to help eliminate the mosquito-borne disease.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

First report on mass shootings from Columbia University database

A study by researchers at Columbia University's Center of Prevention and Evaluation finds that most mass murders are not committed by individuals with serious mental illness.

2d

ScienceDaily

36

Waste into wealth: Harvesting useful products from microbial growth

Researchers have been exploring how bacteria can convert organic waste into useful products. They describe for the first time how the chain elongation processes are carried out by microorganisms under normal conditions in soil.

2d

Phys.org

36

The search for electron-hole liquids gets warmer

An electron-hole liquid is a unique collective quantum state formation in semiconductors where free charges can condense into a droplet. These droplets have interesting uses for laser-controlled circuits based on light beams instead of wires. Unfortunately, electron-hole liquids normally only exist in extremely cold environments, and aren't practical for real devices. But what if these droplets co

2d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

Do sweat it! Wearable microfluidic sensor to measure lactate concentration in real time

Lactate, a compound present in sweat, is an important biomarker to quantify during exercise. However, available wearable sensors can cause skin irritation, which calls for the use of different materials. In a recent study, scientists have developed a soft and nonirritating microfluidic sensor for the real-time measurement of lactate concentration in sweat. This wearable device will help monitor th

2d

ScienceDaily

36

Insects silencing the alarm

Like a scene from a horror movie, tomato fruitworm caterpillars silence their food plants' cries for help as they devour their leaves. That is the finding of a multidisciplinary team of researchers, who said the results may yield insights into the abilities of crop plants — such as tomato and soybean — to withstand additional stressors, like climate change.

2d

ScienceDaily

36

Human immune system: Structure of essential protein

A research group has succeeded in understanding why a very extended structure is important for an essential protein from the human immune system. The new results offer new opportunities for adjusting the activity of the immune system both up and down. Stimulation is interesting in relation to cancer treatment, while inhibition of the immune system is used in treatment of autoimmune diseases.

3d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

Plastic recycling results in rare metals being found in children's toys and food packaging

Scientists tested a range of new and used products – including children's toys, office equipment and cosmetic containers – and found they contained quantities of rare earth elements.

3d

ScienceDaily

36

The 20 best places to tackle US farm nitrogen pollution

A pioneering study of U.S nitrogen use in agriculture has identified 20 places across the country where farmers, government, and citizens should target nitrogen reduction efforts. The 20 nitrogen 'hotspots of opportunity'– which appear on a striking map — represent a whopping 63% of the total surplus nitrogen balance in U.S. croplands, but only 24% of U.S. cropland area. Nitrogen inputs are so h

3d

ScienceDaily

36

Variation in intensity of fracture-associated prescription drug use

A new study reveals that there is substantial variation across different regions of the country in the intensity of fracture-associated drug use among long-term care residents, and that areas with greater use of these prescription drugs experience higher fracture rates.

3d

ScienceDaily

36

Novel flexible terahertz camera can inspect objects with diverse shapes

Scientists have developed a flexible, free-standing, and versatile terahertz (THz) camera patch. This novel camera overcomes the limitations of the conventional THz cameras that are bulky and rigid. With its high sensitivity, adaptability, and ease of filming irregularly shaped objects, it is a potential tool for effective quality control of complex devices.

3d

ScienceDaily

36

Internet access spending in public schools increases test scores, but also disciplinary problems

In a new study from the University of Notre Dame, researchers quantify how school district connectivity increases test scores, but underscore the dark side of technology — increased behavior problems.

3d

ScienceDaily

36

It takes two to tango: When cells interact

When normal, motile cells come into contact, they typically change direction to avoid collision. But cancer cells behave quite differently. A new statistical analysis sheds light on the basis for this difference.

3d

ScienceDaily

36

Collagen structures get the royal reveal

An algorithm predicts the structures and melting temperatures of collagen, the triple helix that accounts for about a third of the body's proteins and forms the fibrous glue in skin, bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments.

4d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

Collagen structures get the royal reveal

An algorithm predicts the structures and melting temperatures of collagen, the triple helix that accounts for about a third of the body's proteins and forms the fibrous glue in skin, bones, muscles, tendons and ligaments.

4d

ScienceDaily

36

Hydrogel promotes wound healing better than traditional bandages, gauzes

For explosion wounds as well as some incurred in disasters and accidents, severe hemorrhage is a leading cause of death. Hydrogel dressings, which have advanced in recent years, may help; they are good at promoting wound healing and can better meet the demands of different situations. Many are antibacterial, biodegradable, responsive, and injectable and can fill irregularly shaped wounds.

4d

ScienceDaily

36

Biologists devise new way to assess carbon in the ocean

A new study by USC scientists explains how marine microbes control the accumulation of carbon matter with important implications for global warming.

4d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

Moiré patterns facilitate discovery of novel insulating phases

Materials having excess electrons are typically conductors. However, moiré patterns — interference patterns that typically arise when one object with a repetitive pattern is placed over another with a similar pattern — can suppress electrical conductivity, a study by physicists has found.

4d

ScienceDaily

36

Kagome graphene promises exciting properties

For the first time, physicists have produced a graphene compound consisting of carbon atoms and a small number of nitrogen atoms in a regular grid of hexagons and triangles. This honeycomb-structured "kagome lattice" behaves as a semiconductor and may also have unusual electrical properties. In the future, it could potentially be used in electronic sensors or quantum computers.

4d

Futurity.org

36

Urine test accurately flags prostate cancer

Researchers have found that a new urine test is extremely accurate at detecting aggressive prostate cancer with few false negatives. The test could have possibly avoided one third of unnecessary prostate cancer biopsies while failing to detect only a small number of cancers, according to a validation study of more than 1,500 patients. The MyProstateScore test measures levels of cancer-specific ge

5d

forskning.se

36

Ämne i kroppen ger mer fett men mindre diabetes

En variant av ett visst protein, LRIG1, är kopplat till mer fett på kroppen, men paradoxalt nog också till mindre typ 2-diabetes. En särskild grupp proteiner i kroppen spelar en nyckelroll vid omvandling till fettceller och inlagring av fett. En variant av detta protein är hos människor kopplat till mer fett på kroppen, men nog också till mindre förekomst av typ 2-diabetes. – Den oväntade upptäck

5d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

36

Endangered baby right whale found dead on Florida beach

The plight of endangered right whales took another sad turn Saturday, when a baby whale, possibly two months old, washed ashore dead on a Florida beach with telltale signs of being struck by a boat.

6d

NPR

36

'Perseverance' Mission Will Put NASA Wheels Back On Mars

Another six-wheeled rover is about to land on Mars. NASA Perseverance's mission is headed to Jezero Crater, which once may have been a lake. It's carrying two new items: a microphone and a helicopter.

6d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

The Lancet: COVID-19 vaccination potential will not be achieved without increased production, affordable pricing, global availability, and successful rollout

Having new COVID-19 vaccines will mean little if people around the world are unable to get vaccinated in a timely manner. Vaccines have to be affordable and available to all countries, and governments must have the administrative and political capacities to deliver them locally to ensure an effective global immunisation strategy against COVID-19, say the authors of a Health Policy piece published

8d

ScienceDaily

36

Learning by observation reduces cognitive bias, research suggests

Research suggests that observing others' decision-making can teach people to make better decisions themselves. The research tested the effectiveness of a new debiasing training strategy and reports first evidence that watching others make decisions can improve our own decision making.

8d

ScienceDaily

36

Bone marrow 'map' opens path to organoid-like blood stem cell production

A study provides powerful new insights into how bone marrow tissue works.

8d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

36

'Sex, lasers and male competition:' fruit flies win genetic race with rivals

Scientists have accepted natural selection as a driver of evolution for more than 160 years, thanks to Charles Darwin.

8d

Phys.org

36

Detecting multiple sepsis biomarkers from whole blood—made fast, accurate, and cheap

Many life-threatening medical conditions, such as sepsis, which is triggered by blood-borne pathogens, cannot be detected accurately and quickly enough to initiate the right course of treatment. In patients that have been infected by an unknown pathogen and progress to overt sepsis, every additional hour that an effective antibiotic cannot be administered significantly increases the mortality rate

8d

Future(s) Studies

36

Researchers working on ways to regenerate lost hair from stem cells identified a recipe for normal hair regeneration in the lab. "A method for cyclical regeneration of hair follicles from hair follicle stem cells and will help make hair follicle regeneration therapy a reality in the near future."

submitted by /u/mvea [link] [comments]

8d

The Atlantic

36

Minari Will Draw You in With Its Beautiful Little Details

The open, green plot of land that the Yi family moves to at the start of Minari represents something different to each member. The kids, David (played by Alan Kim) and Anne (Noel Cho), treat it as a playground, a mysterious new landscape to run around and explore. The mother, Monica (Yeri Han), views the isolated lot—and the vacant trailer home in the middle of it—with horror and resignation. But

8d

ScienceDaily

36

Mobile game that uses implicit learning improved children's short-term food choices

A new study examined how Indian 10- and 11-year-olds' food choices were affected by playing a pediatric dietary mobile game that uses implicit learning — educating players without making them aware of the lessons through innovations in neurocognitive training and immersive technology. The study found that the game significantly improved children's food choices immediately after play.

8d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

36

How the 3-D structure of eye-lens proteins is formed

Chemical bonds within the eye-lens protein gamma-B crystallin hold the protein together and are therefore important for the function of the protein within the lens. Contrary to previous assumptions, some of these bonds, called disulphide bridges, are already formed simultaneously with the synthesis of the protein in the cell.

9d

ScienceDaily

36

Quantum effects help minimize communication flaws

Noise limits the performance of modern quantum technologies. However, particles traveling in a superposition of paths can bypass noise in communication. New research reveals novel techniques to reduce noise in quantum communication. The results demonstrate that quantum particles traveling in a superposition of paths enable noise reduction in communications.

9d

ScienceDaily

36

New weapon against resistant bacteria

Researchers have developed a new antibiotic that can help in the fight against resistant bacteria, and they hope it will reach the patients.

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

36

Study finds even the common house sparrow is declining

The European House Sparrow has a story to tell about survival in the modern world. In parts of its native range in Europe, House Sparrow numbers are down by nearly 60%. Their fate in the U.S. and Canada is less well known. A new study by Cornell Lab of Ornithology scientists aims to clarify the status of this non-native species, using 21 years of citizen science data from the Cornell Lab's Project

9d

Phys.org

36

Mars mission inspires growing fan base back in China

Cui Tingting dyed her hair Mars red for the arrival of China's spacecraft at the planet known in Chinese as the Fire Star.

9d

ScienceDaily

36

Spectacular 'honeycomb heart' revealed in iconic stellar explosion

A unique 'heart-shape', with wisps of gas filaments showing an intricate honeycomb-like arrangement, has been discovered at the center of the iconic supernova remnant, the Crab Nebula. Astronomers have mapped the void in unprecedented detail, creating a realistic three-dimensional reconstruction.

9d

ScienceDaily

36

How messenger substances influence individual decision-making

Psychologists and physicists investigated the neurobiological processes in different types of decision-making. They report that variations in the ratio of two messenger substances affects short-term and long-term strategic decisions in a different manner.

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

Definitely not the flu: risk of death from COVID-19 3.5 times higher than from flu

A new study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) found that the risk of death from COVID-19 was 3.5 times higher than from influenza.

10d

Discover Magazine

36

City Squirrels Look Different. Is Evolution Driving a Color Change?

Black squirrels — a relic of ancient, old-growth forests — are now more common in cities. To understand why, scientists want to track the color of squirrels in your backyard.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

36

Bats & pangolins in Southeast Asia harbour SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses, reveals new study

A new study led by scientists from Duke-NUS Medical School, Singapore, and Chulalongkorn University, Thailand, shows that SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses (SC2r-CoVs) are circulating in animals as far away as Thailand. The study, published in Nature Communications today, reported that high levels of neutralising antibodies against the virus were present in both bats and pangolins found in the Sout

11d

ScienceDaily

36

New factor in the carbon cycle of the Southern Ocean identified

The Southern Ocean is one of the key regions for understanding the climate system. The photosynthesis-performing plankton there contribute significantly to controlling the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. But which factors favor or limit plankton growth? Researchers have now published a study showing for the first time that, in addition to the micronutrient iron, manganese can play an importan

11d

Phys.org

36

Himalayan glacier disaster highlights climate change risks

When Ravi Chopra saw the devastating deluge of water and debris crash downstream from a Himalayan glacier on Sunday, his first thought was that this was exactly the scenario that his team had warned the Indian government of in 2014.

11d

Future(s) Studies

36

China to build the world's biggest dam on sacred Tibetan river

submitted by /u/dustofoblivion123 [link] [comments]

11d

ScienceDaily

36

Popular tool for measuring child feeding practices validated by RIT researcher

A Rochester Institute of Technology researcher has validated a tool measuring adherence to a popular child feeding approach used by pediatricians, nutritionists, social workers and child psychologists to assess parents' feeding practices and prevent feeding problems. The best-practice approach, known as the Satter Division of Responsibility in Feeding, has now been rigorously tested and peer revie

12d

ScienceDaily

36

What rules govern the structure of membraneless organelles?

A study explores how membraneless organelles (MLOs) or biomolecular condensates, form and organize themselves. The research lays out physical rules controlling the arrangement of various types of synthetic MLOs created using just three kinds of building materials: RNA and two different proteins, a prion-like polypeptide (PLP) and an arginine-rich polypeptide (RRP).

12d

ScienceDaily

36

Researchers produce tiny nanoparticles and reveal their inner structure for the first time

Tiny nanoparticles can be furnished with dyes and could be used for new imaging techniques, as chemists and physicists show in a recent study. The researchers have also been the first to fully determine the particles' internal structure.

12d

ScienceDaily

36

Two-phase material with surprising properties

Some materials can couple electrical and mechanical properties – this can lead to astonishing effects: New materials have been developed, consisting of both crystalline and amorphous regions. In these special polymers, the electro-mechanical coupling suddenly disappears – scientists have now found out how.

12d

ScienceDaily

36

How iodine-containing molecules contribute to the formation of atmospheric aerosols, affect climate

Chemists have helped discover that iodic acids can rapidly form aerosol particles in the atmosphere, giving scientists more knowledge of how iodine emissions can contribute to cloud formation and climate change.

12d

Phys.org

36

5 twinkling galaxies help us uncover the mystery of the Milky Way's missing matter

We've all looked up at night and admired the brightly shining stars. Beyond making a gorgeous spectacle, measuring that light helps us learn about matter in our galaxy, the Milky Way.

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

35

Biotechnologists developed an effective technology for nutrient biocapture from wastewater

Biotechnologists from RUDN University in collaboration with Lomonosov MSU and Kurchatov institute made an important contribution to the technology of phosphate and nitrate biocapture from wastewater using Lobosphaera algae fixed on the filters.The biomass obtained in the course of this process can be used as a fertilizer.

1d

Discover Magazine

35

Is Vaping Healthier Than Smoking? Here's What One Lung Specialist Can Tell Us

Vaping is often touted as a less harmful alternative to smoking. Is that true?

1d

Phys.org

35

Fuel for earliest life forms: Organic molecules found in 3.5 billion-year-old rocks

A research team including the geobiologist Dr. Helge Missbach from the University of Cologne has detected organic molecules and gases trapped in 3.5-billion-year-old rocks. A widely accepted hypothesis says that the earliest life forms used small organic molecules as building materials and energy sources. However, the existence of such components in early habitats on Earth was as yet unproven. The

1d

Phys.org

35

Studies reveal global ice melt estimates have been conservative

Two new studies suggest that recent estimates of global ice melt are conservative. In other words, ice is melting much more rapidly than experts thought. As a result, sea levels are rising faster as well.

2d

forskning.se

35

Neandertalgener både skyddar och ökar risken vid covid-19

Förra året visade forskare att en viktig genetisk riskfaktor för svår covid-19 är nedärvd från neandertalare. Nu visar samma forskare att neandertalarna även bidrog med en skyddande variant. Hälften av alla människor utanför Afrika bär på genvarianten som minskar risken att bli inlagd på intensivvårdsavdelning med 20 procent. Varför vissa blir svårt sjuka i covid-19 medan andra bara får lindriga

3d

Phys.org

35

Breakthrough material can protect satellites from ultraviolet radiation and atomic oxygen in low-Earth orbit

Atomic oxygen is created when O2 molecules break apart, a process made easier in space because of the abundance of ultraviolet radiation. According to NASA, 96 percent of low-Earth orbit's atmosphere is atomic oxygen, a reality that caused problems in NASA's early space shuttle missions.

4d

Sciencemag

35

GLP-1 and Obesity

Let's have a look at a paper that came out recently in the New England Journal of Medicine. It shows strong results in a therapeutic area that a lot of people have spent a lot of effort on: obesity. I've been kicking around the idea of reviewing the history of anti-obesity drug discovery, but it's just too much to face on a Monday morning! Put shortly, though, this has been, for the most part, a

5d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

35

Epic's New MetaHuman Creator Generates Digital Characters that Avoid the Uncanny Valley

Every gamer has been there—you're playing a title that has incredible sweeping vistas, razor-sharp controls, and clever writing. And then you get a close look at a character model, whose unrealistic, robot-like face breaks the immersion granted by the environment. Making authentic-looking human models without veering too far into the uncanny valley is not easy, but Epic might have cracked the cod

10d

Retraction Watch

35

Editors decide not to retract microplastics article but "they feel that it is barely justified"

Chemosphere has issued an expression of concern for a 2019 paper on microplastics in the ocean with an uncomfortable degree of similarity to a previously published article in another journal. However, the editors decided that they could find enough daylight between the two papers that leaving their version unretracted was "barely justified" — a less-than-hearty … Continue reading

10d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

35

Intel Hits Back at Apple M1 with Questionable Benchmarks

Apple finally proved the rumor mill right last year when it launched its custom M1 processor in the new MacBooks and Mac Mini. Early benchmarks showed the Apple M1 clobbering the competition in most ways that matter, but now Intel has regrouped and has released a slideshow (because of course it has) that compares the M1 to Intel's latest Core laptop processor. The Apple M1 leverages all the exper

12d

Phys.org

35

Genetic 'cut and paste' to achieve more nutritious and resistant plants

A team of researchers from the Institute of Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP), mixed center of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), has taken another step to facilitate the genomic editing of plants. Their breakthrough will enable the use of CRISPR systems, which opens the door to obtain new, more productive and nutritive varieti

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

35

Genetic 'cut and paste' to achieve more nutritious and resistant plants

A team of researchers from the Institute of Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBMCP), mixed center of the Polytechnic University of Valencia (UPV) and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), has taken another step to facilitate the genomic editing of plants. Their breakthrough will enable the use of CRISPR systems, which opens the door to obtain new, more productive and nutritive varieti

12d

Phys.org

34

Weather experts: Lack of planning caused cold catastrophe

This week's killer freeze in the U.S. was no surprise.

1d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

34

Så mycket vaccin är planerat till våren

När kommer egentligen vaccinleveranserna? Hur många vaccindoser kommer att levereras? SVT Vetenskap listar vårens preliminära siffror.

1d

Popular Science | RSS

34

Best gaming keyboard: Light up your setup

Play better—and win more—with one of these sweet keyboards. (Christian Wiediger via Unsplash /) Gaming keyboards are the literal way that a gamer connects with a PC; they're the physical interface between player and action. That makes them extremely important for gaming quality. The best gaming keyboard can improve your game by ensuring that each key you press is correctly identified and passed t

1d

ScienceDaily

34

Climate change and suppression tactics are critical factors increasing fires

Both climate change and forest management have been blamed for wildfire hazards increasing across western North America, but the relative influence of these drivers is still heavily debated. The results of a recent study show that in some ecosystems, human-caused climate change is the predominant factor; in other places, the trend can also be attributed to a century of fire suppression that has pr

2d

Phys.org

34

Quantum computing: When ignorance is wanted

Quantum computers promise not only to outperform classical machines in certain important tasks, but also to maintain the privacy of data processing. The secure delegation of computations has been an increasingly important issue since the possibility of utilizing cloud computing and cloud networks. Of particular interest is the ability to exploit quantum technology that allows for unconditional sec

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

34

New bioprinting technique allows for complex microtissues

Bioprinting is currently used to generate model tissues for research and has potential applications in regenerative medicine. Existing bioprinting techniques rely on printing cells embedded in hydrogels, which results in low-cell-density constructs that are well below what is required to grow functional tissues. Maneuvering different kinds of cells into position to replicate the complex makeup of

3d

Phys.org

34

New bioprinting technique allows for complex microtissues

Bioprinting is currently used to generate model tissues for research and has potential applications in regenerative medicine. Existing bioprinting techniques rely on printing cells embedded in hydrogels, which results in low-cell-density constructs that are well below what is required to grow functional tissues. Maneuvering different kinds of cells into position to replicate the complex makeup of

3d

Phys.org

34

Targeting Nsp1 protein could be a pathway for COVID-19 therapy

A study that identifies how a coronavirus protein called Nsp1 blocks the activity of genes that promote viral replication provides hope for new COVID-19 treatments.

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

34

Targeting Nsp1 protein could be a pathway for COVID-19 therapy

A study that identifies how a coronavirus protein called Nsp1 blocks the activity of genes that promote viral replication provides hope for new COVID-19 treatments.

4d

Phys.org

34

Subduction may recycle less water than thought

When one tectonic plate dives beneath another at a subduction zone, it recycles huge amounts of water and other chemicals into Earth's mantle. The sinking plate carries seawater trapped in sediments and crust or chemically bound in minerals like serpentine. Later release of this water in the mantle contributes to key geological processes, such as earthquakes and the formation of volcano-feeding ma

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

34

Biodiversity protects bee communities from disease

Photos

8d

Phys.org

34

Gender gap: Women represent two-thirds of doctorates, only one-third of academic jobs

Women today represent two-thirds of all Canadian doctorates in archaeology, but only one-third of Canadian tenure-stream faculty. While men with Canadian Ph.D.s have done well in securing tenure-track jobs in Canada over the past 15 years, women have not, according to a new study from McGill University. The current COVID-19 pandemic is likely to exacerbate these existing inequalities.

9d

Science & technology

34

Microbial ecosystems in the mouth and gut are linked to many ills

Understanding how will help treatments

10d

ScienceDaily

34

Genetic evolution doesn't always take millions of years

Love them or hate them, there's no doubt the European Starling is a wildly successful bird. A new study examines this non-native species from the inside out to learn what exactly happened at the genetic level as the starling population exploded across North America?

10d

ExtremeTechExtreme – ExtremeTech

34

The UAE Probe 'Hope' Has Successfully Reached Mars

The United Arab Emirates has joined the ranks of just a handful of countries to successfully send a mission to the Red Planet. The UAE probe Hope successfully entered orbit on Tuesday after a 27-minute rocket burn slowed the craft enough for Mars' gravity to capture it. Hope is a satellite designed to study Martian weather over the short and long term, including measurements of dust storms and th

10d

Phys.org

34

Collective worm and robot 'blobs' protect individuals, swarm together

Individually, California blackworms live an unremarkable life eating microorganisms in ponds and serving as tropical fish food for aquarium enthusiasts. But together, tens, hundreds, or thousands of the centimeter-long creatures can collaborate to form a "worm blob," a shape-shifting living liquid that collectively protects its members from drying out and helps them escape threats such as excessiv

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

34

Human eye beats machine in archaeological color identification test

A ruler and scale can tell archaeologists the size and weight of a fragment of pottery – but identifying its precise color can depend on individual perception. So, when a handheld color-matching gadget came on the market, scientists hoped it offered a consistent way of determining color, free of human bias.

11d

Phys.org

34

Children's finger length points to mothers' income level

Low-income mothers feminize their children in the womb by adjusting their hormones, whereas high-income mothers masculinize their children, a major study based on finger length, led by a Swansea University expert, has found.

11d

Phys.org

34

Deep-sea vision linked to night life on the reef

To see—and survive—at night, some coral fish have developed visual adaptations that are similar to those of their cousins living in the ocean's darkest depths, new research shows.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

34

Deep-sea vision linked to night life on the reef

To see—and survive—at night, some coral fish have developed visual adaptations that are similar to those of their cousins living in the ocean's darkest depths, new research shows.

11d

ScienceDaily

33

New study examines leeches for role in major disease of sea turtles in Florida

Researchers are homing in on the cause of a major disease of sea turtles, with some of their latest findings implicating saltwater leeches as a possible factor. The results present the first evidence of a significant association between leeches and the disease in sea turtles, according to the researchers.

1d

Phys.org

33

Increasing temperatures will hit meat and milk production in East Africa

New research published in Nature Food warns that heat stress in animals caused by rising temperatures and humidity will occur more frequently and for longer periods, impacting milk and meat productivity for dairy cattle, beef cattle, sheep, goat, pigs and poultry across East Africa.

2d

Phys.org

33

Drought restrictions had side benefit: Lowering risk of mosquito-borne disease

Shallow pools of water on lawns are ideal breeding grounds for the mosquitoes that transmit West Nile virus, the most common mosquito-borne disease in the United States.

3d

forskning.se

33

Förändrad livsstil kan påverka fostrets gener

Fysisk aktivitet och en hälsosam kost under graviditeten hos kvinnor med fetma kan påverka barnens kroppssammansättning och tillväxt även senare i livet. Det visar en internationell forskningsstudie, ledd av Lunds universitet. Under det senaste decenniet har kunskapen ökat om hur vår livsstil påverkar våra gener, och hur sådana förändringar kan gå i arv utan att direkt ändra vårt dna. Det är ocks

3d

Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

33

Hydrogel promotes wound healing better than traditional bandages, gauzes

The widespread use of high-speed and high-energy weapons in modern warfare has led to an increasing incidence of explosive injuries. For such wounds as well as those incurred in disasters and accidents, severe hemorrhage is the leading cause of death.

4d

Phys.org

33

Spacecraft reveal new details of magnetic reconnection

The space environment around Earth is characterized by interactions between Earth's magnetic field and nearby plasma. A key physical process in these interactions is magnetic reconnection, in which two adjacent field lines break and each half subsequently joins half of the other broken line to form new field lines. Reconnection releases potential energy stored in the field lines, transferring it t

4d

Vetenskap och Folkbildning

33

Tarotkort

En variant av vanliga spelkort är i huvudsak bara en alternativ typ av spelkort och de används fortfarande för kortspel på många håll, bland annat i Italien och Frankrike. … Continued Inlägget Tarotkort dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .

5d

Ingeniøren

33

Efter løs trailer på Storebælt: Nu skal farlige vindforhold på broen gennemanalyseres

PLUS. Efter Storebælts-ulykken beviste DTU-ekspert, at vind kan vælte en trailer af en lommevogn. Nu er han hyret til en vindanalyse af togtrafik på broen, som har været syltet siden 2019.

5d

Science | The Guardian

33

Lionel Fry obituary

My former colleague Lionel Fry, who has died aged 87, was one of the most significant dermatologists of his generation. In addition to running a demanding NHS department at St Mary's hospital in London, he founded and led a pioneering research unit there which came up with new ways of alleviating psoriasis. Lionel's work altered our understanding of the development and treatment of psoriasis, and

6d

Phys.org

33

Scent detection dogs can identify individuals infected with COVID-19

In a recent article in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, authors gathered previously published research to summarize current thinking on the feasibility and efficacy of using scent detection dogs to screen for the COVID-19 virus. The researchers report that sensitivity, specificity, and overall success rates reported by the canine scent detection studies are comparable or better than the standa

9d

Science

33

African countries unsure whether to use Oxford/AstraZeneca jab

Conflicting advice about Covid vaccine's efficacy against variant has bred uncertainty

9d

ScienceDaily

33

Bats and pangolins in Southeast Asia harbour SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses, reveals new study

A new study shows that SARS-CoV-2-related coronaviruses (SC2r-CoVs) are circulating in animals as far away as Thailand. The study reported that high levels of neutralizing antibodies against the virus were present in both bats and pangolins found in the Southeast Asian country. The study further indicates that more SC2r-CoVs are likely to be discovered in the region.

9d

Popular Science | RSS

33

Best toaster: Get perfectly golden slices every time

Always perfect. (Cera via Unsplash/) Is there any bagel or slice of rye that's not more delicious with a dark, golden hue and crispy crunch? The answer, of course, is no. That's why the humble toaster is one of the most important appliances in anyone's kitchen. Toasters come in two basic varieties: conventional slot toasters and toaster ovens. The best slot toasters only do one thing—and they do

10d

Phys.org

33

Changing cropping systems in impaired watersheds can produce water quality gains

Growing the right crop in the right place within an impaired watershed can achieve significant water quality improvements, according to Penn State researchers, who conducted a novel study in the drainage of a Susquehanna River tributary in an agricultural area in southeastern Pennsylvania.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

33

Evidence mounts that ecofriendly wine tastes better

Consumers have shown that they are willing to pay extra for organic produce grown without pesticides, even if it doesn't taste better.

11d

ScienceDaily

32

Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products

Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacteria to aid in natural product discovery.

4h

Discover Magazine

32

Apophis: Doomsday Asteroid, or Just a Passing Space Rock?

The asteroid Apophis is about to make its close flyby of Earth. And astronomers want to get a good look at it while they can.

8h

Popular Science | RSS

32

Best Windshield Snow Cover: Protect Your Car With a Frost Guard

Make sure your windshield doesn't get too icy. (Le Duc via Unsplash/) With wintry weather comes all manner of seasonal outdoor fun, from skiing to snowball fights and everything in between. The season is somewhat less fun for your car. Choosing the best windshield snow cover will ensure that you get the most enjoyment out of snowy weather without the hassle and worry that come from needing to scr

1d

Popular Science | RSS

32

Bar stools that bring a room together

Have a seat at the counter. (Unsplash/) Bar stools keep it low key—whether in the kitchen or on the patio, the bar stool is where you want to sit to enjoy a quick lunch, sunset cocktail, or passing conversation. Save the dinner table for, well, having dinner! And if you've got a bar lining your kitchen then stools are simply indispensable. They're awesome for entertaining and arguably even better

1d

ScienceDaily

32

Is odor the secret to bats' sex appeal?

Odor-producing glands and tissues in bats may play a prominent role in mating behavior.

1d

ScienceDaily

32

Light and genetic probes untangle dynamics of brain blood flow

New research on tiny capillaries and cells called pericytes details how blood moves through over 400 miles of total vasculature in the human brain.

1d

ScienceDaily

32

Release of nutrients from lake-bottom sediments worsens Lake Erie's annual 'dead zone'

Robotic laboratories on the bottom of Lake Erie have revealed that the muddy sediments there release nearly as much of the nutrient phosphorus into the surrounding waters as enters the lake's central basin each year from rivers and their tributaries.

1d

ScienceDaily

32

New piece of the puzzle increases understanding of speciation

Speciation is important because it increases biodiversity. A new thesis examines the speciation process in multiple marine species where different populations of the same species might evolve into two completely new species.

1d

ScienceDaily

32

Magnetic attraction: Breakthrough test for malaria

After nearly a decade of research, a new test that detects the magnetic properties of malaria-infected blood could soon be used to help eliminate the mosquito-borne disease.

1d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

32

Waste into wealth: Harvesting useful products from microbial growth

Researchers have been exploring how bacteria can convert organic waste into useful products. They describe for the first time how the chain elongation processes are carried out by microorganisms under normal conditions in soil.

2d

ScienceDaily

32

New crystalline form of ice

Three years ago, chemists found evidence for the existence of a new variety of ice. Until then, 18 types of crystalline ice were known. The team now reports on the elucidation of the crystal structure of ice XIX using neutron diffraction.

2d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

32

New route to forming complex crystals

When materials reach extremely small size scales, strange things begin to happen. One of those phenomena is the formation of mesocrystals.

2d

Phys.org

32

Air pollution caused 160,000 deaths in big cities last year: NGO

Serious pollution caused around 160,000 premature deaths in the world's five most populous cities last year, even as air quality improved in some places due to coronavirus lockdowns, an environmental group said Thursday.

2d

ScienceDaily

32

Termite gut microbes could aid biofuel production

Wheat straw, the dried stalks left over from grain production, is a potential source of biofuels and commodity chemicals. But before straw can be converted to useful products by biorefineries, the polymers that make it up must be broken down into their building blocks. Now, researchers have found that microbes from the guts of certain termite species can help break down lignin, a particularly toug

2d

ScienceDaily

32

Credit card-sized soft pumps power wearable artificial muscles

Robotic clothing that is entirely soft and could help people to move more easily is a step closer to reality thanks to the development of a new flexible and lightweight power system for soft robotics.

2d

ScienceDaily

32

Fish diet heats up marine biodiversity hotspot

A never-before-seen biodiversity pattern of coral reef fishes suggests some fishes might be exceptionally vulnerable to environmental change. It highlights, for the first time, a unique link between the diet and distribution of species across the marine realm.

2d

ScienceDaily

32

A new, clearer insight into Earth's hidden crystals

Geologists have developed a new theory about the state of Earth billions of years ago after examining the very old rocks formed in the Earth's mantle below the continents.

3d

Phys.org

32

Panama disease breakthrough sparks US funding

QUT researcher and Distinguished Professor James Dale and his team have successfully developed a line of Cavendish bananas resistant to Panama disease tropical race 4 (TR4).

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

32

Panama disease breakthrough sparks US funding

QUT researcher and Distinguished Professor James Dale and his team have successfully developed a line of Cavendish bananas resistant to Panama disease tropical race 4 (TR4).

3d

Phys.org

32

Review: Bill Gates offers a hopeful take on climate change

"How to Avoid Climate Disaster: The Solutions We Have and the Breakthroughs We Need," by Bill Gates (Knopf)

3d

Phys.org

32

Explainer: Topsy-turvy weather comes from polar vortex

It's as if the world has been turned upside-down, or at least its weather. You can blame the increasingly familiar polar vortex, which has brought a taste of the Arctic to places where winter often requires no more than a jacket.

