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A leaked report shows Pfizer's vaccine is conquering covid-19 in its largest real-world test
A leaked scientific report jointly prepared by Israel's health ministry and Pfizer claims that the company's covid-19 vaccine is stopping nine out of 10 infections and the country could approach herd immunity by next month. The study, based on the health records of hundreds of thousands of Israelis, finds that the vaccine may sharply curtail transmission of the coronavirus. "High vaccine uptake c
1d
US Formally Rejoins Paris Climate Agreement
After US president Joe Biden signed an executive order almost a month ago to move the United States toward rejoining the Paris climate agreement, the country formally reentered the international pact today, as Scientific American reports . The reentry signals the start of a lengthy process of drafting new emissions pledges. Biden called for an international climate summit on April 22, which falls
23h
Incredible Photo Shows NASA Mars Rover Hanging Below "Sky Crane"
Jetpack Snapshot NASA has released a new photo sent to us all the way from Mars courtesy of its Perseverance rover, which successfully landed on the Red Planet on Thursday. The incredible image shows the rover hanging below the probe's "sky crane," a rocket-powered device that lowered Perseverance from an altitude of about 70 feet down to the surface below. A similarly designed crane also was use
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Nomadland Is a Gorgeous Journey Through the Wreckage of American Promise
Fern (played by Frances McDormand), the hardscrabble hero of Chloé Zhao's Nomadland , is the kind of resolute, independent protagonist that has dominated American movies since the dawn of the Western genre. She drives around the country in her van, living as self-sufficiently as possible, and carries a flinty affect with people, revealing little about herself and the turmoil that has led to her l
8h
A speed limit also applies in the quantum world
Even in the world of the smallest particles with their own special rules, things cannot proceed infinitely fast. Physicists at the University of Bonn have now shown what the speed limit is for complex quantum operations. The study also involved scientists from MIT, the universities of Hamburg, Cologne and Padua, and the Jülich Research Center. The results are important for the realization of quant
23h
Time-lapse reveals the hidden dance of roots
Duke researchers have been studying something that happens too slowly for our eyes to see. A team in biologist Philip Benfey's lab wanted to see how plant roots burrow into the soil. So they set up a camera on rice seeds sprouting in clear gel, taking a new picture every 15 minutes for several days after germination.
1d
Nasa scientists hail Perseverance rover's arrival on Mars with stunning images
Car-sized vehicle designed to seek signs of life is pronounced 'healthy' after dramatic descent to surface of the red planet Nasa scientists have said the Perseverance Mars rover is "healthy" and is beaming back many stunning new images from the surface of the planet, promising significant scientific discoveries ahead. Related: Perseverance's mission to Mars – in pictures Continue reading…
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Another Earthquake Nails the Crumbling Fukushima Power Plant
Not Again A powerful earthquake struck the site of Japan's already-crumbling Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant last weekend, further damaging the facility that experts and authorities have spent years trying to safely maintain. The power plant's operators found that cooling water levels had dropped in two of the plant's reactors, indicating that the earthquake caused them to spring new leaks,
1d
Neanderthals May Have Been Killed Off By Magnetic Pole Flip
Polar Opposites Scientists have discovered evidence that Earth's magnetic poles flipped 42,000 years ago — possibly leading to the Neanderthals' extinction. Researchers from Sydney's University of South Wales (UNSW) and the South Australian Museum released a paper describing the findings in the journal Science detailing how the reversal of the poles caused abrupt solar storms and climate shifts t
1h
Long Covid: 'It's a year since I've felt like myself'
There is fresh hope for those still suffering the effects of the virus after 12 months with £18.5m of new funding and 70 new NHS clinics Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Today is an anniversary that George Hencken never imagined. It is exactly one year since she caught Covid-19. But unlike most people who have suffered from the disease, she remains ill. "It's a year s
4h
NASA's New Mars Rover Is Less Powerful Than Many Smartphones
iMars If you thought a NASA rover that cost $2.4 billion to build and launch would be more powerful your old smartphone, you have another thing coming. NASA's Perseverance rover, which landed successfully on Mars Thursday , is powered by an old chipset that gives it about the same processing power as an iMac from 1998, according to PCMag 's breakdown . More specifically, it's packing 256MB of RAM
5h
A New Era of Black Holes Is Here
When the first black-hole collision was detected in 2015, it was a watershed moment in the history of astronomy. Using gravitational waves, astronomers were observing the universe in an entirely new way. But this first event didn't revolutionize our understanding of black holes—nor could it. This collision would be the first of many, astronomers knew, and only with that bounty would answers come.
