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People with extremist views less able to do complex mental tasks, research suggests
Cambridge University team say their findings could be used to spot people at risk from radicalisation Our brains hold clues for the ideologies we choose to live by, according to research, which has suggested that people who espouse extremist attitudes tend to perform poorly on complex mental tasks. Researchers from the University of Cambridge sought to evaluate whether cognitive disposition – dif
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Texas Pays the Price of the Culture War
SAN ANTONIO—The power gave out last Monday night. When we woke up on Tuesday morning, the temperature in the house was dipping below 50 degrees. We bundled our toddler in her warm jammies and tiny bubble coat. The gas and water were still on, so we huddled in front of the stove, boiling water for tea, hoping to raise the temperature a bit. We were among the millions of Texans who lost power when
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The 5 Trump Amendments to the Constitution
When I step back to look at the legacy of President Donald Trump, a surprising conclusion emerges: He has substantially altered the Constitution. His changes aren't formal, of course. But his informal amendments are important. If left to stand, they threaten to make Congress an advisory body and give carte blanche to rogue presidents. The surprising aspect of this conclusion is not that the Const
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We're Just Rediscovering a 19th-Century Pandemic Strategy
A few years ago, when I still had confidence in our modern ability to fight viruses, I pored over a photo essay of the 1918 flu pandemic . How quaint, I remember thinking, as I looked at people bundled up for outdoor classes and court and church. How primitive their technology, those nurses in gauze masks. How little did I know. I felt secure, foolishly, in our 100 additional years of innovation.
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The Most Likely Timeline for Life to Return to Normal
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . The end of the coronavirus pandemic is on the horizon at last, but the timeline for actually getting there feels like it shifts daily, with updates about viral variants, vaccine logistics, and other important variables seeming to push back the finish line or scoot it forwar
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Death Is Nothing to Celebrate
Twitter is often contentious, but sometimes it turns truly savage. The death of the talk-radio host Rush Limbaugh, who could himself certainly be savage, touched off an explosion of gleeful celebration on the site. "For everyone about to tweet out a joke or otherwise revel in the death of Rush Limbaugh I just ask that you pause and ask yourself: am I going big enough?" one user tweeted , urging h
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NASA Releases Video of Perseverance Touching Down on Mars
Touchdown! NASA just released footage of its Perseverance Mars rover touching down on the Red Planet. The awe-inspiring video is a nail-biter — though it ended in success, it's yet another illustration of the extraordinary difficult of landing a heavy research spacecraft on an alien world. Parachute Pants First, the rover deploys a large parachute to slow down. Then the heat shield separated, all
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Why Isn't NASA Releasing RAW Images from Perseverance?
Update: NASA is now releasing a much larger number of RAW images from Perseverance. We have the details here . If you've been keeping track of the Perseverance Mars rover mission, you've no doubt seen the stunning images NASA has released of the landing. However, one planetary scientist has a simple question about the pictures NASA isn't releasing: Where the hell are all the RAW images from Perse
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Nasa releases video of Perseverance rover landing on Mars
Space agency also reveals audio recorded by Perseverance on surface of red planet Nasa has unveiled a first-of-its-kind video of its car-sized rover Perseverance making its sensational landing on Mars, and released the first audio recorded on the surface of the red planet. The American space agency shared the footage on Monday, days after the spacecraft made its dramatic descent to the Martian su
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Ghost particle from shredded star reveals cosmic particle accelerator
Tracing back a ghostly particle to a shredded star, scientists have uncovered a gigantic cosmic particle accelerator. The subatomic particle, called a neutrino, was hurled towards Earth after the doomed star came too close to the supermassive black hole at the center of its home galaxy and was ripped apart by the black hole's colossal gravity. It is the first particle that can be traced back to su
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Scotland Covid vaccination drive linked to big drop in hospital admissions
Pfizer jab cuts risk of admission by up to 85% four weeks after first dose, while AstraZeneca jab cuts risk by 94%, study finds Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage One dose of vaccine against Covid-19 in Scotland has cut hospital admissions by more than 85%, according to the first data to be published on the impact of the UK programme. By the fourth week after receiving
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UK Covid live: Pfizer and AstraZeneca vaccines reduce hospital admissions by 85% and 94%, study suggests
Data on coronavirus hospital admissions in Scotland finds fall among people who have had first jab compared with those who had not Johnson unveils Covid lockdown exit plan: schools and social contact first Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage 10.29am GMT Dr Josie Murray , Public Health Scotland's public health consultant lead for the EAVE II project which found that the P
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I was on the WHO's Covid mission to China, here's what we found |Dominic Dwyer
No, it didn't originate in Wuhan's wet market, but it could have been spread by frozen food. Here is what we learned from Phase 1 of the investigation As I write, I am in hotel quarantine in Sydney, after returning from Wuhan, China. There, I was the Australian representative on the international World Health Organization's (WHO) investigation into the origins of the Sars-CoV-2 virus . Much has b
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Pfizer Vaccine Curbs COVID Transmissions in Israel by Nearly 90%
According to a new study, the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine has been nearly 90 percent effective at preventing COVID-19 transmissions in Israel — an early data point indicating that vaccines are at least largely effective at halting the spread of the coronavirus. The vaccine was 89.4 percent effective at preventing lab-confirmed COVID infections, Bloomberg reports . The results also indicate the effect
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NASA Releases Incredible Panorama of Mars Rover's Landing Site
Mars 360 NASA has been showering us with incredible multimedia from the Martian surface, courtesy of its Perseverance rover. First, we got an out-of-this-world video of the rover landing the Red Planet. Then, we got the first microphone recordings as well. Now, engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have stitched together a highly detailed 360-degree panorama of Perseverance's landing site
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Scientists Now Testing Fuel for Giant New Fusion Reactor
British engineers are preparing to test the fuel mix that could one day power the largest nuclear fusion experiment in the world, Nature reports . Researchers at the Joint European Torus (JET), a fusion reactor at the Culham Centre for Fusion Energy in Oxfordshire, UK, began conducting fusion tests involving tritium, a radioactive isotope of hydrogen, back in December. The tokamak, a commonly imp
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NASA Releases First-Ever Recording of Sound on Mars
Martian Breeze As if video footage of a NASA rover landing on Mars wasn't enough, now the agency has blessed us with another incredible recording. NASA released the first ever audio recordings taken on the surface of Mars, as picked up by one of the Perseverance Mars rover's two microphones. Skip to ten seconds in and you'll be able to hear an audible Martian breeze. The high-pitched frequencies
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Company Mounts Paintball Gun on Robot Dog to Shoot Up Art Gallery
Marketing collective MSCHF has decided to let a robot dog equipped with a paintball loose inside an art gallery — and it's letting people around the world take control of it remotely, The Verge reports . The campaign is called "Spot's Rampage," in a nod to the Boston Dynamics robot dog Spot, and it'll kick off on February 24. Those who want to take control of the paintball-blasting killer robot c
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Mathematicians Set Numbers in Motion to Unlock Their Secrets
Joseph Silverman remembers when he began connecting the dots that would ultimately lead to a new branch of mathematics: April 25, 1992, at a conference at Union College in Schenectady, New York. It happened by accident while he was at a talk by the decorated mathematician John Milnor. Milnor's subject was a field called complex dynamics, which Silverman knew little about. But as Milnor introduced
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New 'metalens' shifts focus without tilting or moving
Polished glass has been at the center of imaging systems for centuries. Their precise curvature enables lenses to focus light and produce sharp images, whether the object in view is a single cell, the page of a book, or a far-off galaxy.