3d

ScienceDaily

32

Asthma may heighten flu risk and cause dangerous mutations

A subtype of asthma in adults may cause higher susceptibility to influenza and could result in dangerous flu mutations. Animal studies have found that paucigranulocytic asthma (PGA) – a non-allergic form of the condition – allows the flu virus to flourish in greater numbers in sufferers.

3d

ScienceDaily

32

Health survey conveys messages on how we should live

The questions in a health survey aimed at young people raise issues of status and convey norms about what people should own and how they should be. Since the 1980s, the physical and mental health of Swedish children and young people has been measured by way of surveys. One of these is the international "Health Behavior in School-aged Children Survey" which is taken by 11-, 13- and 15-year-olds eve

3d

Phys.org

32

Despite sea-level rise risks, migration to some threatened coastal areas may increase

In coming decades as coastal communities around the world are expected to encounter sea-level rise, the general expectation has been that people's migration toward the coast will slow or reverse in many places.

4d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

32

Kagome graphene promises exciting properties

For the first time, physicists have produced a graphene compound consisting of carbon atoms and a small number of nitrogen atoms in a regular grid of hexagons and triangles. This honeycomb-structured "kagome lattice" behaves as a semiconductor and may also have unusual electrical properties. In the future, it could potentially be used in electronic sensors or quantum computers.

4d

ScienceDaily

32

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex

Researchers have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins.

4d

ScienceDaily

32

The water surface is a fantastic place for chemical reactions

Using an advanced technique, scientists have demonstrated that a chemical reaction powered by light takes place ten thousand times faster at the air-water interface — what we usually call the water surface — than in the bulk of the water, even when the light has equivalent energy. This finding could help our understanding of the many important chemical and biological processes that take place at

4d

Phys.org

32

Hydrogel promotes wound healing better than traditional bandages, gauzes

The widespread use of high-speed and high-energy weapons in modern warfare has led to an increasing incidence of explosive injuries. For such wounds as well as those incurred in disasters and accidents, severe hemorrhage is the leading cause of death.

4d

Phys.org

32

Save the trees: Never-ending construction in cities threatens the urban forest

City trees are important: they purify the air, reduce heat islands, help regulate the water cycle and provide immense health benefits. Yet unbridled development threatens the survival of the urban forest and the full range of ecosystem services it provides.

5d

ScienceDaily

32

Membrane building blocks play decisive role in controlling cell growth

Lipids are the building blocks of a cell's envelope – the cell membrane. In addition to their structural function, some lipids also play a regulatory role and decisively influence cell growth. The impact of the lipids depends on how they are distributed over the plasma membrane.

5d

ScienceDaily

32

Capuchin monkey genome reveals clues to its long life and large brain

Scientists have sequenced the genome of a capuchin monkey for the first time, uncovering new genetic clues about the evolution of their long lifespan and large brains.

5d

ScienceDaily

32

New insight into protein structures that could treat Huntington's disease

In Huntington's disease, a faulty protein aggregates in brain cells and eventually kills them. Such protein aggregates could, in principle, be prevented with a heat shock protein. However, it is not well known how these proteins interact with the Huntington's disease protein. New research has partially resolved the structure of heat shock proteins that bind to such aggregating proteins.

7d

ScienceDaily

32

Main genetic causes of autoimmune Addison's disease identified

Scientists have discovered the genes involved in autoimmune Addison's disease.

7d

ScienceDaily

32

The politics of synonyms

Researchers found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns.

7d

ScienceDaily

32

Aggressive brain tumor mapped in genetic, molecular detail

A new study has revealed a detailed map of the genes, proteins, infiltrating cells and signaling pathways that play key roles in driving glioblastoma. The study, of 99 tumors from patients, is the largest and most detailed schematic of this deadly brain tumor.

7d

ScienceDaily

32

Wafer-scale production of graphene-based photonic devices

Researchers have devised a wafer-scale fabrication method that paves the way to the next generation of telecom and datacom devices.

8d

ScienceDaily

32

Age shall not weary them when it comes to discus and javelin

Discus and javelin throwers as well as marathon runners and race walkers are likely to achieve their best performances at a later age than sprinters, hurdlers and middle-distance runners. Why? It comes down to muscle fibres and technique.

8d

Popular Science | RSS

32

Must-have art supplies to let your inner creative shine

Everything you need to up your art game. (Rachael Gorjestani via Unsplash/) Spending a lot of time indoors will likely result in you discovering something about yourself. Maybe you're the kind of person who cannot be still and has to burn some energy in order to stay sane. Or maybe you are super creative and you just never gave yourself the time to channel your talents into an actual skill. If yo

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

32

Scent detection dogs can identify individuals infected with COVID-19

In a recent article in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine, authors gathered previously published research to summarize current thinking on the feasibility and efficacy of using scent detection dogs to screen for the COVID-19 virus. The researchers report that sensitivity, specificity, and overall success rates reported by the canine scent detection studies are comparable or better than the standa

9d

Science Magazine

32

Study: Police diversity matters

[no content]

9d

Science Magazine

32

Bill Gates's guide to avoiding climate catastrophe

[no content]

9d

ScienceDaily

32

Arizona economic burden of valley fever totals $736 million

Expenses for the fungal disease endemic to the Southwest can skyrocket for people whose diagnosis is delayed, leading to more serious infection or death.

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

32

Machine-learning how to create better AAV gene delivery vehicles

Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have become promising vehicles for delivering gene therapies to defective tissues in the human body because they are non-pathogenic and can transfer therapeutic DNA into target cells. However, while the first gene therapy products approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) use AAV vectors and others are likely to follow, AAV vectors still have not reached the

9d

Phys.org

32

Machine-learning how to create better AAV gene delivery vehicles

Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have become promising vehicles for delivering gene therapies to defective tissues in the human body because they are non-pathogenic and can transfer therapeutic DNA into target cells. However, while the first gene therapy products approved by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) use AAV vectors and others are likely to follow, AAV vectors still have not reached the

9d

The Economist

32

Business this week

[no content]

9d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

32

Which conspiracy theory do you believe in?

Everyone believes in at least one conspiracy theory, according to conspiracy researchers. Conspiracy theories aren't reserved for angry Republicans in the United States. Do you think Biden stole the election?

9d

ScienceDaily

32

Origami powered by light

Some human-made materials can mimic plants' slow but steady reaction to light energy, usually triggered by lasers or focused ambient light. New research has discovered a way to speed up this effect enough that its performance can compete against electrical and pneumatic systems.

9d

ScienceDaily

32

A new way to look for life-sustaining planets

A new system for mid-infrared exoplanet imaging in combination with long observation time allows ground-based telescopes to directly capture images of planets about three times the size of Earth within the habitable zones of nearby stars.

10d

ScienceDaily

32

Why does love of bargain hunting run in families?

Headlines like 'Black Friday Shoppers Trampled in New York' and popular television shows such as 'Extreme Couponing' remind us how crazy consumers can get about retail sales promotions. This enthusiasm for getting bargains has been termed 'deal proneness.'

10d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

32

Functional rarity and evenness are key facets of biodiversity to boost multifunctionality [Ecology]

The functional traits of organisms within multispecies assemblages regulate biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning. Yet how traits should assemble to boost multiple ecosystem functions simultaneously (multifunctionality) remains poorly explored. In a multibiome litter experiment covering most of the global variation in leaf trait spectra, we showed that three dimensions of…

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

32

Adult neurogenesis may hold clues for more effective treatment of alcoholism

Neuroplasticity, the remarkable ability of the brain to modify and reorganize itself, is affected by or in response to excessive alcohol, whether through individual consumption or exposure in the womb. It is now well accepted that the birth and integration of new neurons continue beyond development and into adulthood. New discoveries and insights on how alcohol impacts this and other plastic proce

10d

ScienceDaily

32

High CO2 to slow tropical fish move to cooler waters

A new study shows that the ocean acidification predicted under continuing high CO2 emissions may make cooler, temperate waters less welcoming.

10d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

32

Long-term environmental damage from transportation projects in Kenya, scientists warn

The construction of a major railway through Kenya will have long-term environmental impacts on the area, suggesting more work needs to be done to limit the damage on future infrastructure projects, a major study reveals.

10d

ScienceDaily

32

Long-term environmental damage from transportation projects in Kenya, scientists warn

The construction of a major railway through Kenya will have long-term environmental impacts on the area, suggesting more work needs to be done to limit the damage on future infrastructure projects, a major study reveals.

10d

Phys.org

32

Brazil: Air conditioning equipment days of use will double without climate action

Space cooling already accounts for 14% of residential electricity demand in Brazil, and it is expected to increase further because of climate change.

10d

ScienceDaily

32

Immune response to insulin could identify, help treat those at risk for Type 1 Diabetes

Researchers have found that immune responses to insulin could help identify individuals most at risk for developing Type 1 diabetes.

11d

Phys.org

32

A new modifier increases the efficiency of perovskite solar cells

The research team of NUST MISIS has presented an improved structure of perovskite solar cells. Scientists have modified perovskite-based solar cells using MXenes—thin two-dimensional titanium carbides with high electrical conductivity. The MXenes-based modified cells showed superior performance, with power conversion efficiency exceeding 19% (the reference demonstrated 17%) and improved stabilized

11d

Phys.org

32

Twenty-one per cent of all citations go to the elite

In the span of only 15 years, a small academic elite has increased its share of academic citations significantly. In the year 2000, 14 per cent of all citations went to the top one percent of the most cited researchers. New research shows that this figure had risen to 21 per cent in 2015.

11d

Phys.org

32

Evidence mounts that ecofriendly wine tastes better

Consumers have shown that they are willing to pay extra for organic produce grown without pesticides, even if it doesn't taste better.

11d

Phys.org

32

Eliminating textile waste requires new ways of thinking

A lot of material is wasted when clothes are produced; reducing this waste requires new ways of thinking. "The system was built up during a time when we thought that the earth's resources were unlimited, which we now know is not true. My model and experimental three-dimensional designs aim to get designers and the industry to move away from the current system," said Holly McQuillan, who recently d

11d

Phys.org

32

A pioneering NASA mini weather satellite ends its mission

After nearly 2.5 years in orbit, a shoebox-size weather satellite phoned home one last time before plunging into Earth's atmosphere and burning up on Dec. 24, 2020. RainCube (Radar in a CubeSat) was a technology demonstration meant to show that shrinking a weather radar into a low-cost, miniature satellite called a CubeSat could provide science-quality data.

11d

ScienceDaily

32

Silicon anode structure generates new potential for lithium-ion batteries

New research has identified a nanostructure that improves the anode in lithium-ion batteries. Instead of using graphite for the anode, the researchers turned to silicon: a material that stores more charge but is susceptible to fracturing. The team deposited silicon atoms on top of metallic nanoparticles to form an arched nanostructure, increasing the strength and structural integrity of the anode.

12d

Phys.org

32

Scientists propose lithium to cope with high-risk condition in future fusion facilities

Perhaps the greatest technological challenge to harvesting on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars in future tokamak fusion reactors will be controlling the extreme heat that could strike the exhaust system inside the devices. Such heat flow, or flux, could seriously damage the walls of the divertor at the heart of the exhaust system and shut down fusion reactions in the doughnut-

12d

ScienceDaily

32

Captive-bred juvenile salmon unlikely to become migratory when released into streams

Researchers have revealed that when captive-bred juvenile red-spotted masu salmon are released into natural streams, very few individuals become migrants. This was an important species in the rivers of west Japan for the fishing industry, however in recent years their numbers are declining rapidly. The results of this research offer important suggestions for stocking practices and the management o

12d

ScienceDaily

32

Richness of plant species reduces the number of viral infections in meadows

A new study indicates that agricultural activity confuses the mechanisms that regulate the occurrence of plant diseases in nature. A wider variety of virus species was found in meadows close to agricultural fields compared to those located in natural surroundings, with the richness of plant species having no effect on the number of virus species. However, maintaining biodiversity is worthwhile, as

12d

ScienceDaily

32

Flexible piezoelectric crystal

A team of researchers has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than other materials in the same class, opening the way to better micro machines.

12d

Phys.org

31

Songbirds' reproductive success reduced by natural gas compressor noise

Some songbirds are not dissuaded by constant, loud noise emitted by natural gas pipeline compressors and will establish nests nearby. The number of eggs they lay is unaffected by the din, but their reproductive success ultimately is diminished.

2d

The Scientist RSS

31

Watch a Trained Pup Detect Prostate Cancer From a Urine Sample

Good girl, Florin!

2d

Phys.org

31

Unusual breeding behavior reported in treefrogs for the first time

Paranapiacaba Treefrogs (Bokermannohyla astartea) mate and lay spawn in small pools of water inside the tanks of bromeliad plants, Leo Ramos Malagoli from the Universidade Estadual Paulista in Brazil and colleagues report in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The 3cm-long tadpoles must then make their way to a stream to complete development. The study, publishing February 17, is the first to report

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

31

Unusual breeding behavior reported in treefrogs for the first time

Paranapiacaba Treefrogs (Bokermannohyla astartea) mate and lay spawn in small pools of water inside the tanks of bromeliad plants, Leo Ramos Malagoli from the Universidade Estadual Paulista in Brazil and colleagues report in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. The 3cm-long tadpoles must then make their way to a stream to complete development. The study, publishing February 17, is the first to report

3d

Phys.org

31

Scientists and indigenous people unite to save Colombian condor

Rosendo Quira silently shakes a medicinal plant to attract a condor to the bait. The bird of prey glides through the clouds over Colombia towards a mountain pass some 3,200 meters above the sea.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

31

Scientists and indigenous people unite to save Colombian condor

Rosendo Quira silently shakes a medicinal plant to attract a condor to the bait. The bird of prey glides through the clouds over Colombia towards a mountain pass some 3,200 meters above the sea.

3d

Phys.org

31

A new quantum switch for electronics

A Russian physicist and his international colleagues studied a quantum point contact (QCP) between two conductors with external oscillating fields applied to the contact. They found that, for some types of contacts, an increase in the oscillation frequency above a critical value reduced the current to zero—a promising mechanism that can help create nanoelectronics components. This research support

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Science

31

How the UK boosted its vaccine manufacturing capacity

Four companies are now making or preparing to make Covid jabs and two rapid response centres are under construction

10d

Phys.org

31

New insights put a freeze on the mechanisms for safely cryopreserving biological materials

Cryopreservation involves preserving biological materials, such as cells, tissues, and organs, at ultra-low temperatures so that they can be revived and used at a later date. To achieve cryopreservation such that the preserved materials are not damaged, scientists use various chemicals called cryoprotectants, which facilitate the freezing process. Unfortunately, many of the existing cryoprotective

11d

Phys.org

31

Millie Hughes-Fulford, trailblazing astronaut, dies at 75

Millie Hughes-Fulford, a trailblazing astronaut and scientist who became the first female payload specialist to fly in space for NASA, died following a yearslong battle with cancer, her family said. She was 75.

11d

Popular Science | RSS

31

Best mittens: Keep your hands cozy

Keep your hands toasty, no matter the weather. ( freestocks via Unsplash/) The best mittens have been providing heat to cold hands during freezing winters for centuries. After all this time, though, people still get mittens mixed up with gloves. The two are hardly interchangeable. Gloves are designed in the shape of hands, with spaces for each individual finger, so you can continue to perform cer

12d

Science | The Guardian

31

Did you solve it? Think of a number

The solution to today's Q&A puzzle Earlier today I asked you the following puzzle. Ask Johnny Continue reading…

12d

Phys.org

30

Study reveals impact of evictions on people with mental health disorders

All renters facing eviction deal with anxiety and stress at the prospect of losing the roof over their heads.

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ScienceDaily

30

The distribution of vertebrate animals redefines temperate and cold climate regions

The distribution of vegetation is routinely used to classify climate regions worldwide, yet whether these regions are relevant to other organisms is unknown. Researchers have established climate regions based on vertebrate species' distributions in a new study. They found that while high-energy climate regions are similar across vertebrate and plant groups, there are large differences in temperate

1d

Ingeniøren

30

Ny algoritme kan forudse den næste coronavirus

Forskere fra Liverpool University har udviklet en algoritme, der ved hjælp af kunstig intelligens kan forudse, hvor den næste coronavirus kan opstå.

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

30

Early protein intake predicts functional connectivity and neurocognition in preterm born children

Scientific Reports, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83125-z

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Phys.org

30

Novel two-polymer membrane boosts hydrogen fuel cell performance

A considerable portion of the efforts to realize a sustainable world has gone into developing hydrogen fuel cells so that a hydrogen economy can be achieved. Fuel cells have distinctive advantages: high energy-conversion efficiencies (up to 70%) and a clean by-product, water. In the past decade, anion exchange membrane fuel cells (AEMFC), which convert chemical energy to electrical energy via the

3d

Scientific American Content

30

Snakes' Flexible, Heat-Sensing Organs Explained

Scientists decode how some snakes "see" in the dark — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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ScienceDaily

30

Despite sea-level rise risks, migration to some threatened coastal areas may increase

New research shows that migration to the coast could actually accelerate in some places like Bangladesh despite sea-level change, contradicting current assumptions.

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Retraction Watch

30

Third journal scammed by rogue editors

Burned by the offer of a special issue, a journal has retracted four papers after determining that the guest editors of the supplement were not legit. Neuroscience Letters, an Elsevier title, published the special issue — "Special Issue on Clinical and Imaging Assessment of Cognitive Dysfunction in Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders" — last summer, but … Continue reading

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forskning.se

30

Forskare injicerar lysande diamanter i celler

Många forskare har försökt placera extremt små diamanter i levande celler. Varför? Jo, diamanterna fluorescerar och kan därmed ge helt ny kunskap om cellens inre liv. Nu har fysikforskare i Lund lyckats med bedriften. Diamanter är inte bara eftertraktade för sin skönhet, utan också för de unikt självlysande egenskaperna. Åtminstone bland forskare. Till skillnad från andra fluorescerande material

5d

Science

30

A tale of two very different Chinese new years

Contrasting celebrations in China and the US underline their relative success in fighting the pandemic

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Phys.org

30

Discovering new gases on Mars

The ESA-Roscosmos ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter is investigating the martian atmosphere. Discovering new gases related to active process and looking for their sources is a key goal of the mission. ExoMars has discovered hydrogen chloride for the first time. It appeared during a global dust storm in 2018 and disappeared again afterwards.

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Discover Magazine

30

Planetary Alignment Didn't End the World in 1919. But One Professor Thought It Would

Famous for his drastic weather predictions, Albert F. Porta's name could be seen in local papers across the country in the early 1900s. His story is a cautionary tale of how fake news spreads when the world is in disarray.

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

30

Response to cancer immunotherapy may be affected by genes we carry from birth

For all their importance as a breakthrough treatment, the cancer immunotherapies known as checkpoint inhibitors still only benefit a small minority of patients, perhaps 15 percent across different types of cancer. Moreover, doctors cannot accurately predict which of their patients will respond.

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Futurism

30

This Real Estate Investing Platform Is Democratizing the Way We Build Wealth

As we were all recently reminded by the Gamestop/Robinhood fiasco that nearly brought Wall Street to a halt, for far too long there have been two different sets of rules governing how people generate wealth. There's the set of rules that regular people have to play by. And there's the set of rules that the one percent get to play by. However, slowly but surely, things are starting to change. Than

11d

Science | The Guardian

30

Alwyn Lishman obituary

Neuropsychiatrist who brought brain and mind together in studies of mental health Alwyn Lishman liked to tell people that he wrote his classic textbook Organic Psychiatry (1978) only because the £500 advance would enable him to buy the Bechstein grand piano that he coveted. Yet he put his heart and soul into it, setting the subject of neuropsychiatry on a new footing, and trained generations of s

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Phys.org

30

Large-scale com­mod­ity farm­ing ac­cel­er­at­ing cli­mate change in the Amazon

Deforestation has converted swaths of land in the southern Amazon region from rainforest to farmland. The uses of the deforested land are diverse, and activities can range from small-scale farming in rural settlements to large-scale commodity agriculture. Commercial farms in the Southern Amazon can reach hundreds of thousands of hectares in area, exporting millions of tons in grains and beef every

11d

Phys.org

29

We could find extraterrestrial civilizations by their air pollution

Upcoming telescopes will give us more power to search for biosignatures on all the exoplanets we've found. Much of the biosignature conversation is centered on biogenic chemistry, such as atmospheric gases produced by simple, single-celled creatures. But what if we want to search for technological civilizations that might be out there? Could we find them by searching for their air pollution?

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ScienceDaily

29

Temperature affects susceptibility of newts to skin-eating fungus

Eastern newt populations in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada are at greatest risk of infection with a new skin-eating fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), according to a new study.

1d

Phys.org

29

Temperature affects susceptibility of newts to skin-eating fungus

Eastern newt populations in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada are at greatest risk of infection with a new skin-eating fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), according to a study published February 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Matthew Gray of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, and colleagues.

2d

Phys.org

29

Ultrafast electron dynamics in space and time

Often depicted as colorful balloons or clouds, electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of electrons in molecules, a bit like fuzzy snapshots. In order to understand the exchange of electrons in chemical reactions, it is not only important to know their spatial distribution but also their motion in time. Scientists from Julich, Marburg, and Graz have now made huge progress in this

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Popular Science | RSS

29

Best ergonomic mouse: Computer accessories designed for you

Mice you'll want to use all day and every day. (Sirisvisual via Unsplash/) Whether you spend long hours sitting at a computer each day or you only sit down to check your emails intermittently, the likelihood of developing joint discomfort, carpal tunnel, and other wrist-related disorders increases with every minute spent at a computer desk. Finding the best ergonomic mouse for your personal setup

2d

Phys.org

29

How new design patterns can enable cities and their residents to change with climate change

Our cities, designed for one set of climatic ranges, are increasingly "out of place" as average temperatures rise. The days above 40℃ and nights above 30℃ are increasing, especially in the expanding suburbs of Australian cities. This presents us with a massive redesign project.

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Phys.org

29

Healthy rivers: Communities use DNA tool to keep tabs on freshwater quality

Photos of Canada often show the Great Lakes, expanses of wetlands and scenic rivers. The country is described as a water-rich nation, and it is, with seven percent of the world's renewable freshwater supply. However, freshwater sources are far from endless.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

29

Small 'window of opportunity' for best recovery after stroke

An international study has shown, for the first time, that the capacity of the human brain to recover and rewire itself peaks around two weeks after a stroke and diminishes over time.

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Phys.org

29

Bendable concrete and other carbon-infused cement mixes could dramatically cut global emissions

One of the big contributors to climate change is right beneath your feet, and transforming it could be a powerful solution for keeping greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere.

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Futurism

29

This Ingenious Stress Relief Device Manipulates Your Nervous System With Gentle Vibrations

Are you feeling stressed out or anxious? Have you been having trouble sleeping, focusing, or maintaining energy? If the answer is yes, you're hardly alone. The strain of modern life can easily weigh you down under normal circumstances. But with the pandemic, social unrest, and the global economic collapse, right now nobody is living under "normal" circumstances. But the good news is that there ar

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

29

The chemistry lab inside cells

Investigators from the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University, together with Hiroshima Institute of Technology, have announced the discovery of a new protein that allows an organism to conduct an initial and essential step in converting amino acid residues on a crosslinked polypeptide into an enzyme cofactor. This research may lead to a better understanding of the bioc

10d

Phys.org

29

The chemistry lab inside cells

Investigators from the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University, together with Hiroshima Institute of Technology, have announced the discovery of a new protein that allows an organism to conduct an initial and essential step in converting amino acid residues on a crosslinked polypeptide into an enzyme cofactor. This research may lead to a better understanding of the bioc

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Phys.org

29

These shrimplike crustaceans are the fastest snappers in the sea

The snapping claws of male amphipods—tiny, shrimplike crustaceans—are among the fastest and most energetic of any life on Earth. Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 8 find that the crustaceans can repeatedly close their claws in less than 0.01% of a second, generating high-energy water jets and audible pops. The snapping claws are so fast, they almost defy the laws of

12d

Phys.org

29

Uncovering how some corals resist bleaching

Coral reefs are beautiful and diverse ecosystems that power the economies of many coastal communities. They're also facing threats that are driving their decline, including the planet's warming waters.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

29

These shrimplike crustaceans are the fastest snappers in the sea

The snapping claws of male amphipods—tiny, shrimplike crustaceans—are among the fastest and most energetic of any life on Earth. Researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 8 find that the crustaceans can repeatedly close their claws in less than 0.01% of a second, generating high-energy water jets and audible pops. The snapping claws are so fast, they almost defy the laws of

12d

Ingeniøren

29

Stadion får ny facade bygget af gamle fly

Genbrug i stor skala er en del af renoveringen og udbygningen af fodboldklubben Racing Club de Strasbourgs stadion. Facadebeklædningen skal nemlig bestå af dele fra 30 dekommissionerede Airbus A340

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Phys.org

28

Floods cripple Indonesia's capital

Whole neighbourhoods of Indonesia's capital Jakarta and dozens of major roads were flooded on Saturday after torrential rains pounded the Southeast Asian city overnight.

7h

Phys.org

28

Southern cities hit hard by storms face new crisis: No water

Southern cities slammed by winter storms that left millions without power for days have traded one crisis for another: Busted water pipes ruptured by record-low temperatures created shortages of clean drinking water, shut down the Memphis airport on Friday and left hospitals struggling to maintain sanitary conditions.

7h

ScienceDaily

28

Explainable AI for decoding genome biology

Researchers have developed advanced explainable artificial intelligence (AI) in a technical tour de force to decipher regulatory instructions encoded in DNA.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation

A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips.

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ScienceDaily

28

Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria

Rather sweet than salty: In the ocean microalgae produce a lot of sugar during algae blooms. These enormous quantities of algal biomass are normally recycled rapidly by marine bacteria, degradation process that is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Especially sugars have been considered as easily digestible and therefore poor candidates for natural carbon sequestration. Now scientists r

1d

ScienceDaily

28

Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation

A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips.

1d

ScienceDaily

28

Fuel for earliest life forms: Organic molecules found in 3.5 billion-year-old rocks

For the first time, biologically-relevant organic molecules have been detected in Archaean fluid inclusions, which most likely served as nutrients for early life on Earth.

1d

Phys.org

28

Dynamics of nanoparticles using a new isolated lymphatic vessel lumen perfusion system

Nanoparticles used in drug delivery systems, bioimaging, and regenerative medicine migrate from tissues to lymphatic vessels after entering the body, so it is necessary to clarify the interaction between nanoparticles and lymphatic vessels. Although technology to observe the flow of nanoparticles through lymphatic vessels in vivo has been developed, there has been no method to evaluate the flow of

1d

ScienceDaily

28

Deep learning may help doctors choose better lung cancer treatments

Researchers have developed a deep learning model that, in certain conditions, is more than 71 percent accurate in predicting survival expectancy of lung cancer patients, significantly better than traditional machine learning models that the team tested. The other machine learning models the team tested had about a 61 percent accuracy rate.

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ScienceDaily

28

Smartphone study points to new ways to measure food consumption

A team of researchers has devised a method using smartphones in order to measure food consumption — an approach that also offers new ways to predict physical well-being.

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ScienceDaily

28

Wolves prefer to feed on the wild side

When there is a choice, wolves in Mongolia prefer to feed on wild animals rather than grazing livestock. Previous studies had shown that the diet of wolves in inland Central Asia consists mainly of grazing livestock, which could lead to increasing conflict between nomadic livestock herders and wild predatory animals like wolves.

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ScienceDaily

28

A new piece of the HIV infection puzzle explored

Researchers combine high-resolution imaging to observe the infection process in cell nuclei, opening the door for new therapeutics.

1d

Phys.org

28

Saharan dust expected to hit Europe again this weekend

Dust and sand particles whipped up from the Sahara will once again blanket skies over Europe this weekend, impacting air quality, the European Union's Copernicus satellite monitoring service said Friday.

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Phys.org

28

India's glacier disaster highlights Himalayan dangers

Long before this month's deadly flash flood in a remote Indian Himalayan valley, Kundan Singh Rana knew that all the construction work in the fragile region would one day mean disaster.

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Phys.org

28

Indonesia volcano erupts, spews red-hot lava

Indonesia's Mount Merapi, one of the world's most active volcanoes, erupted on Friday, belching out fiery red lava.

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ScienceDaily

28

Combination therapy suppresses pancreatic tumor growth in mice

Researchers have uncovered a potential new way to target pancreatic tumors that express high intratumoral interferon signaling (IFN).

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Temperature affects susceptibility of newts to skin-eating fungus

Eastern newt populations in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada are at greatest risk of infection with a new skin-eating fungus, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), according to a study published February 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Matthew Gray of the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, and colleagues.

2d

Phys.org

28

New study helps policymakers combat global warming with negative-emissions technology

Cutting down global emissions of greenhouse gases to combat global warming won't do the trick alone: we also need negative-emissions technology that can capture carbon dioxide directly out of the air. In the prestigious journal Global Environmental Change, Ph.D. candidate Oscar Rueda and colleagues shed light on this highly neglected solution, and come up with a framework to guide policymakers in

2d

Phys.org

28

Real-time behavioral analysis using artificial intelligence

Every behavior of an animal is based on the interaction of many nerve cells in the brain, which form a close-meshed web called a neuronal network. However, what happens in the neuronal networks during particular behaviors is not easy for researchers to study—they have to describe the sequences of recurring postures and link them directly to the neuronal processes. Researchers at the University of

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Real-time behavioral analysis using artificial intelligence

Every behavior of an animal is based on the interaction of many nerve cells in the brain, which form a close-meshed web called a neuronal network. However, what happens in the neuronal networks during particular behaviors is not easy for researchers to study—they have to describe the sequences of recurring postures and link them directly to the neuronal processes. Researchers at the University of

2d

Futurity.org

28

LGB bias may skew diagnosis of borderline personality disorder

Some health care professionals show their bias toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual individuals when diagnosing borderline personality disorder, research indicates. This bias for borderline personality disorder, or BPD—a chronic mental illness known for impulsive behavior, people's uncertainty about themselves, and relationship difficulties—is more pronounced for sexual minorities than heterosexual

2d

Discover Magazine

28

Upstairs Downstairs: Swirling Auroral Displays as Seen From Space and on the Ground

Early February brought beautiful displays of the northern lights — thanks to a giant 'hole' in the Sun

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ScienceDaily

28

A boost for plant research

Optogenetics can be used to activate and study cells in a targeted manner using light. Scientists have now succeeded in transferring this technique to plants.

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ScienceDaily

28

Past earthquakes triggered large rockslides in the Eastern Alps

Geologists shed new light on a long-lasting debate about the trigger mechanism of large rockslides. Lake mud in two Alpine lakes in Tyrol reveal that rare strong earthquakes are the final cause of multiple, prehistoric rockslides in the Eastern Alps. The steep rock slopes were degraded by a series of prehistoric earthquakes, larger than any of the historically documented events in the region of th

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Phys.org

28

Millions endure record cold without power; at least 20 dead

A winter storm that left millions without power in record-breaking cold weather claimed more lives Tuesday, including three people found dead after a tornado hit a seaside town in North Carolina and four family members who perished in a Houston-area house fire while using a fireplace to stay warm.

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ScienceDaily

28

International study reveals exceptional property of next generation optical fibers

Researchers have successfully measured for the first time back-reflection in cutting-edge hollow-core fibers that is around 10,000 times lower than conventional optical fibers.

4d

Phys.org

28

Record sunshine during first COVID-19 lockdown largely caused by unusual weather

Dry and cloudless weather was mainly responsible for the unusually high solar irradiance in western Europe during the spring of 2020, not the reduction in aerosol emissions due to the first lockdown. This was the result of an international meteorological study, in which scientists from the University of Cologne participated. The results have been published in the current issue of Nature Communicat

4d

ScienceDaily

28

Water is a probable vector for mammalian virus transmission

Water is a necessity for all life but its availability can be limited. In geographical areas experiencing dry seasons, animals congregate near the few freshwater sources, often reaching large densities. These sites may be key locations for pathogen transmissions, if viruses remain stable and infectious in water.

4d

ScienceDaily

28

Move over heavy goggles, here come the ultra-high refractive index lenses

A research team develops a transparent silicon without visible light loss by controlling the silicon atomic structure.

4d

Phys.org

28

Astronauts test virus-fighting surface coating

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) are conducting experiments with an antimicrobial surface coating designed to fight the spread of bacteria and viruses.

4d

Phys.org

28

Harnessing socially distant molecular interactions for future computing

Could long-distance interactions between individual molecules forge a new way to compute?

5d

Phys.org

28

Russian cargo ship launched to International Space Station

An unmanned Russian cargo ship launched successfully Monday with a load of supplies for the International Space Station.

5d

ScienceDaily

28

Study contradicts belief that whales learn songs from one another

A new study is directly contradicting the widely accepted cultural transmission hypothesis suggesting that whales learn their songs from other whales. 'Our findings indicate that neither cultural transmission nor social learning contributes significantly to how humpback whales change their songs over time.', says one of the researchers.

7d

ScienceDaily

28

Flowers of St. John's Wort serve as green catalyst

An interdisciplinary team of scientists has for the first time used dried flowers of St. John's Wort (genus Hypericum) as an active catalyst in various photochemical reactions.

7d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Detecting single molecules and diagnosing diseases with a smartphone

Researchers show that the light emitted by a single molecule can be detected with a low-cost optical setup. Their prototype could facilitate medical diagnostics.

7d

ScienceDaily

28

Changing the connection between the hemispheres affects speech perception

When we listen to speech sounds, our brain needs to combine information from both hemispheres. How does the brain integrate acoustic information from remote areas? In a neuroimaging study, a team of researchers applied electrical stimulation to participants' brains during a listening task. The stimulation affected the connection between the two hemispheres, which in turn changed participants' list

7d

ScienceDaily

28

New machine learning theory raises questions about nature of science

A novel computer algorithm, or set of rules, that accurately predicts the orbits of planets in the solar system could be adapted to better predict and control the behavior of the plasma that fuels fusion facilities designed to harvest on Earth the fusion energy that powers the sun and stars.