9h
New technology enables predictive design of engineered human cells
Northwestern University synthetic biologist Joshua Leonard used to build devices when he was a child using electronic kits. Now he and his team have developed a design-driven process that uses parts from a very different kind of toolkit to build complex genetic circuits for cellular engineering.
1d
New study identifies 126 species that could host coronavirus
The novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is a product of different coronaviruses recombining in animal species. A new study suggests that hundreds of animal species may harbor multiple types of coronaviruses, meaning recombination events could be more likely than previously thought. The authors noted that their results could help improve surveillance programs to mitigate the risks associated wi
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Are billionaires bad for the environment?
A 100-meter yacht like this one can TK. (Arno Senoner//) Richard Wilk is a distinguished professor and provost's professor of anthropology at the Director of the Open Anthropology Institute at Indiana University. Beatriz Barros is a Ph.D. Candidate in anthropology at Indiana University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Tesla's Elon Musk and Amazon's Jeff Bezos have been vying
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Johns Hopkins Professor: US Will Hit COVID Herd Immunity by April
COVID-19 will be "mostly gone" by April, according to a Johns Hopkins professor. Dr. Marty Makary, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, points to several reasons to be hopeful in a new op-ed for The Wall Street Journal . He believes a combination of natural immunity from previous infection, rising vaccination rates, and a dramatic drop in cases mean America will reach herd immuni
4h
For the First Time, Scientists Clone Endangered Species
It's Alive! For the first time, scientists cloned an organism on the United States' list of endangered species: a black-footed ferret that they've named Elizabeth Ann. Elizabeth Ann was born on December 10 and, as far as the Fish and Wildlife Service scientists raising her can tell, is a perfectly healthy and lively young critter, The Associated Press reports . The tentative success story, a firs
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'An exciting time': European Space Agency takes diversity to space
Helen Sharman, the UK's first astronaut, praises the agency as it begins a search for 26 recruits Helen Sharman, the UK's first astronaut, has welcomed the European Space Agency's decision to improve diversity among crew as an "exciting time for human space flight expansion". Esa announced earlier this week that as part of its bid to recruit up to 26 new astronauts it was casting its net wider th
10h
Coronavirus: UK should donate vaccines to poorer nations now, says new WTO chief; two die amid lockdown protests in Gabon
Thousands of China's Sinovac vaccine on way to Mexico France reports increase in daily Covid death toll Ireland reports three cases of Brazilian variant See all our coronavirus coverage 9.50am GMT A year ago, Laura Ricevuti and Annalisa Malara – both doctors at Codogno hospital in Italy – had a hunch something was different about a patient in the intensive care ward. As Reuters reports, their dec
13h
Who Will Be the Next F.D.A. Chief?
Two leading contenders generate wider debate about the leadership needed to restore morale and scientific integrity to an agency battered by the politicized Trump administration.
14h
NASA Releases Amazing Photo of Rover Parachuting to Mars Surface
Free Falling NASA continues to give Annie Leibovitz a run for her money with its stunning new photos of the Perseverance rover as it landed on Mars on Thursday. One of its latest is a spectacular wide shot of Perseverance as it descends on parachute through the Martian atmosphere — another historic document of what may be the most technologically advanced off-planet exploration in the history of
16min
See the wonderful world of fermented foods on one delicious chart
From snacks to sauces, fermentation is an important culinary tool across eras and cultures. (Mona Chalabi/) No matter who you are or where you live, you've almost certainly eaten something fermented . Humans have been processing food this way for at least 10,000 years in cuisines on every populated continent. Microbes like bacteria and fungi flourish when feeding off carbohydrates, turning sugars
4h
Drug companies look to AI to end 'hit and miss' research
Technology that speeded the development of Covid vaccines has potential to transform the pharmaceutical industry The hunt for new medicines has often been more like a game of roulette than high-end science. But now the pharmaceutical sector is on the cusp of a transformation, as it delves into cutting-edge technology to come up with new treatments for diseases such as cancer, rheumatoid arthritis
6h
Inside the Strange World of the Police
Photographs by Joseph Rodríguez "Police work is doing what people in the city want done," Willie Williams, the Los Angeles Police Department chief, told me in 1994. Williams, the agency's first Black chief, had been brought in from Philadelphia to make changes after LAPD officers beat Rodney King in 1991, the incident that ultimately led to the Los Angeles riots. A commission that year concluded
10h
Storing the Pfizer vaccine could get a lot simpler in coming weeks
The Pfizer vaccine can actually be stored in normal freezers. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. In an announcement this morning, Pfizer and BioNTech described new findings showing that their COVID vaccine could be stored for at standard freezing temperatures, setting the stage for a dramatically simplified vaccine distribution effort. That's a big step for Pfizer's v
23h
The melting of large icebergs is a key stage in the evolution of ice ages
A new study, in which the Andalusian Earth Sciences Institute (IACT) (CSIC-UGR) participated, has described for the first time a key stage in the beginning of the great glaciations and indicates that it can happen to our planet in the future. The study claims to have found a new connection that could explain the beginning of the ice ages on Earth.