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Patient Dies After Doctors Transplant COVID-Infected Lungs
A Michigan woman has died from COVID-19 two months after receiving a double-lung transplant from a donor who had been infected with the virus. The woman, who had chronic obstructive lung disease, contracted the virus when she received a lung transplant at the University Hospital at Ann Arbor, according to Kaiser Health News . Three days after the operation, she began to show symptoms of COVID inc
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Biden sets an ambitious goal to protect 30 percent of US lands and waters
Outdoorspeople are cautiously optimistic about the president's 30 by 30 plan. (John Hafner/) This story originally featured on Outdoor Life . Among dozens of executive orders President Joe Biden signed his first weeks in office, the one that caught most conservation organizations' attention was aimed at slowing climate change by conserving wildlands. While Executive Order 14008′s stop on all new
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In Reversal, NASA Is Now Releasing RAW Images From Perseverance
Photo Finish Yesterday, Futurism reported that NASA had broken with tradition by not releasing the RAW images from its newly-landed Perseverance Mars rover — a retreat from transparency in the era of digital photography. A NASA spokesperson didn't reply to our request for comment, but it now appears that the space agency has reversed course. As of today, you can access dozens of RAW images from t
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Two fighter pilots passed out over Nevada last year. Software saved them both.
An F-16C aircraft takes off on May 21, 2020, from Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada. (Airman 1st Class Bryan Guthrie / US Air Force/) On January 23 of last year, a pilot flying a single-seat F-16 over Nevada lost consciousness. Around 6 months later, on July 16, another pilot operating the same type of fighter jet, also in Nevada, passed out as well. Both of them would have almost certainly been ki
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Tweaking corn kernels with CRISPR
Corn—or maize—has changed over thousands of years from weedy plants that make ears with less than a dozen kernels to the cobs packed with hundreds of juicy kernels that we see on farms today. Powerful DNA-editing techniques such as CRISPR can speed up that process. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Professor David Jackson and his postdoctoral fellow Lei Liu collaborated with University of Massa
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Tweaking corn kernels with CRISPR
Corn—or maize—has changed over thousands of years from weedy plants that make ears with less than a dozen kernels to the cobs packed with hundreds of juicy kernels that we see on farms today. Powerful DNA-editing techniques such as CRISPR can speed up that process. Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) Professor David Jackson and his postdoctoral fellow Lei Liu collaborated with University of Massa
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A new study reveals that quantum physics can cause mutations in our DNA
Quantum biology is an emerging field of science, established in the 1920s, which looks at whether the subatomic world of quantum mechanics plays a role in living cells. Quantum mechanics is an interdisciplinary field by nature, bringing together nuclear physicists, biochemists and molecular biologists.
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The Democrats' Last Chance to Save Democracy
S upporters of Donald Trump assaulted the Capitol on January 6, 2021, but American democracy has been under siege for far longer—from both former President Trump and the Republican Party. Trump's transgressions against democracy are well known: They include having attacked the press as the "enemy of the people," assailed sitting judges, politicized the Justice Department and the intelligence agen
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Bone Cancer Survivor Will Get Free Trip to Space This Year
Youngest in Space Bone cancer survivor and Haley Arceneaux will be experiencing the trip of a lifetime on board a SpaceX Crew Dragon capsule, the space company's first private flight to space later this year, the Associated Press reports . She won't be flying alone. The 29-year-old physician assistant will be joining billionaire entrepreneur Jared Isaacman and two other contest winners who have y
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Black Mold From Earth Could Survive on Mars, NASA Says
According to new research by scientists from NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR), some Earthling microbes — and even black mold — could survive the hostile conditions on the Martian surface. The research could enhance our understanding of how Earth-based life could survive on a different planet — and could have implications for future space missions as well. In an experiment, the researche
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Recent Eruptions on Mount Etna
Mount Etna has erupted four times in the past six days, sending lava down its slopes and showering nearby villages with ash. Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, is one of the most active volcanoes in the world. No significant damage or injuries have been reported during this recent outburst, and officials have said they do not think there is immediate danger of escalation, but the views have b
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Unfortunate timing and rate of change may be enough to tip a climate system
Imagine abrupt shifts of the tropical monsoons, reductions in Northern Hemisphere rainfall, and strengthening of North Atlantic storm tracks within decades. These are some of the impacts that climate scientists expect if the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which redistributes heat from equatorial regions to the Northern Hemisphere, suddenly tips into a dormant state as a result
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China Is the Myanmar Coup's 'Biggest Loser'
P rotesters in Yangon have in recent days gathered near the imposing red doors of the Chinese embassy in the city, denouncing China for what they say is its support of this month's military coup in Myanmar. Conspiracy theories have swirled about the arrival of Chinese technicians to help Myanmar's new junta build its own "firewall" to control the internet. Rumors abound about what is being transp
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Ultramassive black hole in NGC 1600 investigated in detail
Using NASA's Chandra X-ray observatory, astronomers from the University of Alabama in Huntsville have investigated the central region of the galaxy NGC 1600, focusing on its ultramassive black hole (UMBH). Results of the study, presented in a paper published February 11 on the arXiv pre-print server, shed more light on the properties of this UMBH.
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The Government Needs to Find Big Tech a New Business Model
Big Tech companies are facing an existential crisis, but they are doing everything they can to resist it and keep things just as they are. Facebook and Google, in particular, want to keep playing three roles: essential infrastructure, publisher, and targeted-ad mogul. They want to be perceived as neutral platforms, while also being perceived as civically responsible, while also maximizing surveil
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Lack of symmetry in qubits can't fix errors in quantum computing, might explain matter/antimatter
A team of quantum theorists seeking to cure a basic problem with quantum annealing computers—they have to run at a relatively slow pace to operate properly—found something intriguing instead. While probing how quantum annealers perform when operated faster than desired, the team unexpectedly discovered a new effect that may account for the imbalanced distribution of matter and antimatter in the un
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What's the Justice Department Actually For?