7d

Singularity Hub

28

This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through February 13)

VIRTUAL REALITY Epic Games' MetaHuman Creator Lets Developers Create Realistic Digital Humans Within Minutes Dean Takahashi | VentureBeat "Epic Games has unveiled its MetaHuman Creator, a new browser-based app that enables game developers and creators of real-time content to slash the time it takes to build digital humans from weeks to less than an hour. And as you can see from the images in this

7d

ScienceDaily

28

Limited transmission of COVID-19 from open schools but teachers were affected: Swedish study

In Sweden, upper-secondary schools moved online while lower-secondary schools remained open during the spring of 2020. A comparison of parents with children in the final year of lower-secondary and first year of upper-secondary school shows that keeping the former open had limited consequences for the overall transmission of the virus. However, the infection rate doubled among lower-secondary teac

7d

ScienceDaily

28

Ionic liquid uniformly delivers chemotherapy to tumors while destroying cancerous tissue

Vascular and interventional radiologists report the development of a new ionic liquid formulation that killed cancer cells and allowed uniform distribution of a chemotherapy drug into liver tumors and other solid tumors in the lab. This discovery could solve a problem that has long plagued drug delivery to tumors.

8d

Nature

28

Russian academics decry law change that threatens scientific outreach

Nature, Published online: 12 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00385-5 Researchers say that a proposed amendment could impede collaboration with foreign speakers and scientific literacy.

8d

ScienceDaily

28

Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

8d

ScienceDaily

28

Novel protein could reverse severe muscle wasting in disease, aging and trauma

Muscle stem cells drive the tissue's growth and repair after such injuries. But growing these cells in the lab and using them to therapeutically replace damaged muscle has been frustratingly difficult. Researchers have discovered a factor that triggers these muscle stem cells to proliferate and heal. In a mouse model of severe muscle damage, injections of this naturally occurring protein led to th

8d

ScienceDaily

28

Discovery of a new law of phase separation

Researchers show that the dynamics of spontaneous phase separations forming network structures can be controlled by the slow dynamics in the networks formed. This work may lead to cheaper and more powerful rechargeable batteries.

8d

Futurity.org

28

Dogs can sniff out COVID-19 in human sweat

New research adds to a small but growing consensus that trained medical scent dogs can effectively screen individuals who may be infected with the COVID-19 virus by smell. The review paper in the Journal of Osteopathic Medicine follows a comprehensive survey of research devoted to the use of trained scent dogs for detecting COVID. "The most striking result is that studies have already demonstrate

8d

Phys.org

28

St. John's Wort flowers serve as green catalyst

Since ancient times, St. John's Wort has been used as a medicinal herb covering a wide range of applications such as the treatment of burns, skin injuries, neuralgia, fibrosis, sciatica and depression. Due to its high medicinal potential, the plant known in technical terminology as Hypericum perforatum even became "Medicinal Plant of the Year" in 2015. Now, scientists at TU Dresden have shown that

8d

Discover Magazine

28

Are Humans Wired to Find the Color Red Seductive?

In cultures around the world, red is tied to passion, sex and romance. Does the association come from social learning or our evolutionary heritage?

8d

ScienceDaily

28

Nanoparticle gel unites oil and water in manufacturing-friendly approach

Oil and water may not mix, but adding the right nanoparticles to the recipe can convert these two immiscible fluids into an exotic gel with uses ranging from batteries to water filters to tint-changing smart windows. A new approach to creating this unusual class of soft materials could carry them out of the laboratory and into the marketplace.

8d

ScienceDaily

28

HIV research yields potential drug target

Understanding the mechanism of activation of a protein called SAMHD1 could be a step forward in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

8d

ScienceDaily

28

Flooding in the Columbia River basin expected to increase under climate change

The Columbia River basin will see an increase in flooding over the next 50 years as a result of climate change, experts say.

8d

Discover Magazine

28

Converting to Geothermal Energy May Help Save the Planet

Whether rain or shine, geothermal power is always available and has the potential to save the climate. So, what is stopping us from utilizing it?

9d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

New mathematical method for generating random connected networks

Many natural and human-made networks, such as computer, biological or social networks have a connectivity structure that critically shapes their behavior. The academic field of network science is concerned with analyzing such real-world complex networks and understanding how their structure influences their function or behavior. Examples are the vascular network of our bodies, the network of neuro

9d

ScienceDaily

28

A scalable method for the large-area integration of 2D materials

Researchers report a new method to integrate graphene and 2D materials into semiconductor manufacturing lines, a milestone for the recently launched 2D-EPL project.

9d

ScienceDaily

28

Long-term stress linked to increased risk of heart attack

Can long-term stress lead to heart attacks? Most people would probably answer in the affirmative, but the scientific evidence of this is scarce. A new study reveals that the levels of the stress hormone cortisol were increased in the months preceding a heart attack. The results suggest that long-term stress is a risk factor for heart attacks.

9d

ScienceDaily

28

Genetic markers show Pacific albacore tuna intermingle across equator

Analyzing thousands of genetic markers in albacore tuna from the Pacific Ocean, researchers have learned that just seven dozen of those markers are needed to determine which side of the equator a fish comes from.

9d

Phys.org

28

Video: Rotating galaxy disks in the early universe

Our Milky Way galaxy is a spiral galaxy. It evolved into its flat disk shape over billions of years. But astronomers have discovered a distant and young galaxy that has a remarkably similar shape.

9d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Discovery of a new law of phase separation

Researchers show that the dynamics of spontaneous phase separations forming network structures can be controlled by the slow dynamics in the networks formed. This work may lead to cheaper and more powerful rechargeable batteries.

9d

ScienceDaily

28

Scientists create liquid crystals that look a lot like their solid counterparts

New kinds of liquid crystals resemble gypsum or lazulite crystals — except that they flow like fluids.

9d

Phys.org

28

China's 'space dream': A Long March to the Moon and beyond

The successful entry of China's Tianwen-1 probe into Mars' orbit on Wednesday underlined just how far the country has come in achieving its space dream.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Quantum computing enables simulations to unravel mysteries of magnetic materials

A multi-institutional team became the first to generate accurate results from materials science simulations on a quantum computer that can be verified with neutron scattering experiments and other practical techniques.

10d

Phys.org

28

Strong earthquake shakes western Indonesia; no tsunami alert

A strong undersea earthquake shook western Indonesia on Wednesday, but no injuries were immediately reported.

10d

ScienceDaily

28

Quantum computing enables simulations to unravel mysteries of magnetic materials

A multi-institutional team became the first to generate accurate results from materials science simulations on a quantum computer that can be verified with neutron scattering experiments and other practical techniques.

10d

ScienceDaily

28

Ancient Amazonian farmers fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it

Ancient Amazonian communities fortified valuable land they had spent years making fertile to protect it from conflict, excavations show.

10d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

28

Forskaren: Därför vill vi lära oss mer om planeten Mars

Under tisdagen gick Förenade Arabemiratens rymdsond Al-Amal, eller Hope som den också kallas, in i omloppsbana kring planeten Mars. Under onsdagen följde kinesiska Tianwen-1 efter och i nästa vecka ska Nasas rover Perseverance landa på planetens yta. Men varför vill vi egentligen lära oss mer om Mars?

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ScienceDaily

28

Biomaterials could mean better vaccines, virus-fighting surfaces

Advances in the fields of biomaterials and nanotechnology could lead to big breakthroughs in the fight against dangerous viruses like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Researchers describe possibilities being explored by scientists, combining biomaterials and nanotechnology, to make vaccines more effective and build surfaces that could fight and kill viruses on their own.

11d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Biomaterials could mean better vaccines, virus-fighting surfaces

Advances in the fields of biomaterials and nanotechnology could lead to big breakthroughs in the fight against dangerous viruses like the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Researchers describe possibilities being explored by scientists, combining biomaterials and nanotechnology, to make vaccines more effective and build surfaces that could fight and kill viruses on their own.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

28

Advanced simulations reveal how air conditioning spreads COVID-19 aerosols

A restaurant outbreak in China was widely reported as strong evidence of airflow-induced transmission of COVID-19, but it lacked a detailed investigation about exactly how transmission occurred. In Physics of Fluids, researchers at the University of Minnesota report using advanced simulation methods to capture the complex flows that occur when the cold airflow from air conditioners interacts with

11d

Phys.org

28

New method for asymmetric N,N-acetal synthesis promises advances in drug development

A lot of our medicines and other bioactive drugs are based on chemical structures called enantiomers—molecules that are mirror images of each other and are non-superimposable. Notable among them are chiral N,N-acetals contained in diuretic drugs like bendroflumethiazide and thiabutazide, used to treat high blood pressure and edema. Because an enantiomer and its mirror image version often have diff

11d

Phys.org

28

Chromatin remodelers never rest to keep our genome open

Chromatin remodelers are needed to take nucleosomes away from DNA in order to make room for transcription factors to bind, and regulate the activity of our genes. It has been unclear how dynamic this process is. Researchers from the Schübeler group now revealed that active regulatory regions undergo continuous cycles of chromatin opening.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Chromatin remodelers never rest to keep our genome open

Chromatin remodelers are needed to take nucleosomes away from DNA in order to make room for transcription factors to bind, and regulate the activity of our genes. It has been unclear how dynamic this process is. Researchers from the Schübeler group now revealed that active regulatory regions undergo continuous cycles of chromatin opening.

11d

Phys.org

28

Six ways satellites make the world a better place

Almost 3,000 operational spacecraft orbit our Earth. This number is growing constantly, thanks to cheaper materials and smaller satellites.

11d

Phys.org

28

From trash to treasure: Silicon waste finds new use in Li-ion batteries

Li-ion batteries (LIBs) are widely used in mobile electronics. Concerns of global warming and climate change have recently boosted the demand for LIBs in electric vehicles and solar photovoltaic output smoothing. Si has been studied as an active material with a high theoretical capacity of 3578 mAh/g, which is around ten times higher than that of graphite (372 mAh/g).

11d

ScienceDaily

28

Variable weather makes weeds harder to whack

From flooded spring fields to summer hailstorms and drought, farmers are well aware the weather is changing. It often means spring planting can't happen on time or has to happen twice to make up for catastrophic losses of young seedlings. It also means common pre-emergence herbicides are less effective.

11d

ScienceDaily

28

New timeline of deadliest California wildfire could guide lifesaving research and action

What made the Camp Fire so devastating? And what lessons can we learn to prevent another disaster of this scale? Researchers have begun to answer these questions by investigating the conditions leading up to the fire and meticulously reconstructing the sequence of events describing the first 24 hours of its progression.

12d

Phys.org

28

New microscopy concept enters into force

The development of scanning probe microscopes in the early 1980s brought a breakthrough in imaging, throwing open a window into the world at the nanoscale. The key idea is to scan an extremely sharp tip over a substrate and to record at each location the strength of the interaction between tip and surface. In scanning force microscopy, this interaction is—as the name implies—the force between tip

12d

ScienceDaily

28

A magnetic twist to graphene

By combining ferromagnets and two rotated layers of graphene, researchers open up a new platform for strongly interacting states using graphene's unique quantum degree of freedom.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

28

Uncovering how some corals resist bleaching

Coral reefs are beautiful and diverse ecosystems that power the economies of many coastal communities. They're also facing threats that are driving their decline, including the planet's warming waters.

12d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

28

Flexible piezoelectric crystal

A team of researchers has developed a new material, that when electricity is applied to it, can flex and bend forty times more than other materials in the same class, opening the way to better micro machines.

12d

Phys.org

28

2-D centrosymmetrical antiferromagnets model produces pure spin current

Pure spin current without any accompanying net charge current can ensure low dissipation in information processing and storage.

12d

Scientific American Content

27

Coronavirus News Roundup, February 13 – February 19

Pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientific American Content

27

U.S. Officially Rejoins Paris Climate Agreement

The Biden Administration aims to strengthen the country's emissions reduction pledge under the pact by Earth Day — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

27

How the 'noise' in our brain influences our behavior

The brain's neural activity is irregular, changing from one moment to the next. To date, this apparent "noise" has been thought to be due to random natural variations or measurement error. However, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development have shown that this neural variability may provide a unique window into brain function.

3d

Phys.org

27

Changing livestock in ancient Europe reflect political shifts

In ancient European settlements, livestock use was likely primarily determined by political structure and market demands, according to a study published February 17, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ariadna Nieto-Espinet and colleagues of the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Barcelona.

3d

Discover Magazine

27

Is Life Expectancy Written in Our DNA?

DNA methylation provides clues about how long a person or animal is likely to live. Could it be harnessed to slow the aging process?

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

27

Could a nasal spray prevent coronavirus transmission?

A nasal antiviral created by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons blocked transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in ferrets, suggesting the nasal spray also may prevent infection in people exposed to the new coronavirus, including recent variants.

3d

Scientific American

27

Snakes' Flexible, Heat-Sensing Organs Explained

Scientists decode how some snakes "see" in the dark — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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Scientific American Content

27

The Shrapnel That Killed the Dinosaurs

Science provides knowledge of objects that threaten the Earth, and the means to deflect them — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

4d

Ingeniøren

27

Snart stiger smittetallene: Den britiske variant er nu dominerende i Danmark

PLUS. I går passerede den britiske variant 50 procent af alle covid-19-tilfælde herhjemme. Dermed vil smittetallet stige om et par uger.

5d

For Better Science

27

Alysson Muotri, a minibrain

Autistic Neanderthal minibrains operating crab robots via brain waves of newborn babies are to be launched into outer space for the purpose of interstellar colonization. No, I am not insane. Science Has Spoken.

5d

Science

27

US earnings season shows corporate sector rebound

Return to sales and earnings growth comes sooner than many analysts had expected

5d

Popular Science | RSS

27

Best gaming chair: Find the right seat for your marathon gaming sessions

Be comfortable no matter how long you're playing. (Florian Olivo via Unsplash/) The modern gaming experience is a far cry from what it was in the early days of 8-bit computers and consoles. But all of the original immersive and captivating magic has only become more pronounced with each successive generation's technological leap in graphics and processing power. Today's best games are sure to pro

6d

Phys.org

27

Research team develops joint splints for sports and medicine inspired by dragonfly wings

Around 80% of sports injuries are so-called musculoskeletal injuries, for example sprains, strains or overstretching. Such injuries can occur especially in those sports with high loads on the wrists, such as handball, basketball or weightlifting. Conventional supports either do not provide enough stability or restrict the mobility of the joint too much. A research team from the Zoological Institut

8d

Science Magazine

27

Immunological characteristics govern the transition of COVID-19 to endemicity

We are currently faced with the question of how the severity of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) may change in the years ahead. Our analysis of immunological and epidemiological data on endemic human coronaviruses (HCoVs) shows that infection-blocking immunity wanes rapidly but that disease-reducing immunity is long-lived. Our model, incorporating these

9d

Phys.org

27

Coronavirus test from a suitcase

The PCR test is the most accurate tool to identify SARS-CoV-2. However, valid results are often available only after days. Moreover, the testing laboratory must be well equipped, have trained personnel and sufficient financial resources. All of this is usually a problem in Africa. A portable suitcase could help. In cooperation with several African universities, scientists at Leipzig University hav

9d

For Better Science

27

The English science supremacy

England leads the world in science, any fule kno. Meet some more of the star jesters: Nick Lemoine, Peter St George-Hyslop and Xin Lu. They are curing cancer and Alzheimer with Photoshop.

10d

Phys.org

27

Why does love of bargain hunting run in families?

Headlines like "Black Friday Shoppers Trampled in New York" and popular television shows such as "Extreme Couponing" remind us how crazy consumers can get about retail sales promotions. This enthusiasm for getting bargains has been termed "deal proneness."

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

27

Long-term environmental damage from transportation projects in Kenya, scientists warn

The construction of a major railway through Kenya will have long-term environmental impacts on the area, suggesting more work needs to be done to limit the damage on future infrastructure projects, a major study reveals.

11d

Phys.org

27

Gun sales spiked in 2020 amid pandemic, social justice protests

Amid the protests and turbulence of 2020, Americans set a new record for gun purchases, with the FBI tallying a new high of 21 million background checks over the year. That was an increase of 26% over the 2016 record of 15.7 million.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

26

Unique study of isolated bobcat population confirms accuracy of extinction model

The reintroduction of 32 bobcats to an island off the coast of Georgia more than three decades ago created an ideal experiment to examine the accuracy of a genetic-modeling technique that predicts extinction of isolated wildlife populations.

1d

Phys.org

26

Cryptic sex: How female and unisexual animals reproduce without males

Not all species need sperm to fertilize an egg for sexual reproduction. Some species need sperm in order to induce completion of egg nucleus development, but then never use the sperm's DNA. I describe how this self-sexual reproduction occurs in many animals, including some insects, molluscs, fish, amphibians and reptiles, but not mammals.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

26

Cryptic sex: How female and unisexual animals reproduce without males

Not all species need sperm to fertilize an egg for sexual reproduction. Some species need sperm in order to induce completion of egg nucleus development, but then never use the sperm's DNA. I describe how this self-sexual reproduction occurs in many animals, including some insects, molluscs, fish, amphibians and reptiles, but not mammals.

1d

Phys.org

26

Citing levels of uncertainty decreases public faith in science

We seem to face apocalyptic forecasts on a more and more frequent basis and yet often the predictions do not manifest themselves in the anticipated doom and gloom. Of course, some predictions have long-term consequences such as those surrounding climate change. However, as with all areas of science, the error bars that scientists know only too well can simply look like uncertainty and dithering to

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

26

Songbirds' reproductive success reduced by natural gas compressor noise

Some songbirds are not dissuaded by constant, loud noise emitted by natural gas pipeline compressors and will establish nests nearby. The number of eggs they lay is unaffected by the din, but their reproductive success ultimately is diminished.

2d

Phys.org

26

Electrolyte 'boost' improves performance of aqueous dual-ion batteries

Widespread adoption of renewable energy in the power grid requires the right kind of battery—one that is safe, sustainable, powerful, long-lasting, and made from materials that are plentiful and ethically-sourced.

2d

Retraction Watch

26

'No malicious intent': Authors retract week-old Science Advances paper based on embargoed data

The authors of a paper in Science Advances on methanogens — archaea that produce methane — have retracted the work a week after its publication because they included genetic data that violated an embargo. The article, published on February 10, was titled "A methylotrophic origin of methanogenesis and early divergence of anaerobic multicarbon alkane metabolism," … Continue reading

3d

ScienceDaily

26

Wintering bird communities track climate change faster than breeding communities in Europe and North America

A study recently completed in Europe and North America indicates that the composition of wintering and breeding bird communities changes in line with global warming. However, wintering bird communities are considerably faster at tracking the changing climate compared to breeding communities.

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

26

Genetic study of Lewy body dementia supports ties to Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases

In a study led by National Institutes of Health (NIH) researchers, scientists found that five genes may play a critical role in determining whether a person will suffer from Lewy body dementia, a devastating disorder that riddles the brain with clumps of abnormal protein deposits called Lewy bodies. The results also supported the disorder's ties to Parkinson's and Alzheimer diseases.

4d

Phys.org

26

International study reveals exceptional property of next generation optical fibres

Researchers from the University of Southampton and Université Laval, Canada, have successfully measured for the first time back reflection in cutting-edge hollow-core fibres that is around 10,000 times lower than conventional optical fibres.

4d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

26

Groundwater recharge rates mapped for Africa

Rapid population growth in many African countries plus climate change has focused attention on the increased development of groundwater for irrigation and drinking water supplies.

4d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

26

Gene duplication at the Fascicled ear1 locus controls the fate of inflorescence meristem cells in maize [Plant Biology]

Plant meristems are self-renewing groups of pluripotent stem cells that produce lateral organs in a stereotypical pattern. Of interest is how the radially symmetrical meristem produces laminar lateral organs. Both the male and female inflorescence meristems of the dominant Fascicled ear (Fas1) mutant fail to grow as a single point…

8d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

26

Medication-based starvation of cancer cells

Immunomodulatory drugs, including the Contergan derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide have significantly improved the therapy of hematologic malignancies such as multiple myeloma. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now further decoded the mode of action in this class of medications. At the same time, they identified new innovative targeted cancer therapies.

8d

Phys.org

26

Here comes the new generation of climate models: The future of rainfall in the Alps

Less intense mean daily precipitation, more intense and localized extreme events. This is what future climate scenarios indicate for the Eastern Alps, according to the study "Evaluation and Expected Changes of Summer Precipitation at Convection Permitting Scale with COSMO-CLM over Alpine Space," published by the CMCC Foundation in the journal Atmosphere.

8d

Popular Science | RSS

26

Best desk chair for any home office

These bad boys making sitting easy. (Jeff Sheldon via Unsplash/) With more of us able to work from home now, it's time to retire the uncomfortable dining room table chair you've repurposed for your home office. Protect your back, whole body, and even your mind with a desk chair so comfortable you'll never want to stop working (maybe). We've researched the best desk chairs dependent on the way you

9d

Phys.org

26

Rich countries fall short in sciences gender equality: UNESCO

Women still face a massive gender bias in science careers worldwide, UNESCO reported on Wednesday, with several rich western nations way behind poorer ones in terms of gender equality.

10d

Phys.org

26

To succeed in an AI world, students must learn the human traits of writing

Students across Australia have started the new school year using pencils, pens and keyboards to learn to write.

10d

Phys.org

26

Research reveals why plant diversity is so important for bee diversity

As abundant and widespread bees, it is common to see both bumble bees and honey bees foraging on the same flower species during the summer, whether in Britain or many other countries.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

26

Research reveals why plant diversity is so important for bee diversity

As abundant and widespread bees, it is common to see both bumble bees and honey bees foraging on the same flower species during the summer, whether in Britain or many other countries.

10d

Phys.org

26

The wars in Former Yugoslavia continue in the classroom

According to the Education Act, schools in the ethnically divided Bosnia and Herzegovina must teach students "democratic ideals in a multicultural society." But according to new research from the University of Copenhagen, the opposite happens: Segregated schools perpetuate ethnic divisions between Croats, Serbs and Bosniaks, making reconciliation after the 1992-1995 wars extremely difficult.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

26

Quantum causal loops

Causal reasoning is ubiquitous – from physics to medicine, economics and social sciences, as well as in everyday life. Normally, causal influence is assumed to only go one way – from cause to effect – and never back from the effect to the cause: the ringing of the bell does not cause the pressing of the button that triggered it. Now researchers have developed a theory of causality in quantum theor

11d

Phys.org

26

Corporate concentration in the US food system makes food more expensive and less accessible for many Americans

Agribusiness executives and government policymakers often praise the U.S. food system for producing abundant and affordable food. In fact, however, food costs are rising, and shoppers in many parts of the U.S. have limited access to fresh, healthy products.

12d

Futurism

25

Behold This Sky Map of 25,000 Supermassive Black Holes

Nightlight Scientists just published a massive map of the night sky speckled with twinkling white lights. But instead of distant stars and constellations, the map actually shows the locations of more than 25,000 supermassive black holes, according to research accepted for publication in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics . Each one is surrounded by its own galaxy, illuminated by the radio emiss

1d

Scientific American

25

Even Tiny Phytoplankton Have Microbiomes

These algae exchange vital chemicals with bacteria that live around their surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Scientific American Content

25

Even Tiny Phytoplankton Have Microbiomes

These algae exchange vital chemicals with bacteria that live around their surface — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

1d

Phys.org

25

Electrons living on the edge

Scientists at the University of Tsukuba demonstrated the possibility of electrons moving as if they were massless when certain materials called "topological insulators" are irradiated with laser beams. This work may lead to a new class of highly efficient electronic devices and photonic crystals.

2d

Phys.org

25

Geography can become a root cause for inequality when cities are built in a way that fragments social networks

Communities worldwide are trying to address inequality. One promising approach could be to look at the design of a city, according to research with real-world data in the journal Nature Communications.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

25

Researchers ID blood protein that sheds light on common, post-operative complication

In a new study led by an interdisciplinary team of gerontologists, geriatricians, precision medicine experts, and bioinformaticians at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC), researchers identified a single protein present in the blood that is associated with increased risk of post-operative delirium.

3d

Phys.org

25

Global mapping projects aid humanitarian organisations

In recent years, free digital world maps like OpenStreetMap (OSM) have become a vital instrument to support humanitarian missions over the entire world. In disaster management as well as the implementation of the United Nations Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs), geodata compiled by the volunteer mapper community open up new possibilities to coordinate aid interventions and carry out sustaina

3d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

25

IU study finds unintended consequences of state, opioid policies

Study reveals the unintended and negative consequences of policies designed to reduce the supply of opioids in the population for overdose.

3d

Phys.org

25

Management consultants in healthcare do more harm than good, but keep getting rehired

The use of management consultants has grown enormously in recent years. In the UK, consultancy brings in around £10 billion a year in fees across the public and private sectors. And while not totally recession-proof, the numbers grew in the run-up to Brexit and then COVID-19. (Remember test and trace? Consultants played a major role.)

3d

Phys.org

25

Photosynthetic bacteria-based cancer optotheranostics

Cancer is one of the most thought-provoking healthcare problems throughout the world. The development of therapeutic agents with highly selective anti-cancer activities is increasingly attractive due to the lack of tumor selectivity of conventional treatments.

4d

Phys.org

25

Five ways to reduce your household waste – and stop it being shipped to poorer countries

The UK is the largest plastic waste producer in Europe and one of the biggest producers of plastic waste in the world, second only to the US. The UK produces 99kg of plastic waste per person per year. And it exports about two-thirds of this waste to poorer countries such as Malaysia, Pakistan and Vietnam.

4d

Futurity.org

25

Humpback whales change up their songs like DJs

Humpback whales don't change their songs through a process of cultural learning, a new study shows. The findings contradict the widely accepted cultural transmission hypothesis that suggests whales learn their songs from other whales. "It seems like that is not correct," says Eduardo Mercado, a professor of psychology in the University at Buffalo. "Our findings indicate that neither cultural tran

5d

Ingeniøren

25

Astronomer har opdaget tre unge planeter

Planeterne er 120 millioner år gamle og 400 lysår væk. Og alt for varme til at være beboelige.

5d

Science | The Guardian

25

'A managerial Mephistopheles': inside the mind of Jeff Bezos – podcast

The Amazon founder's relentless quest for 'customer ecstasy' made him one of the world's richest people – now he's looking to the unlimited resources of space. Is he the genius our age of consumerism deserves? By Mark O'Connell Continue reading…

5d

Discover Magazine

25

Why Did Greenland's Norse Colonies Mysteriously Vanish? Walrus Bones Hold the Clues

Norse hunters forged a lucrative ivory market in harsh climates. Why didn't their success last?

10d

Science Advances current issue

25

Transient HCl in the atmosphere of Mars

A major quest in Mars' exploration has been the hunt for atmospheric gases, potentially unveiling ongoing activity of geophysical or biological origin. Here, we report the first detection of a halogen gas, HCl, which could, in theory, originate from contemporary volcanic degassing or chlorine released from gas-solid reactions. Our detections made at ~3.2 to 3.8 μm with the Atmospheric Chemistry S

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

25

Texas A&M researchers discover energy drinks' harmful effects on heart

A team of researchers, led by a Texas A&M University professor, has found that some energy drinks have adverse effects on the muscle cells of the heart.

10d

Phys.org

25

Drilling will stop on controversial oil well 150 miles from South Florida after company finds the well too dry

A company will stop drilling a controversial oil well it started in December about 150 miles from the South Florida coast, after saying it did not find a valuable oil source.

10d

Phys.org

25

Millions of lives saved annually by 2040 if countries raise their climate ambitions: modelling study

Adopting policies that are consistent with achieving the Paris Agreement and prioritise health, could save 6.4 million lives due to better diet, 1.6 million lives due to cleaner air, and 2.1 million lives due to increased exercise, per year, across nine countries.

10d

Phys.org

25

Plume of Sahara dust caused spike in European air pollution

A plume of Sahara dust that has blanketed parts of southern and central Europe in recent days caused a short, sharp spike in air pollution across the region, researchers said Tuesday.

11d

Phys.org

25

Fenghwaia, a new tree: Identifying the monotypic genus of Rhamnaceae from China

During a field investigation, taxonomic researchers from the South China Botanical Garden of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found a new species Fenghwaia gardeniicarpa, belonging to the monotypic genus Fenghwaia of the family Rhamnaceae.

11d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

25

Limiting warming to 2 C requires emissions reductions 80% above Paris Agreement targets

Even if all countries meet their Paris Agreement goals for reducing emissions, Earth has only a 5% chance of staying below 2 C warming this century, a 2017 study showed. But reductions about 80% more ambitious, or an average of 1.8% drop in emissions per year rather than 1% per year, would be enough to meet the agreement's stated goal, analysis shows.

11d

Future(s) Studies

24

Chemists developed two sustainable plastic alternatives to polyethylene, derived from plants, that can be recycled with a recovery rate of more than 96%, as low-waste, environmentally friendly replacements to conventional fossil fuel-based plastics. (Nature, 17 Feb)

submitted by /u/blaspheminCapn [link] [comments]

3h

ScienceDaily

24

Researchers identify mechanisms that are essential for proper skin development

Latest discovery could improve development of future stem cell therapies and cancer treatments.

1d

Phys.org

24

Animal evolution—glimpses of ancient environments

Although amber looks like a somewhat unusual inorganic mineral, it is actually derived from an organic source—tree resins. Millions of years ago, when this aromatic and sticky substance was slowly oozing from coniferous trees, insects and other biological material could become trapped in it. That is why some samples of amber contain fossilized specimens, preserved in a virtually pristine state, wh

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Animal evolution—glimpses of ancient environments

Although amber looks like a somewhat unusual inorganic mineral, it is actually derived from an organic source—tree resins. Millions of years ago, when this aromatic and sticky substance was slowly oozing from coniferous trees, insects and other biological material could become trapped in it. That is why some samples of amber contain fossilized specimens, preserved in a virtually pristine state, wh

1d

ScienceDaily

24

Tuning electrode surfaces to optimize solar fuel production

Scientists discovered that changing the topmost layer of atoms on electrode surfaces can impact the activity of splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen — a clean fuel.

1d

ScienceDaily

24

Songbirds' reproductive success reduced by natural gas compressor noise

Some songbirds are not dissuaded by constant, loud noise emitted by natural gas pipeline compressors and will establish nests nearby. The number of eggs they lay is unaffected by the din, but their reproductive success ultimately is diminished.

1d

ScienceDaily

24

Ultrafast electron dynamics in space and time

Often depicted as colorful balloons or clouds, electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of electrons in molecules, a bit like fuzzy snapshots. In order to understand the exchange of electrons in chemical reactions, it is not only important to know their spatial distribution but also their motion in time. Scientists have now made huge progress in this direction: They successfully re

1d

ScienceDaily

24

Quartz crystals in the stomach of fossil bird complicates the mystery of its diet

The fossil of a bird that lived alongside the dinosaurs was found with some sort of rocks in its stomach. Previously, researchers thought that these rocks were swallowed on purpose to help clean its stomach, like modern birds of prey do, giving a hint at its diet. But in a new study, scientists discovered that these rocks are quartz crystals that likely formed after the bird died — its diet is st

1d

Phys.org

24

Unique study of isolated bobcat population confirms accuracy of extinction model

The reintroduction of 32 bobcats to an island off the coast of Georgia more than three decades ago created an ideal experiment to examine the accuracy of a genetic-modeling technique that predicts extinction of isolated wildlife populations.

1d

ScienceDaily

24

Investigating the wave properties of matter with vibrating molecules

Researchers used a novel, high-precision laser spectroscopic experiment to measure the internal vibration of the simplest molecule. This allowed the researchers to investigate the wave character of the motion of atomic nuclei with unprecedented accuracy.

1d

Phys.org

24

Tourism desperately wants a return to the 'old normal' but that would be a disaster

With each passing day, the grave future of Earth becomes more stark. The disruption of COVID-19 has not been enough to shift the trajectory, nor has it prompted polluting sectors of the economy to reconsider the harms they inflict on the planet.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Warming seas could wipe out Snake River chinook by 2060, scientists predict

Snake River spring-summer chinook could be nearly extinct by 2060 and interventions are "desperately needed" to boost survival in every stage of their lives, scientists warn.

1d

Phys.org

24

Warming seas could wipe out Snake River chinook by 2060, scientists predict

Snake River spring-summer chinook could be nearly extinct by 2060 and interventions are "desperately needed" to boost survival in every stage of their lives, scientists warn.

1d

Phys.org

24

Dozens of whales die stranded on Indonesian beach

Forty-six small whales stranded on a beach in Indonesia have died, after rescue efforts succeeded in saving three others, local officials said Friday.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Dozens of whales die stranded on Indonesian beach

Forty-six small whales stranded on a beach in Indonesia have died, after rescue efforts succeeded in saving three others, local officials said Friday.

1d

Retraction Watch

24

Exclusive: Ohio State researcher kept six-figure job for more than a year after a misconduct finding

In 2016, Mingjun Zhang, a biomedical engineering researcher at The Ohio State University, along with collaborators, published a paper that explored the mechanism behind ivy's impressive adhesive strength. In it, the authors claimed to report the genetic sequences of the proteins making up the adhesive. The paper, entitled "Nanospherical arabinogalactan proteins are a key component … Continue readi

1d

Phys.org

24

Deep seabed mining must benefit all humankind

As investors set their sights on the mineral resources of the deep seabed, the International Seabed Authority (ISA) is developing regulations that will govern their future exploration and possible exploitation. A new IASS Policy Brief, published in cooperation with the Federal Environment Agency (UBA), presents three recommendations to ensure that future deep seabed mining would be to the common b

2d

Phys.org

24

New protected area relieves pressure on primates and pangolins in South Sudan

The future of globally important wildlife—including endangered chimpanzees and pangolins—looks a little brighter after over 17,000 hectares of severely threatened forest habitat in an ecologically unique region of South Sudan were granted formal protection.