1d
Nasa reveals new colour images of Mars from Perseverance rover – video
Adam Steltzner, the chief engineer on the Perseverance project, said his team was 'overwhelmed with excitement and joy' as he revealed new colour photographs beamed back from Nasa's Perseverance rover Nasa scientists release new images of Perseverance rover on Mars at news briefing Nasa scientists hail Perseverance rover's arrival on Mars with stunning images Continue reading…
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How the brain processes sign language
Over 70 million deaf people use sign languages as their preferred communication form. Although they access similar brain structures as spoken languages, it hasn't been identified the brain regions that process both forms of language equally. Scientists have now discovered that Broca's area in the left hemisphere, central for spoken languages, is also crucial for sign languages. This is where the g
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Listen: 'A Disaster for Feminism'
Nearly a year ago, Atlantic staff writer Helen Lewis predicted that the pandemic would be " a disaster for feminism ," and far too many of her predictions have proved true. With women leaving the workforce at unprecedented rates, why has the pandemic's burden fallen so much harder on them? And what can we, as a society, do about it? Lewis joins staff writer James Hamblin and comedian Maeve Higgin
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Artificial Intelligence-Worshipping Church Officially Shuts Down
Closed Doors Remember that artificial intelligence-worshipping church, the Way of the Future? Well, first of all: Yes, that existed . But secondly, founder Anthony Levandowski told TechCrunch this week that he has now decided to dissolve the church and donate all of its funds — just over $175,000 — to the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Levandowski still supports the church's mission to r
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What we can learn from the Facebook-Australia news debacle
Democracies around the world are all mired in one crisis or another, which is why measures of their health are trending in the wrong direction. Many look at the decline of the news industry as one contributing factor. No wonder, then, that figuring out how to pay for journalism is an urgent issue, and some governments are pushing ahead with ambitious plans. Big ideas for ways to funnel billions o
9h
The Blackmagic 6K Pro is the budget camera filmmakers have been waiting for
The angled viewfinder is an available add-on to make the camera feel more like a DSLR-style mirrorless camera. (Blackmagic Design /) By now, you've seen cameras—even those attached to smartphones—with specs boasting the ability to shoot 8K footage. It's an impressive number and it looks great on marketing material, and it does comes in handy for some specific purposes. But for many pro and high-e
1d
Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products
Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacter
1d
Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products
Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacter
1d
Mitochondrial function can play significant part in serious disease
Disorders of the cells' energy supply can cause a number of serious diseases, but also seem to be connected to ageing. More research is needed on mitochondrial function to find future treatments. A new study shows how an important molecule inside the mitochondria affects their function in mice and fruit flies. The study adds valuable knowledge on formerly relatively unexplored protein modification
1d
Sounding rocket CLASP2 elucidates solar magnetic field
Cooperative operations between a solar observation satellite and a sounding-rocket telescope have measured the magnetic field strength in the photosphere and chromosphere above an active solar plage region. This is the first time that the magnetic field in the chromosphere has been charted all the way up its top. This finding brings us closer to understanding how energy is transferred between laye
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'I could physically feel the germs on me': how Covid is a double-edged sword for those with OCD
For some the pandemic has worsened their symptoms, but others say social distancing and hygiene measures have made life easier Luka Buchanan has always been consumed by the fear of contamination and germs, washing their hands until they were raw, and terrified the food they ate would poison them. Diagnosed with obsessive compulsive disorder at age 19, Buchanan, who uses they/them pronouns, spent
3h
How to reconcile after a family rift
Estrangement is surprisingly common – so how can the injured parties put their differences aside? Harry and Meghan have apparently severed links with the royal family and moved halfway across the globe. Nicole Kidman has been allegedly snubbed by her two eldest Scientologist children. Angelina Jolie has a difficult relationship with her father Jon Voight – it probably doesn't help that he's Donal
5h
The Moment Britain's Army Knew It Was Lost
This is a story about the nadir, the end of days. Monday, March 24, 2008, marked five years to the month after the British army arrived in Iraq, preaching to the Americans their apparent expertise in counterinsurgency operations and understanding of the manifold ways of, in the historical British upper-class vernacular, "the Arab." This is the story of how that complacency—the claimed legacy of i
11h
A speed limit also applies in the quantum world
Even in the world of the smallest particles with their own special rules, things cannot proceed infinitely fast. Physicists have now shown what the speed limit is for complex quantum operations. The results are important for the realization of quantum computers, among other things.