This time around, Judge Merrick Garland is getting his hearing. Not only is President Joe Biden's nominee for attorney general receiving a Senate audience, but his confirmation seems very likely, a second difference from his 2016 nomination to the Supreme Court, which was stymied by then–Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. But there's still an important question at stake in Garland's nomination, and
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Why COVID cases are falling around the world
The US Centers of Disease Control (CDC) says that the second dose of both the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines can be delivered up to six weeks after the first dose. (Pixabay /) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. This week, despite numerous setbacks across the US, COVID-19 case counts continue to retreat , both across the nation and around the world. It's a reprieve that may
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Bone cancer survivor to participate in first SpaceX private flight
Hayley Arceneaux, 29, will become youngest American in space when she joins Jared Isaacman and two contest winners on flight Hayley Arceneaux, a 29-year-old physician's assistant and former bone cancer patient, will become the youngest American in space later this year, when she participates in the first SpaceX private flight. St Jude Children's Research hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, where Arce
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The One Area Where the U.S. COVID-19 Strategy Seems to Be Working
T he American government's COVID-19 response has been a disaster, right? The United States strategy is a four-alarm dumpster fire, sent from hell to remind Americans to never again elect a president who describes the scientific method as "Now they have it, they have studied it, they know very much." When people needed coronavirus guidance, U.S. leaders had none. Government officials told people n
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Rapid evolution may help species adapt to climate change and competition
Loss of biodiversity in the face of climate change is a growing worldwide concern. Another major factor driving the loss of biodiversity is the establishment of invasive species, which often displace native species. A new study shows that species can adapt rapidly to an invader and that this evolutionary change can affect how they deal with a stressful climate.
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Rapid evolution may help species adapt to climate change and competition
Loss of biodiversity in the face of climate change is a growing worldwide concern. Another major factor driving the loss of biodiversity is the establishment of invasive species, which often displace native species. A new study shows that species can adapt rapidly to an invader and that this evolutionary change can affect how they deal with a stressful climate.
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Polymer film protects from electromagnetic radiation, signal interference
As electronic devices saturate all corners of public and personal life, engineers are scrambling to find lightweight, mechanically stable, flexible, and easily manufactured materials that can shield humans from excessive electromagnetic radiation as well as prevent electronic devices from interfering with each other.
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For Black Americans, Covid-19 is a reminder of the racism of US healthcare | Keon L Gilbert, Ruqaiijah Yearby, Amber Johnson and Kira Banks
A disproportionate number of the 500,000 Americans who have died of coronavirus are people of color For Black Americans, Covid-19 is another brutal reminder of the racist legacy of the American healthcare system. A disproportionate number of the 500,000 Americans who have died of coronavirus are Black. Yet African Americans and other people of color have struggled to access vaccines . Racism corr
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Record for oldest DNA ever sequenced broken by mammoth remains
Scientists extracting DNA from mammoth teeth have set a new record for the oldest DNA ever sequenced. The new record holder may also be a member of a new species of mammoth, but that remains to be proven. The findings suggest that DNA as old as 2.6 million years old could be decoded. Analysis of million-year-old mammoth remains has set a new record for the oldest DNA ever sequenced and revealed a
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Optical frequency combs with a new dimension
Periodic pulses of light forming a comb in the frequency domain are widely used for sensing and ranging. The key to the miniaturization of this technology toward chip-integrated solutions is the generation of dissipative solitons in ring-shaped microresonators. Dissipative solitons are stable pulses circulating around the circumference of a nonlinear resonator.
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Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
Some microbes on Earth could temporarily survive on the surface of Mars, finds a new study by NASA and German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers tested the endurance of microorganisms to Martian conditions by launching them into the Earth's stratosphere, as it closely represents key conditions on the Red Planet. Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, this work paves the way for understa
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A unique prototype of microbial life designed on actual Martian material
Experimental microbially assisted chemolithotrophy provides an opportunity to trace the putative bioalteration processes of the Martian crust. A study on the Noachian Martian breccia Northwest Africa (NWA) 7034, composed of ancient (ca. 4.5 Gyr old) crustal materials from Mars has delivered a unique prototype of microbial life experimentally designed on actual Martian material. As the researchers
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Border Disputes Threaten Climate Science in the Himalayas
The Hindu Kush Himalayan region is home to the world's highest peaks. The area is warming faster than the rest of the planet, and the loss of glaciers threatens billions of people who depend upon glacial rivers. Climate models might be able to help — if scientists can cooperate across disputed terrain.
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Why male mosquitoes leave humans alone
Male mosquitoes won't bite you. For one thing, they cannot—males are hopelessly bad at finding humans and lack a specialized stylet to pierce your skin. But even if they could bite you, they would not want to. They refuse blood meals served to them in the lab through netting, even as their female counterparts engorge on what must appear to be a free lunch.
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Bioengineered hybrid muscle fiber for regenerative medicine
Muscle constitutes the largest organ in humans, accounting for 40% of body mass, and it plays an essential role in maintaining life. Muscle tissue is notable for its unique ability for spontaneous regeneration. However, in serious injuries such as those sustained in car accidents or tumor resection which results in a volumetric muscle loss (VML), the muscle's ability to recover is greatly diminish
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Tech tips for working with people in different time zones
So, is it tomorrow already in Sydney? (Rodolfo Barreto/Unsplash/) In this day and age, offices seem to have no barriers, so you may have colleagues or clients living in different time zones. This is great (and almost magical—thank you, internet!), but it can also lead to headaches when it comes to staying in touch or when projects and deadlines are involved. You don't have to use your fingers to
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How outdoor pollution affects indoor air quality
Just when you thought you could head indoors to be safe from the air pollution that plagues the Salt Lake Valley, new research shows that elevated air pollution events, like horror movie villains, claw their way into indoor spaces. The research, conducted in conjunction with the Utah Division of Facilities Construction and Management, is published in Science of the Total Environment.
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Image: Hubble views a baby star's tantrums
Herbig-Haro objects are some of the rarer sights in the night sky, taking the form of thin spindly jets of matter floating among the surrounding gas and stars. The two Herbig-Haro objects cataloged as HH46 and HH47, seen in this image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, were spotted in the constellation of Vela (the Sails), at a distance of over 1,400 light-years from Earth. Prior to t
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NASA's Swift helps tie neutrino to star-shredding black hole
For only the second time, astronomers have linked an elusive particle called a high-energy neutrino to an object outside our galaxy. Using ground- and space-based facilities, including NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, they traced the neutrino to a black hole tearing apart a star, a rare cataclysmic occurrence called a tidal disruption event.
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The melting of large icebergs is a key stage in the evolution of ice ages
Antarctic iceberg melt could hold the key to the activation of a series of mechanisms that cause the Earth to suffer prolonged periods of global cooling, according to Francisco J. Jiménez-Espejo, a researcher at the Andalusian Earth Sciences Institute (CSIC-UGR), whose discoveries were recently published in Nature.