2d

Phys.org

24

Waste into wealth: Harvesting useful products from microbial growth

Ancient alchemists dreamed of transforming base materials like lead into gold and other valuable commodities. While such efforts generally came to naught, researchers today are having some success in extracting a variety of useful products like aviation fuels, lubricants, solvents, food additives and plastics from organic waste.

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

New protected area relieves pressure on primates and pangolins in South Sudan

The future of globally important wildlife—including endangered chimpanzees and pangolins—looks a little brighter after over 17,000 hectares of severely threatened forest habitat in an ecologically unique region of South Sudan were granted formal protection.

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Waste into wealth: Harvesting useful products from microbial growth

Ancient alchemists dreamed of transforming base materials like lead into gold and other valuable commodities. While such efforts generally came to naught, researchers today are having some success in extracting a variety of useful products like aviation fuels, lubricants, solvents, food additives and plastics from organic waste.

2d

Phys.org

24

Researchers clarify the microscopic origin of dissipation with graphene

Mechanical sources of dissipation play a key role in modern physics, with applications that span nanomechanics, biomechanics, materials science, and quantum computing. In clocks and other vibrating mechanisms, energy loss is usually proportional to the speed of the vibrating object. But in special circumstances, where one resonant frequency of the resonator is exactly twice as high as another reso

2d

Phys.org

24

Frigid temperatures, power outages lead to water problems

About 7 million people in Texas—a quarter of the nation's second-most populous state—were told to boil their water or stop using it entirely as homeowners, hospitals, and businesses grappled with broken water mains and burst pipes, many in areas unaccustomed to dealing with sustained frigid temperatures.

2d

Phys.org

24

Study: Including videos in college teaching may improve student learning

As higher education institutions worldwide transition to new methods of instruction, including the use of more pre-recorded videos, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, many observers are concerned that student learning is suffering as a result. However, a new comprehensive review of research offers some positive news for college students. The authors found that, in many cases, replacing teaching

3d

ScienceDaily

24

Out of this world: Photosynthesis measured from space

In school, we learned that plants use sunlight to synthesize CO2 and water into products like carbohydrates. Now, a research team is finding another use for photosynthesis. By using satellite data to measure plants' CO2 intake and fixation, scientists can generate insights into ecosystem health; specifically, how our agricultural systems will react to an erratic climate and increasingly carbon-fil

3d

Futurity.org

24

Drug relieves chronic pain without the addiction risk

A low dose of a drug called naltrexone is a good option for patients with orofacial and chronic pain, without the risk of addiction, researchers report. According to some estimates, chronic pain affects up to 40% of Americans, and treating it frustrates both clinicians and patients—a frustration that a hesitation to prescribe opioids often compounds. Naltrexone is a semi-synthetic opioid first de

3d

ScienceDaily

24

Electricity source determines benefits of electrifying China's vehicles

Researchers have concluded air quality and public health benefits of EVs — as well as their ability to reduce carbon emissions — in China are dependent on the type of transport electrified and the composition of the electric grid.

3d

Phys.org

24

Tijuana sewage pounded South Bay beaches last year. EPA says help is on the way

When a storm pummeled the San Diego-Tijuana region two weeks ago, hundreds of millions of gallons of water laced with raw sewage, trash and industrial chemicals flowed over the border shuttering beaches as far north as Coronado.

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ScienceDaily

24

Quantum leaps in understanding how living corals survive

A new imaging technique has been developed to improve our ability to visualize and track the symbiotic interactions between coral and algae in response to globally warming sea surface temperatures and deepening seawaters.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Finding coronavirus's helper proteins

A group of scientists led by EMBL's Mikhail Savitski, Nassos Typas, and Pedro Beltrao, and collaborator Steeve Boulant at Heidelberg University Hospital, have analyzed how the novel coronavirus affects proteins in human cells. They identified several human proteins as potential drug targets to prevent viral replication.

4d

Phys.org

24

Finding coronavirus's helper proteins

A group of scientists led by EMBL's Mikhail Savitski, Nassos Typas, and Pedro Beltrao, and collaborator Steeve Boulant at Heidelberg University Hospital, have analyzed how the novel coronavirus affects proteins in human cells. They identified several human proteins as potential drug targets to prevent viral replication.

4d

Phys.org

24

Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division

The processes in living beings follow a finely orchestrated choreography down to the molecular level. Rhythmic processes are found everywhere in biology, for example, the 24-hour circadian cycle, a kind of 'internal clock,' plays an important role in regulating many processes in living cells, including metabolism and cell division mechanisms.

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Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

24

Researchers find a novel connection between cell metabolism and cell division

The processes in living beings follow a finely orchestrated choreography down to the molecular level. Rhythmic processes are found everywhere in biology, for example, the 24-hour circadian cycle, a kind of 'internal clock,' plays an important role in regulating many processes in living cells, including metabolism and cell division mechanisms.

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ScienceDaily

24

A machine-learning approach to finding treatment options for COVID-19

Researchers have developed a machine-learning approach to identify drugs that could be repurposed to fight COVID-19. The advance could boost clinical trial efforts, and it could be adapted to a broader range of diseases.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

24

Nile Red fluorescence spectroscopy reports early physicochemical changes in myelin with high sensitivity [Neuroscience]

The molecular composition of myelin membranes determines their structure and function. Even minute changes to the biochemical balance can have profound consequences for axonal conduction and the synchronicity of neural networks. Hypothesizing that the earliest indication of myelin injury involves changes in the composition and/or polarity of its constituent lipids,…

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex

Researchers have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins.

4d

ScienceDaily

24

Groundwater recharge rates mapped for Africa

Rapid population growth in many African countries plus climate change has focused attention on the increased development of groundwater for irrigation and drinking water supplies.

4d

Ingeniøren

24

Rigtig førerløs kørsel: Movia i femte danske forsøg med selvkørende køretøjer

PLUS. Sammen med Ballerup Kommune vil Movia fra juli 2022 og op til 8 måneder frem teste førerløse busser uden en safety driver i erhvervsområdet Lautrup.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Kenya's locust hunters on tireless quest to halt ancient pest

As dawn breaks in central Kenya, a helicopter lifts off in a race to find roosting locusts before the sun warms their bodies and sends them on a ravenous flight through farmland.

4d

Phys.org

24

Kenya's locust hunters on tireless quest to halt ancient pest

As dawn breaks in central Kenya, a helicopter lifts off in a race to find roosting locusts before the sun warms their bodies and sends them on a ravenous flight through farmland.

4d

Phys.org

24

Researchers uncover how mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 spike could lead to greater infectivity

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have compared the original SARS-CoV-2 spike protein with a mutated version which arose last spring. They have found structural differences which could help to explain why the mutated version remains the dominant form circulating in all recent variants of concern, such as the UK and South African strains.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Researchers uncover how mutations in the SARS-CoV-2 spike could lead to greater infectivity

Researchers at the Francis Crick Institute have compared the original SARS-CoV-2 spike protein with a mutated version which arose last spring. They have found structural differences which could help to explain why the mutated version remains the dominant form circulating in all recent variants of concern, such as the UK and South African strains.

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ScienceDaily

24

New research identifies biological causes of muscle weakness in later life

A new largescale genetic analysis has found biological mechanisms that contribute to making people more susceptible to muscle weakness in later life, finding that diseases such as osteoarthritis and diabetes may play a large role in susceptibility.

5d

Phys.org

24

Method for temporal monitoring of microplastic sedimentation

The effects of microplastics on our health and the environment are being rigorously studied all across the world. Researchers are identifying microplastic sources and their potential routes to the environment by examining rainwater, wastewater, and soil.

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ScienceDaily

24

Immunotherapy — targeted drug combination improves survival in advanced kidney cancer

Patients with advanced kidney cancer, who received a targeted drug combined with a checkpoint-blocker immunotherapy agent had longer survival than patients treated with the standard targeted drug according to the results from a phase 3 clinical trial.

6d

Phys.org

24

Timing of next Virgin Galactic flight still up in the air

Virgin Galactic on Friday put off plans to make another attempt at a rocket-powered flight from New Mexico to the fringe of space, saying it needed more time for technical checks.

8d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

24

Study suggests sounds influence the developing brain earlier than previously thought

In experiments in newborn mice, scientists at Johns Hopkins report that sounds appear to change "wiring" patterns in areas of the brain that process sound earlier than scientists assumed and even before the ear canal opens.

8d

ScienceDaily

24

Vibrating 2D materials

Two-dimensional materials hold out hope for many technical applications. An international research team now has determined for the first time how strongly 2D materials vibrate when electronically excited with light.

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ScienceDaily

24

Combination of pine scent and ozone as super source of particulate emissions

Scientists have managed to figure out why conifer forests release so many fine particles into the atmosphere. Aerosol particles are particularly abundant when a-pinene, the molecule responsible for the characteristic scent of pine trees, reacts with atmospheric ozone.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Common pipistrelle bats attracted to wind turbines

One of the most abundant bats in Europe may be attracted to wind turbines, a new study shows.

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ScienceDaily

24

Biosensors monitor plant well-being in real time

Researchers have developed biosensors that make it possible to monitor sugar levels in real time deep in the plant tissues – something that has previously been impossible. The information from the sensors may help agriculture to adapt production as the world faces climate change.

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ScienceDaily

24

How cells drop the stress

Protein condensation slows down gene activity and ensures the survival of stressed cells.

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ScienceDaily

24

Can strep throat make tics worse in kids?

Exposure to the bacteria that causes strep throat does not appear to make Tourette syndrome and other chronic tic disorders worse in children and teens, according to a new study. However, exposure was associated with increased symptoms of hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

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ScienceDaily

24

'Handy pen' lights up when exposed to nerve gas or spoiled food vapors

Exposure to some odorless, colorless and tasteless gases, such as nerve agents, can be toxic or even lethal. And having the ability to detect other types of vapors could save people from eating spoiled or rotten food. Easy-to-use portable devices could, therefore, go a long way toward protecting the public. Now researchers have created a pen-like sensor that changes color when exposed to harmful g

8d

ScienceDaily

24

Emissions of banned ozone-depleting substance are back on the decline

Global emissions of a potent substance notorious for depleting the Earth's ozone layer — the protective barrier which absorbs the Sun's harmful UV rays — have fallen rapidly and are now back on the decline, according to new research.

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ScienceDaily

24

Study on submarine permafrost suggests locked greenhouse gases are emerging

Frozen land beneath rising sea levels currently traps 60 billion tons of methane and 560 billion tons of organic carbon. Little is known about the frozen sediment and soil — called submarine permafrost — even as it slowly thaws and releases methane and carbon that could have significant impacts on climate.

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ScienceDaily

24

Cell biology: Overseers of cell death

A new study shows that proteins called IAPs, which can trigger programmed cell death, are inhibited by a specific chemical modification, and reveals that they play a wider role in protein quality control than previously assumed.

9d

Phys.org

24

Researchers examine how the subtle choice of synonyms may tip your hand as to which political party you support

Previous studies have shown people can identify the gender and race of a speaker based on the words chosen, but could a person identify something like political membership? A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University found people are more successful at identifying language associated with Republican speech than Democratic speech patterns. The results are available in the February issue of

9d

ScienceDaily

24

Industrial compound gets eco-friendly reaction

Scientists have developed a chemical reaction that produces high yields of a compound used in a wide variety of industries, without needing high temperatures or toxic catalysts. The approach offers a practical and sustainable solution for industrial (meth)acrylate (= acrylate or methacrylate) ester synthesis.

9d

ScienceDaily

24

Depressed moms who breastfeed boost babies' mood, neuroprotection and mutual touch

Feeding method and affectionate touch patterns in depressed and non-depressed mothers and babies as well as infant's EEG activity showed that mother-infant affectionate touch differed as a function of mood and feeding method (breastfeeding and bottle-feeding). Infants in the depressed and bottle-fed group reduced touch toward their mothers while breastfeeding had a positive effect on both mother a

9d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Industrial compound gets eco-friendly reaction

Scientists have developed a chemical reaction that produces high yields of a compound used in a wide variety of industries, without needing high temperatures or toxic catalysts. The approach offers a practical and sustainable solution for industrial (meth)acrylate (= acrylate or methacrylate) ester synthesis.

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ScienceDaily

24

Family ties explain mysterious social life of coral gobies

The strange social structure of tiny fish called emerald coral gobies may be explained by family loyalty, new research shows.

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Phys.org

24

Researcher uses machine learning to classify stellar objects from TESS data

A game of chess has 20 possible opening moves. Imagine being asked to start a game with tens of millions of openings instead. That was the task assigned to Adam Friedman, a 2020 summer intern at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. A chess champion in high school, Friedman analyzed his opponent—a deluge of data on the brightness changes of over 70 million stars.

9d

Phys.org

24

Plant-based magnetic nanoparticles with antifungal properties

A team of researchers from Immanuel Kant Baltic Federal University obtained magnetic nanoparticles using sweet flag (Acorus calamus). Both the roots and the leaves of this plant have antioxidant, antimicrobial, and insecticide properties. The extract of sweet flag was used as a non-toxic reagent for the manufacture of coated particles. The authors of the work also showed the efficiency of the new

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

24

Vitamin D supplementation: possible gain in life years combined with cost savings

Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now calculated: If all Germans over the age of 50 were to take vitamin D supplements, up to 30,000 cancer deaths per year could possibly be avoided and more than 300,000 years of life could be gained – in addition, health care costs could be saved.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

Links between pollution and cancer in wild animals: What can we learn?

The recent review, published in Environment International and led by the University of Tartu, summarizes the effect of aquatic pollution on cancer prevalence in wild animals with the help of more than 300 reviewed studies. Authors shed light on understudied yet important fields in cancer research in wild animals—summarizing the key effects and pointing to future research avenues to crack the puzzl

10d

Phys.org

24

Links between pollution and cancer in wild animals: What can we learn?

The recent review, published in Environment International and led by the University of Tartu, summarizes the effect of aquatic pollution on cancer prevalence in wild animals with the help of more than 300 reviewed studies. Authors shed light on understudied yet important fields in cancer research in wild animals—summarizing the key effects and pointing to future research avenues to crack the puzzl

10d

Phys.org

24

Keeping it fluid: Probing how fluids behave in weightlessness

NASA astronaut Victor Glover installs the Fluid Dynamics in Space experiment, or Fluidics for short. Fluidics is the black cylinder pictured in the foreground of the European Columbus module of the International Space Station.

10d

Phys.org

24

Image: Proba-V's plus one

This satellite mockup, seen during antenna testing, shows the shape of ESA's new Proba-V Companion CubeSat, which is due for launch at the end of this year.

10d

Phys.org

24

You don't need to know nature to love it: study

A common belief in nature conservation is that people need to "know nature" in order to care about it. However, new research has found that farmers in the Brazilian Amazon can develop strong connections with nature despite having little knowledge of local biodiversity—in this case local bird species.

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ScienceDaily

24

Physicists finesse the storing of light to create rainbows of color

Physicists have found a way to use resonance to harness the energy of light more effectively inside microresonators.

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ScienceDaily

24

Climate change shrinks and shifts juvenile white shark range

Unprecedented sightings of juvenile white sharks at the northern end of Monterey Bay signal a significant shift in the young white sharks' range. Researchers conclude the northward range shift demonstrates the young sharks are being subjected to a loss of suitable thermal habitat, meaning water temperatures within their preferred temperature range are becoming harder to find.

11d

ScienceDaily

24

How rocks rusted on Earth and turned red

How did rocks rust on Earth and turn red? A new study has shed new light on the important phenomenon and will help address questions about the Late Triassic climate more than 200 million years ago, when greenhouse gas levels were high enough to be a model for what our planet may be like in the future.

11d

Phys.org

24

Sentinel-6 passes in-orbit tests with flying colors

In November 2020, the Copernicus Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite was launched into orbit from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, US. Now, months later, the satellite has successfully passed what is known as the 'in-orbit verification phase," where its equipment is switched on and the instruments' performance is checked.

11d

Phys.org

24

A new type of university is emerging to meet the challenges of today

The world is changing rapidly and in order to serve the human population dealing with those changes, American universities need to change, too. In fact, their role is to model the resiliency that all institutions need to embrace, according to Arizona State University President Michal M. Crow.

11d

Phys.org

24

An age of CRAGE: Advances in rapidly engineering non-model bacteria

In 2019, the JGI's Yasuo Yoshikuni and his team announced in Nature Microbiology an important addition to the synthetic biologist's toolkit: a technique for chassis (or strain)-independent recombinase-assisted genome engineering (CRAGE). CRAGE enables scientists to insert large pieces of DNA (up to 60 kb) in a single step, directly into the genome.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

An age of CRAGE: Advances in rapidly engineering non-model bacteria

In 2019, the JGI's Yasuo Yoshikuni and his team announced in Nature Microbiology an important addition to the synthetic biologist's toolkit: a technique for chassis (or strain)-independent recombinase-assisted genome engineering (CRAGE). CRAGE enables scientists to insert large pieces of DNA (up to 60 kb) in a single step, directly into the genome.

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Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

24

Radiative cooling and solar heating from one system, no electricity needed

A new study describes a new technology that provides both radiative cooling and solar heating, all is one system and without using electricity or fuel. It could help impoverished communities, reduce cooling and heating costs, lower CO2 emissions.

12d

Phys.org

24

Scholar to discuss the applications of quantum technology

Northwestern University's Danna Freedman will share novel insights on quantum chemistry's ability to unlock access to molecules and open new fields of study at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting.

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ScienceDaily

24

Combined bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire spell uncertain future for forests

Bark beetle outbreaks and wildfire alone are not a death sentence for Colorado's beloved forests — but when combined, their toll may become more permanent, shows new research.

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Phys.org

24

Monitoring precious groundwater resources for arid agricultural regions

A framework designed to provide detailed information on agricultural groundwater use in arid regions has been developed by KAUST researchers in collaboration with the Saudi Ministry of Environment Water and Agriculture (MEWA).

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Phys.org

24

Tourism mainly responsible for marine litter on Mediterranean beaches

Researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) warn of the impact the current tourism model in the Mediterranean islands has on the production of marine litter on beaches, and recommend taking advantage of the situation generated by the Covid19 pandemic to rethink a new more sustainable model. The research, recently publis

12d

Phys.org

24

What rules govern the structure of membraneless organelles?

In cells, numerous important biochemical functions take place within spherical chambers made from proteins and RNA.

12d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

24

What rules govern the structure of membraneless organelles?

In cells, numerous important biochemical functions take place within spherical chambers made from proteins and RNA.

12d

Ingeniøren

24

Verdens (foreløbig) største elektrolyseanlæg bygges i Tyskland

Nye anlæg til produktion af grøn brint vælter frem. Senest kunne industrigaskoncernen Linde fortælle om et 24 MW-anlæg.

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

23

Origin of life — Did Darwinian evolution begin before life itself?

A study done by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists demonstrates that fundamental characteristics of polymeric molecules, such as their subunit composition, are sufficient to trigger selection processes in a plausible prebiotic setting.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

23

As insurers end grace period for COVID-19 hospital costs, study estimates potential bills

Hospital care for COVID-19 has been free to most patients, but insurance companies may be ending that. A study of flu-related hospital bills suggests a coronavirus hospital stay could now cost patients $1,000 out of their own pocket, on average.

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Phys.org

23

The water surface is a fantastic place for chemical reactions

Using an advanced technique, scientists from the RIKEN Cluster for Pioneering Research have demonstrated that a chemical reaction powered by light takes place ten thousand times faster at the air-water interface—what we usually call the water surface—than in the bulk of the water, even when the light has equivalent energy. This finding could help our understanding of the many important chemical an

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Undark Magazine

23

I Gave up My Spot in the Vaccine Line. Maybe You Should Too.

A medical student turned down his chance to get vaccinated for Covid-19 — not because he doubts its efficacy or fears the side effects, but because, as someone who faces low exposure risks, he decided it wasn't his time, morally or epidemiologically. He wishes more people would do the same.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

23

How the 3-D structure of eye-lens proteins is formed

The lens of the human eye gets its transparency and refractive power from the fact that certain proteins are densely packed in its cells. These are mainly crystallines. If this dense packing cannot be maintained, for example due to hereditary changes in the crystallines, the result is lens opacities, known as cataracts, which are the most common cause of vision loss worldwide.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

23

The origin and early spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Europe [Population Biology]

The investigation of migratory patterns during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic before spring 2020 border closures in Europe is a crucial first step toward an in-depth evaluation of border closure policies. Here we analyze viral genome sequences using a phylodynamic model with geographic structure to estimate the origin and spread of SARS-CoV-2…

10d

Phys.org

23

How the 3-D structure of eye-lens proteins is formed

The lens of the human eye gets its transparency and refractive power from the fact that certain proteins are densely packed in its cells. These are mainly crystallines. If this dense packing cannot be maintained, for example due to hereditary changes in the crystallines, the result is lens opacities, known as cataracts, which are the most common cause of vision loss worldwide.

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

23

Temple-Led Team: COVID containment measures in Philly associated with rise in gun violence

A team led by Dr. Jessica H. Beard, Assistant Professor of Surgery and Director of Trauma Research at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, sought to determine the magnitude of Philadelphia's increase in firearm violence during the COVID-19 pandemic. They also aimed to understand potential causes of the increase by trying to pinpoint when the increase occurred.

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

23

Time perception and sense of touch: a new connection

The percept of time relates to the sense of touch. A new SISSA study "A sensory integration account for time perception" published in PLOS Computational Biology uncovers this connection. The main clue leading to the new theory is that the perceived duration of a vibration increases not only in relation to actual elapsed time but also in relation to the intensity of the vibration.

10d

Phys.org

23

To confront climate change, we need to understand the environmental footprint of global supply chains

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic upended international trade. Countries shut their borders, breaking the webs of supply chains that crisscross the globe. These systems of people, organisations and companies work to supply consumers with products, such as mobile phones, or services, like transportation. While some supply chains have since returned to a semblance of normality, understanding their exte

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

22

Oil spill has long-term immunological effects in dolphins

A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry has found long-term impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico on bottlenose dolphins' immune function.

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Phys.org

22

Move over heavy goggles, here come the ultra-high refractive index lenses

A POSTECH research team has developed a transparent amorphous silicon that transmits visible light—which permits us to distinguish the colors of objects—enabling the development of paper-thin lenses usable in head-mounted displays (HMD) that show virtual and augmented reality images in real time.

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Phys.org

22

Winter's wrath: Bitter cold, no power and a deadly tornado

At least three people were found dead early Tuesday after a tornado tore through a seaside town in North Carolina at the rough edge of a blast of winter weather across the United States. Millions of people remained without power amid subfreezing temperatures, and authorities warned of treacherous travel conditions in many states.

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Futurity.org

22

Regular exercise may protect against dementia

Regular exercise can improve brain function and may protect against dementia in middle-aged and older adults, with women benefitting almost twice as much as men, according to new research. The study used longitudinal data to investigate the physical activity behavior and cognitive function of 16,700 Europeans aged between 54 and 75 over 13 years. Previous studies have followed people over time, b

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Phys.org

22

Powerful Japan quake sets off landslide, minor injuries (Update)

Residents in northeastern Japan on Sunday cleaned up clutter and debris in stores and homes after a strong earthquake set off a landslide on a highway, damaged buildings and parts of bullet train lines and caused power blackouts for thousands of people.

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Popular Science | RSS

22

Best snowshoes: Five things to consider whether you want to go snowshoeing on flat ground, mountain trails or anywhere else

No matter what your outdoor activity is, get the right snowshoes to get you where you're going. (Alec Moore via Unsplash/) Taking a hike through deep snow is super fun, but it does require special gear: namely, snowshoes. Snowshoes are designed to distribute the wearer's weight over a larger area evenly, so the foot does not completely sink; they also help you avoid getting stuck or fatigued. Sno

8d

Science

22

UK ministers to discuss plans for vaccine and testing certificates

Government starts to explore possibilities for safe reopening of international travel

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Science Magazine

22

Establishment and lineage dynamics of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic in the UK

The United Kingdom's COVID-19 epidemic during early 2020 was one of world's largest and was unusually well represented by virus genomic sampling. We determined the fine-scale genetic lineage structure of this epidemic through analysis of 50,887 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) genomes, including 26,181 from the UK sampled throughout the country's first wave of infectio

9d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

22

At least 50% of COVID-19 infections come from people who aren't showing symptoms

A new study out of the University of Chicago has found that during the initial wave of the COVID-19 outbreak in New York City, only 1 in 5 to 1 in 7 cases of the virus was symptomatic. The research team found that non-symptomatic cases substantially contribute to community transmission, making up at least 50% of the driving force of SARS-CoV-2 infection.

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Phys.org

22

Why are so many 12th graders not proficient in reading and math?

Math and reading scores for 12th graders in the U.S. were at a historic low even before the COVID-19 pandemic forced a massive shift to remote learning, according to results of the 2019 National Assessment of Educational Progress released in late 2020. We asked three scholars to explain why so many high school seniors aren't proficient in these critical subjects.

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forskning.se

22

Pandemin sätter spår i naturen

Pandemin har gjort att vi träffas och vistas i naturen som aldrig förr. Att folkhälsan gynnas av detta står helt klart. Samtidigt får det ökade trycket på naturområdena negativa konsekvenser för miljön då nedskräpning och slitaget på skog och mark ökar. Den pågående pandemin gör att vårt idrottande och friluftsutövande ser ut att leda till nya och förändrade miljöeffekter visar en studie som har

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

22

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit

Which bananas end up in your shopping basket— the uniformly yellow ones or those with brown spots?

12d

Phys.org

22

Food waste researcher: We must learn that brown fruit isn't bad fruit

Which bananas end up in your shopping basket— the uniformly yellow ones or those with brown spots?

12d

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

21

Emergence of diauxie as an optimal growth strategy under resource allocation constraints in cellular metabolism [Systems Biology]

Diauxie, or the sequential consumption of carbohydrates in bacteria such as Escherichia coli, has been hypothesized to be an evolutionary strategy which allows the organism to maximize its instantaneous specific growth—giving the bacterium a competitive advantage. Currently, the computational techniques used in industrial biotechnology fall short of explaining the intracellular…

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Pore-like proteins designed from scratch

In a milestone for biomolecular design, a team of scientists has succeeded in creating new proteins that adopt one of the most complex folds known to molecular biology. These designer proteins were shown in the lab to spontaneously fold into their intended structures and embed into lipid membranes. Reported in the journal Science, this research opens the door to the construction of custom nanoscal

2d

Phys.org

21

Pore-like proteins designed from scratch

In a milestone for biomolecular design, a team of scientists has succeeded in creating new proteins that adopt one of the most complex folds known to molecular biology. These designer proteins were shown in the lab to spontaneously fold into their intended structures and embed into lipid membranes. Reported in the journal Science, this research opens the door to the construction of custom nanoscal

2d

ScienceDaily

21

New Australian fossil lizard

Some of Australia's most famous animals – wombat, platypus, kangaroos and the extinct marsupial tiger thylacine – have been traced back to their fossil ancestors in remarkable finds in central South Australia. Now a remote expedition to a large inland salt lake in 2017 has sifted through remains unearthed in Namba Formation deposits to describe a tiny new skink, an ancestor of Australia's well-kno

2d

Phys.org

21

Biological assessment of world's rivers presents incomplete but bleak picture

An international team of scientists, including two from Oregon State University, conducted a biological assessment of the world's rivers and the limited data they found presents a fairly bleak picture.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Biological assessment of world's rivers presents incomplete but bleak picture

An international team of scientists, including two from Oregon State University, conducted a biological assessment of the world's rivers and the limited data they found presents a fairly bleak picture.

2d

Phys.org

21

X-ray double flashes control atomic nuclei

A team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg has coherently controlled nuclear excitations using suitably shaped X-ray light for the first time. In the experiment performed at the European Synchrotron ESRF, they achieved a temporal control stability of a few zeptoseconds. This forms the basis for new experimental approaches exploiting the control of nuclear

2d

Ingeniøren

21

Kronik: Useriøs fremskrivning af Femern-prognose

PLUS. Femern A/S ekstrapolerer vækstkurven fra 2014- prognosen til 2020-fremskrivningen, som om intet var hændt, og puster dermed antallet af biler gennem tunnelen op, skriver en af selskabets faste kritikere.

2d

Phys.org

21

Oil spill has long-term immunological effects in dolphins

A study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry has found long-term impacts of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the northern Gulf of Mexico on bottlenose dolphins' immune function.

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Light that kills bacteria: Alternative to antibiotics

The World Health Organisation is convinced that one of the greatest threats to humanity is the rapidly growing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics due to their uncontrolled use. One Russian scientific project, the physical part carried out by specialists at MEPhI, offers a possible solution to this problem.

3d

Phys.org

21

Light that kills bacteria: Alternative to antibiotics

The World Health Organisation is convinced that one of the greatest threats to humanity is the rapidly growing resistance of bacteria to antibiotics due to their uncontrolled use. One Russian scientific project, the physical part carried out by specialists at MEPhI, offers a possible solution to this problem.

3d

Phys.org

21

Making swimming pools safer by reducing chlorine disinfection byproducts

Swimming in indoor or outdoor pools is a healthy form of exercise and recreation for many people. However, studies have linked compounds that arise from chlorine disinfection of the pools to respiratory problems, including asthma, in avid swimmers. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology have found that using a complementary form of disinfection, known as copper-silve

3d

Phys.org

21

How bacteria hunt bacteria

We commonly know predator-prey relationships from the animal kingdom, but they are also a survival strategy of certain bacteria: bacterial predators actively kill bacteria of other species in order to feed on them. The predatory species include many myxobacteria, which are widespread in the soil and display unique behavioral patterns: many cells assemble into large groups and go in search of food

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

How bacteria hunt bacteria

We commonly know predator-prey relationships from the animal kingdom, but they are also a survival strategy of certain bacteria: bacterial predators actively kill bacteria of other species in order to feed on them. The predatory species include many myxobacteria, which are widespread in the soil and display unique behavioral patterns: many cells assemble into large groups and go in search of food

4d

Phys.org

21

In search of super-Earths: Spectrograph CRIRES+ at ESO's Very Large Telescope

The astronomy research instrument CRIRES+ is designed to study planets outside our solar system. It is now in operation at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The Institute of Astrophysics at the University of Göttingen is part of the international research consortium that built the high-resolution infrared spectrograph at the Paranal Observatory in Chile.

4d

Phys.org

21

At least three dead in North Carolina tornado

A tornado killed at least three people when it ripped through the state of North Carolina, officials said Tuesday, while elsewhere much of the US remained gripped by a record cold snap.

4d

Phys.org

21

European Space Agency seeks diversity in new astronaut drive

The European Space Agency is holding its first recruitment drive in 11 years and is highlighting its desire to achieve greater diversity.

4d

Phys.org

21

How to spot Mars: See the red planet in the sky the day NASA's Perseverance rover lands

Last year was the year of Mars launches, and this one will be the year of Mars landings. The Hope Mars mission, launched by the United Arab Emirates, entered its orbit around Mars on February 9, while China's Tianwen-1 rover, now orbiting the planet, will land in May. Meanwhile, Nasa's Perseverance rover will land on the red planet come February 18.

4d

Popular Science | RSS

21

How to hit pause on your music streaming subscriptions

Sometimes you just need a break. (Lee Campbell/Unsplash/) It might seem like you're trapped in a constant loop of paying monthly rent to music streaming services like Apple Music and Tidal, but you truly don't have to commit for life. You may choose to take a break to save money, pursue a digital detox, or try out a rival service—whatever the reason, pausing or canceling your subscriptions isn't

4d

Phys.org

21

Food delivery companies in France pledge to cut waste

Nineteen meals delivery companies in France including Uber Eats and Deliveroo have pledged to the French government to reduce their operational waste, officials said Monday.

5d

Big Think

21

How leaders influence people to believe

What does it take to be a leader? For Northwell Health president and CEO Michael Dowling, having an Ivy League degree and a large office is not what makes a leader. Leadership requires something much less tangible: influence. True leaders inspire people to follow and believe in them and the organization's mission by being passionate, having humility, and being a real part of the team. This is esp

5d

Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

21

Breakup of a long-period comet as the origin of the dinosaur extinction

Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-82320-2

5d

Retraction Watch

21

Weekend reads: "Hot-crazy matrix" paper; "comfort women" controversy; COVID-19 vaccine misinformation

Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Eleven papers corrected after nutrition prof fails to disclose patent, … Continue reading

7d

Discover Magazine

21

Lovesickness Is Real. Here's How to Cure It

That feeling like your heart has been ripped out of your chest? Turns out you're not just being melodramatic. Being lovesick can impact your mental and physical wellness, but there are ways to get relief.

8d

The Scientist RSS

21

Fecal Transplant Could Boost Immunotherapy to Treat Melanoma

The results from two Phase 1 trials bolster the case that the gut microbiome plays a role in response to the drugs.

8d

Science

21

Can Covax deliver the vaccines much of the world needs?