1d
Life of a pure Martian design
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034 composed of ancient crustal materials from Mars has now delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on a real Martian material.
1d
Best heated slippers: Say goodbye to cold feet
Don't fear the chilly floor. (Dima Pechurin via Unsplash/) When it's cold out, warmth is always welcome inside, especially from your head to your toes. To keep your feet as toasty as possible, slip into a pair of heated slippers and get instant relief from cold floors and draughty indoor air. But it's not just about the heat this footwear provides. Winter weather can leave feet dry, chapped, and
5h
The hidden dance of roots revealed
New time-lapse videos capture something that's too slow for our eyes to see: the growing tips of plant roots make corkscrew-like motions, waggling and winding in a helical path as they burrow into the soil. By using time-lapse footage, along with a root-like robot to test ideas, researchers have gained new insights into how and why rice root tips twirl as they grow.
21h
Evidence of protein folding at site of intracellular droplets
Researchers have found that elevated concentrations of proteins within the droplets triggered a folding event, increasing the potential for protein aggregation — or misfolding — which has been linked to neurological diseases including Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).
1d
Migratory birds track climate across the year
As climate change takes hold across the Americas, some areas will get wetter, and others will get hotter and drier. A new study of the yellow warbler, a widespread migratory songbird, shows that individuals have the same climatic preferences across their migratory range.
1d
The inflated significance of neutral genetic diversity in conservation genetics [Evolution]
The current rate of species extinction is rapidly approaching unprecedented highs, and life on Earth presently faces a sixth mass extinction event driven by anthropogenic activity, climate change, and ecological collapse. The field of conservation genetics aims at preserving species by using their levels of genetic diversity, usually measured as…
1d
Swimming upstream on sound waves
Scientists have succeeded in propelling microvehicles against a fluid flow using ultrasound. In future, these tiny vehicles are set to be introduced into the human bloodstream, thereby revolutionizing the field of medicine.
1d
Global study of 48 cities finds nature sanitizes 41.7 million tons of human waste a year
Researchers found that nature provides at least 18% of sanitation services in 48 cities worldwide, according to researchers in the United Kingdom and India. The study estimates that more than 2 million cubic meters of the cities' human waste is processed each year without engineered infrastructure. This includes pit latrine waste that gradually filters through the soil — a natural process that cl
1d
Depression, anxiety, loneliness are peaking in college students
A survey by a Boston University researcher of nearly 33,000 college students across the country reveals the prevalence of depression and anxiety in young people continues to increase, now reaching its highest levels, a sign of the mounting stress factors due to the coronavirus pandemic, political unrest, and systemic racism and inequality.
1d
Tuberculosis: New biomarker indicates individual treatment duration
The treatment of tuberculosis (TB) is long and demanding. In particular, in cases of resistant tuberculosis, the WHO generally recommends a standard treatment duration of at least 18 months, as there are no reliable biomarkers for an early termination. Scientists have now succeeded in identifying a biomarker that points to an individual end of therapy based on the activity of 22 genes. In many cas
1d
Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products
Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacteria to aid in natural product discovery.
2h
Wisconsin Biologist Charged In Caviar Scam
The top sturgeon biologist for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and several others have been charged with crimes related to an illegal sturgeon caviar bartering ring.