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Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers launched these small lifeforms into Earth's stratosphere, which replicates key characteristics of the Martian environment, and found that some microorganisms, in particular spores of black mold, survived the trip. This new way of testing endurance to space travel will be invaluable for understanding the threats and opportunities of microbes in fu
19h
They don't come as pills, but try these 6 underprescribed lifestyle medicines for a better, longer life
The majority of Americans are stressed , sleep-deprived and overweight and suffer from largely preventable lifestyle diseases such as heart disease, cancer, stroke and diabetes . Being overweight or obese contributes to the 50% of adults who suffer high blood pressure , 10% with diabetes and additional 35% with pre-diabetes . And the costs are unaffordable and growing. About 90% of the nearly $4
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Scientists image a bright meteoroid explosion in Jupiter's atmosphere
From aboard the Juno spacecraft, a Southwest Research Institute-led instrument observing auroras serendipitously spotted a bright flash above Jupiter's clouds last spring. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) team studied the data and determined that they had captured a bolide, an extremely bright meteoroid explosion in the gas giant's upper atmosphere.
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Best heated insoles: Keep Your Feet Warm in Any Shoe
You might as well stay extra toasty when you're outside in the cold (Emma Dau via Unsplash/) There's nothing worse than heading home early from what should be a great ski day because you can't feel your toes, or having a tough time focusing at work because all you can think about is the cold creeping into your boots. The best heated insoles can quickly and comfortably take out any unwelcome chill
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Big data to model the evolution of the cosmic web
The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has led an international team which has developed an algorithm called COSMIC BIRTH to analyze large scale cosmic structures. This new computation method will permit the analysis of the evolution of the structure of dark matter from the early universe until the formation of present day galaxies. This work was recently published in the journal Monthly N
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More on mRNA Vaccine Manufacturing
Here's a good article from the Washington Post that updates some details that I talked about in this post on the lipids used in the mRNA vaccines and in this one about their overall manufacturing process. It focuses on Acuitas, who make the two proprietary lipids that are used in the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. Actually, if you go back a step, you get to Avanti Polar Lipids down in Alabaster, AL (as
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Astronomers see star with dust disc that is being fed by surrounding material
An international team of astronomers including Leiden scientists publishes the image of a young star with a surrounding dust disk that is still being fed from its surroundings. The phenomenon around the star SU Aur may explain why so many exoplanets are not neatly aligned with their star. The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has declared the image "Photo of the Week." The accompanying research
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Study quantifying parachute science in coral reef research shows it's 'still widespread'
By analyzing 50 years' worth of coral reef biodiversity studies, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 22 have quantified the practice of "parachute science," which happens when international scientists, typically from higher-income countries, conduct field studies in another, typically lower-income country, without engaging with local researchers. They found that instit
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Study quantifying parachute science in coral reef research shows it's 'still widespread'
By analyzing 50 years' worth of coral reef biodiversity studies, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on February 22 have quantified the practice of "parachute science," which happens when international scientists, typically from higher-income countries, conduct field studies in another, typically lower-income country, without engaging with local researchers. They found that instit
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New storage medium uses physical properties of antiferromagnetic material
Using nanoscale quantum sensors, an international research team has succeeded in exploring certain previously uncharted physical properties of an antiferromagnetic material. Based on their results, the researchers developed a concept for a new storage medium published in the journal Nature Physics. The project was coordinated by researchers from the Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience
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Magnetic effect without a magnet
Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field—in conducting materials, this leads to the so-called Hall effect. This effect is often used to measure magnetic fields. A surprising discovery has now been made at TU Wien, in collaboration with scientists from the Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland), McMater University (Canada), and Rice University (U.S.): an exotic metal made of cerium, bismuth
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Drones used to locate dangerous, unplugged oil wells
There are millions of unplugged oil wells in the United States, which pose a serious threat to the environment. Using drones, researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new method to locate these hard-to-locate and dangerous wells.
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New study on the forecasting of extreme rainfall events in Mediterranean countries
A new study identifies nine specific large-scale weather patterns that influence extreme precipitation over the Mediterranean. Making use of this connection between localized extremes and large-scale weather variability can help to better predict heavy rainfall up to three weeks ahead. Researchers at the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF, UK) and TU Bergakademie Freiberg (G
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Future ocean warming boosts tropical rainfall extremes
The El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the most energetic naturally occurring year-to-year variation of ocean temperature and rainfall on the planet. The irregular swings between warm and wet El Niño conditions in the equatorial Pacific and the cold and dry La Niña event influence weather conditions worldwide, with impacts on ecosystems, agriculture and economies. Climate models predict that t
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Genomic insights into the origin of pre-historic populations in East Asia
East Asia today harbors more than a fifth of the world's population and some of the most deeply branching modern human lineages outside of Africa. The archaeological record attests that this region was also one of the earliest centers of animal and plant domestication. However, its genetic diversity and deep population history remain poorly understood relative to many other parts of the world. In
6h
Biological therapy has proved a suitable alternative to antibiotics
In the course of a new and groundbreaking study, led by Dr. Natalia Freund and the doctoral candidate Avia Watson at the Sackler Medical Faculty, the research group succeeded in isolating monoclonal antibodies, which hindered the growth of tuberculosis germs in laboratory mice. The antibodies were isolated from a patient who had succumbed to active tuberculosis disease but had since recovered. Thi
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Biological therapy has proved a suitable alternative to antibiotics
In the course of a new and groundbreaking study, led by Dr. Natalia Freund and the doctoral candidate Avia Watson at the Sackler Medical Faculty, the research group succeeded in isolating monoclonal antibodies, which hindered the growth of tuberculosis germs in laboratory mice. The antibodies were isolated from a patient who had succumbed to active tuberculosis disease but had since recovered. Thi
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Hedge plant effective at filtering automobile air pollutants
A combined team of researchers from the Royal Horticultural Society and the University of Reading has found that the Cotoneaster franchetii (also known as Franchet's cotoneaster) hedge plant is effective at filtering automobile air pollutants. In their paper published in the journal Environments, the group describes experiments that involved testing different types of plants to find out which were
10h
Altruism in bacteria—Gut microbes help family first
A recent discovery that, in real-world conditions bacteria, similar to animals, cooperate and selflessly act for the greater good of the group, could help scientists to predict how helpful and harmful strains behave. The study is the first to reveal that in the human gut, complex bacterial communities, made up of hundreds of species, contain 'helpers' whose behaviors benefit their closest relative
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Altruism in bacteria—Gut microbes help family first
A recent discovery that, in real-world conditions bacteria, similar to animals, cooperate and selflessly act for the greater good of the group, could help scientists to predict how helpful and harmful strains behave. The study is the first to reveal that in the human gut, complex bacterial communities, made up of hundreds of species, contain 'helpers' whose behaviors benefit their closest relative
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Footage of Perseverance rover landing on Mars released by Nasa – video
Nasa has released first-of-its-kind footage of the Perseverance rover landing on Mars. The video shows the final minutes of last week's descent, up to the point where the rover touches down on Mars' surface. The rover is covered with cameras, including seven dedicated to recording the rover's landing. More than 30GB of information has already been collected from the rover – along with 23,000 imag
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'Forward' jet-tracking components installed at RHIC's STAR detector
Just prior to the start of this year's run at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)—a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—a team of scientists, engineers, technicians, and students completed the installation of important new components of the collider's STAR detector. This house-sized particle tracker (
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Potentially harmful chemicals found in plastic toys
It has long been known that several chemicals used in plastic toys in different parts of the world can be harmful to human health. However, it is difficult for parents to figure out how to avoid plastic toys containing chemicals that may cause possible health risks to their children.