The WHO-backed programme aims to provide 2bn doses in 2021 but deliveries are yet to start

8d

Futurity.org

21

Lemurs show monogamy is more complex than we thought

New research with lemurs suggests the brain circuitry that makes love last in some species may not be the same in others. Humans aren't the only mammals that form long-term bonds with a single, special mate—some bats, wolves, beavers, foxes, and other animals do, too. The new study compares monogamous and promiscuous species within a closely related group of lemurs, distant primate cousins of hum

8d

Future(s) Studies

21

Scientists Create A Tattoo That Is Able To Change Its Color Depending On Glucose Levels

submitted by /u/sopadebombillas [link] [comments]

8d

Science Magazine

21

Dream interpretation meets modern science

[no content]

9d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

21

Origami-inspired antenna technology for use in small satellites

In a brand-new study, scientists from Korea and the USA have revealed a novel antenna design for use in CubeSat nanosatellites using state-of-the-art communications systems like 6G communications. Using theoretical knowledge based on origami theory, mechanical dynamics, and antenna array principles, the researchers built a small, lightweight, and reconfigurable antenna for CubeSat depending on ope

9d

Phys.org

21

Biomarkers that could help determine who's at risk for severe COVID-19 symptoms

One of the many mysteries still surrounding COVID-19 is why some people experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, whereas others suffer life-threatening respiratory problems, vascular dysfunction and tissue damage. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry have used a combination of metabolomics and machine learning to identify possible biomarkers that could both help diagnose COVID-1

10d

Phys.org

21

Multi-inch single-crystalline perovskite for self-powered integrated circuit photodetection reported

Multiple-cation and mixed-halide (FAMACs) perovskites, which are formed by incorporating Cs/MA/Br ions into the FAPbI3 perovskites, are considered as the best compositions for applications in high-efficiency photovoltaic and photoelectronic devices owing to their enhanced stability, suppressed ion migration, and reduced hysteresis. However, the actual composition, especially the content of Cs in F

10d

Phys.org

21

Gulls: Sentinels of bacteria in the environment

Gulls are one of the main wild birds that act as reservoirs of Campylobacter and Salmonella, two most relevant intestinal antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing gastroenteritis in humans. Therefore, according to an article published in the journal Science of the Total Environment seagulls could act as sentinels of the antibiotic pressure in the environment.

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

21

Mediterranean-style diet linked to better thinking skills in later life

People who eat a Mediterranean-style diet–particularly one rich in green leafy vegetables and low in meat–are more likely to stay mentally sharp in later life, a study shows. Closely adhering to a Mediterranean diet was associated with higher scores on a range of memory and thinking tests among adults in their late 70s, the research found.The study found no link, however, between the Mediterrane

10d

Phys.org

21

Really random networks

Many natural and human-made networks, such as computer, biological or social networks have a connectivity structure that critically shapes their behavior. The academic field of network science is concerned with analyzing such real-world complex networks and understanding how their structure influences their function or behavior. Examples are the vascular network of our bodies, the network of neuro

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Study finds birdsong remains the same in forests after 1080 poison drops

Claims that forests "fall silent" because birds are killed in such large numbers during 1080 poison drops are unsupported by newly released research by Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington scientists.

10d

Phys.org

21

Study finds birdsong remains the same in forests after 1080 poison drops

Claims that forests "fall silent" because birds are killed in such large numbers during 1080 poison drops are unsupported by newly released research by Te Herenga Waka—Victoria University of Wellington scientists.

10d

Phys.org

21

Long-term environmental damage from transportation projects in Kenya, scientists warn

The construction of a major railway through Kenya will have long-term environmental impacts on the area, suggesting more work needs to be done to limit the damage on future infrastructure projects, a major study reveals.

11d

Phys.org

21

First-time study reveals high percentage of albatross deaths linked to single-use plastics

Three veterinarians from Massey University's Wildbase Hospital have been involved with a recent study that has found single-use plastics are an underestimated but notable cause of albatross and fishery-related deaths in the Southern Hemisphere.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Fenghwaia, a new tree: Identifying the monotypic genus of Rhamnaceae from China

During a field investigation, taxonomic researchers from the South China Botanical Garden of the Chinese Academy of Sciences found a new species Fenghwaia gardeniicarpa, belonging to the monotypic genus Fenghwaia of the family Rhamnaceae.

11d

Future(s) Studies

21

Protein Discovery in the Development of New Hearing Hair Cells Could Lead to Treatments for Hearing Loss

submitted by /u/blaspheminCapn [link] [comments]

11d

Ingeniøren

21

Forskere går i kødet på POL-INTEL: Vil granske politiets algoritme-værktøj

Nordisk forskningsamarbejde vil kaste lys over politiets digitale muligheder – herunder især POL-INTEL i Danmark, der hjælper politiet med at samkøre data.

11d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

21

Novel bio-syncretic phototransistor developed based on living cells for visual perception

Integration of living visual elements into visual prosthesis design can inherit the merits of biological visual systems and enhance its overall biocompatibility. However, the current studies of photodetection using biological elements have the disadvantages of slow response and low imaging capability, and thus cannot meet the demand of visual perception.

12d

Phys.org

21

Scientists estimate ice thickness and subglacial terrains in Yulong snow mountain

Under the influence of climate warming, a typical monsoon temperate glacier in Yulong Snow Mountain (Mt. Yulong) located in the southernmost part of China, has been continuously shrinking at a faster rate, and this has resulted in a dense distribution of crevasses on its surface. These drastic changes of glaciers have exerted a great impact on the local social economy, especially on the tourism in

12d

Phys.org

21

Novel bio-syncretic phototransistor developed based on living cells for visual perception

Integration of living visual elements into visual prosthesis design can inherit the merits of biological visual systems and enhance its overall biocompatibility. However, the current studies of photodetection using biological elements have the disadvantages of slow response and low imaging capability, and thus cannot meet the demand of visual perception.

12d

ScienceDaily

20

Genetic variants for skin color in African Americans linked to vitamin D deficiency

One day physicians may be able to look at an African American's skin color and, with the help of other determinants, know if prescribing vitamin D supplements would lower that person's risk of getting cancers of the prostate, colon, rectum or breast.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

20

How the brain processes sign language

Over 70 million deaf people use sign languages as their preferred communication form. Although they access similar brain structures as spoken languages, it hasn't been identified the brain regions that process both forms of language equally. MPI CBS has now discovered that Broca's area in the left hemisphere, central for spoken languages, is also crucial for sign languages. This is where the gramm

1d

Phys.org

20

COVID-19 has crippled the winter sports industry—but a digital revolution will help it recover

It was all going so well. When China sparked the greatest winter sports boom in history by trying to inspire 300m people ahead of the Olympics in Beijing in 2022, the forecast for the industry was great. The 2018/2019 season was the most successful for 20 years, as the American and European markets were thriving too.

1d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

20

Investigating the wave properties of matter with vibrating molecules

Researchers used a novel, high-precision laser spectroscopic experiment to measure the internal vibration of the simplest molecule. This allowed the researchers to investigate the wave character of the motion of atomic nuclei with unprecedented accuracy.

1d

Phys.org

20

Extending maser techniques to Floquet systems

A team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in China and one in Germany has investigated the possibility of extending maser techniques to Floquet systems. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their approach to creating a new type of maser by amplifying radio frequencies in Floquet systems. Ren-Bao Liu, with the Chinese University of Hong Kong

1d

Phys.org

20

Fierce winter storm in US seen tapering off

A fierce and deadly winter storm that wreaked havoc in the southern and central US and blanketed the East Coast in snow was forecast Friday to start tapering off.

1d

ScienceDaily

20

Selective concentration of cationic species

Sample pretreatment processes such as concentration or classification are essential to finding trace substances present in a fluid. In scientific communities recently, prolific research is being conducted on sample pretreatment techniques utilizing electrokinetics.

1d

Phys.org

20

Farmers and scientists unite for pint-sized pygmies

Fifty-two pygmy bluetongue lizards have been released on a farm in a southern area of the mid-north, 90km north of Adelaide, as part of a $400,000 Flinders University Australian Research Council Linkage project to save them from looming extinction as our climate warms.

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Farmers and scientists unite for pint-sized pygmies

Fifty-two pygmy bluetongue lizards have been released on a farm in a southern area of the mid-north, 90km north of Adelaide, as part of a $400,000 Flinders University Australian Research Council Linkage project to save them from looming extinction as our climate warms.

1d

ScienceDaily

20

Cell-free DNA in urine as potential method for cancer detection

What if a simple urine sample could detect cancer in its very earliest stages when the disease responds more favorably to treatment and improved outcomes are more likely? That was the question posed by scientists who have found a way of zeroing in on early-stage cancer by analyzing short strands of cell-free DNA in urine.

1d

Phys.org

20

What studying children's attitudes can tell us about gender‑based pay inequity

Children as young as five recognize the unfairness of gender-based pay inequality and appear willing to incur a personal cost to ensure both boys and girls are paid equitably, according to a new study by a Dalhousie researcher.

1d

Phys.org

20

Artificial intelligence may help achieve UN's Sustainable Development Goals

Scientists from the Andalusian Research Institute in Data Science and Computational Intelligence, or DaSCI (University of Granada), together with the private company Ferrovial and the Spanish Royal Academy of Engineering (RAI), have conducted a study to analyze how engineering and technological solutions strongly linked to artificial intelligence (AI) can positively contribute to the 17 Sustainabl

2d

Phys.org

20

Amazon's Climate Pledge gains 20 members, including two based in Seattle

IBM and 19 other companies have joined Amazon's Climate Pledge, committing to neutralize their carbon emissions, Amazon announced Wednesday. The new signatories include Seattle-based companies MiiR, the upscale thermos manufacturer, and consulting group Slalom.

2d

Phys.org

20

Climate change concern unaffected by pandemic, study shows

COVID-19 has not made people any less concerned about climate change—despite the pandemic disrupting and dominating many aspects of their lives, a study suggests.

2d

ScienceDaily

20

A 'twisted elevator' could be key to understanding neurological diseases

For the first time, researchers have found one of the most important molecular machines in our cells uses a 'twisting elevator' mechanism, solving a mystery of how it transports crucial chemical signals from one cell to another.

2d

The Economist

20

Business this week

[no content]

2d

Phys.org

20

Power outages linger for millions as another icy storm looms

Utility crews raced Wednesday to restore power to nearly 3.4 million customers around the U.S. who were still without electricity or heat in the aftermath of a deadly winter storm while another blast of ice and snow threatened to sow more chaos.

2d

ScienceDaily

20

Battery: Getting the lead in

Researchers developed a low-cost, high-performance, sustainable lead-based anode for lithium-ion batteries that can power hybrid and all-electric vehicles. They also uncovered its previously unknown reaction mechanism during charge and discharge.

3d

ScienceDaily

20

Mathematical modeling to identify factors that determine adaptive therapy success

Researchers report results from their study using mathematical modeling to show that cell turnover impacts drug resistance and is an important factor that governs the success of adaptive therapy.

3d

Phys.org

20

Novel sandwich technology improves sensitivity of rapid tests

EPFL scientists have developed a method for boosting the sensitivity of rapid-detection tests like those used for the new coronavirus. The results of their feasibility study have just been published in Nano Letters.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Researcher makes significant discoveries in scope of disease, parasite spread by feral cats

Kayleigh Chalkowski, a doctoral student in the Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, is leading a research study that's making important discoveries about the scope of disease caused by a deadly parasite spread by feral cat populations—not just in Kauai, Hawaii, where the study took place—but worldwide.

3d

Phys.org

20

Researcher makes significant discoveries in scope of disease, parasite spread by feral cats

Kayleigh Chalkowski, a doctoral student in the Auburn University School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, is leading a research study that's making important discoveries about the scope of disease caused by a deadly parasite spread by feral cat populations—not just in Kauai, Hawaii, where the study took place—but worldwide.

3d

Phys.org

20

Russian cargo ship docks at International Space Station

An unmanned Russian cargo ship docked at the International Space Station Wednesday with a load of supplies.

3d

Ingeniøren

20

VIDEO: Se den udtørrede flod, hvor Mars-bil skal lande

Overblik: Der er touchdown på Mars i denne uge. Mars 2020 missionen handler om at lede efter tegn på mikroorganismer i en gammel flod og sø. I denne video forklarer Nasas forskere, hvorfor Jezero-krateret er så interessant og hvad roveren Perseverance skal lave.

3d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Tourists could be spreading the virus causing COVID-19 to wild mountain gorillas by taking selfies with the animals

without following precautions. Researchers from Oxford Brookes University examined nearly 1,000 Instagram posts and found most gorilla trekking tourists were close enough to the animals, without face masks on, to make transmission of viruses and diseases possible.

3d

Phys.org

20

Tourists could be spreading the virus causing COVID-19 to wild mountain gorillas by taking selfies with the animals

without following precautions. Researchers from Oxford Brookes University examined nearly 1,000 Instagram posts and found most gorilla trekking tourists were close enough to the animals, without face masks on, to make transmission of viruses and diseases possible.

3d

Phys.org

20

Opponents of NJ offshore wind project worry turbines will affect views, fishing, and tourism

A half-dozen people stood on an oceanfront deck with a million-dollar view, asking a hundred questions about what's on the horizon. On this clear, winter afternoon, it was the Atlantic as far as the eye can see.

4d

Phys.org

20

Past earthquakes triggered large rockslides in the Eastern Alps

Geologists from the University of Innsbruck shed new light on a long-lasting debate about the trigger mechanism of large rockslides. Lake mud in two Alpine lakes in Tyrol reveal that rare strong earthquakes are the final cause of multiple, prehistoric rockslides in the Eastern Alps. The steep rock slopes were degraded by a series of prehistoric earthquakes, larger than any of the historically docu

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Secret to how cholera adapts to temperature revealed

Scientists have discovered an essential protein in cholera-causing bacteria that allows them to adapt to changes in temperature, according to a study published today in eLife.

4d

Phys.org

20

Secret to how cholera adapts to temperature revealed

Scientists have discovered an essential protein in cholera-causing bacteria that allows them to adapt to changes in temperature, according to a study published today in eLife.

4d

Phys.org

20

Quantum leaps in understanding how living corals survive

Coral reefs have thrived for millions of years in their shallow ocean water environments due to their unique partnerships with the algae that live in their tissues. Corals provide a safe haven and carbon dioxide while their algal symbionts provide them with food and oxygen produced from photosynthesis. Using the corals Orbicella annularis and Orbicella faveolate in the southern Caribbean, research

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Quantum leaps in understanding how living corals survive

Coral reefs have thrived for millions of years in their shallow ocean water environments due to their unique partnerships with the algae that live in their tissues. Corals provide a safe haven and carbon dioxide while their algal symbionts provide them with food and oxygen produced from photosynthesis. Using the corals Orbicella annularis and Orbicella faveolate in the southern Caribbean, research

4d

Phys.org

20

Breakthrough in organic chemistry: Asymmetric syntheses of useful, unique chiral compounds

Atropisomers are a class of stereoisomers (chemical compounds that differ in spatial arrangement of atoms) arising from restricted rotation around a single bond and have various applications in chemistry. To date, most research on atropisomers has focused on "biaryl atropisomers" (due to the rotational restriction around a carbon-carbon bond), but it is also possible for atropisomers to arise from

4d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Shrubs and soils: A hot topic in the cool tundra

Climate change is rapid in the Arctic. As the climate warms, shrubs expand towards higher latitudes and altitudes. Researcher Julia Kemppinen together with her colleagues investigated the impacts of dwarf shrubs on tundra soils in the sub-Arctic Fennoscandia.

4d

Phys.org

20

Shrubs and soils: A hot topic in the cool tundra

Climate change is rapid in the Arctic. As the climate warms, shrubs expand towards higher latitudes and altitudes. Researcher Julia Kemppinen together with her colleagues investigated the impacts of dwarf shrubs on tundra soils in the sub-Arctic Fennoscandia.

4d

Phys.org

20

We tested tiger snake scales to measure wetland pollution in Perth. The news is worse than expected

Australia's wetlands are home to a huge range of stunning flora and fauna, with large snakes often at the top of the food chain.

4d

Phys.org

20

Wastewater treatment at one-third the size and cost

Wastewater treatment systems that combine conventional set-ups with a relatively new technology could reap a host of benefits: smaller plant sizes, lower energy costs and more nitrogen pollution removed.

4d

Phys.org

20

Improving performance of a thermoelectric material by partially substituting selective atoms with cations

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in India and one in China has found a way to improve the performance of a certain thermoelectric material by partially substituting selective atoms with certain cations. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their process and how well their material worked when tested. Yu Liu and Maria Ibáñez with the Instit

4d

Phys.org

20

Solution to puzzling phenomenon may open door to improved cold spray efficiency

An international team of researchers has solved a puzzling phenomenon whereby strangely beautiful, vortex-like structures appear between materials deposited onto engineering components used in multiple settings—from space shuttles to household items and everyday transport vehicles.

4d

Phys.org

20

In Athens, rare snow blankets Acropolis, halts vaccinations

Heavy snowfall has blanketed the Acropolis and other ancient monuments in Athens and halted COVID-19 vaccinations in the Greek capital Tuesday as many services across the country were brought to a standstill.

4d

Phys.org

20

The Fukushima quake may be an echo of the 2011 disaster—and a warning for the future

A 7.1 magnitude earthquake was recorded off the coast of Fukushima Prefecture in northeastern Japan on Saturday night, injuring around 100 people, closing roads and trains, and leaving almost a million people without electricity overnight.

5d

ScienceDaily

20

Biodiversity protects bee communities from disease

A new analysis of thousands of native and nonnative Michigan bees shows that the most diverse bee communities have the lowest levels of three common viral pathogens.

7d

Science

20

History is key to understanding vaccine hesitancy in people of colour

Distrust has its roots in 'scientific' experiments that aimed to prove racial superiority

7d

Phys.org

20

The epigenetics of life at 12,000 feet

Humans inhabit an incredible range of environments across the globe, from arid deserts to frozen tundra, tropical rainforests, and some of the highest peaks on Earth. Indigenous populations that have lived in these extreme environments for thousands of years have adapted to confront the unique challenges that they present. Approximately 2% of people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes of

8d

ScienceDaily

20

Biochemical rules between RNA-protein interactions and expression of thousands of genes uncovered

A team of researchers has found a way to measure key characteristics of proteins that bind to RNA in cells–a discovery that could improve our understanding of how gene function is disturbed in cancer, neurodegenerative disorders or infections.

8d

Phys.org

20

Study shows airborne particulate matter is also contaminated with tobacco smoke-driven particulates

In a courtesy call to HE the President of Malta at San Anton Palace on Thursday, February 11, 2021, Dr. Noel Aquilina from the Department of Chemistry, accompanied by Professor Emmanuel Sinagra, Head of the Department of Chemistry and Dean of the Faculty of Science at the University of Malta, presented the findings of a landmark study. This study shows and confirms that airborne particulate matter

8d

Phys.org

20

Why African countries must invest more in earth sciences

The African continent contains some of the world's richest mineral resources. For instance, the Democratic Republic of Congo produces most of the world's cobalt; Rwanda, Ethiopia and Mozambique are major contributors to global tantalum output. These minerals are important constituents in modern electronics.

8d

Phys.org

20

Raman spectroscopy provides non-invasive way to track cell reprogramming

In an advance that promises to facilitate research into stem cells and regenerative medicine, a RIKEN-led team has demonstrated a non-invasive method for tracking the chemical changes that accompany the reprogramming of somatic cells into stem cells.

8d

Phys.org

20

Arctic blast puts Europe's homeless, travelers in peril

Aid workers are warning that the sharp drop in temperatures across parts of northern Europe this month has put homeless people at serious risk.

8d

Phys.org

20

Finding the best targets to improve crop yield by following CO2 journey inside the leaf

A team of scientists have measured the relative importance of the different obstacles that carbon dioxide (CO2) encounters in its voyage from the atmosphere to the interior of plant cells, where it is converted into sugars. This research leading method provides much needed information that will help to increase the yield of important food crops such as cowpea, soybean and cassava.

8d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Finding the best targets to improve crop yield by following CO2 journey inside the leaf

A team of scientists have measured the relative importance of the different obstacles that carbon dioxide (CO2) encounters in its voyage from the atmosphere to the interior of plant cells, where it is converted into sugars. This research leading method provides much needed information that will help to increase the yield of important food crops such as cowpea, soybean and cassava.

8d

Phys.org

20

Recommendations for regional action to combat marine plastic pollution

Millions of tons of plastic waste find their way into the ocean every year. A team of researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) in Potsdam has investigated the role of regional ocean governance in the fight against marine plastic pollution, highlighting why regional marine governance should be further strengthened as negotiations for a new global agreement continue.

9d

Science Magazine

20

Speedy galaxy evolution

[no content]

9d

ScienceDaily

20

Function identified of 'mystery protein' that kills brain cells of people with Parkinson's

Scientists have made a 'vital step' towards understanding the origins of Parkinson's Disease – the fastest growing neurological condition in the world. A study presents a compelling new evidence about what a key protein called alpha-synuclein actually does in neurons in the brain.

9d

The Economist

20

Politics this week

[no content]

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Scientists discover how jellyfish know when to sting

To sting or not to sting? For jellyfish, that is the question whenever their tentacles brush up against anything, including millions of human swimmers around the world.

9d

Phys.org

20

The time to take low-carbon transition risks seriously is now

On February 19, the world's second-largest greenhouse gas emitter, the United States, will rejoin the Paris Agreement. This will kickstart a year of intensifying policy activity ahead of the United Nations Climate Change conference (COP26) in November, when countries will re-commit to their emissions reduction goals.

9d

Phys.org

20

Scientists discover how jellyfish know when to sting

To sting or not to sting? For jellyfish, that is the question whenever their tentacles brush up against anything, including millions of human swimmers around the world.

9d

Phys.org

20

New material shown to more efficiently desalinate water

By 2025, two-thirds of the world's population could experience a freshwater shortage. To tackle this issue, researchers from the University of Notre Dame have identified a new solvent—an ionic liquid—that improves on an emerging desalination technology: directional solvent extraction.

9d

Discover Magazine

20

Systemic Racism Affects Wildlife, Too: A Q&A With an Urban Ecologist

"We need to understand the profound impacts that racial inequality, systemic racism and social injustice have on shaping our natural landscape."

9d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Toward more fish-friendly hydropower plants

Over the course of the EU project FIThydro, research and industry partners studied the ecological impact of hydropower plants. ETH Zurich's Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW) has developed a protection and guidance system that can help migratory fish to safely bypass hydropower turbines.

9d

Phys.org

20

Toward more fish-friendly hydropower plants

Over the course of the EU project FIThydro, research and industry partners studied the ecological impact of hydropower plants. ETH Zurich's Laboratory of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW) has developed a protection and guidance system that can help migratory fish to safely bypass hydropower turbines.

9d

Phys.org

20

Landing on the origin of life

Imagine you're way out in the middle of the Pilbara. There's no one around you, but you may be surprised to learn you're close to the origin of life.

9d

Ingeniøren

20

Nyt studie anbefaler dobbelt maskering mod coronasmitte

Beskyttelsen mod aerosoldråber kan øges med op mod 90 procent ved brug af to-lags maskering, viser amerikansk undersøgelse.

9d

Viden

20

Danmarks nye techstrategi får hug af ekspert: 'Vi har mistet førertrøjen'

Det har taget et år at finde en ny ambassadør og få den nye techstrategi på plads.

9d

Phys.org

20

Audit raises concerns about wildfire risks at US nuclear lab

One of the nation's premier nuclear laboratories isn't taking the necessary precautions to guard against wildfires, according to an audit by the U.S. Energy Department's inspector general.

10d

Popular Science | RSS

20

Best hand warmers: Block the chill during your favorite winter activities

Don't let your hands freeze in cold weather. (Maik Fischer via Unsplash/) Ever tried tying your shoes, finding your car keys, or getting out your credit card when you can't feel your fingers? Not fun. Cold weather can lead to poor circulation, which can, in turn, lead to uselessly frigid hands and frozen fingers. If you're someone whose extremities suffer in the cold, think about investing in han

10d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

20

Sleep keeps teens on track for good mental health

As families settle back into a new school year, sleep experts at the University of South Australia are reminding parents about the importance of teenagers getting enough sleep, cautioning them that insufficient sleep can negatively affect their mental health.

10d

Phys.org

20

Monitoring the body's fat burning by sampling breath

Your breath holds the key to monitoring fat burning, and now a research group from Tohoku University has created a compact and low-cost device that can measure how our body metabolizes fat.

10d

Phys.org

20

Scientists propose three-step method to reverse significant reforestation side effect

While deforestation levels have decreased significantly since the turn of the 21st century, the United Nations (UN) estimates that 10 million hectares of trees have been felled in each of the last five years.

10d

Phys.org

20

Cataloguing genetic information about yams

Yams are a staple food in West Africa, which produces over 90% of the world's yams each year. Yams play a key role in the food security, economic income, and traditional culture for the region.

10d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

20

Cataloguing genetic information about yams

Yams are a staple food in West Africa, which produces over 90% of the world's yams each year. Yams play a key role in the food security, economic income, and traditional culture for the region.

10d

Phys.org

20

Researching ways to improve sustainability and reduce waste in the seafood industry

Nutritionists have been touting the health benefits of seafood for years. Dietary guidelines recommend that the average adult get at least two servings of seafood per week. But the push to increase our consumption of seafood can put a strain on the seafood industry and create more waste.

11d

Phys.org

20

The pandemic lockdown leads to cleaner city air across Canada, paper reveals

The COVID-19 pandemic that shuttered cities around the world did not just affect the way we work, study and socialize. It also affected our mobility. With millions of workers no longer commuting, vehicle traffic across Canada has plummeted. This has had a significant impact on the quality of air in major Canadian cities, according to a new study by Concordia researchers.

11d

Phys.org

20

Explainer: how the UAE probe reached Mars' orbit

The first Arab interplanetary mission reached Mars' orbit Tuesday in the most critical stage of its journey to unravel the secrets of weather on the Red Planet.

11d

ScienceDaily

20

Cleaning Up the Mississippi River

A researcher has reconstructed a 100-year record chronicling water quality trends in the lower Mississippi River by compiling water quality data collected from 1901 to 2019. The Mississippi River is the largest river in North America with about 30 million people living within its watershed. He tracked pH levels and concentrations of bacteria, oxygen, lead and sulphate in this new study.

11d

Phys.org

20

THz spectroscopy tracks electron solvation in photoionized water

Photoionization of water involves the migration and solvation of electrons, with many transient and highly active intermediates. The process results in a large blue shift in the absorption spectrum, from the THz or gigahertz region to the visible range. While the behavior of low-density quasifree electrons excited by small pump power density has been investigated extensively, we still know little

11d

Popular Science | RSS

20

Pet stain & odor removers that get the job done

The best pet stain and odor removers work quickly and effectively to remove substances and smells from floors, carpets, and more, while being safe for humans and animals alike. (Pexels/) We've all been there: you wake up or come home to an unexpected gift from even the most trained and diligent cat or dog. No sweat: the problem is quickly more manageable if you have the right cleaner on hand. A g

11d

Phys.org

20

Enabling carbon capture, usage and storage

In 2019, the UK became the first major economy to pass legislation that commits to a target of net zero greenhouse gases emissions by 2050, and by 2045 in Scotland. There are many technologies that could assist the UK in reaching these targets, but only one, that regardless of other policy decisions, has been identified as essential: carbon, capture and storage (CCS).

11d

Science

20

Global stocks rally loses steam in US trading

US and European benchmarks lower after gains in Asia

11d

Futurism

20

For Valentine's Day, Mini Museum Makes Jewelry That's Unlike Anything You've Ever Seen

When it comes to Valentine's Day gifts, jewelry is usually a pretty safe bet. However, if you want to step things up a bit this year, don't settle for the generic department store stuff. Instead, get your special someone something totally unique. Something they didn't even know was possible. Something thousands or even millions of years in the making. Get them a one-of-a-kind piece curated and ha

12d

Phys.org

20

Shuffling bubbles reveal how liquid foams evolve

Foams are found everywhere, in soaps and detergents, meringues, beer foam, cosmetics and insulation for clothing and building. The application of foams tends to take advantage of their unique structure, which is why understanding how their structure can change over time is so important.

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

20

Study describes the diversity of genetic changes that cause inherited kidney disease

A study has described genetic changes in patients with the most common form of hereditary kidney disease that affects an estimated 12.5 million people worldwide. The research, which focussed on Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) in Ireland, provides insights into PKD that will assist doctors and patients in the management of this of inherited condition.

12d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

20

Two-phase material with surprising properties

Some materials can couple electrical and mechanical properties – this can lead to astonishing effects: New materials have been developed, consisting of both crystalline and amorphous regions. In these special polymers, the electro-mechanical coupling suddenly disappers – scientits at TU Wien have found out how.

12d

Phys.org

20

Mars missions from China and UAE are set to go into orbit – here's what they could discover

How times have changed since the Apollo era. Within the space of a few days, two space missions from China and the United Arab Emirates (UAE), respectively, are set to reach Mars. The UAE's Hope mission will go into orbit around Mars on February 9. The next day, the Chinese Tianwen-1 mission – an orbiter and lander—will swing into orbit, with a predicted landing date sometime in May.

12d

Phys.org

20

Droplets perform daredevil feats on gel surfaces

Welcome to the amazing world of soft substrates. These materials are made of silicon gels and have the same texture as panna cotta—but without the delicious flavor. They are used in a range of applications, especially in the pharmaceutical industry, because their biocompatible and antiadhesive properties make them resistant to corrosion and bacterial contamination. These substrates are so soft tha

12d

Phys.org

20

Two-phase material with surprising properties

Microstructure and macroscopic electro-mechanical properties are closely coupled in so-called ferroelectric polymers. An explanation for the high temperature dependence of this coupling has now been found at TU Wien.

12d

Phys.org

20

Half of global wastewater treated, rates in developing countries still lagging

A new study by scientists at Utrecht University and the United Nations University concludes that about half of global wastewater is treated, rather than the previous estimate of 20%. Despite this promising finding, the authors warn that treatment rates in developing countries are still very low. The study and its dataset were published Open Access in the journal Earth System Science Data.

12d

forskning.se

20

Städerna i Danmark både tätare och grönare

Förtätning och mer grönska i städer har ofta setts som motsatsförhållanden. Men, med hjälp av högupplösta satellitbilder kan forskare tvärtom visa att städerna i Danmark har blivit både tätare och grönare under den 20-årsperiod som studerats. Tidigare studier har visat på en ökad grönska i landskapet som helhet, men här avslöjas att det har hänt även i områden där det också har blivit en ökad bef

12d

Futurism

Easily Keep Your Email Private With the Highly-Rated StartMail

When you use Siri, or predictive text on your email, or have something snagged in your spam filter, you can thank Enron. No, really: In 2003, California regulators released the Enron Corpus , half a million email messages from senior management at the disgraced energy company. Everything from flirty messages to spam was just dumped onto the internet. That's set the tone for email privacy, unfortu

2h

ScienceAlert – Latest

Deer Developed Hairy Eyeballs Due to Rare, Bizarre Condition

It would be like 'covering your eyes with a washcloth.'

2h

Future(s) Studies

Overtone Throat Singing • Relaxing Soundscape Generator

submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Novel two-polymer membrane boosts hydrogen fuel cell performance

submitted by /u/Hyric89 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Flare Finance announces public BETA for February 25

submitted by /u/bravetaco2 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Origin of life: Did Darwinian evolution begin before life itself?

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

US Miltary Technology could be used on Soldiers to reprogram cells and give them the ability to heal five times faster than human body.

submitted by /u/Bream1000 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

First black hole ever detected is even more massive than first thought

submitted by /u/tocreatewebsite [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Mosquito massacre: Can we safely tackle malaria with a CRISPR gene drive?

submitted by /u/kernals12 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

The exponential improvement of "StyleFlow" over "StyleGAN2". Aging and other modifications off the chart. This new computing derived AI is proprietary and was released exclusively to "Two Minute Papers"

submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

In 2020, California lost about 1,587 gigawatt-hours in renewable energy because solar and wind farms generated more power than the grid needed at the time. Could hydrogen be the storage key?

submitted by /u/testuser1500 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Artificial Intelligence Could Mean Large Increases in Prosperity—But Only for a Privileged Few

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Scientists Achieve Real-Time Communication With Lucid Dreamers in Breakthrough

submitted by /u/MichaelTen [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Soon an electric tanker with a huge 3.5 MWh battery

submitted by /u/Crazy_Mirror_3158 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Psychedelic drug therapy now offered at Calgary clinic, the first of its kind in Alberta

submitted by /u/FreeChickenDinner [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Researchers Create DNA Modified "Super Soldiers" to Fight Cancer

submitted by /u/Sorin61 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

The future of work after COVID-19 – Two-thirds of senior executives plan to increase investment in automation and AI during the recovery from COVID-19, while 107 million workers in eight countries may need to change occupations by 2030, according to a global McKinsey study.

submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

US Air Force progresses testing of anti-drone laser weapons

submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

The Solution Isn't Trees. It's Trees Plus Math.

submitted by /u/redingerforcongress [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

The environmental cost of #Bitcoin: "One mine alone was using 175MW of electricity, the government said"

submitted by /u/Jackson_Filmmaker [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

OpenAI GPT-3 Powered NPCs: A Must-Watch Glimpse Of The Future

submitted by /u/TotalMegaCool [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Scientists have found a way to compute neural networks, using mathematical models to analyze how neurons behave at the 'edge of chaos.' This could help AI learn the way humans do, and might even help us predict brain patterns.

submitted by /u/monisharavisetti [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Millions of jobs probably aren't coming back, even after the pandemic ends

submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

Right To Repair: The Last Stand In Checking Big Tech's Power Grab – Right to Repair safeguards our right to keep the electronics we own for as long as we want to.