9h
Best Windshield Snow Cover: Protect Your Car With a Frost Guard
Make sure your windshield doesn't get too icy. (Le Duc via Unsplash/) With wintry weather comes all manner of seasonal outdoor fun, from skiing to snowball fights and everything in between. The season is somewhat less fun for your car. Choosing the best windshield snow cover will ensure that you get the most enjoyment out of snowy weather without the hassle and worry that come from needing to scr
1d
Bar stools that bring a room together
Have a seat at the counter. (Unsplash/) Bar stools keep it low key—whether in the kitchen or on the patio, the bar stool is where you want to sit to enjoy a quick lunch, sunset cocktail, or passing conversation. Save the dinner table for, well, having dinner! And if you've got a bar lining your kitchen then stools are simply indispensable. They're awesome for entertaining and arguably even better
1d
Floods cripple Indonesia's capital
Whole neighbourhoods of Indonesia's capital Jakarta and dozens of major roads were flooded on Saturday after torrential rains pounded the Southeast Asian city overnight.
5h
Southern cities hit hard by storms face new crisis: No water
Southern cities slammed by winter storms that left millions without power for days have traded one crisis for another: Busted water pipes ruptured by record-low temperatures created shortages of clean drinking water, shut down the Memphis airport on Friday and left hospitals struggling to maintain sanitary conditions.
5h
Sweet marine particles resist hungry bacteria
Rather sweet than salty: In the ocean microalgae produce a lot of sugar during algae blooms. These enormous quantities of algal biomass are normally recycled rapidly by marine bacteria, degradation process that is an important part of the global carbon cycle. Especially sugars have been considered as easily digestible and therefore poor candidates for natural carbon sequestration. Now scientists r
1d
Behold This Sky Map of 25,000 Supermassive Black Holes
Nightlight Scientists just published a massive map of the night sky speckled with twinkling white lights. But instead of distant stars and constellations, the map actually shows the locations of more than 25,000 supermassive black holes, according to research accepted for publication in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics . Each one is surrounded by its own galaxy, illuminated by the radio emiss
1d
Easily Keep Your Email Private With the Highly-Rated StartMail
When you use Siri, or predictive text on your email, or have something snagged in your spam filter, you can thank Enron. No, really: In 2003, California regulators released the Enron Corpus , half a million email messages from senior management at the disgraced energy company. Everything from flirty messages to spam was just dumped onto the internet. That's set the tone for email privacy, unfortu
44min
Save 75% On a Lifetime Subscription to Knowable's Audio Learning Platform
2020 was a year of involuntary social experiments, from drastic emissions reductions to using Google to track public health trends . Yet the one we'll probably remember the most is the toll the year took on education. Around the world, people had to switch to new forms of teaching and learning, many of them involving videoconferencing, instructional videos, and other uses of screens. Knowable is
2h
Elon Musk Collaborated With MIT to Track COVID Infections at SpaceX
More than 4,000 SpaceX employees took part in a study, helmed by Elon Musk, to track the spread of COVID-19 throughout the company. Musk partnered with researchers from Harvard and MIT to develop the antibody testing program, which required volunteer SpaceX employees to submit to monthly blood tests. This week, the group published a peer-reviewed study — Musk, known as an unusually hands-on execu
3h
Australia vs. Facebook
The tech giant's ban on Australians searching for news on its platform suggests that equitable control of international reporting is very much a work in progress — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
4 fun techniques to keep kids learning while they're stuck at home
Playthings that come with no set rules, like these colorful blocks, encourage kids to be creative. (La-Rel Easter/Unsplash/) Editor's Note: This story was produced in collaboration with the team behind PopSci's new line of STEM toys . A year into living in a COVID-19 world, we've learned to live with things like face masks and one-third-capacity gyms, but challenges remain. Even as some schools i
3h
This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through February 20)
ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE A New Artificial Intelligence Makes Mistakes—on Purpos e Will Knight | Wired "It took about 50 years for computers to eviscerate humans in the venerable game of chess. A standard smartphone can now play the kind of moves that make a grandmaster's head spin. But one artificial intelligence program is taking a few steps backward, to appreciate how average humans play—blunder
5h
Best desk organizer: Desk accessories that banish clutter
Make sure you know where everything is in your office. (Slava Keyzman via Unsplash/) Countless books, television shows, and organizing gurus will tell you that a tidy workspace can improve your mood, productivity, and ultimately your happiness. The best desk organizers are stylish and minimalist, and offer ingenious tricks to help reduce clutter and maximize usable desk space. If you've ever trie
7h
Weekend reads: An editorial board resigns over interference; what a manuscript rejection means; the scientific 1%