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Big ideas in small packages: The seeds and worms making their way to the ISS
On Feb. 20, 2021, Northrop Grumman will launch its Cygnus cargo spacecraft aboard an Antares rocket to deliver several tons of cargo and supplies to the International Space Station for its 15th resupply mission (CRS-15). Included in these bulky supplies will be a handful of items that weigh no more than a few grams—a sampling of seeds, some microscopic proteins, and a few small worms. Yet it is th
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Fantastic beasts, but where to find them? | Letters
Neanderthals | Royal family | Unicorn shortage | Grace Dent | Crosswords The fanciful painting used to illustrate the print version (19 February) of your article discussing possible reasons for the demise of the Neanderthals offers yet another explanation. There appears to be just one identifiable female individual shown, breastfeeding a baby. Though the painter has modestly covered all genital a
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Genomic insights into the origin of pre-historic populations in East Asia
East Asia today harbors more than a fifth of the world's population and some of the most deeply branching modern human lineages outside of Africa. The archaeological record attests that this region was also one of the earliest centers of animal and plant domestication. However, its genetic diversity and deep population history remain poorly understood relative to many other parts of the world. In
6h
Heat loss control method in fusion reactors
The core of a fusion reactor is incredibly hot. Hydrogen that inevitably escapes from it must be cooled on its way to the wall, as otherwise, the reactor wall would be damaged. Researchers from the Dutch institute DIFFER and EPFL's Swiss Plasma Center have developed a strict measurement and control method for the cooling of very hot particles escaping from fusion plasmas.
10h
NASA Releases Incredible Perseverance Rover Landing Video
NASA's Perseverance rover has been on the surface of Mars for several days , giving the team here on Earth time to run system checks and download preliminary data from the robot. The agency has now released the first large batch of media from the mission, including hundreds of still images and the first video and audio ever recorded on Mars. Some past Mars missions have sent back "videos," but th
3h
Dozens of new lichen species discovered in East African mountain forests
The species diversity and relationships of lichens in the genus Leptogium, which are often very difficult to identify to species, were assessed on the basis of DNA analyses using a large dataset collected during more than 10 years from East Africa. "The lengthy groundwork is finally complete," says Jouko Rikkinen, Professor of Botany at the University of Helsinki, Finland, giving a sigh of relief.
9h
Dozens of new lichen species discovered in East African mountain forests
The species diversity and relationships of lichens in the genus Leptogium, which are often very difficult to identify to species, were assessed on the basis of DNA analyses using a large dataset collected during more than 10 years from East Africa. "The lengthy groundwork is finally complete," says Jouko Rikkinen, Professor of Botany at the University of Helsinki, Finland, giving a sigh of relief.
9h
Scientists Communicated With People While They Were Lucid Dreaming
We've probed the depths of Earth's deepest trench, sent rovers to Mars , and observed other worlds billions of light years away. Yet we've never been able to decipher the mysterious, bizarre, and disjointed world of our own dreams. It seems impossible: after all, people who dream are fast asleep and oblivious to the outside world. Except now, we can. In a mind-bending paper published last week in
9h
Carpets of moss help stop erosion
Every year, billions of tons of valuable soil are lost worldwide through erosion, much of it deposited in bodies of water that fill with sand or silt as a result. Soil losses measured in Germany range from 1.4 to 3.2 tons per hectare per year; in extreme weather, the figure can be as high as fifty tons. Geoscientists at the University of Tübingen have now shown how biological soil crusts provide a
9h
China's temperate glaciers are melting at accelerating rate
Temperate glaciers are very sensitive to variations in temperature and precipitation, and thus represent a good indicator of climate change. China's temperate glaciers have a relatively warm and humid climate and hydrothermal conditions at low latitudes, which are more significantly affected by climate change.
10h
Research reveals stellar kinematics of the galactic disc
By using a sample of 118945 red giant branch (RGB) stars from the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) and Gaia, Dr. Wu Yaqian from the National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) investigated the stellar kinematics of the galactic disc in 7
10h
Investigating dense plasmas with positron waves
Astrophysical and lab-created plasmas under the influence of magnetic fields are the source of intense study. New research seeks to understand the dynamics of position waves traveling through these clouds of highly ionized gas.
10h
Scientists claim that all high-energy cosmic neutrinos are born by quasars
Scientists of the P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (LPI RAS), the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and the Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS (INR RAS) have studied the arrival directions of astrophysical neutrinos with energies more than a trillion electronvolts (TeV) and came to an unexpected conclusion: all of them are born near black holes
9h
The First Black Hole Ever Discovered Might Be Even Larger
The general idea of a stellar object with such intense gravity that even light cannot escape dates back to the late 18th century. However, it wasn't until Einstein's contributions in the early 20th century that we had the necessary theoretical underpinnings to go looking for such an object. Cygnus X-1 caught the attention of scientists because of its X-ray signature. Today, Cygnus X-1 is widely a
11h
Tandläkarskräck – ett folkhälsoproblem
Trots att tandvårdsrädslan minskat något i Sverige är en av fem vuxna så rädda för att gå till tandläkaren att de på sikt riskerar att få sämre hälsa. Brist på kontroll och rädsla för smärta är de vanligaste orsakerna. Faktorer som tandläkaren relativt enkelt kan förebygga och kontrollera. I avhandlingen från Göteborgs universitet ingår en nationell intervjustudie som inkluderade 3 500 slumpvist
14h
Electrophotocatalytic diamination of vicinal C–H bonds
In organic chemistry, the conversion of inactivated carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bonds to carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bonds is a highly valued transformation. Scientists can accomplish such reactions at only a single C-H site since the first derivatization can diminish the reactivity of the surrounding C-H bonds. In a new report now published in Science, Tao Shen and Tristan H. Lambert at the department of che
6h
Tax on sugary drinks unfairly targets Indigenous communities instead of improving health
"Sin taxes" are a tried, although not necessarily true, strategy for reducing harm connected to alcohol and tobacco. Calls for a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages are supported by a large body of evidence linking weight gain and Type 2 diabetes, to excess consumption of these drinks. This response is supported by the World Health Organization, among others, to offset negative health and economic ef
10h
Plant responses to climate are lagged
Two in five of the world's plant species are at risk of extinction. In the face of climate change, understanding why certain plant species are vulnerable to extinction while others prevail is more urgent than ever before. Previous studies linking climate and plant vital rates have found relatively modest effects, sometimes leading to the conclusion that other threats, such as land use change, may
9h
Plant responses to climate are lagged
Two in five of the world's plant species are at risk of extinction. In the face of climate change, understanding why certain plant species are vulnerable to extinction while others prevail is more urgent than ever before. Previous studies linking climate and plant vital rates have found relatively modest effects, sometimes leading to the conclusion that other threats, such as land use change, may
9h
Long-term exposure to low levels of air pollution increases risk of heart and lung disease
Analysis of records for more than 63 million Medicare enrollees from 2000 to 2016 finds long-term exposure to air pollution had a significant impact on the number of people hospitalized for cardiac and respiratory conditions. Researchers examined three components of air pollution: fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Even levels lower than national standards affected heart and resp
10h
Graphene oxide membranes could reduce paper industry energy costs
The U.S. pulp and paper industry uses large quantities of water to produce cellulose pulp from trees. The water leaving the pulping process contains a number of organic byproducts and inorganic chemicals. To reuse the water and the chemicals, paper mills rely on steam-fed evaporators that boil up the water and separate it from the chemicals.