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

3h

Future(s) Studies

If We Want To End Homelessness, We Need To End Social Darwinism

submitted by /u/PresenceSalt922 [link] [comments]

3h

Futurism

Save 75% On a Lifetime Subscription to Knowable's Audio Learning Platform

2020 was a year of involuntary social experiments, from drastic emissions reductions to using Google to track public health trends . Yet the one we'll probably remember the most is the toll the year took on education. Around the world, people had to switch to new forms of teaching and learning, many of them involving videoconferencing, instructional videos, and other uses of screens. Knowable is

4h

Futurism

Elon Musk Collaborated With MIT to Track COVID Infections at SpaceX

More than 4,000 SpaceX employees took part in a study, helmed by Elon Musk, to track the spread of COVID-19 throughout the company. Musk partnered with researchers from Harvard and MIT to develop the antibody testing program, which required volunteer SpaceX employees to submit to monthly blood tests. This week, the group published a peer-reviewed study — Musk, known as an unusually hands-on execu

5h

Scientific American Content

Australia vs. Facebook

The tech giant's ban on Australians searching for news on its platform suggests that equitable control of international reporting is very much a work in progress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

5h

Popular Science | RSS

4 fun techniques to keep kids learning while they're stuck at home

Playthings that come with no set rules, like these colorful blocks, encourage kids to be creative. (La-Rel Easter/Unsplash/) Editor's Note: This story was produced in collaboration with the team behind PopSci's new line of STEM toys . A year into living in a COVID-19 world, we've learned to live with things like face masks and one-third-capacity gyms, but challenges remain. Even as some schools i

5h

Singularity Hub

This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through February 20)

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE A New Artificial Intelligence Makes Mistakes—on Purpos e Will Knight | Wired "It took about 50 years for computers to eviscerate humans in the venerable game of chess. A standard smartphone can now play the kind of moves that make a grandmaster's head spin. But one artificial intelligence program is taking a few steps backward, to appreciate how average humans play—blunder

7h

Ingeniøren

Nordic Harvest producerer grøntsager på hylder: »Uden maskiner skulle vi have 150 arbejdere ansat«

PLUS. Det vertikale landbrug er i konstant udvikling for at holde omkostningerne nede. Nordic Harvest er ingen undtagelse.

8h

Popular Science | RSS

Best desk organizer: Desk accessories that banish clutter

Make sure you know where everything is in your office. (Slava Keyzman via Unsplash/) Countless books, television shows, and organizing gurus will tell you that a tidy workspace can improve your mood, productivity, and ultimately your happiness. The best desk organizers are stylish and minimalist, and offer ingenious tricks to help reduce clutter and maximize usable desk space. If you've ever trie

9h

Retraction Watch

Weekend reads: An editorial board resigns over interference; what a manuscript rejection means; the scientific 1%

Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Exclusive: Ohio State researcher kept six-figure job for more than … Continue reading

9h

Futurism

This High Tech Sauna Blanket Uses Infrared Light to Fight Seasonal Affective Disorder

It's the dead of winter, it's freezing, and you haven't felt the warm kiss of the sun on your skin for longer than you can remember. Even though it won't last forever, the effect it has on your mental and physical well-being can add up. According to Psychology Today , it's estimated that Seasonal Affective Disorder affects 10 million Americans. With another 10-to-20 percentof people suffering fro

10h

Ingeniøren

Master i akustik åbnede ny karrierevej for tonemester

PLUS. 29-årig brite specialiserede sig i design af studiemikrofoner på DTU's toårige masteruddannelse i akustik, der tiltrækker mange udenlandske studerende.

11h

Ingeniøren

Banecykling er en af ingeniørkunstens favoritter ved OL: Har vi dårligere udstyr, får de andre et forspring

PLUS. Der bliver skruet i døgndrift på alle de teknologiske knapper i cykel-laboratoriet frem mod verdens største sportsbegivenhed i Tokyo.

12h

cognitive science

Shared Imagination Social Network

Given that the brain/mind is – in a sense – a biological computer, wouldn't a shared imagination social network be feasible at some point? I.e Have users imagine the color "red", and that's it. Report back their experience (quite the hallucinations.) Obviously assessing an individuals response is going to be…complicated. Language is very limited, very simplified. But its not impossible to imagi

14h

cognitive science

Join the new server Society where have intellectual discussions on how to improve the world and bring forth human flourishing:

https://discord.gg/VTT9SFsBNm submitted by /u/ArcherMan12 [link] [comments]

14h

cognitive science

[R] Sleep researchers demonstrate the ability to communicate with people during lucid REM sleep

submitted by /u/MostlyAffable [link] [comments]

14h

cognitive science

Is OpenAI's GPT3 good enough to fool the general population? / The world's largest scale Turing Test

I finally managed to get access to GPT3 🙌 and am curious about this question so have created a web application to test it. At a pre-scheduled time, thousands of people from around the world will go on to the app and enter a chat interface. There is a 50-50 chance that they are matched to another visitor or GPT3. Through messaging back and forth, they have to figure out who is on the other side,

14h

cognitive science

Isn't it better not to have any feelings?

Considering the evolution of cortex in humans, isn't it better not to have any feelings and make decisions only rationally using critical thinking rather than emotionaly? Is amygdala going to get smaller through evolution? Would you like to go under a surgery to make your thinking less emotionaly biased and more rational and critical? ( without any surgical risks ) Please share your scientific op

14h

cognitive science

A passing moment of gratitude

Hey all, long-time lurker, first-time blah blahs. I just wanted to share that, thanks to my dive into the rabbit hole that is cognitive science and helping out with virtual lab work, I finally feel "alive" again. I look forward to what might be in store the next day. When thinking about this as I was prepping a quick shake, I realized this field makes me feel what World of Warcraft did as a tween

14h

cognitive science

Study pinpoints hormonal pathway through which early poverty may contribute to poor psychological health

submitted by /u/tarjebie [link] [comments]

14h

cognitive science

How can I change my diet to improve brain function and mood?

I consume a lot of sugar and carbs, in layman's terms how does this effect my psychological state? And what can I do to improve it? submitted by /u/bilbo_bag_holder [link] [comments]

14h

cognitive science

Research Study: The REACT Study (Boston, MA)

Hi everyone! My name is Meghan and I am a researcher at Mass General. I'm writing to share some information about a study in my unit that's currently recruiting. If you or someone you know are interested, please feel free to share this info and/or PM me. Thank you. REACT is a 12-week study for females ages 14- 35 who have missed their period in the past 6 months because of exercise activity or re

14h

cognitive science

Capturing all text entry including keystroke timing for studying cognition

Apologies if this shouldn't be posted here. If you could direct me to the right subreddit, I would appreciate it. I'm not sure why I'm having so much trouble with this, but I'm just trying to capture the text and keystroke information in a free text entry field. For example, if a user typed "I am", the following would be captured: Text: "I am" Keystroke, Keypress, KeyUp SHIFT, 1, 3 i, 2, 3 SPACE,

14h

cognitive science

Hi all, if you don't know me, my name is Ava, a PhD student in mental health neuroscience. This video talks about what I've learned making YouTube videos on sensitive mental health topics, including how to talk specifically about different vulnerable groups. I hope you enjoy x

submitted by /u/ava_flava123 [link] [comments]

14h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Smakprov ur "Tio ekvationer som styr världen"

Vi tänker ofta på matematiken som en hård, objektiv vetenskap. Och det är den: Många av de frågor jag tittar på i Tio ekvationer som styr världen handlar om spel, finansvärlden och algoritmerna i sociala medier. Men matematik kan också hantera mjukare och vardagligare problem, som att bedöma om det är dags att bli rädd när flygplanet skakar extra mycket, eller att avgöra hur generös det är rimligt

17h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Ekvationer för underhållning och makt

1 | Hur kom det sig att du skrev just den här boken? – Efter min förra bok Uträknad funderade jag på hur jag skulle kunna nå en bredare publik och förklara varför matematik är viktigt.

17h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Två som slår hål på myter om träning och hälsa

Känns det segt att börja träna? Helt normalt. Att vi skulle vara födda för att träna är en av många myter om träning som Daniel Lieberman, professor i evolutionsbiologi vid Harvard i USA, slår hål på i sin nya bok Träningsparadoxen. Mest känd är han för en artikel i tidskriften Nature 2004 om att människan är fysiologiskt utvecklad för att springa, som sedan blev temat i journalisten Christopher M

17h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Samlad kunskap om hästar och människor

Kunskap, sådan som nog inte hade funnits om den inte hade rört vid både hjärta och hjärna, kunskap om en praktik som berör många vetenskapliga områden och som samtidigt är ett vetenskapligt område i sin egen rätt. Det är sådan kunskap som förmedlas i antologin Hästen och den mänskliga hälsan, redigerad av Gunilla Silfverberg, professor i vårdetik, och Henrik Lerner, lektor i vårdetik, båda vid Ers

17h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Om sorg och fjärran planeter

Livets stora frågor berör många olika plan av tillvaron. Sara Seager är astronom och arbetar med att söka efter tecken på liv långt ute i universum. Samtidigt ställdes hennes eget liv på ända när hennes man dog i cancer och hon blev ensam med två barn. Hur fungerar livet alls, när en närståendes liv tar slut? Ett slumpartat möte i en pulkabacke blev en viktig nyckel för Sara Seager när hon skulle

17h

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Kvinnors våld var ofta grovt

Att 1800-talets kvinnor endast var offer för mäns våld stämmer inte. I själva verket utövade många kvinnor både grovt och genomtänkt våld mot såväl vuxna som barn, och sig själva. Det konstaterar historikerna Marie Eriksson och Roddy Nilsson i en ny bok. 1 | Ni har djupdykt i domstolshandlingar och obduktionsprotokoll. Varför ville ni skriva boken?

17h

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Optical frequency combs found a new dimension

Scientists from EPFL and IBM Research Europe have demonstrated thegeneration of tunable and coherent frequency combs in a pair ofhybridised optical microresonators.

18h

ScienceDaily

In dueling ants vying to become queen, behavioral and molecular cues quickly determine who will win

In one species of ants, workers duel to establish new leadership after the death of their queen. While these sparring matches stretch for more than a month, changes in behavior and gene expression in the first three days of dueling can accurately predict who will triumph, according to a New York University study published in the journal Genes & Development.

23h

Discover Magazine

What Does Wind Chill Mean, Exactly?

Though often talked about as the "feels like" temperature, wind chill involves a lot more than just how you feel outside.

1d

Popular Science | RSS

Eco-friendly golf balls for a greener game

Fore! (Unsplash/) The average golf course has nearly 75 acres of land. That's a lot of space for errant balls to disappear, and even if you put a RFID tracker on your autographed favorite, it can still get stuck in the mud under six feet of water. Fortunately, unlike lost socks, lost golf balls don't always appear to vaporize into a parallel universe. Enterprising companies have done the work to

1d

Futurism

Say Goodbye To 'Coronasomnia' With the Yana Sleep Body Pillow

It's harder than ever to get a good night's sleep . Thanks to the pandemic, almost everyone's life has been impacted. It's taken a toll on our work, home, family life–and subsequently the quality of our sleep. A report out of the National Institutes of Health reveals that Coronasomnia, the loss of sleep due to pandemic-related stress, has resulted in a nearly 40-percent increase in clinical insom

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students

New nationwide survey data uncovers college students' current mental health challenges and needs.

1d

Science Magazine

Road map to U.S. fusion power plant comes into clearer focus—sort of

National academies lay out to-do list to build multibillion-dollar plant by 2035

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Time-lapse reveals the hidden dance of roots

New time-lapse videos capture something that's too slow for our eyes to see: the growing tips of plant roots make corkscrew-like motions, waggling and winding in a helical path as they burrow into the soil. By using time-lapse footage, along with a root-like robot to test ideas, researchers have gained new insights into how and why rice root tips twirl as they grow.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products

Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at Illinois previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacteria to aid in natural product di

1d

Biochemistry Research News — ScienceDaily

Pore-like proteins designed from scratch

Scientists have created new proteins that adopt one of the most complex folds known to molecular biology. These pore-like barrel-shaped proteins spontaneously fold into their intended structures and embed into lipid membranes. Although the scientists drew inspiration from proteins found throughout the living world, they arrived at sequences that differ from any known before. The resulting compact

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Popular Science | RSS

Dinner plates that make your food look more delicious

Yum! (Unsplash/) A good-looking meal makes the eyes grow wide and whets the appetite, so be sure your food is dressed for success. The ideal dinner plate will both suit the food you prepare and fit the look of your home. Maybe you make elaborate meals in your maximalist palace and need plates that put on a show. Or perhaps you're more of a meat-and-potatoes type cooking in a cozy log cabin. There

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Emergency flashlights for both survival and adventure

An emergency flashlight should be small enough to stash away, but powerful enough to light up an area when needed. (Pexels/) You don't have to be a survivalist to keep jumper cables in your car or your pantry stocked with canned food. And you don't have to believe in Murphy's Law to know that things don't always go according to plan. Emergency flashlights are great tools for those hard-to-foresee

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ScienceDaily

Pore-like proteins designed from scratch

Scientists have created new proteins that adopt one of the most complex folds known to molecular biology. These pore-like barrel-shaped proteins spontaneously fold into their intended structures and embed into lipid membranes. Although the scientists drew inspiration from proteins found throughout the living world, they arrived at sequences that differ from any known before. The resulting compact

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ScienceDaily

New Data sheds light on genesis of our body's powerhouses

Scientists uncover for the first time how the body's energy makers are made. An international team of researchers report an insight into the molecular mechanism of membrane-tethered protein synthesis in mitochondria. This is a fundamental new understanding of how the human mitoribosome functions and could explain how it is affected by mutations and deregulation leading to disorders like deafness a

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

LSU Health study finds psychosocial factors may drive peritoneal dialysis patient dropout

A retrospective study conducted by LSU Health New Orleans reports that contrary to previous research, most patients who drop out of peritoneal dialysis may do so for psychosocial reasons. The findings are published in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences . The paper inspired a companion editorial.

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Popular Science | RSS

Dog food bowls that will please any pooch

Somebody is ready for dinner! (Unsplash/) Dogs require love and attention in large quantities. Raising a puppy in particular—fun as it may be—can feel like a full time job. Luckily, feeding time is a moment when your dog is excited, engaged, and well, out of your hair. So use this rare respite to your advantage and make their experience nourishing and satisfying. Dog bowls can regulate the rate a

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Dagens Medicin

God kræftbehandling er også god diagnostik, god rehabilitering og god palliation

Der er behov for, at sundhedsvæsenet arbejder ud fra en national kvalitetsplan med fælles kvalitetsstandarder for hver enkelt del af kræftbehandlingen fra start til slut, uafhængigt af hvem der yder den sundhedsfaglige indsats.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Call to action for research ethics in the time of COVID-19 and BLM

In their paper 'Ethics of Research at the Intersection of COVID-19 and Black Lives Matter: A Call to Action,' UIC faculty authors highlight the historical issues that impact research involving Black populations. They also provide recommendations for researchers to ethically engage Black populations in research. The article is published online in the Journal of Medical Ethics.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

RUDN University chemist used iodine to synthesize new chalcogenides

A chemist from RUDN University, working with a group of colleagues, synthesized three new chalcogenides (compounds that contain metals and elements from group 16 of the periodic table). The team suggested an unusual approach to synthesis that was based on iodine.

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Popular Science | RSS

Paper shredders to eat up sensitive documents and information

Keep your private information secure with a paper shredder. (Boxis/) You don't need to be doing anything salacious to benefit from a paper shredder. While they do evoke images of government evasion and organized crime, these helpful appliances are great for getting rid of sensitive, personal information. Don't let old documents pile up because you're afraid of dumping them in the recycling bin fo

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Science Magazine

Humble dung beetles may be ideal DNA detectors for animal surveys

Other animals' poop found in the beetles' guts could reveal local biodiversity

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The melting of large icebergs is a key stage in the evolution of ice ages

A new study, in which the Andalusian Earth Sciences Institute (IACT) (CSIC-UGR) participated, has described for the first time a key stage in the beginning of the great glaciations and indicates that it can happen to our planet in the future. The findings were recently published in the scientific journal NatureThe study claims to have found a new connection that could explain the beginning of the

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Parasites' dispersal capacity and rates of genetic introgression–a study

The results, recently published in the journal Communications Biology, have important applications in the field of coevolutionary biology

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Targeting MAPK4 emerges as a promising therapy for prostate cancer

New research opens the possibility that targeting the enzyme MAPK4 in human prostate cancer might provide a novel therapeutic strategy for this disease that is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Lancet: 3-month interval between first and second dose of Oxford COVID-19 vaccine results in higher vaccine efficacy than 6-week interval

* Exploratory analyses including 17,178 participants find that higher vaccine efficacy is obtained with a longer interval between the first and second standard dose (81% for 3-month interval vs 55% for up to 6-week interval). In addition, a single dose of vaccine is highly efficacious in the first 3 months (76% efficacy from 22 days after vaccination onwards).

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A speed limit also applies in the quantum world

Even in the world of the smallest particles with their own special rules, things cannot proceed infinitely fast. Physicists at the University of Bonn have now shown what the speed limit is for complex quantum operations. The study also involved scientists from MIT, the universities of Hamburg, Cologne and Padua, and the Jülich Research Center. The results are important for the realization of quant

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Popular Science | RSS

Blue light blocking glasses that give your eyes a needed screen reprieve

Blue light blocking glasses can help to reduce eye strain. (Pexels/) We as humans spend a lot of our waking lives in front of screens. Wearing blue light blocking glasses can improve sleep and help reduce the risk of developing eye-related problems and other negative effects. They can also be a cute new accessory for switching up your personal style. Here are our most effective, affordable, and s

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New review compiles immunogenicity data on leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates

In a new Review, P.J. Klasse and colleagues present an extensive overview of the immunogenicity profiles of several leading SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, including several developed under the auspices of

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First multi-whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans

In African Americans, the genetic risk landscape for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is very different from that of people with European ancestry, according to results of the first whole-genome study of IBD in African Americans. The authors say that future clinical research on IBD needs to take ancestry into account.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers find evidence of protein folding at site of intracellular droplets

Researchers at the University of Notre Dame found that elevated concentrations of proteins within the droplets triggered a folding event, increasing the potential for protein aggregation — or misfolding — which has been linked to neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Targeting RNA polymerase II Mediator subunits in cancer therapy [Cell Biology]

Targeting Transcription Factors in Cancer Human cancers undergo an extremely diverse range of DNA mutations and rearrangements to generate oncogenes and to inactivate tumor suppressors in the process of their malignant transformation. As a consequence, decades of research have focused on the genes and the molecular pathways as well as…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Biodiversity and community structure [Ecology]

In natural plant communities, one finds ample examples of both competitive and facilitative interactions. The effect of a species A on another species B is said to be competitive (facilitative) if an increase in A's population size reduces (enhances) the population growth rate of B. Competition may arise if two…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Giant spontaneous Hall effect in a nonmagnetic Weyl-Kondo semimetal [Physics]

Nontrivial topology in condensed-matter systems enriches quantum states of matter to go beyond either the classification into metals and insulators in terms of conventional band theory or that of symmetry-broken phases by Landau's order parameter framework. So far, focus has been on weakly interacting systems, and little is known about…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Precise initial abundance of Niobium-92 in the Solar System and implications for p-process nucleosynthesis [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The niobium-92–zirconium-92 (92Nb–92Zr) decay system with a half-life of 37 Ma has great potential to date the evolution of planetary materials in the early Solar System. Moreover, the initial abundance of the p-process isotope 92Nb in the Solar System is important for quantifying the contribution of p-process nucleosynthesis in astrophysical…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tissue folding at the organ-meristem boundary results in nuclear compression and chromatin compaction [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Artificial mechanical perturbations affect chromatin in animal cells in culture. Whether this is also relevant to growing tissues in living organisms remains debated. In plants, aerial organ emergence occurs through localized outgrowth at the periphery of the shoot apical meristem, which also contains a stem cell niche. Interestingly, organ outgrowth…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanism and function of root circumnutation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Early root growth is critical for plant establishment and survival. We have identified a molecular pathway required for helical root tip movement known as circumnutation. Here, we report a multiscale investigation of the regulation and function of this phenomenon. We identify key cell signaling events comprising interaction of the ethylene,…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Kinetic description of site ensembles on catalytic surfaces [Chemistry]

We demonstrate that the Langmuir–Hinshelwood formalism is an incomplete kinetic description and, in particular, that the Hinshelwood assumption (i.e., that adsorbates are randomly distributed on the surface) is inappropriate even in catalytic reactions as simple as A + A → A2. The Hinshelwood assumption results in miscounting of site pairs…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nonreciprocity of spin waves in the conical helix state [Physics]

Nonreciprocity emerges in nature and in artificial objects from various physical origins, being widely utilized in contemporary technologies as exemplified by diode elements in electronics. While most of the nonreciprocal phenomena are realized by employing interfaces where the inversion symmetry is trivially lifted, nonreciprocal transport of photons, electrons, magnons, and…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Mark Stoneking [Profiles]

Molecular anthropologist Mark Stoneking's contributions to the field of human evolution began in the mid-1980s. As a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, Stoneking helped to identify the first genetic evidence supporting the African origin of modern humans. Since then, Stoneking, now a Group Leader at the Max…

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Inside Science – Reliable news for an expanding universe

Not Just Bats: Researchers Say Numerous Mammals Could Host Unknown Coronaviruses

Creature amalate Fri, 02/19/2021 – 14:19 Image Media credits Victor Sassen A new model suggests that many more mammal species than was previously known could host the creation of novel coronaviruses. Tuesday, February 16, 2021 Meredith Fore, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/not-just-bats-researchers-say-numerous-mamma…

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Eating more refined grains increases risk of heart attack & death: SFU researcher

A new study published in The British Medical Journal by researchers including SFU health sciences professor Scott Lear found consuming a high number of refined grains, such as croissants and white bread, is associated with a higher risk of major cardiovascular disease, stroke and death.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Combined vaccination and physical distancing enough to prevent future COVID-19 surges

A combination of robust vaccination programmes and strict physical distancing could avoid recurring peaks of COVID-19 without the need for stay-at-home restrictions, according to a new study by epidemiologists and demographers from WorldPop at the University of Southampton and The Chinese University of Hong Kong.Using anonymised mobile phone geolocation data with epidemiological and coronavirus ca

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New research on mitochondrial function can play significant part in serious disease

Disorders of the cells' energy supply can cause a number of serious diseases, but also seem to be connected to ageing. More research is needed on mitochondrial function to find future treatments. A new study involving researchers at Karolinska Institutet shows how an important molecule inside the mitochondria affects their function in mice and fruit flies. The study, which is published in Science

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The CLASP2 space experiment achieves an unprecedented map of the Sun's magnetic field

Every day space telescopes provide spectacular images of the solar activity. However, their instruments are blind to its main driver: the magnetic field in the outer layers of the solar atmosphere, where the explosive events that occasionally affect the Earth occur.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New technology enables predictive design of engineered human cells

Northwestern University synthetic biologists have developed a design-driven process to build complex genetic circuits for cellular engineering. The new technology utilizes computational modeling to more efficiently identify useful genetic designs before building them in the lab. Faced with myriad possibilities, modeling points researchers to designs that offer real opportunity. The researchers con

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sounding rocket CLASP2 elucidates solar magnetic field

Cooperative operations between a solar observation satellite and a sounding-rocket telescope have measured the magnetic field strength in the photosphere and chromosphere above an active solar plage region. This is the first time that the magnetic field in the chromosphere has been charted all the way up to its top. This finding brings us closer to understanding how energy is transferred between l

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study reveals energy sources supporting coral reef predators

Since Charles Darwin's day, the abundance of life on coral reefs has been puzzling, given that most oceanic surface waters in the tropics are low in nutrients and unproductive. But now research, led by Newcastle University and published in in the journal Science Advances, has confirmed that the food web of a coral reef in the Maldives relies heavily on what comes in from the open ocean.

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Science Magazine

New U.K. funding agency would tackle innovative research

Advanced Research & Invention Agency managers would have freedom to fund risky ideas

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Science Advances current issue

Learning hierarchical sequence representations across human cortex and hippocampus

Sensory input arrives in continuous sequences that humans experience as segmented units, e.g., words and events. The brain's ability to discover regularities is called statistical learning. Structure can be represented at multiple levels, including transitional probabilities, ordinal position, and identity of units. To investigate sequence encoding in cortex and hippocampus, we recorded from intr

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Science Advances current issue

A distinct population of heterogeneously color-tuned neurons in macaque visual cortex

Color is a key feature of natural environments that higher mammals routinely use to detect food, avoid predators, and interpret social signals. The distribution of color signals in natural scenes is widely variable, ranging from uniform patches to highly nonuniform regions in which different colors lie in close proximity. Whether individual neurons are tuned to this high degree of variability of

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Science Advances current issue

A stapled peptide mimetic of the CtIP tetramerization motif interferes with double-strand break repair and replication fork protection

Cancer cells display high levels of DNA damage and replication stress, vulnerabilities that could be exploited by drugs targeting DNA repair proteins. Human CtIP promotes homology-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and protects stalled replication forks from nucleolytic degradation, thus representing an attractive candidate for targeted cancer therapy. Here, we establish a peptide

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Science Advances current issue

An autophagy-related protein Becn2 regulates cocaine reward behaviors in the dopaminergic system

Drug abuse is a foremost public health problem. Cocaine is a widely abused drug worldwide that produces various reward-related behaviors. The mechanisms that underlie cocaine-induced disorders are unresolved, and effective treatments are lacking. Here, we found that an autophagy-related protein Becn2 is a previously unidentified regulator of cocaine reward behaviors. Becn2 deletion protects mice

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Science Advances current issue

Synaptic communication mediates the assembly of a self-organizing circuit that controls reproduction

Migration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons from their birthplace in the nasal placode to their hypothalamic destination is critical for vertebrate reproduction and species persistence. While their migration mode as individual GnRH neurons has been extensively studied, the role of GnRH-GnRH cell communication during migration remains largely unexplored. Here, we show in awake zebra

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Science Advances current issue

PKA C{alpha} subunit mutation triggers caspase-dependent RII{beta} subunit degradation via Ser114 phosphorylation

Mutations in the PRKACA gene are the most frequent cause of cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas leading to Cushing's syndrome. PRKACA encodes for the catalytic subunit α of protein kinase A (PKA). We already showed that PRKACA mutations lead to impairment of regulatory (R) subunit binding. Furthermore, PRKACA mutations are associated with reduced RIIβ protein levels; however, the mechanism

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Science Advances current issue

Imaging the mechanisms of anti-CD20 therapy in vivo uncovers spatiotemporal bottlenecks in antibody-dependent phagocytosis

Anti-CD20 antibody (mAb) represents an effective strategy for the treatment of B cell malignancies, possibly involving complement activity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and phagocytosis (ADP). While ADP by Kupffer cells deplete circulating tumors, mechanisms targeting non-circulating tumors remain unclear. Using intravital imaging in a model of B cell lymphoma, we establish here the d

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Science Advances current issue

Noninvasive monitoring of hepatic glutathione depletion through fluorescence imaging and blood testing

Hepatic glutathione plays a key role in regulating redox potential of the entire body, and its depletion is known to increase susceptibility to oxidative stress involved in many diseases. However, this crucial pathophysiological event can only be detected noninvasively with high-end instrumentation or invasively with surgical biopsy, limiting both preclinical research and clinical prevention of o

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Science Advances current issue

Naked mole rat TRF1 safeguards glycolytic capacity and telomere replication under low oxygen

The naked mole rat (NMR), a long-lived and cancer-resistant rodent, is highly resistant to hypoxia. Here, using robust cellular models wherein the mouse telomeric protein TRF1 is substituted by NMR TRF1 or its mutant forms, we show that TRF1 supports maximal glycolytic capacity under low oxygen, shows increased nuclear localization and association with telomeres, and protects telomeres from repli

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Science Advances current issue

Kinetics of osmotic stress regulate a cell fate switch of cell survival

Exposure of cells to diverse types of stressful environments differentially regulates cell fate. Although many types of stresses causing this differential regulation are known, it is unknown how changes over time of the same stressor regulate cell fate. Changes in extracellular osmolarity are critically involved in physiological and pathophysiological processes in several tissues. We observe that

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Science Advances current issue

SUGAR-seq enables simultaneous detection of glycans, epitopes, and the transcriptome in single cells

Multimodal single-cell RNA sequencing enables the precise mapping of transcriptional and phenotypic features of cellular differentiation states but does not allow for simultaneous integration of critical posttranslational modification data. Here, we describe SUrface-protein Glycan And RNA-seq (SUGAR-seq), a method that enables detection and analysis of N-linked glycosylation, extracellular epitop

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Science Advances current issue

Patient-tailored design for selective co-inhibition of leukemic cell subpopulations

The extensive drug resistance requires rational approaches to design personalized combinatorial treatments that exploit patient-specific therapeutic vulnerabilities to selectively target disease-driving cell subpopulations. To solve the combinatorial explosion challenge, we implemented an effective machine learning approach that prioritizes patient-customized drug combinations with a desired syne

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Science Advances current issue

Quantification of Cas9 binding and cleavage across diverse guide sequences maps landscapes of target engagement

The RNA-guided nuclease Cas9 has unlocked powerful methods for perturbing both the genome through targeted DNA cleavage and the regulome through targeted DNA binding, but limited biochemical data have hampered efforts to quantitatively model sequence perturbation of target binding and cleavage across diverse guide sequences. We present scalable, sequencing-based platforms for high-throughput filt

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Science Advances current issue

Mapping solar magnetic fields from the photosphere to the base of the corona

Routine ultraviolet imaging of the Sun's upper atmosphere shows the spectacular manifestation of solar activity; yet, we remain blind to its main driver, the magnetic field. Here, we report unprecedented spectropolarimetric observations of an active region plage and its surrounding enhanced network, showing circular polarization in ultraviolet (Mg h & k and Mn ) and visible (Fe ) lines. We infer

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Science Advances current issue

Model-guided design of mammalian genetic programs

Genetically engineering cells to perform customizable functions is an emerging frontier with numerous technological and translational applications. However, it remains challenging to systematically engineer mammalian cells to execute complex functions. To address this need, we developed a method enabling accurate genetic program design using high-performing genetic parts and predictive computatio

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Science Advances current issue

The one-carbon pool controls mitochondrial energy metabolism via complex I and iron-sulfur clusters

Induction of the one-carbon cycle is an early hallmark of mitochondrial dysfunction and cancer metabolism. Vital intermediary steps are localized to mitochondria, but it remains unclear how one-carbon availability connects to mitochondrial function. Here, we show that the one-carbon metabolite and methyl group donor S -adenosylmethionine (SAM) is pivotal for energy metabolism. A gradual decline i

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Science Advances current issue

An all-epitaxial nitride heterostructure with concurrent quantum Hall effect and superconductivity

Creating seamless heterostructures that exhibit the quantum Hall effect and superconductivity is highly desirable for future electronics based on topological quantum computing. However, the two topologically robust electronic phases are typically incompatible owing to conflicting magnetic field requirements. Combined advances in the epitaxial growth of a nitride superconductor with a high critica

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Science Advances current issue

Offshore pelagic subsidies dominate carbon inputs to coral reef predators

Coral reefs were traditionally perceived as productive hot spots in oligotrophic waters. While modern evidence indicates that many coral reef food webs are heavily subsidized by planktonic production, the pathways through which this occurs remain unresolved. We used the analytical power of carbon isotope analysis of essential amino acids to distinguish between alternative carbon pathways supporti

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Science Advances current issue

Suppression of dendrite growth by cross-flow in microfluidics

Formation of rough, dendritic deposits is a critical problem in metal electrodeposition processes and could occur in next-generation, rechargeable batteries that use metallic electrodes. Electroconvection, which originates from the coupling of the imposed electric field and a charged fluid near an electrode surface, is believed to be responsible for dendrite growth. However, few studies are perfo

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study reveals how a longevity gene protects brain stem cells from stress

A gene linked to unusually long lifespans in humans protects brain stem cells from the harmful effects of stress, according to a new study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mayo Clinic researchers develop test to measure effect of breast cancer gene variants

Researchers at Mayo Clinic have combined results from a functional test measuring the effect of inherited variants in the BRCA2 breast and ovarian cancer gene with clinical information from women who received genetic testing to determine the clinical importance of many BRCA2 variants of uncertain significance (VUS). The findings were published today in a study in the American Journal of Human Gene

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Science

G7 pledges faster vaccine rollout to developing world

Macron urges Europe and US to allocate 5 per cent of supplies to poorer countries

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NeuWrite West

Turning back the clock: reversing aging to restore sight

Tick, tock; tick …. tock. I'd like you to imagine a giant clock counting off seconds, tracking history's passing and marking the future's arrival. Our clocks and calendars monitor time, distinguishing new pieces of information, people, and things from older ones. But how do our cells record time? If there are little molecular clocks inside each cell, could we turn them back? Could we trick cells

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

'In the blink of an eye' statistics

HSE University researchers Yuri Markov and Natalia Tiurina discovered that when people visually estimate the size of objects, they are also able to consider their distance from the observer, even if there are many such objects. The observers rely not only on the objects' retinal representation, but also on the surrounding context. The paper was published in the journal Acta Psychologica .

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Science Magazine

Perseverance's 'sky crane' captures Mars descent

Shot provides unprecedented look at rover's landing

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Data show lower daily temperatures lead to higher transmission of COVID-19

Understanding the impact of seasonal temperature changes on transmission of SARS-CoV-2 is an important factor in reducing the virus's spread in the years to come. Researchers compared daily low temperature data and logged cases of COVID-19 in 50 countries in the Northern Hemisphere between Jan. 22 and April 6, 2020. Their research, published this week in PLOS ONE, showed that as temperatures rose,

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sex that is not for reproduction

Conjugation (or mating) of ciliates is a unique phenomenon among living beings. They have sex not for reproduction or pleasure – they seek to increase genetic variation. Scientists from St Petersburg University, together with colleagues from Poland and France, have studied the mating process in five sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex. Their findings enabled them to describe genetic

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Nature

Coronavirus diaries: Laughter is the best medicine

Nature, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00474-5 John Tregoning reckons with gallows humour in a serious time.

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Nature

No sign of Planet Nine? Trail runs cold for hypothetical world

Nature, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00456-7 Analysis of three astronomical surveys provides some of the best evidence yet against the existence of a giant planet at the fringes of the Solar System.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Prion diseases: new clues in the structure of prion proteins

A new study carried out by SISSA – Scuola Internazionale Superiore di StudiAvanzati in collaboration with other institutions including Genos Glycoscience. Research Laboratory from Zagreb, Croatia and Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste,provides important information on the differences in structures of the prions, proteins responsible for diseases that at the state of the art are incurable.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

3D biopsies to better understand brain tumors

Researchers at the Institut de Neurociències of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (INc-UAB) obtained a highly accurate recreation of human glioblastoma's features using a novel 3D microscopy analysis. The study, published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica Communications, provides new information to help with the diagnose, by finding therapeutical targets and designing immunotherapeutical st

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Innovative parenting programs address inequality in young children's development

Parent education programs and interventions that begin shortly after the birth of a child have shown to significantly impact parenting behaviors that support social and academic engagement for children growing up in poverty, according to a study led by pediatricians and psychologists across the country, including NYU Grossman School of Medicine, NYU Steinhardt, and the University of Pittsburgh.