Before we present this week's Weekend Reads, a question: Do you enjoy our weekly roundup? If so, we could really use your help. Would you consider a tax-deductible donation to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The week at Retraction Watch featured: Exclusive: Ohio State researcher kept six-figure job for more than … Continue reading
7h
This High Tech Sauna Blanket Uses Infrared Light to Fight Seasonal Affective Disorder
It's the dead of winter, it's freezing, and you haven't felt the warm kiss of the sun on your skin for longer than you can remember. Even though it won't last forever, the effect it has on your mental and physical well-being can add up. According to Psychology Today , it's estimated that Seasonal Affective Disorder affects 10 million Americans. With another 10-to-20 percentof people suffering fro
8h
Shared Imagination Social Network
Given that the brain/mind is – in a sense – a biological computer, wouldn't a shared imagination social network be feasible at some point? I.e Have users imagine the color "red", and that's it. Report back their experience (quite the hallucinations.) Obviously assessing an individuals response is going to be…complicated. Language is very limited, very simplified. But its not impossible to imagi
12h
Is OpenAI's GPT3 good enough to fool the general population? / The world's largest scale Turing Test
I finally managed to get access to GPT3 🙌 and am curious about this question so have created a web application to test it. At a pre-scheduled time, thousands of people from around the world will go on to the app and enter a chat interface. There is a 50-50 chance that they are matched to another visitor or GPT3. Through messaging back and forth, they have to figure out who is on the other side,
12h
Isn't it better not to have any feelings?
Considering the evolution of cortex in humans, isn't it better not to have any feelings and make decisions only rationally using critical thinking rather than emotionaly? Is amygdala going to get smaller through evolution? Would you like to go under a surgery to make your thinking less emotionaly biased and more rational and critical? ( without any surgical risks ) Please share your scientific op
12h
A passing moment of gratitude
Hey all, long-time lurker, first-time blah blahs. I just wanted to share that, thanks to my dive into the rabbit hole that is cognitive science and helping out with virtual lab work, I finally feel "alive" again. I look forward to what might be in store the next day. When thinking about this as I was prepping a quick shake, I realized this field makes me feel what World of Warcraft did as a tween
12h
Research Study: The REACT Study (Boston, MA)
Hi everyone! My name is Meghan and I am a researcher at Mass General. I'm writing to share some information about a study in my unit that's currently recruiting. If you or someone you know are interested, please feel free to share this info and/or PM me. Thank you. REACT is a 12-week study for females ages 14- 35 who have missed their period in the past 6 months because of exercise activity or re
12h
Capturing all text entry including keystroke timing for studying cognition
Apologies if this shouldn't be posted here. If you could direct me to the right subreddit, I would appreciate it. I'm not sure why I'm having so much trouble with this, but I'm just trying to capture the text and keystroke information in a free text entry field. For example, if a user typed "I am", the following would be captured: Text: "I am" Keystroke, Keypress, KeyUp SHIFT, 1, 3 i, 2, 3 SPACE,
12h
Smakprov ur "Tio ekvationer som styr världen"
Vi tänker ofta på matematiken som en hård, objektiv vetenskap. Och det är den: Många av de frågor jag tittar på i Tio ekvationer som styr världen handlar om spel, finansvärlden och algoritmerna i sociala medier. Men matematik kan också hantera mjukare och vardagligare problem, som att bedöma om det är dags att bli rädd när flygplanet skakar extra mycket, eller att avgöra hur generös det är rimligt
15h
Två som slår hål på myter om träning och hälsa
Känns det segt att börja träna? Helt normalt. Att vi skulle vara födda för att träna är en av många myter om träning som Daniel Lieberman, professor i evolutionsbiologi vid Harvard i USA, slår hål på i sin nya bok Träningsparadoxen. Mest känd är han för en artikel i tidskriften Nature 2004 om att människan är fysiologiskt utvecklad för att springa, som sedan blev temat i journalisten Christopher M
15h
Samlad kunskap om hästar och människor
Kunskap, sådan som nog inte hade funnits om den inte hade rört vid både hjärta och hjärna, kunskap om en praktik som berör många vetenskapliga områden och som samtidigt är ett vetenskapligt område i sin egen rätt. Det är sådan kunskap som förmedlas i antologin Hästen och den mänskliga hälsan, redigerad av Gunilla Silfverberg, professor i vårdetik, och Henrik Lerner, lektor i vårdetik, båda vid Ers
15h
Om sorg och fjärran planeter
Livets stora frågor berör många olika plan av tillvaron. Sara Seager är astronom och arbetar med att söka efter tecken på liv långt ute i universum. Samtidigt ställdes hennes eget liv på ända när hennes man dog i cancer och hon blev ensam med två barn. Hur fungerar livet alls, när en närståendes liv tar slut? Ett slumpartat möte i en pulkabacke blev en viktig nyckel för Sara Seager när hon skulle
15h
Kvinnors våld var ofta grovt
Att 1800-talets kvinnor endast var offer för mäns våld stämmer inte. I själva verket utövade många kvinnor både grovt och genomtänkt våld mot såväl vuxna som barn, och sig själva. Det konstaterar historikerna Marie Eriksson och Roddy Nilsson i en ny bok. 1 | Ni har djupdykt i domstolshandlingar och obduktionsprotokoll. Varför ville ni skriva boken?