2h
Potential regional declines in species richness of tomato pollinators under climate
About 70% of the world's main crops depend on insect pollination. Climate change is already affecting the abundance and distribution of insects, which could cause geographical mismatches between crops and their pollinators. Crops that rely primarily on wild pollinators (e.g., crops that cannot be effectively pollinated by commercial colonies of honey bees) could be particularly in jeopardy.
5h
Traditional hydrologic models may misidentify snow as rain, new citizen science data shows
Normally, we think of the freezing point of water as 32°F—but in the world of weather forecasting and hydrologic prediction, that isn't always the case. In the Lake Tahoe region of the Sierra Nevada, the shift from snow to rain during winter storms may actually occur at temperatures closer to 39.5°F, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), Lynker Technologies, and citiz
5h
Potential regional declines in species richness of tomato pollinators under climate
About 70% of the world's main crops depend on insect pollination. Climate change is already affecting the abundance and distribution of insects, which could cause geographical mismatches between crops and their pollinators. Crops that rely primarily on wild pollinators (e.g., crops that cannot be effectively pollinated by commercial colonies of honey bees) could be particularly in jeopardy.
5h
Researcher sheds new light on the psychology of radicalization
Learning more about what motivates people to join violent ideological groups and engage in acts of cruelty against others is of great social and societal importance. New research from Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYUAD Jocelyn Bélanger explores the idea of ideological obsession as a form of addictive behavior that is central to understanding why people ultimately engage in ideological viol
6h
Study could explain tuberculosis bacteria paradox
Tuberculosis bacteria have evolved to remember stressful encounters and react quickly to future stress, according to a study by computational bioengineers at Rice University and infectious disease experts at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School (NJMS).
6h
Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journ
6h
Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journ
6h
Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for
Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance emitted in the 21st Century. Consequently, strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A recent study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to desi
6h
Transcending Boundaries in Louisiana Watershed Management
Often local and regional regulations impact the natural environment beyond the jurisdiction for which they were developed. Scientists in LSU's College of the Coast & Environment are analyzing Louisiana's patchwork of regulations to get a big picture view of how they are influencing current conditions in the coastal watershed. This research is part of the Louisiana Watershed Initiative, or LWI, and
9h
Fine-tuning device performance with swarms of swimming cells
Scientists use acoustic microfluidic devices to separate and sort components in fluids, such as red and white blood cells, platelets and tumor cells in blood, to better understand diseases or to develop new treatments. However, technologies developed in research labs often lack the consistent performance needed for use in clinical and industrial settings.
10h
Neurologists identify consistent neuroinflammatory response in ICH patients
Understanding how the immune system responds to acute brain hemorrhage could open doors to identifying treatments for this devastating disease. However, up until now, there has been limited information on inflammation in the brain from human patients, especially during the first days after a hemorrhagic stroke. This led a team of researchers to partner with a large clinical trial of minimally-inva
47min
The perfect recipe for efficient perovskite solar cells
A long-cherished dream of materials researchers is a solar cell that converts sunlight into electrical energy as efficiently as silicon, but that can be easily and inexpensively fabricated from abundant materials. Scientists have now come a step closer to achieving this.
47min
Advanced imaging technology captures translation of the maternal genome
Researchers have captured ribosomes translating messenger RNA expressed from the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome. Utilizing the latest advances in cryo-electron microscopy, the group discovered a novel mechanism that mitochondrial ribosomes use for the synthesis and delivery of newly made proteins to prevent premature misfolding. Disruptions to protein folding can lead to devastating hum
1h
Plant responses to climate are lagged
Plant responses to climate drivers such as temperature and precipitation may become visible only years after the actual climate event. New results indicate that climate drivers may have different effects on the survivorship, growth and reproduction of plant species than suggested by earlier studies.
1h
Concept for a new storage medium
Physicists have proposed an innovative new data storage medium. The technique is based on specific properties of antiferromagnetic materials that had previously resisted experimental examination.
1h
What pregnant, breastfeeding, and prospective parents should know about the COVID-19 vaccines
Pregnant people who get COVID-19 face an increased risk of pregnancy-related issues compared to people who are pregnant who don't get the disease. (Pixabay/) Click here to see all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage. For people who are pregnant or who might become pregnant soon, one question is top of mind: Is it okay for me to get the COVID-19 vaccine? After all, pregnant people weren't included in th
1h
Binary stars are all around us, new map of solar neighborhood shows
A doctoral student has mined the most recent Gaia survey for all binary stars near Earth and created a 3D atlas of 1.3 million of them. The last local survey included about 200 binary pairs. With such census data, astronomers can conduct statistical analyses on binary populations. For pairs that contain white dwarfs, it's possible to determine the age of their main-sequence companion, and thus of
1h
Magnetic effect without a magnet
Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field — this leads to the so-called Hall effect. A surprising discovery has now been made: an exotic metal was examined and a giant Hall effect was found to be produced by the material, in the total absence of any magnetic field.
1h
Scientists image a bright meteoroid explosion in Jupiter's atmosphere
From aboard the Juno spacecraft, an instrument observing auroras serendipitously spotted a bright flash above Jupiter's clouds last spring. The Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVS) team studied the data and determined that they had captured a bolide, an extremely bright meteoroid explosion in the gas giant's upper atmosphere.
2h
Stem cells provide hope for dwindling wildlife populations
A paper recently published in the scientific journal Stem Cells and Development shares an important advancement in conservation—one that may make the difference between survival and extinction for wildlife species that have been reduced to very small population sizes. Using fibroblast cells that have been preserved in San Diego Zoo Global's Frozen Zoo, scientists have been able to generate induced
3h
Stem cells provide hope for dwindling wildlife populations
A paper recently published in the scientific journal Stem Cells and Development shares an important advancement in conservation—one that may make the difference between survival and extinction for wildlife species that have been reduced to very small population sizes. Using fibroblast cells that have been preserved in San Diego Zoo Global's Frozen Zoo, scientists have been able to generate induced
3h
Gray whales learn daring feeding strategy in Puget Sound: Digging for ghost shrimp at high tide
Every spring, a small group of about a dozen gray whales pauses along an epic migration from calving lagoons in Baja California to their feeding grounds in the Arctic. They travel more than 170 miles off their coastal migration route, to stop off in northern Puget Sound. There, they linger from about March through May.