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Futurity.org

Asthma may lead to dangerous flu mutations

A subtype of asthma in adults may cause higher susceptibility to influenza and could result in dangerous flu mutations, researchers report. Animal studies have found that paucigranulocytic asthma (PGA)—a non-allergic form of the condition—allows the flu virus to flourish in greater numbers. This was due to the asthma's suppression of the immune system, says Katina Hulme, a PhD candidate at the Un

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Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

Stora utmaningar i vaccinplanen

Enligt regeringen ska alla över 18 år ha blivit erbjudna vaccin före 30 juni. Men den preliminära vaccinplan som finns har många utmaningar. – Jag tror att den här vaccinplanen är realistisk. Men alla vaccinbolagen måste vara med för att den ska fungera, säger Richard Bergström, Sveriges vaccinsamordnare.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Basque ethnic identity and collective empowerment are associated with wellbeing

A member of the Culture, Cognition and Emotion research group at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque country has explored how social identification with Basque speakers and collective psychological empowerment relate to personal and social wellbeing and community participation. Individuals who experience a high degree of identification with Basque speakers and a high degree of empowerment have be

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What impact will robots and autonomous systems have on urban ecosystems?

Unmanned aerial vehicles (drones), autonomous cars, robots that can repair urban infrastructure and wireless sensor networks used for monitoring, etc. are just some of the devices that will spring up all over our cities in a few years. They have a wide range of potential applications, such as autonomous transport, waste collection, infrastructure maintenance and repair, surveillance and precision

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The Scientist RSS

Promoting Stem Cell Growth and Self-Renewal In Vitro

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Nature

Coronapod: our future with an ever-present coronavirus

Nature, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00457-6 Scientists expect SARS-CoV-2 to become endemic, but what does that mean?

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forskning.se

Fynd av urgamla fossila svampar i Siljans meteoritkrater

Nyupptagna djupa borrkärnor från Siljansringens berggrund visar att svamp koloniserade kratern för miljontals år sedan. Svampar som levde helt utan syre, och som bidrog till att växthusgasen metan bildades. – Mikroorganismer och deras förmåga att kolonisera och överleva i jordens mest ogästvänliga miljöer fortsätter att förbluffa oss, säger forskaren Henrik Drake som lett studien. Den mäktiga met

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Life of a pure Martian design

Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient crustal materials from Mars, led by ERC grantee Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry of the University of Vienna, now delivered a unique prototype of microbia

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria

Rather sweet than salty: In the ocean microalgae produce a lot of sugar during algae blooms. These enormous quantities of algal biomass are normally recycled rapidly by marine bacteria, degradation process that is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Especially sugars have been considered as easily digestible and therefore poor candidates for natural carbon sequestration. Now scientists f

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

An eco-route for heavy-duty vehicles could reduce fuel consumption

Semi-trucks and other heavy-duty vehicles are responsible for nearly half of road transportation carbon dioxide emissions in Europe, according to the International Council on Clean Transportation. A team of researchers in Italy has proposed a plan to reduce the emissions without compromising priorities such as delivery times. They published their approach in IEEE/CAA Journal of Automatica Sinica,

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Animal evolution — glimpses of ancient environments

Zoologists at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich report the discovery of a trove of fossil fly larvae, and an intriguing caterpillar, encapsulated in samples of amber that are tens of millions of years old.

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Big Think

Rousseau explained: What his philosophy means for us

Jean-Jacques Rousseau was a Swiss Enlightenment philosopher with some radical ideas. He argued passionately for democracy, equality, liberty, and supporting the common good by any means necessary. While his ideas may be utopian (or dystopian), they are thought-provoking and can inform modern discourse. Modern political debates often ask how much democracy we should have and what should, and shoul

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The Scientist RSS

Technique Talk: Improving IHC and IF Staining Results

In this workshop, Craig Pow will explore optimizing IHC and IF staining workflows.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Communal activities boost rehabilitation for older adults in long term care

A group of researchers has developed a new program showing participation and activity is critical for the rehabilitation of older adults in long-term care.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tuberculosis: New biomarker indicates individual treatment duration

The treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is long and demanding. In particular, in cases of resistant tuberculosis, the WHO generally recommends a standard treatment duration of at least 18 months, as there are no reliable biomarkers for an early termination. Under the leadership of the DZIF scientists at the Borstel Research Center have now succeeded in identifying a biomarker that points to an individu

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

COVID-19 may have caused the loss of more than 20.5 million years of life worldwide

A study by a group researchers from several international universities and research centres, including lecturers from the UPF Department of Economics and Business, has estimated the premature mortality impact of covid-19. It has done so by calculating years of life lost (YLL) due to covid-19 compared to YLL for other common illnesses, such as the flu or cardiovascular diseases.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Deep brain stimulation prevents epileptic seizures in mouse model

Scientists led by neurobiologist Prof. Dr. Carola Haas, head of the research group at the Department of Neurosurgery at Medical Center – University of Freiburg and the BrainLinks-BrainTools research center, have investigated a new therapeutic approach to prevent epileptic seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy. They showed in mice that low-frequency stimulation of specific brain areas could completely

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Atomic nuclei in the quantum swing

The extremely precise control of nuclear excitations opens up possibilities of ultra-precise atomic clocks and powerful nuclear batteries.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Insight-HXMT gives insight into origin of fast radio bursts

The latest observations from Insight-HXMT were published online in Nature Astronomy on Feb. 18. Insight-HXMT has discovered the very first X-ray burst associated with a fast radio burst (FRB) and has identified that it originated from soft-gamma repeater (SGR) J1935+2154, which is a magnetar in our Milky Way.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Swimming upstream on sound waves

ETH researchers are among the first scientists to have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionising the field of medicine.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Turbocharging the killing power of immune cells against cancer

Creating "super soldiers" of specific white blood cells to boost an anti-tumour response has been shown in a series of elegant experiments by Princess Margaret researchers.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Conservation paradox – the pros and cons of recreational hunting

In a new article published in the journal One Earth, scientists from the University of Helsinki in Finland and Flinders University in Australia have reviewed more than 1,000 studies on recreational hunting — the first such attempt to summarize the scientific literature examining the biodiversity and social effects of recreational hunting globally.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Race, income, education affect access to 3D mammography

Women of minority races and ethnicities and with less education and income have had relatively lower access to 3D mammography, a technology that can improve breast cancer detection and decrease false alarms, according to new research.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Including racial/ethnic minorities, females, older adults in vaccine trials

Using data from completed interventional vaccine trials from 2011 to 2020, researchers examined whether racial/ethnic minority groups, females and older adults were underrepresented in U.S.-based vaccine clinical trials.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Symptoms months after COVID-19

Persistent symptoms among adults with COVID-19 up to nine months after illness onset were analyzed in this study.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New study highlights lack of diversity and inclusion in vaccine clinical trials

A team of scientific experts from across the U.S. and Puerto Rico are advocating for increased diversity in vaccine trials after publishing a new report that highlights a decade's worth of disparities.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Global study of 48 cities finds nature sanitizes 41.7 million tons of human waste a year

Researchers found that nature provides at least 18% of sanitation services in 48 cities worldwide, according to researchers in the United Kingdom and India. The study, published February 19 in the journal One Earth , estimates that more than 2 million cubic meters of the cities' human waste is processed each year without engineered infrastructure. This includes pit latrine waste that gradually fil

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Futurity.org

'Stereotype threat' makes older adults perform worse

Stereotypes that view older adults as cognitively or physically impaired, may affect how they perform on a variety of tasks, according to a new study. Stigmatized groups—whether due to race, socioeconomic status, or age—perform more poorly when faced with negative stereotypes, says Sarah Barber, a psychology and gerontology researcher at Georgia State University. She found expectations of others

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

HKUST decodes a deep-sea vent-endemic snail hologenome

A research team led by Prof. QIAN Peiyuan, Head and Chair Professor from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST)'s Department of Ocean Science and David von Hansemann Professor of Science, has discovered that Gigantopelta snail houses both sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and methane-oxidizing bacteria inside its esophageal gland cells (part of digestive system) as endosymbionts, discl

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Dynamics of nanoparticles using a new isolated lymphatic vessel lumen perfusion system

Nanoparticles introduced into the body enter the lymphatic vessels. A research group led by Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine has developed a new isolated lymphatic vessel lumen perfusion system that can move carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles into surgically removed lymphatic vessels. The group succeeded in developing a novel experimental system to evaluate how nanoparticles mo

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UNH researchers release child maltreatment report showing mixed trends

A new report from the University of New Hampshire's Crimes against Children Research Center (CCRC) showed a mixed trend in child maltreatment with marked increase in child abuse fatalities but also declines in physical abuse and neglect in 2019.

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Phys.org

Why do mass shootings spawn conspiracy theories?

While conspiracy theories are not limited to any topic, there is one type of event that seems particularly likely to spark them: mass shootings, typically defined as attacks in which a shooter kills at least four other people.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Northern Hemisphere cold surges result of Arctic and tropical Pacific synergistic effects

A case study on China's 2020-21 winter could help predict future extreme winter weather.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Oregon experiments find that electrical sparks are possible on Mars

Friction caused by dry Martian dust particles making contact with each other may produce electrical discharge at the surface and in the planet's atmosphere, according University of Oregon researchers. However, such sparks are likely to be small and pose little danger to robotic or human missions to the red planet, they report in the journal Icarus.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Amination strategy improves efficiency of CO2 electrocatalytic reduction

A research team led by Prof. LIU Licheng from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology (QIBEBT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) proposed a two-step amination strategy to regulate the electronic structure of M-N/C catalysts (M=Ni, Fe, Zn) and enhance the intrinsic activity of CO 2 electrocatalytic reduction.

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Phys.org

Scientists make 3-D heart scan breakthrough for animals and humans

The University of Manchester scientists have created the most detailed ever 3-D scan of a rare form of congenital heart disease.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Scientists make 3-D heart scan breakthrough for animals and humans

The University of Manchester scientists have created the most detailed ever 3-D scan of a rare form of congenital heart disease.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Artificial intelligence predicts nonlinear ultrafast dynamics in optics

Researchers at Tampere University have successfully used artificial intelligence to predict nonlinear dynamics that take place when ultrashort light pulses interact with matter. This novel solution can be used for efficient and fast numerical modelling, for example, in imaging, manufacturing and surgery. The findings were published in the prestigious Nature Machine Intelligence journal.

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Phys.org

California Republicans less likely to seek COVID vaccine, poll reports

As California struggles to bring the deadly COVID-19 pandemic under control, the state's Republican voters are far less likely to seek a vaccine and express less support for small businesses, health care workers and other at-risk workers, according to a new poll by UC Berkeley's Institute of Governmental Studies (IGS).

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Futurity.org

Swabs suggest COVID-19 safety during cancer care

New research finds extremely low levels of the virus that causes COVID-19 on surfaces where oncology and hematology inpatients and outpatients receive treatment. The finding provides additional assurance that those receiving cancer care are safe when receiving care. "For patients with blood cancers who may be at higher risk of developing complications from the virus, our findings provide a layer

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Nature

Electrons are caught in the act of relaxing — over quadrillionths of a second

Nature, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00434-z Physicists fire lasers at electrons to understand how the particles gain and shed energy.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spin hall effect of light with near 100% efficiency

POSTECH-KAIST joint research team develops perfect SHEL using anisotropic metasurfaces.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Electron cryo-microscopy sheds light on how bioenergy makers are made in our body

Scientists uncover how the body's energy makers are made. A new paper published in Science by Alexey Amunts' laboratory with an international team of researchers reports the molecular mechanism of membrane-tethered protein synthesis in mitochondria.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A better tool for the job: Laser-based technique to elucidate the mysteries of exosomes

Exosomes are small vesicles released by cells, which contain proteins and genetic materials. They are thought to be involved in various life activities, but current techniques to observe them are expensive and time-consuming. In a recent study, a team of undergraduate students from DGIST, Korea, proved the convenience and effectiveness of laser-based technique in identifying exosomes using exosome

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ultraviolet 'television' for animals helps us better understand them

University of Queensland scientists have developed an ultraviolet 'television' display designed to help researchers better understand how animals see the world.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New method converts methane in natural gas to methanol at room temperature

Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have discovered a way to convert the methane in natural gas into liquid methanol at room temperature.

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The Scientist RSS

CTK Bio Canada Develops Bioplastic Resin Designed to Break Down in Soil and Seawater

CTK Bio Canada (the "Company") has developed a new bioplastic resin designed to biodegrade by both industrial and home composting, as well as in unmanagedenvironments like soil and seawater, in order to reduce microplastic pollution.

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The Scientist RSS

CTK Bio Canada Develops Bioplastic Resin Designed to Break Down in Soil and Seawater

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Why do we love koalas so much? Because they look like baby humans

The koala is a much-loved species and lucrative tourism drawcard. Yet, for all its popularity, koalas are forecast to be extinct in NSW within 30 years.

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Phys.org

Why do we love koalas so much? Because they look like baby humans

The koala is a much-loved species and lucrative tourism drawcard. Yet, for all its popularity, koalas are forecast to be extinct in NSW within 30 years.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Seeing stable topology using instabilities

The researchers explore how topological phases of light in nonlinear optical media undergo the process of modulational instability.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Release of nutrients from lake-bottom sediments worsens Lake Erie's annual 'dead zone,'

Robotic laboratories on the bottom of Lake Erie have revealed that the muddy sediments there release nearly as much of the nutrient phosphorus into the surrounding waters as enters the lake's central basin each year from rivers and their tributaries.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Asthmatics no higher risk dying from COVID, review of studies on 587,000 people shows

A new study looking at how COVID-19 affects people with asthma provides reassurance that having the condition doesn't increase the risk of severe illness or death from the virus.

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Phys.org

Pet-inclusive housing will help tenants and landlords

New research has found people living in private rental housing are much more likely to have had to give up a pet due to their housing circumstances than people living in other tenancies.

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Tankyrase inhibitor XAV-939 enhances osteoblastogenesis and mineralization of human skeletal (mesenchymal) stem cells

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83943-1

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: The trans-kingdom battle between donor and recipient gut microbiome influences fecal microbiota transplantation outcome

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-82644-z

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ScienceDaily

UK hospital admissions for food-induced anaphylaxis triple over 20 year period but death rate falls

The rate of people who are admitted to hospital in the UK due to a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis) caused by food has more than tripled over a 20-year period. Despite this, the death rate from food-induced anaphylaxis halved over the same period, according to new research.

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HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

Virtual Brain Modeling for Epilepsy: The Next Generation

Read the accompanying news item here: https://www.humanbrainproject.eu/en/follow-hbp/news/new-ebrains-enabled-tool-to-help-guide-surgery-in-drug-resistant-epilepsy-patients/ This video describes one of the showcases that tests the capabilities of the EBRAINS Research Infrastructure over the course of the last phase of the Human Brain Project. From 2020 to 2023 the developers are using EBRAINS to

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Phys.org

Laser-based technique to elucidate the mysteries of exosomes

Exosomes are small vesicles released by cells, which contain proteins and genetic materials. They are thought to be involved in various life activities, but current techniques to observe them are expensive and time-consuming. In a recent study, a team of undergraduate students from DGIST, Korea, proved the convenience and effectiveness of laser-based technique in identifying exosomes using exosome

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Phys.org

Paper reconciles two branches of evolutionary science into one framework

A review paper published in this week's Evolutionary Anthropology reconciles competing approaches in the sciences of human behavior. Co-authored by SFI Applied Complexity Fellow Michael Price and Elspeth Ready of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, it examines two branches of evolutionary science that are often regarded as rivals and presents a general framework to reconcile th

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Biochemistry News – Chemistry News

Laser-based technique to elucidate the mysteries of exosomes

Exosomes are small vesicles released by cells, which contain proteins and genetic materials. They are thought to be involved in various life activities, but current techniques to observe them are expensive and time-consuming. In a recent study, a team of undergraduate students from DGIST, Korea, proved the convenience and effectiveness of laser-based technique in identifying exosomes using exosome

1d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

Paper reconciles two branches of evolutionary science into one framework

A review paper published in this week's Evolutionary Anthropology reconciles competing approaches in the sciences of human behavior. Co-authored by SFI Applied Complexity Fellow Michael Price and Elspeth Ready of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, it examines two branches of evolutionary science that are often regarded as rivals and presents a general framework to reconcile th

1d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: High-performance compliant thermoelectric generators with magnetically self-assembled soft heat conductors for self-powered wearable electronics

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21629-y

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Author Correction: Small molecule inhibition of Dynamin-dependent endocytosis targets multiple niche signals and impairs leukemia stem cells

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21688-1

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Ingeniøren

Omstridt fjernstyring af klapbroer et skridt nærmere: »Fuldt forsvarligt«

PLUS. Vejdirektoratet skyder lokalbefolkningens bekymringer om omdebatteret fjernstyring af klapbroer i jorden og en permanent løsning ser ud til at blive en realitet.

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forskning.se

Hälsoenkät till skolbarn förmedlar normer för hur man ska leva

Enkätfrågor om hur många datorer och badrum man har hemma kan både sporra barn – och väcka skuld. – En del tonåringar frågar sig om man bör svara som det är i verkligheten, säger Anette Wickström, en av forskarna bakom studien. Det är vanligt att svenska barns och ungdomars fysiska och psykiska hälsa mäts genom enkäter. En av dem är den internationella undersökningen "Skolbarns hälsovanor" som be

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Nature

Can COVID vaccines stop transmission? Scientists race to find answers

Nature, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00450-z Controlling the pandemic will require shots that prevent viral spread, but that feature is difficult to measure.

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Science | Smithsonian Magazine

How 'Star Trek' Helped NASA Dream Big

And how NASA helped 'Star Trek' stand the test of time

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forskning.se

Skollunchen ofta stressig och svårorganiserad

Förutsättningar för skollunchen är dåliga. Trots goda ambitioner kan elever, lärare och rektorer uppleva skollunchen som rörig, svårorganiserad och stressig. Sverige är ett av få länder i världen som erbjuder skattefinansierad skollunch till alla elever i grundskolan. Den utgör en viktig del av samhällets insatser för en god folkhälsa och en pedagogisk ansats uppmuntras. I de nationella riktlinje

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Ingeniøren

Danske banker sætter AI ind i kampen mod hvidvask og terror

PLUS. Terrorister, hvidvaskere og andre kriminelle, der forsøger at sende ulovlige penge ind i pengeinstitutternes pengesystemer, skal ikke længere kun snyde menneskers intelligens.

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Science-Based Medicine

Science-Based Satire: Portland Compounding Pharmacy Introduces Line of Bespoke Artisinal Parenteral Nutrition

Are compounding pharmacies working with naturopathic integrative functional medicine doctors to make bespoke artisanal IV nutrition that looks like soup in a mason jar? No. Stop it. You know this isn't true. It's satire. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .

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Phys.org

China considers new actions to lift flagging birthrate

China is considering additional measures to increase its flagging birthrate, more than four years after ending its controversial one-child policy.

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Reply to: "Correlation between paddy rice growth and satellite-observed methane column abundance does not imply causation"

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21437-4

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Mitochondrial DNA editing in mice with DddA-TALE fusion deaminases

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21464-1 Split DddA-derived base editors fused to TALEs enable mitochondrial DNA editing. Here the authors demonstrate their use in mouse embryos with germline transmission.

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Moiré pattern of interference dislocations in condensate of indirect excitons

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21353-7 Previous interference experiments on indirect excitons found dislocation-like phase singularities that could not be explained by common phase defects. Here, the authors explain these features in terms of the moiré pattern of interference of condensate matter waves propagating over macroscopic distances.

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Correlation between paddy rice growth and satellite-observed methane column abundance does not imply causation

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21434-7

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

High-efficiency magnetic refrigeration using holmium

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21234-z Magnetic refrigeration offers a promising alternative to gas cycle cooling; however, it is typically hampered by the need for large magnetic fields. Here, the authors demonstrate that holmium can exhibit a large magnetic caloric effect while requiring only small magnetic fields.

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Ultra-sensitive nanometric flat laser prints for binocular stereoscopic image

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21499-4 The authors demonstrate fidelity colour prints and binocular stereoscopic images in multilayer MoS2 integrated on an Au substrate, showing nanometric layer sensitivity in the Fabry-Perot resonance changed by a facile laser recipe.

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Bifurcation in brain dynamics reveals a signature of conscious processing independent of report

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21393-z Current knowledge on the neural basis of consciousness mostly relies on situations where people report their perception. Here, the authors provide evidence for the idea that bifurcation in brain dynamics reflects conscious perception independent of report.

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Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Four-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy for nanoscale mapping of phonon dispersion in BN nanotubes

Nature Communications, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21452-5 Mapping local phonon dispersion in individual nanostructures reveals their thermal, optical, and mechanical properties but requires high detection sensitivity. Here, the authors present position-dependent phonon dispersion measurements in individual boron nitride nanotubes.

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

The first observation of 4D tomography measurement of plasma structures and fluctuations

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83191-3

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Association between fluoroquinolone resistance and MRSA genotype in Alexandria, Egypt

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83578-2

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Study on interaction mechanism of different atomic ratio of neodymium, arsenic and iron

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83698-9

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Incidence and remission of aeroallergen sensitization in adults in Northern Finland: 15 years longitudinal study

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83326-6 Incidence and remission of aeroallergen sensitization in adults in Northern Finland: 15 years longitudinal study

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Modified conditioning regimen with idarubicin followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for invasive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81944-8

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Direct evidence of electronic ferroelectricity in YbFe2O4 using neutron diffraction and nonlinear spectroscopy

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83655-6 Direct evidence of electronic ferroelectricity in YbFe 2 O 4 using neutron diffraction and nonlinear spectroscopy

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Herpes simplex virus-1 KOS-63 strain is virulent and causes titer-dependent corneal nerve damage and keratitis

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-83412-9

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Scientific Reports – nature.com science feeds

Biogeography of the cosmopolitan terrestrial diatom Hantzschia amphioxys sensu lato based on molecular and morphological data

Scientific Reports, Published online: 19 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-82092-9

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Ingeniøren

Danske forskere sender strøm gennem brækkede knogler: Holder langt bedre øje med heling

PLUS. Færre røntgenbilleder og hurtigere indgriben, hvis knogler ikke vokser korrekt sammen efter voldsomme brud. Det er målet, som danske ortopædkirurger og elektro-ingeniører jagter ved at bruge elektroder fremfor billeddiagnostik til at overvåge brækkede knogler.

1d

Nature

Daily briefing: Vaccine inequality leaves doctors to die in Africa

Nature, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00464-7 Health-care workers in sub-Saharan Africa continue to work without the protection of COVID vaccines. Plus, million-year-old Mammoth DNA is the oldest ever sequenced and a three-device quantum network.

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Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Utfasad kemikalie ger ökad risk för missfall

Omkring 15 till 20 procent av alla graviditeter slutar i ett missfall inom 14 veckor, i många fall utan en tydlig förklaring.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

How to calculate the social cost of carbon? Researchers offer roadmap in new analysis

The Biden administration is revising the social cost of carbon (SCC), a decade-old cost-benefit metric used to inform climate policy by placing a monetary value on the impact of climate change. In a newly published analysis, a team of researchers lists a series of measures the administration should consider in recalculating the SCC.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Spina bifida can be caused by uninherited genetic mutations

Genetic mutations which occur naturally during the earliest stages of an embryo's development can cause the severe birth defect spina bifida, finds a new experimental study in mice led by UCL scientists.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Covid-19: Future targets for treatments rapidly identified with new computer simulations

Researchers have detailed a mechanism in the distinctive corona of Covid-19 that could help scientists to rapidly find new treatments for the virus, and quickly test whether existing treatments are likely to work with mutated versions as they develop.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Good cop, bad cop

Serendipitous observation leads to novel insight into how cancer-immune crosstalk can either promote or suppress tumour growth. Ultimately, this study's results may help develop novel cancer therapies as well as an assay to select patients for immunotherapy treatment.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Making sense of the mass data generated from firing neurons

Scientists reveal technological breakthrough which may help answer key questions about how animals process information and adapt to environmental changes. Researchers at the University of Sussex and University of Kyoto have developed a new framework capable of analysing the masses of data created when studying the thousands of neutrons within an animal's brain.

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NPR

NASA's Rover Perseverance Safely Lands On Mars

NASA Perseverance Mars

  •  

NASA's six-wheeled rover landed successfully on Mars yesterday. NPR's Joe Palca talks about the descent and landing, and what's next for the mission.

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Ingeniøren

222 Boeing 787 skal inspiceres for fejl, som kan gøre det svært at bekæmpe lastrumsbrand

PLUS. Dreamlinerne skal undersøges, efter at paneler, som skal isolere ved lastrumsbrand, flere gange er fundet ødelagte eller ufastgjorte

1d

Phys.org

What happens when consumers pick their own prices?

Researchers from California Polytechnic State University and University of Oregon published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the potential benefits for firms and consumers of pick-your-price (PYP) over pay-what-you-want (PWYW) and fixed pricing strategies.

1d

Vetenskap och Hälsa

Ovisshet och utsatthet präglar patientens upplevelse på "Akuten"

Att tvingas bli inlagd på akutmottagningen och vänta på att få komma till en vårdavdelning är som att befinna sig i limbo, i ett ingenmansland. – Många vittnar om att de känner sig ensamma, utsatta och övergivna, säger Andreas Rantala, ambulanssjuksköterska, som sett patienterna vänta i korridorerna på akutmottagningen, ibland i flera dagar.

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Ingeniøren

Bagsiden: Hvad har denne tang været brugt til?

PLUS. Et loppefund til en femmer har givet en bagsidelæser hovedbrud. Kender du dette værktøj?

1d

Future(s) Studies

Evidence for a hidden 'Planet Nine' beyond Neptune has weakened

submitted by /u/ComprehensiveWater3 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

NASA's Perseverance rover is about to land on Mars and look for life

submitted by /u/ComprehensiveWater3 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Evading death and mind-uploading: The ambition of transhumanism

submitted by /u/ComprehensiveWater3 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Technology's future isn't gleaming, it's dirty and biological

submitted by /u/ComprehensiveWater3 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

90 MW community solar plus energy storage to be completed in New York by 2025

submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

The NIA Is Funding Clinical Trials Against Aging | Lifespan.io

submitted by /u/FDP_666 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

NASA's Perseverance rover lands on Mars to look for signs of ancient life

submitted by /u/dustofoblivion123 [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Scientists entered people's dreams and got them 'talking'

submitted by /u/eaeozs [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

1st clone of US endangered species, a ferret, announced

submitted by /u/DonnieMostDefinitely [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Researchers developed new Explainable AI for decoding genome biology. Neural network trained on high-resolution maps of protein DNA interactions can uncover subtle DNA sequence patterns throughout the genome and provide a deeper understanding of how these sequences are organized to regulate genes

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Origin Energy (Australia) has seen its profits virtually eliminated in the first half of the financial year, as renewable energy – and particularly solar – continue to eat into its one remaining coal plant, and as it prepares to replace that asset with a new big battery.

submitted by /u/Tabodo [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Life Biosciences Announces Pioneering Research in Nature Describing New Mechanisms for Reversing Age-Related Disease

submitted by /u/TylerSpicknell [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

These buildings combine affordable housing and vertical farming

submitted by /u/passintimendgas [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Video games are often blamed for increasing player aggression or obsession, but now a team of researchers says that this conclusion may be totally bunk. In their new study, the researchers have found that games like Animal Crossing might actually have a positive impact on mental health.

submitted by /u/CyborgTomHanks [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Researchers Have Made Self-Assembling DNA Nanobots With Encoded Structural Plans

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Scientists Find a Way to Communicate With Dreaming People – scientists in 4 countries say they've shown it's possible to communicate with people while they're lucid dreaming.

submitted by /u/lughnasadh [link] [comments]

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Future(s) Studies

Eco-friendly cruise ships to be powered by sails

submitted by /u/Bream1000 [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

'7 Minutes of Terror': The Technology Perseverance Will Need to Survive Landing on Mars

submitted by /u/dwaxe [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

20something Entrepreneur Figures Out How to Recycle Waste Plastic Into Strong, Cheap Bricks – After that year of trial and error, Matee had figured out certain types of plastics mixed with certain ratios of sand, produced a lightweight concrete-like material that she could form into bricks.

submitted by /u/speckz [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

Clean Meat is at the brink of revolutionising the livestock industry, expected to hit market this year.

'Clean meat.' I've been keeping an eye on this industry for the last few years but one big problem has been holding it back. The 'fetal bovine serum' (FBS) problem. Which is absolutely as awful as it sounds. Luckily this problem has largely been solved by each lab grown meat company individually, who now have or are almost finished developing their own solutions. Making Lab Grown Meat officially

1d

Future(s) Studies

Geothermal home heating gets a $30 million boost from Bill Gates' Breakthrough Energy Ventures

submitted by /u/Gram-GramAndShabadoo [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

Universal Basic Income Could Be Coming for Kids – Tax-credit proposals would send almost every parent $250 or more a month

submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

Singapore removed criminal penalty for suicide, leading to better outcomes for mentally ill. Mental health advocates say the decriminalization of suicide is a big win.

submitted by /u/Sumit316 [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

Breakthrough mRNA vaccine developed in China is able to reprogram the immune system to shrink tumour cells and prevent tumours spreading

submitted by /u/QuantumThinkology [link] [comments]

1d

Future(s) Studies

Collapsing thermal coal price pushes miners deep into the red

submitted by /u/Tabodo [link] [comments]

1d

Dagens Medicin

Vindere Danmarks Bedste Hospitaler 2021

Få overblik over årets vindere i de tre hovedkategorier og på de 65 behandlingsområder.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Vinder: »De mindre sygehuse er også rigtig velfungerende«

Dorte Lydum Senning, specialeansvarlig overlæge, Børn og Unge, Regionshospitalet Viborg. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til behandling af børnediabetes.

1d

Dagens Medicin

RKKP vil være fødselshjælper på tværs af fagligheder og sektorer

Data er vigtige i arbejdet med at øge behandlingskvaliteten, men dialogen mellem de forskellige fagligheder og de tre sektorer er for RKKP-direktør Jens Winther Jensen en lige så vigtig grundpille i arbejdet med at skabe bedre kvalitet for patienterne. RKKP er på en mission, hvor man vil skabe databaser med udgangspunkt i det samlede patientforløb.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Flere data om nydiagnosticerede patienter med rygsøjlegigt registreres i DANBIO

Ingen indikatorer lever op til standard i årsrapport for rygsøjlegigt. Dog er der fremgang blandt registrering af billeddiagnostik, CRP og HLA-B27 ved diagnosetidspunktet.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Vinder: »Vi prøver at behandle patienterne, som vi gerne selv vil behandles«

René Østgaard, specialeansvarlig overlæge, Diagnostisk Center, Silkeborg Sygehus. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til behandling af leddegigt.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Kommunal deltagelse i kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser skal bidrage til bedre overblik over patientforløb

Sektorsamarbejde mellem hospitaler, almen praksis og kommuner om kvalitetsdatabaser kan blive et vigtigt redskab til at hjælpe de svageste hjertepatienter, mener formanden for Dansk Hjerterehabiliteringsdatabase.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Store regionale forskelle på at følge patienter med leddegigt over længere tid

En indikator er tæt på at være opfyldt, men ingen opfylder standard i årsrapport for patienter med leddegigt. Manglende registreringer for lægers stillingtagen til ny behandlingsstrategi kan være relateret til kapacitetsmæssige udfordringer.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Overlevelse lever op til internationale standarder

Danmark har høj standard for behandling af kræft i lever, galdeveje og levermetastaser, men Rigshospitalet er presset på kapaciteten, fremgår det af årsrapport fra Dansk Lever-Galdevejscancer Database.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Faldende deltagelse i screening for livmoderhalskræft

Selvopsamlet prøve til HPV-testning kan blive et nationalt tiltag for at øge tilslutningen til screening for livmoderhalskræft, fremgår det af årsrapport fra Dansk Kvalitetsdatabase for Livmoderhalskræftscreening.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Geriatri: Aarhus vinder igen-igen

På Aarhus Universitetshospital hedder Geriatrisk Afdeling 'Ældresygdomme', og her er Catherine Hauerslev Foss ledende overlæge. For Gud ved hvilken gang er afdelingen primus inter pares, bedst blandt ligemænd.

1d

Dagens Medicin

MS: Stigende antal behandlingsskift presser afdelinger

Stadig flere lægemidler til behandling af multipel sclerose, og de deraf følgende muligheder for at skifte behandling, lægger pres på neurologiske afdelingers ressourcer, viser årsrapport fra Sclerosebehandlingsregistret.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Næsten alle TIA-patienter får trombocythæmmende behandling i rette tid

99 pct. af patienter med en forbigående blodprop blev sat i trombocythæmmende behandling senest to dage efter første kontakt til sekundær sektor, viser årsrapport.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Sådan finder vi Danmarks Bedste Hospitaler

I år er det 14. gang, at Dagens Medicin analyserer kvalitetsdata fra danske hospitaler og finder de dygtigste hospitaler og afdelinger inden for 65 behandlings- og undersøgelsesområder.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Store regionale forskelle ved brug af udvidet kognitiv undersøgelse bekymrer

Syddanmark og Nordjylland er blevet bedre til at registrere udvidet kognitiv undersøgelse ved udredning af demens, men regionerne halter stadig efter de andre, viser seneste årsrapport. Det bekymrer styregruppe.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Styregruppe efterlyser større fokus på ernæring for geriatriske patienter

Det er voldsomt bekymrende, at ernæringsarbejdet i afdelingerne ikke prioriteres tilstrækkeligt højt, skriver styregruppe bag database for geriatriske patienter.