15h
Eco-friendly golf balls for a greener game
Fore! (Unsplash/) The average golf course has nearly 75 acres of land. That's a lot of space for errant balls to disappear, and even if you put a RFID tracker on your autographed favorite, it can still get stuck in the mud under six feet of water. Fortunately, unlike lost socks, lost golf balls don't always appear to vaporize into a parallel universe. Enterprising companies have done the work to
23h
Say Goodbye To 'Coronasomnia' With the Yana Sleep Body Pillow
It's harder than ever to get a good night's sleep . Thanks to the pandemic, almost everyone's life has been impacted. It's taken a toll on our work, home, family life–and subsequently the quality of our sleep. A report out of the National Institutes of Health reveals that Coronasomnia, the loss of sleep due to pandemic-related stress, has resulted in a nearly 40-percent increase in clinical insom
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Time-lapse reveals the hidden dance of roots
New time-lapse videos capture something that's too slow for our eyes to see: the growing tips of plant roots make corkscrew-like motions, waggling and winding in a helical path as they burrow into the soil. By using time-lapse footage, along with a root-like robot to test ideas, researchers have gained new insights into how and why rice root tips twirl as they grow.
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Direct cloning method CAPTUREs novel microbial natural products
Microorganisms possess natural product biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) that may harbor unique bioactivities for use in drug development and agricultural applications. However, many uncharacterized microbial BGCs remain inaccessible. Researchers at Illinois previously demonstrated a technique using transcription factor decoys to activate large, silent BGCs in bacteria to aid in natural product di
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Pore-like proteins designed from scratch
Scientists have created new proteins that adopt one of the most complex folds known to molecular biology. These pore-like barrel-shaped proteins spontaneously fold into their intended structures and embed into lipid membranes. Although the scientists drew inspiration from proteins found throughout the living world, they arrived at sequences that differ from any known before. The resulting compact
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Dinner plates that make your food look more delicious
Yum! (Unsplash/) A good-looking meal makes the eyes grow wide and whets the appetite, so be sure your food is dressed for success. The ideal dinner plate will both suit the food you prepare and fit the look of your home. Maybe you make elaborate meals in your maximalist palace and need plates that put on a show. Or perhaps you're more of a meat-and-potatoes type cooking in a cozy log cabin. There
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Emergency flashlights for both survival and adventure
An emergency flashlight should be small enough to stash away, but powerful enough to light up an area when needed. (Pexels/) You don't have to be a survivalist to keep jumper cables in your car or your pantry stocked with canned food. And you don't have to believe in Murphy's Law to know that things don't always go according to plan. Emergency flashlights are great tools for those hard-to-foresee
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Pore-like proteins designed from scratch
Scientists have created new proteins that adopt one of the most complex folds known to molecular biology. These pore-like barrel-shaped proteins spontaneously fold into their intended structures and embed into lipid membranes. Although the scientists drew inspiration from proteins found throughout the living world, they arrived at sequences that differ from any known before. The resulting compact
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New Data sheds light on genesis of our body's powerhouses
Scientists uncover for the first time how the body's energy makers are made. An international team of researchers report an insight into the molecular mechanism of membrane-tethered protein synthesis in mitochondria. This is a fundamental new understanding of how the human mitoribosome functions and could explain how it is affected by mutations and deregulation leading to disorders like deafness a
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