3h
NASA's Swift helps tie neutrino to star-shredding black hole
For only the second time, astronomers have linked an elusive particle called a high-energy neutrino to an object outside our galaxy. Using ground- and space-based facilities, they traced the neutrino to a black hole tearing apart a star, a rare cataclysmic occurrence called a tidal disruption event.
3h
Graphene Oxide membranes could reduce paper industry energy costs
Paper industry wastewater recycling is among the most energy-intensive chemical processes in the world. Georgia Tech researchers have found a method to engineer membranes made from graphene oxide that allow water to get through it much faster than through conventional membranes and, in the process, can save the paper industry more than 30% in energy costs of water separation.
3h
Depressed and out of work? Therapy may help you find a job
If depression is making it more difficult for some unemployed people to land a job, one type of therapy may help, research suggests.In a new study, 41% of unemployed or underemployed people undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) found a new job or went from part- to full-time work by the end of the 16-week treatment for depression.
3h
Spotify has a major audio-quality upgrade coming later this year
Spotify will offer high-res audio versions of some songs for an extra fee later this year. (Stan Horaczek/) Mention Spotify around any hardcore audiophile and they'll likely set their $1,500 open-air headphones down on their bespoke mahogany headphone holder and scoff at the idea of listening to compressed music through a streaming service. During a recent press event, however, Spotify announced
3h
Did the solar system's planets form in 2 waves?
A new theory that may explain why the inner solar system is so different to the outer regions runs counter to the prevailing wisdom. Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars in the inner solar system are relatively small, dry planets, unlike Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune in the outer regions, planets that contain much greater quantities of volatile elements. "In the last few years, we've also disco
3h
Stroke of luck: Scientists discover target for stroke therapy in blood-brain barrier
The blood-brain barrier prevents immune cells from circulating freely in the brain, and the breakdown of its function is a major cause of post-stroke inflammation. Now, for the first time, researchers have identified how a toxic stroke byproduct, acrolein, could activate the barrier-degrading enzyme proheparanase (proHPSE). The research group has discovered that proHPSE degrades the glycocalyx wit
3h
CABBI researchers challenge the CRP status quo to mitigate fossil fuels
Amid population expansion and severe climate conditions threatening agricultural productivity, sustainable food production is a national priority. Simultaneously, advances in bioenergy agriculture are necessary to move our energy sector away from fossil fuels. A CABBI team led by Madhu Khanna and Ph.D. student Luoye Chen suggest allocating Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) land for energy biomass
3h
Stem cells provide hope for dwindling wildlife populations
A paper recently published in the scientific journal Stem Cells and Development shares an important advancement in conservation — one that may make the difference between survival and extinction for wildlife species that have been reduced to very small population sizes. Using fibroblast cells that have been preserved in San Diego Zoo Global's Frozen Zoo®, scientists have been able to generate ind
4h
Researchers grow artificial hairs with clever physics trick
Things just got hairy at Princeton.Researchers found they could coat a liquid elastic on the outside of a disc and spin it to form useful, complex patterns. When spun just right, tiny spindles rise from the material as it cures. The spindles grow as the disc accelerates, forming a soft solid that resembles hairs. Published in PNAS Feb. 22
4h
Experience Seven Minutes of Terror in New Perseverance Mars Rover Landing Video
Last week's pinpoint touchdown of NASA's Mars Perseverance rover in Jezero Crater was historic for many reasons, chief among them the epochal nature of the mission's task of seeking signs of ancient life—and caching relevant samples for eventual return to Earth. But even if the rover finds no evidence of Martian microbes during its operations, it will have still produced another spectacular "firs
5h
Traditional hydrologic models may misidentify snow as rain, new citizen science data shows
Normally, we think of the freezing point of water as 32°F – but in the world of weather forecasting and hydrologic prediction, that isn't always the case. In the Lake Tahoe region of the Sierra Nevada, the shift from snow to rain during winter storms may actually occur at temperatures closer to 39.5°F, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), Lynker Technologies, and cit
5h
Female heart disease patients with female physicians fare better
Female physicians have better patient outcomes compared with their male peers, while female patients are less likely to receive guideline-recommended care when treated by a male physician, according to a systematic review from the American College of Cardiology's Cardiovascular Disease in Women section published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
5h
The Climate Connections of a Record Fire Year in the U.S. West
The year 2020 will be remembered for many things, not the least of which were a series of devastating fires around the globe that bear the fingerprints of climate change . From Australia and South America's Amazon and Pantanal regions, to Siberia and the U.S. West, wildfires set new records and made news year-round. It was an especially bad year for wildfires on the U.S. West Coast. Five of Calif
5h
Watch: Jumping ants duel with antennae after the queen dies
Changes in behavior and gene expression show which worker will come out on top in the first days of a month-long battle between worker ants to establish new leadership after their queen dies, researchers report. "Despite prolonged social upheaval in ant colonies following the loss of the queen, the winners of these dueling tournaments are rapidly determined," says Claude Desplan, a professor of b
6h
Tigers may need a 'genetic rescue'
A "genetic rescue" may offer the best way to save tigers, researchers say. Tigers face uncertain futures primarily due to habitat fragmentation, human-wildlife conflict, and poaching. As global tiger populations decline, so does their genetic diversity. But until now it's been unclear how the animals' dwindling numbers are affecting them at the genetic level. To find out, researchers sequenced 65
6h
Medications for enlarged prostate linked to heart failure risk
Widely used medications for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) – also known as enlarged prostate – may be associated with a small, but significant increase in the probability of developing heart failure, suggests a study in The Journal of Urology ®, Official Journal of the American Urological Association (AUA). The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.
6h
Focus on the positive to improve classroom behavior
When teachers encounter disruptive or noncompliant students in the classroom, they typically respond by focusing on the negative behavior. However, new research from the University of Missouri found that offering students more positive encouragement not only reduces disruptive classroom behavior, but can improve students' academic and social outcomes.