1d

Dagens Medicin

'Imponerende' national mediantid på 28 minutter for trombolysebehandling

Alle afdelinger på nær to lever op til, at 85 pct. af patienterne med akut iskæmisk apopleksi får trombolysebehandling inden for en time efter ankomst til trombolyseenhed.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Vinder: »Vi glæder os til, at vi kan se hinanden ordentligt«

Mikkel Rosendahl, overlæge og teamleder, Gynækologisk Afdeling, Rigshospitalet. Afdelingen er Danmarks bedste til behandling af ovariecancer.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Peritonitisraten er svagt faldende for patienter i ­peritonealdialyseforløb

Syddanmark halter efter de andre regioners peritonitisrater i seneste årsrapport for patienter med kronisk nyresvigt. Årsrapport viser også en stigning i patienter med planlagt opstart af dialyse.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Graftoverlevelsen efter første nyretransplantation stiger

Nationalt er der en stigende tendens i både etårs- og femårsgraftoverlevelse efter første nyretransplantation, viser årsrapport. Rigshospitalet går tilbage på femårsgraftoverlevelsen.

1d

Dagens Medicin

LPR3 præger årets kåring, der byder på to nye vindere i hovedkategorierne

Igen i år løber jyderne med førstepladserne for bedste lille, mellemstore og store hospital. Problemer med omlægningen til det nye Landspatientregister (LPR3) har ramt en del af de kliniske kvalitetsdatabaser, der derfor ikke har opdaterede data.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

What happens when consumers pick their own prices?

A pick-your-price (PYP) strategy can have advantages over pay-what-you-want (PWYW) and fixed pricing strategies.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

To end HIV epidemic, we must address health disparities

despite coordinated national efforts to implement HIV services, the epidemic persists, especially in the South. It also disproportionately impacts marginalized groups, such as Black/African-American and Latinx communities, women, people who use drugs, men who have sex with men, and other sexual and gender minorities. researchers, advocates, and other stakeholders reported on the HIV epidemic respo

1d

Dagens Medicin

Kulturkanylen: »Min kærlighed ligger hos klassikerne«

Steen Werner Hansen, afgående vicedirektør på Herlev og Gentofte Hospital, har en forkærlighed for de klassiske balletter og operaer, men når det gælder billedkunsten, er det de impressionistiske malere, der trækker.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Kræftbehandlinger DBH 2021

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Vinder: »God karkirurgi er ikke nok«

Bedste afdeling i disciplinerne carotis trombendarterektomi og abdominale aortaaneurismer ligger denne gang i Odense, hvor professor i karkirurgi Jes Sanddal Lindholt er overlæge på Hjerte-, Lunge- og Karkirurgisk afdeling T.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Stigende langtidsoverlevelse ved børnecancer

Femårsoverlevelsen for børn og unge med kræft er steget til 87 pct., viser den seneste årsrapport fra Dansk Børnecancer Register.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Stabilt overlevelsesniveau for patienter med akut leukæmi

Overlevelsen blandt patienter med akut leukæmi er på niveau med tidligere år, viser årsrapport fra Dansk Akut Leukæmi Database.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Bred opbakning til sarkomdatabase

Mange specialer sørger for at indrapportere til database for sarkomer, som kan være lokaliseret overalt i kroppen.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Markant stigende langtidsoverlevelse blandt myelomatosepatienter

Effekten af indførelsen af en række nye og mere effektive behandlinger slår for alvor igennem i resultaterne i den seneste årsrapport fra Dansk Myelomatose Database.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Centralisering har øget behandlings­kvaliteten af testikelkræft

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Onkologisk behandling af pancreascancer bør gøres til et højt specialiseret tilbud

Styregruppen bag Dansk Pancreas Cancer Database mener, at overlevelsen kan forbedres, hvis den onkologiske behandling gøres til en højt specialiseret funktion.

1d

Dagens Medicin

God vurdering af operationsegnede patienter

Høj overlevelse blandt patienter med kræft i spiserør, mavemund og mavesæk peger på korrekt udvælgelse af de rette patienter til kemoterapi, strålebehandling og efterfølgende operation.

1d

Dagens Medicin

God langtidsprognose for patienter med kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi

Database for kronisk lymfatisk leukæmi mangler de fleste behandlingsskemaer for 2019 på grund af overgangen til LPR3.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Screening finder ofte tarmkræft i tidligt stadie

Næsten to tredjedele af alle tilfælde af tarmkræft, som findes via det nationale screeningsprogram, er i et tidligt stadie af sygdommen, viser den seneste årsrapport fra Dansk Tarmkræftscreeningsdatabase.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Stigende overlevelse blandt patienter ­med ovariecancer

En stigende andel af patienter med ovariecancer er i live fem år efter diagnosen, viser årsrapport fra Dansk Gynækologisk Cancer Database.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Høj overlevelse blandt MPN-patienter

Nye målrettede behandlinger har forbedret prognosen for patienter med kroniske myeloproliferative neoplasier.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Flere MDS-patienter kan tilbydes knoglemarvstransplantation

For patienter med myelodysplastisk syndrom er knoglemarvstransplantation afgørende for langtidsoverlevelsen, og her ses en lille, men vigtig stigning i antallet af patienter, som modtager transplantation.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Overlevelse på internationalt niveau

Færre tilfælde af cervixcancer har gjort det muligt at centralisere operationer af patienter med fremskreden sygdom.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Centralisering har drevet forbedret overlevelse blandt patienter med nyrekræft

Markant stigning i langtidsoverlevelse for danske nyrekræftpatienter, viser årsrapport fra Dansk Renal Cancer Database.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Danskernes sygdomsmønstre anno 2021 kalder på strukturelle forandringer

Vi må erkende, at sundheden primært skabes i livet uden for sundhedsvæsenet, så det er der, vi skal sætte ind.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Vi er klar til kvalitetsmåling version 2.0

Hvis vi virkelig skal have et fantastisk sundhedsvæsen, er vi også nødt til at kunne måle på kvaliteten af opsporing og opfølgning, som i vidt omfang foregår i primærsektoren.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Markant stigning i antallet af knæalloplastikker

Manglende effekt af at anbefale træning frem for operation kan måske være årsag til stor stigning i antallet af knæalloplastikker inden for de seneste år.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Flere korsbåndsopererede danskere må tilbage på operationsbordet

2,5 pct. af de 2080 patienter, som i 2017 fik rekonstrueret deres forreste korsbånd, røg tilbage på operationsbordet inden for to år. Det er flere end de foregående år, viser den seneste årsrapport fra Dansk Korsbånds Rekonstruktions Register (DKRR).

1d

Dagens Medicin

Hoftealloplastik: Indberetninger af reoperationer langt under standarden

I 2019 blev der indrapporteret flere hofteoperationer til Dansk Hoftealloplastik Register end året før, og komplethedsgraden for primær total hoftealloplastik (THA) er nu oppe på 96,7 pct. efter at have befundet sig på et utilfredsstillende niveau året før.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Hoftenære lårbensbrud: Målrettet indsats har rykket ved 30-dagesoverlevelsen

Et toårigt forbedringsprojekt med deltagelse fra kommuner og hospitaler ser ud til at have haft en effekt på kvaliteten af behandling og pleje af patienter over 65 år med hoftenært lårbensbrud.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Skulderalloplastik: Region Sjælland halser efter

Indberetningerne af skulderalloplastikrevisioner falder fortsat. I 2019 blev blot 79,2 pct. af alle revisioner på landsplan indberettet til Dansk Skulderalloplastik Register (DSR). Særligt Region Sjælland halser langt efter den vedtagne standard på området.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Dansk fedmekirurgi er i topklasse

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Flere patienter skal hurtigere under kniven

For mange patienter med perforeret ulcus er mere end seks timer om at komme under kniven efter ankomst til hospitalet. »Der skal mere fokus på hurtig modtagelse, resuscitering og diagnostisk,« lyder den faglige anbefaling fra styregruppen for Akut Kirurgi Databasen i den seneste årsrapport.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Data fra almen praksis skal løfte ­samarbejde om KOL-patienter

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Styregruppe hæver standard efter årrække med stilstand for reoperationer

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1d

Dagens Medicin

For få astmapatienter får målt ­lungefunktion

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Sidste år med monitorering på nationalt niveau

En tilfredsstillende høj kvalitet i behandlingen og lav mortalitet betyder, at det fremadrettet er et regionalt anliggende at lave audit på patienter med blødende mavesår og benchmarke de enkelte afdelinger.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Færre udskrabninger efter abort

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Stadig flere ukomplicerede fødsler

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Få komplikationer, mange tilbagefald

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1d

Dagens Medicin

'Amputeret' årsrapport for hysterektomi

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1d

Dagens Medicin

It-problemer udfordrer igen data for intensiv behandling

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1d

Dagens Medicin

Styregruppe glæder sig over nedadgående rate for reoperationer

Den tidlige reoperationsrate efter operation for navle- eller epigastrielhernie er svagt nedadgående, viser årsrapport for Herniedatabasen.

1d

Dagens Medicin

Kun to regioner og privathospitaler kan levere brugbare data til årsrapport

Styregruppen kalder det et drastisk valg, men dataoverførslen fra de elektroniske patientjournalsystemer i Midtjylland, Sjælland og Hovedstaden er så mangelfulde, at de er irrelevante at inddrage i årsrapporten.

1d

ScienceDaily

Changing livestock in ancient Europe reflect political shifts

In ancient European settlements, livestock use was likely primarily determined by political structure and market demands, according to a new study.

1d

Ingeniøren

Venstre vil have fornyet fokus på IT: »Digitalisering er blevet nedprioriteret«

Der mangler planer for, hvordan Danmark i endnu højere grad kan forløse sit digitale potentiale. Nu er emnet endelig ved at komme på regeringens dagsorden, men der mangler konkrete resultater, lyder kritikken fra Venstres it-ordfører.

1d

ScienceDaily

Unusual breeding behavior reported in treefrogs for the first time

Paranapiacaba Treefrogs mate and lay spawn in small pools of water inside the tanks of bromeliad plants, researchers report. The 3 cm-long tadpoles must then make their way to a stream to complete development.

1d

Science

Australian Open triumphs over lockdown, quarantine and mice

Organisers were criticised but say tennis tournament could be a template for Tokyo Olympics

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Local and national restrictions in England reduced contacts in small and varied ways

The imposition of various local and national restrictions in England during the summer and autumn of 2020 gradually reduced contacts between people, but these changes were smaller and more varied than during the lockdown in March, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Medicine.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Boys who play video games have lower depression risk

Boys who regularly play video games at age 11 are less likely to develop depressive symptoms three years later, finds a new study led by a UCL researcher.

1d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The Lancet Healthy Longevity: Study finds racial and ethnic disparities in flu vaccine uptake among people aged 65 and older in the USA

A new study published today in The Lancet Healthy Longevity journal has found significant racial and ethnic disparities in uptake of the seasonal influenza vaccine among people aged 65 years and over in the USA.

2d

ScienceDaily

Researchers solve riddle of plant immune system

How do plants build resilience? An international research team studied the molecular mechanisms of the plant immune system. They were able to show a connection between a relatively unknown gene and resistance to pathogens.

2d

Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Race Replay: Kamikaze Crashes the El Camino | Street Outlaws

Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/StreetOutlaws We're on Instagram! ht

2d

Nature Communications – current – nature.com science feeds

Publisher Correction: Engineered bidirectional promoters enable rapid multi-gene co-expression optimization

Nature Communications, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21369-z

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Handcuffing the culprit cancer: Immunotherapy for cold tumors with trispecific antibody

The recent discovery of "bispecific antibodies" has led to the development of effective immunotherapies against various cancers. Researchers have constructed a protein made up of anti-CD16, -IL-15, and -CD19 motifs, specifically designed to capture CD19-positive cancer cells and redirect them to natural killer (NK) cells. This protein also enhances the proliferation, homeostasis, activation, and s

2d

Nature

Touch down! NASA's Mars landing sparks new era of exploration

Nature, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00432-1 Having stuck its nail-biting landing, the Perseverance rover will now collect rocks to return to Earth and record Mars sounds for the first time.

2d

Forskning & Framsteg – För dig som är nyfiken på allvar

Välkänt svart hål är oväntat stort

En internationell forskargrupp har gjort en ny och noggrann mätning av avståndet till ett av de mest studerade svarta hålen, Cygnus X-1 i stjärnbilden Svanen. Det befinner sig längre från jorden än de trott, över 7000 ljusår. Det påverkar det svarta hålets massa, som nu beräknas till 21 gånger större än solens. Cygnus X-1 är därmed det hittills största svarta hål som bildats av en stjärna som expl

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Tuning electrode surfaces to optimize solar fuel production

Scientists discovered that changing the topmost layer of atoms on electrode surfaces can impact the activity of splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen–a clean fuel.

2d

Science Magazine

'Touchdown confirmed!' Perseverance landing marks new dawn for Mars science

Safely set down in Jezero crater, NASA rover embarks on multiyear mission to gather samples for eventual return to Earth

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Fuel for earliest life forms: Organic molecules found in 3.5 billion-year-old rocks

For the first time, biologically-relevant organic molecules have been detected in Archaean fluid inclusions, which most likely served as nutrients for early life on Earth.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The messenger matters in safe gun storage, suicide prevention education

Law enforcement and those in the military, rather than doctors and celebrities, are the most preferred messengers on firearm safety, a Rutgers study found.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UCI researchers eavesdrop on cellular conversations

An interdisciplinary team of biologists and mathematicians at the University of California, Irvine has developed a new tool to help decipher the language cells use to communicate with one another. In a paper published today in Nature Communications, the researchers introduce CellChat, a computational platform that enables the decoding of signaling molecules that transmit information and commands b

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Songbirds' reproductive success reduced by natural gas compressor noise

Some songbirds are not dissuaded by constant, loud noise emitted by natural gas pipeline compressors and will establish nests nearby. The number of eggs they lay is unaffected by the din, but their reproductive success ultimately is diminished.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Study suggests link between DNA and marriage satisfaction in newlyweds

New study from a University of Arkansas psychologist suggests a link between DNA and traits beneficial to bonding and satisfaction in first years of marriage.

2d

NeuWrite San Diego

Surprise!! A surprise birthday party is a "touchy" subject during a global pandemic

I open the door to my apartment and switch on the light, and at first I cannot see anything, because I'm coming in from a dimly lit hallway. But I also don't have to see anything, because all I hear is a loud "SURPRISE" synchronously shouted from at least 20 people. My heart jumps, my […]

2d

Nature

Addendum: Butterfly effect and a self-modulating El Niño response to global warming

Nature, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03261-4

2d

Nature

Marauding plants steer clear of a communist-ruled island

Nature, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00448-7 Cuba's relatively closed economy could explain why it has fewer invasive plant species per unit area than other Caribbean islands.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Stents or bypass surgery more effective for stable patients with high-risk cardiac anatomy

A study by University of Alberta cardiologists at the Canadian VIGOUR Centre shows that a particular group of patients with stable ischemic heart disease have better outcomes with percutaneous coronary intervention (also called angioplasty with stent) or coronary artery bypass surgery and medication, versus conservative management with medication alone.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Chatter between cell populations drives progression of gastrointestinal tumors

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine identified new therapeutic targets for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) that could lead to new treatment options for patients.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Is odor the secret to bats' sex appeal?

A literature review revealed that odor-producing glands and tissues in bats may play a prominent role in mating behavior

2d

Vetenskap | SVT Nyheter

Förhoppningen: Snart kan vi se drönarbilder från Mars

En ny rymdsond ska landa på Mars, och inte vilken som helst. Nasas rover Perseverance är utrustad med propellrar, och förhoppningen är att man ska kunna flyga så pass nära planeten att man kan komma hem med drönarbilder.

2d

Phys.org

Poor swelter as urban areas of U.S. Southwest get hotter

Acres of asphalt parking lots, unshaded roads, dense apartment complexes and neighborhoods with few parks have taken their toll on the poor. As climate change accelerates, low-income districts in the Southwestern United States are 4 to 7 degrees hotter in Fahrenheit—on average—than wealthy neighborhoods in the same metro regions, University of California, Davis, researchers have found in a new ana

2d

Phys.org

New study examines leeches for role in major disease of sea turtles in Florida

University of Central Florida researchers are homing in on the cause of a major disease of sea turtles, with some of their latest findings implicating saltwater leeches as a possible factor.

2d

Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

New study examines leeches for role in major disease of sea turtles in Florida

University of Central Florida researchers are homing in on the cause of a major disease of sea turtles, with some of their latest findings implicating saltwater leeches as a possible factor.

2d

Phys.org

Internet trends suggest COVID-19 spurred a return to earlier values and activities

American values, attitudes and activities have changed dramatically during COVID-19, according to a new study of online behavior.

2d

Livescience.com

Malcolm X: Life and legacy of the fierce civil rights campaigner

This political activist and minister challenged the conventions of race and religion during the early years of the civil rights movement.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Like it or not, history shows that taxes and bureaucracy are cornerstones of democracy

A team of anthropologists assembled data on 30 pre-modern societies, and conducted a quantitative analysis of the features and durability of 'good governance'–that is, receptiveness to citizen voice, provision of goods and services, and limited concentration of wealth and power. The results showed that societies based on a broad, equitable, well-managed tax system and functioning bureaucracies we

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Explainable AI for decoding genome biology

Researchers at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, in collaboration with colleagues at Stanford University and Technical University of Munich have developed advanced explainable artificial intelligence (AI) in a technical tour de force to decipher regulatory instructions encoded in DNA.

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Mount Sinai researchers identify mechanisms that are essential for proper skin development

Latest discovery could improve development of future stem cell therapies and cancer treatments.

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Biology News – Evolution, Cell theory, Gene theory, Microbiology, Biotechnology

South American lizard's blood pressure mechanism is more efficient at cool temperatures

The mechanism that keeps arterial blood pressure stable in black and white tegu lizards (Salvator merianae) even as their body temperature varies substantially is more efficient at lower than higher external temperatures, contrary to what has always been believed, and vascular regulation plays a key role in pressure adjustments, according to an article published in PLOS ONE by researchers at the F

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Phys.org

South American lizard's blood pressure mechanism is more efficient at cool temperatures

The mechanism that keeps arterial blood pressure stable in black and white tegu lizards (Salvator merianae) even as their body temperature varies substantially is more efficient at lower than higher external temperatures, contrary to what has always been believed, and vascular regulation plays a key role in pressure adjustments, according to an article published in PLOS ONE by researchers at the F

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The Scientist RSS

Technique Talk: Improving IHC and IF Staining Results

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2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Poor swelter as urban areas of US Southwest get hotter

As climate change accelerates, low-income districts in the Southwestern United States are 4 to 7 degrees hotter in Fahrenheit — on average — than wealthy neighborhoods in the same metro regions.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Trivalent chromium isotopes in the eastern tropical North Pacific oxygen-deficient zone [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

Changes in chromium (Cr) isotope ratios due to fractionation between trivalent [Cr(III)] and hexavalent [Cr(VI)] are being utilized by geologists to infer oxygen conditions in past environments. However, there is little information available on Cr in the modern ocean to ground-truth these inferences. Transformations between the two chromium species are…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sexually antagonistic coevolution between the sex chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster [Evolution]

Antagonistic interactions between the sexes are important drivers of evolutionary divergence. Interlocus sexual conflict is generally described as a conflict between alleles at two interacting loci whose identity and genomic location are arbitrary, but with opposite fitness effects in each sex. We build on previous theory by suggesting that when…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heterogeneous Hadean crust with ambient mantle affinity recorded in detrital zircons of the Green Sandstone Bed, South Africa [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]

The nature of Earth's earliest crust and the processes by which it formed remain major issues in Precambrian geology. Due to the absence of a rock record older than ∼4.02 Ga, the only direct record of the Hadean is from rare detrital zircon and that largely from a single area:…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Selenomethionine as an expressible handle for bioconjugations [Biochemistry]

Site-selective chemical bioconjugation reactions are enabling tools for the chemical biologist. Guided by a careful study of the selenomethionine (SeM) benzylation, we have refined the reaction to meet the requirements of practical protein bioconjugation. SeM is readily introduced through auxotrophic expression and exhibits unique nucleophilic properties that allow it to…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inhibitors of cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase 4 with antitumor potential [Applied Biological Sciences]

Cullin-RING (really intersting new gene) E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) are the largest E3 family and direct numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation, thereby impacting a myriad of physiological and pathological processes including cancer. To date, there are no reported small-molecule inhibitors of the catalytic activity of CRLs. Here, we describe…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The DUF1013 protein TrcR tracks with RNA polymerase to control the bacterial cell cycle and protect against antibiotics [Microbiology]

How DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) acts on bacterial cell cycle progression during transcription elongation is poorly investigated. A forward genetic selection for Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle mutants unearthed the uncharacterized DUF1013 protein (TrcR, transcriptional cell cycle regulator). TrcR promotes the accumulation of the essential cell cycle transcriptional activator CtrA in…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nonselective cation permeation in an AMPA-type glutamate receptor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]

Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system relies on the AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR). This receptor incorporates a nonselective cation channel, which is opened by the binding of glutamate. Although the open pore structure has recently became available from cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM), the molecular mechanisms governing cation permeability…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Elastic-instability-enabled locomotion [Engineering]

Locomotion of an organism interacting with an environment is the consequence of a symmetry-breaking action in space-time. Here we show a minimal instantiation of this principle using a thin circular sheet, actuated symmetrically by a pneumatic source, using pressure to change shape nonlinearly via a spontaneous buckling instability. This leads…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ferromagnetic liquid droplets with adjustable magnetic properties [Chemistry]

The assembly and jamming of magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) at liquid–liquid interfaces is a versatile platform to endow structured liquid droplets with a magnetization, i.e., producing ferromagnetic liquid droplets (FMLDs). Here, we use hydrodynamics experiments to probe how the magnetization of FMLDs and their response to external stimuli can be tuned…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

RPA-mediated recruitment of Bre1 couples histone H2B ubiquitination to DNA replication and repair [Genetics]

The ubiquitin E3 ligase Bre1-mediated H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub) is essential for proper DNA replication and repair in eukaryotes. Deficiency in H2Bub causes genome instability and cancer. How the Bre1–H2Bub pathway is evoked in response to DNA replication or repair remains unknown. Here, we identify that the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of short birth spacing on birth-order differences in child stunting: Evidence from India [Economic Sciences]

Do firstborn children have a height advantage? Empirical findings have found mostly that, yes, second or higher-order children often lag behind firstborns in height outcomes, especially in developing countries. However, empirical investigations of birth-order effects on child height overlook the potential impact that birth spacing can have. We provide an…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A de novo strategy to develop NIR precipitating fluorochrome for long-term in situ cell membrane bioimaging [Biochemistry]

Cell membrane–targeted bioimaging is a prerequisite for studying the roles of membrane-associated biomolecules in various physiological and pathological processes. However, long-term in situ bioimaging on the cell membrane with conventional fluorescent probes leads to diffusion into cells from the membrane surface. Therefore, we herein proposed a de novo strategy to…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The Srs2 helicase dampens DNA damage checkpoint by recycling RPA from chromatin [Genetics]

The DNA damage checkpoint induces many cellular changes to cope with genotoxic stress. However, persistent checkpoint signaling can be detrimental to growth partly due to blockage of cell cycle resumption. Checkpoint dampening is essential to counter such harmful effects, but its mechanisms remain to be understood. Here, we show that…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic priming of sensory neurons in mice that overexpress PAR2 enhances allergen responsiveness [Neuroscience]

Pruritus is a common symptom of inflammatory skin conditions, including atopic dermatitis (AD). Although primary sensory neurons that transmit pruritic signals are well-cataloged, little is known about the neuronal alterations that occur as a result of skin disruption in AD. To address this question, we examined the molecular and behavioral…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mambalgin-3 potentiates human acid-sensing ion channel 1b under mild to moderate acidosis: Implications as an analgesic lead [Pharmacology]

Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are expressed in the nervous system, activated by acidosis, and implicated in pain pathways. Mambalgins are peptide inhibitors of ASIC1 and analgesic in rodents via inhibition of centrally expressed ASIC1a and peripheral ASIC1b. This activity has generated interest in mambalgins as potential therapeutics. However, most mechanism…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of a nuclear receptor/coactivator developmental signaling pathway in the nematode parasite Strongyloides stercoralis [Developmental Biology]

DAF-12 is nematode-specific nuclear receptor that has been proposed to govern development of the infectious stage of parasitic species, including Strongyloides stercoralis. Here, we identified a parasite-specific coactivator, called DAF-12 interacting protein-1 (DIP-1), that is required for DAF-12 ligand-dependent transcriptional activity. DIP-1 is found only in Strongyloides spp. and selectively.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptional control of local auxin distribution by the CsDFB1-CsPHB module regulates floral organogenesis in cucumber [Plant Biology]

Plant cystatins are cysteine proteinase inhibitors that play key roles in defense responses. In this work, we describe an unexpected role for the cystatin-like protein DEFORMED FLORAL BUD1 (CsDFB1) as a transcriptional regulator of local auxin distribution in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.). CsDFB1 was strongly expressed in the floral meristems,…

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The male germline-specific protein MAPS is indispensable for pachynema progression and fertility [Developmental Biology]

Meiosis is a specialized cell division that creates haploid germ cells from diploid progenitors. Through differential RNA expression analyses, we previously identified a number of mouse genes that were dramatically elevated in spermatocytes, relative to their very low expression in spermatogonia and somatic organs. Here, we investigated in detail 1700102P08Rik,…

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The Scientist RSS

Directed Evolution of Novel Biocatalysts

Researchers accelerate protein discovery with synthetic DNA libraries.

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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

How old are the oldest Homo sapiens in Far East Asia? [Genetics]

There is abundant genetic and paleontological evidence supporting the African origin of our species. At some point in its evolution, Homo sapiens spread out of Africa into Eurasia, replacing or partially absorbing local populations of other hominin forms. Ultimately, it colonized regions where no humans had ever lived before. Although…

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Futurity.org

'Couple simulation' better models mate selection

A new "couple simulation" model offers insights into the mysteries of mate selection. In your quest for true love and that elusive happily ever after, are you waiting for the "right" person to come along, or do you find yourself going for the cutest person in the room, hoping things will work out? Do you leave your options open, hoping to "trade-up" at the next opportunity, or do you invest in yo

2d

EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Light and genetic probes untangle dynamics of brain blood flow

New research on tiny capillaries and cells called pericytes details how blood moves through over 400 miles of total vasculature in the human brain.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Which suicide prevention strategies work?

Columbia University researchers have found that suicide deaths can be reduced by a Federally coordinated approach employing scientifically proven options.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Researchers uncover new information on the effects of antidepressants

The findings of a new study challenge the prevailing thinking on the primary role of serotonin and other neurotransmitters in the effects of antidepressants.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Antibody response may drive COVID-19 outcomes

Researchers at the Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard and Massachusetts General Hospital show that levels of specific antibodies developed in the immune response may influence COVID-19 outcomes in both children and adults.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

New report calls for universal coverage of long-term care for older adults in U.S.

The COVID-19 pandemic's heavy toll on older Americans highlights the need to strengthen the nation's safety net for people in need of long-term services and supports, according to a new report published by Milbank Quarterly . The report proposes a system of universal coverage to support the long-term care of all older Americans.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Targeting the SARS-CoV-2 main protease yields promise in transgenic mouse model

Inhibitors based on approved drugs and designed to disrupt the SARS-CoV-2 viral protein Mpro display strong antiviral activity both in vitro and in a transgenic mouse model, a new study reports.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Engineers place molecule-scale devices in precise orientation

A technique for controlling the orientation of manufactured DNA shapes now removes one of the last barriers for the combination of molecular devices with conventional semiconductor chips.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

First black hole ever detected is more massive than we thought

An international team, including researchers from National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC), found that the first black hole, Cygnus X-1, contains a stellar-mass black hole with 21 solar mass and rotates at a speed close to the speed of light.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ultrafast electron dynamics in space and time

Often depicted as colourful balloons or clouds, electron orbitals provide information on the whereabouts of electrons in molecules, a bit like fuzzy snapshots. In order to understand the exchange of electrons in chemical reactions, it is not only important to know their spatial distribution but also their motion in time. Scientists from Julich, Marburg, and Graz have now made huge progress in this

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Ancient relic points to a turning point in Earth's history 42,000 years ago

The temporary breakdown of Earth's magnetic field 42,000 years ago sparked major climate shifts that led to global environmental change and mass extinctions, a new international study co-led by UNSW Sydney and the South Australian Museum shows.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Metabolic mutations help bacteria resist drug treatment

MIT researchers have identified a new class of mutations that help bacteria develop antibiotic resistance. In a study of E. coli, they discovered that mutations to genes involved in metabolism can help bacteria to evade the toxic effects of several different antibiotics.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Organoids grown from bile duct cells repair human livers; may aid liver transplant processes

Organoids grown from bile duct epithelial cells can be used to repair damaged bile ducts in transplanted human livers, researchers report.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Lab-grown 'mini-bile ducts' used to repair human livers in regenerative medicine first

Scientists at the University of Cambridge have used a technique to grow bile duct organoids – often referred to as 'mini-organs' – in the lab and shown that these can be used to repair damaged human livers. This is the first time that the technique has been used on human organs.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

More than half of Earth's rivers strongly impacted by human activity

Few of Earth's freshwater areas remain untouched by humans. More than half of the planet's freshwater river basins have been heavily impacted by human activities, according to a new study, which presents a novel, multi-faceted approach for evaluating biodiversity change at a global scale.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Magnetic reversal 42,000 years ago triggered global environmental change

Nearly 42,000 years ago, when Earth's magnetic fields reversed, this triggered major environmental changes, extinction events, and long-term changes in human behavior, a new study reports.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

The mass of Cygnus X-1's black hole challenges stellar evolution models

Weighing in at roughly 21 solar masses, the black hole in the X-ray binary system Cygnus X-1 is so massive that it challenges current stellar evolution models, a new study reveals.

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Nature

George Carruthers (1939–2020)

Nature, Published online: 18 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00461-w Astronomer and engineer of the first observatory on the Moon.

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Science Magazine

Ancient kauri trees capture last collapse of Earth's magnetic field

Unleashed cosmic ray bombardment may have eaten up ozone, driving short-term climate swings

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Futurism

This Futuristic Patio Furniture Stays Clean No Matter What Mother Nature Throws at It

There's nothing like hanging out on your patio or porch when the weather is nice. But outdoor furniture is infamously difficult to maintain, since they're constantly exposed to the elements. But Outer has come up with new, innovative, futuristic patio furniture that can hold up against rain, wind, snow, and grime, without sacrificing comfort in the process. Outer's patent-process memory foam cush

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Migratory birds track climate across the year

As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

UCLA study finds combination therapy suppresses pancreatic tumor growth in mice

UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have uncovered a potential new way to target pancreatic tumors that express high intratumoral interferon signaling (IFN).

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

Rich nations see virus rates fall quicker — study

Richer countries were more likely to see rates of COVID-19 fall faster during the first wave of the pandemic, according to new research published in the journal Frontiers in Public Health.

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EurekAlert! – Breaking News

A natural protection racket among damselfish and mysid shrimp

In nature, there are examples of animals helping one another and living in mutually beneficial relationships that have helped shape the world's landscapes and biodiversity. New research from the University of Delaware has found one of these domesticator-domesticate relationships undersea, in the waters off Belize, where damselfish provide multigenerational support/protection to mysid shrimp in exc

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Science twis

No waters left untouched

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Science twis

Joint strategy for surface chemistry

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Science twis

Walk this way

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Science twis

Distorted thermal properties

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Science twis

Targeting sarbecoviruses

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Science twis

Mapping antibody escape in SARS-CoV-2

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Science twis

Making the energy makers

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Science twis

Reversing the field

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Science twis

No ligand needed for learning

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Science twis

The origins of tissue regeneration

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Science twis

New pathways in plants and microbes

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Science twis

A recipe for new genes

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Science twis

Bacterial cell gene expression

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Science twis

The many roads to resistance

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Science twis

Orienting origami binding

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Science twis

Building a barrel

[no content]

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Science twis

How to hold down transmission

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Science twis

Moving targets of neurotoxins

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Science twis

Organoids regenerate human bile ducts

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Science twis

Controlling amyloid in brain and vessels

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Science twis

Teamwork for T cells

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Science Magazine

Erratum for the Report "CRISPR-Cas12a target binding unleashes indiscriminate single-stranded DNase activity" by J. S. Chen, E. Ma, L. B. Harrington, M. Da Costa, X. Tian, J. M. Palefsky, J. A. Doudna

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Science Magazine

A universal coronavirus vaccine

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Science Magazine

News at a glance

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Science Magazine

Top German scientist fired after police raid of homes and offices

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Science Magazine

France turns to citizens' panel to reduce vaccine skepticism

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Science Magazine

Deaths of health workers in Africa highlight vaccine inequity

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Science Magazine

England's Stonehenge was erected in Wales first

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Science Magazine

Kauri trees mark magnetic flip 42,000 years ago

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Science Magazine

Media and aggression research retracted after scrutiny

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Science Magazine

The long road

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Science Magazine

We need a global science-policy body on chemicals and waste

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Science Magazine

How many genetic changes create new species?

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Science Magazine

New genes from borrowed parts

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Science Magazine

A masing ladder

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Science Magazine

Re-engineering Botox

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Science Magazine

The genetic underground of antibiotic resistance

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Science Magazine

Tissue regeneration: Reserve or reverse?

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Science Magazine

Emerging cell therapy for biliary diseases

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Science Magazine

Portrait of a groundbreaking astronomer

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Science Magazine

Probing the genetic future of humanity

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Science Magazine

Protect and regulate China's oyster resources

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Science Magazine

CropLife International shares FAO's vision

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