6h
A novel gene discovery associated with a development disorder of pituitary origin
The pituitary gland is a pea-sized endocrine gland composed of two structurally and functionally separate parts known as anterior and posterior lobes. The pituitary gland's anterior lobe secretes six hormones essential to growth, reproduction, and other basic physiological functions. Abnormal development of the pituitary gland, or hypopituitarism, can cause mild or complete deficiency of one or mo
6h
Researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3-D tumor models
By engineering common filter papers, similar to coffee filters, a team of NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have created high throughput arrays of miniaturized 3-D tumor models to replicate key aspects of tumor physiology, which are absent in traditional drug testing platforms. With the new paper-based technology, the formed tumor models can be safely cryopreserved and stored for prolonged periods for on-
6h
A novel gene discovery associated with a development disorder of pituitary origin
The pituitary gland is a pea-sized endocrine gland composed of two structurally and functionally separate parts known as anterior and posterior lobes. The pituitary gland's anterior lobe secretes six hormones essential to growth, reproduction, and other basic physiological functions. Abnormal development of the pituitary gland, or hypopituitarism, can cause mild or complete deficiency of one or mo
6h
Toddler sleep patterns matter
Lauren Covington, an assistant professor in the University of Delaware School of Nursing, found that children with inconsistent sleep schedules have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. Her research also found that children from households with greater poverty had more overall inconsistent sleep onset times. But for families living in poverty, consistent bedtime scheduling may not be easily d
6h
NYU Abu Dhabi researcher sheds new light on the psychology of radicalization
Learning more about what motivates people to join violent ideological groups and engage in acts of cruelty against others is of great social and societal importance. New research from Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYUAD Jocelyn Bélanger explores the idea of ideological obsession as a form of addictive behavior that is central to understanding why people ultimately engage in ideological viol
6h
Politics and the brain: Attention perks up when politicians break with party lines
Building upon previous work studying the brain and politics, Ingrid Haas, associate professor of political science affiliated with Nebraska's Center for Brain, Biology and Behavior, examined the insula and anterior cingular cortex in 58 individuals using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging and learned that the human brain processes politically incongruent statements differently.
7h
NASA's Swift helps tie neutrino to star-shredding black hole
For only the second time, astronomers have linked an elusive particle called a high-energy neutrino to an object outside our galaxy. Using ground- and space-based facilities, including NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory, they traced the neutrino to a black hole tearing apart a star, a rare cataclysmic occurrence called a tidal disruption event.
7h
Yale neurologists identify consistent neuroinflammatory response in ICH patients
Understanding how the immune system responds to acute brain hemorrhage could open doors to identifying treatments for this devastating disease. However, up until now, there has been limited information on inflammation in the brain from human patients, especially during the first days after a hemorrhagic stroke.This led a team of researchers to partner with a large clinical trial of minimally-invas
7h
Beginner tennis rackets for training your swing
Serving up a great game of tennis. (Pexels/) Whether you're a regular on the court or you're just starting your journey towards becoming the next Serena Williams, a great tennis racket is the key to success. The best racket will suit your size, experience level, and your goals. If you're getting serious about the game, it's not a bad idea to have a couple! Occasionally, you'll want to practice wi
7h
College student depression doubled over pandemic
Of university students who participated in a new survey, 61% were at risk of clinical depression, researchers report. That's twice the rate prior to the pandemic. This rise in depression came alongside dramatic shifts in lifestyle habits, according to the research. The United States spends more than $200 billion every year to treat and manage mental health. The onset of the coronavirus pandemic n
7h
Tricking the novel coronavirus with a fake "handshake"
Fool the novel coronavirus once and it can't cause infection of cells, new research suggests. Scientists have developed protein fragments, called peptides, that bind to the virus's Spike protein, effectively tricking SARS-CoV-2 into "shaking hands" with a replica rather than with the receptor that lets the virus into a cell.
8h
Panini presses that splendidly squash sandwiches and more
Perfect paninis no longer need to be a luxury from restaurants—you can make them in your own home. (Unsplash/) Hot and evenly-toasted sandwiches don't have to be pricey indulgences you can only get from your local cafe. With a panini press, you can easily combine bread and fillings into delicious creations at home, without searing cheese and tomato juice into your beloved cast iron pan. While the
8h
NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models
By engineering common filter papers, similar to coffee filters, a team of NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have created high throughput arrays of miniaturized 3D tumor models to replicate key aspects of tumor physiology, which are absent in traditional drug testing platforms. With the new paper-based technology, the formed tumor models can be safely cryopreserved and stored for prolonged periods for on-d
8h
New therapeutic approach may help treat age-related macular degeneration effectively
Runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) has been linked to retinal neovascularization and the development of abnormal blood vessels, which result in vision loss in diabetic retinopathy. Now, scientists have found that RUNX1 inhibition presents a new therapeutic approach in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide.
8h
Genomic insights into the origin of pre-historic populations in East Asia
East Asia today harbours more than a fifth of the world's population and some of the most deeply branching modern human lineages outside of Africa. However, its genetic diversity and deep population history remain poorly understood relative to many other parts of the world. In a new study, a team of international researchers analyzes genome-wide data for 166 ancient individuals spanning 8,000 year
8h
New technique reveals switches in RNA
Scientists at the University of Groningen (The Netherlands), in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Torino (Italy), have developed a method to visualize and quantify alternative structures of RNA molecules. These alternative RNA 'shapes' can have important functional relevance in viruses and bacteria. The method was used to identify a conserved structural switch in the RNA of the
8h
Tweaking corn kernels with CRISPR
Corn has a highly complex genome, making it a challenge to apply genome-editing techniques to it. CSHL Professor David Jackson and postdoctoral fellow Lei Liu used CRISPR to tinker with the corn genome promoter regions and modify stem cell growth. They figured out which sections influence kernel yield, and they hope to make targeted genome-editing in corn more precise and efficient.
8h
Study quantifying parachute science in coral reef research shows it's 'still widespread'
Researchers reporting in Current Biology on February 22 have quantified the practice of 'parachute science,' when international scientists conduct research without engaging local researchers. They found that institutions from several lower-middle and upper-middle-income countries with abundant coral reefs produced less research than institutions based in high-income countries with fewer reefs. The
8h
Expert: You should wear two masks to avoid COVID-19
After the CDC recommended the use of two masks to protect from the coronavirus, Peter Gulick weighs in on the new strains of COVID-19 and the effectiveness of layering multiple masks. According to Gulick , professor of medicine at the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, using a well-fitting cloth mask over a surgical or disposable mask can decrease exposure to particulates
8h
You don't need aliens to make history interesting | Sarah Kurnick
Aliens have invaded ancient history: they've cropped up in humanity's past through popular television and movies, displacing facts with absurd yet commonplace beliefs like "aliens built the pyramids." Archaeologist Sarah Kurnick illustrates why these misconceptions perpetuate racist and xenophobic notions of history and culture — and demonstrates how you can help debunk these dangerous, outlandis
8h
New technique reveals switches in RNA
Scientists at the University of Groningen (The Netherlands), in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Torino (Italy), have developed a method to visualize and quantify alternative structures of RNA molecules. These alternative RNA 'shapes' can have important functional relevance in viruses and bacteria. The researchers used an algorithm to rapidly analyze large quantities of chemica
8h
New technique reveals switches in RNA
Scientists at the University of Groningen (The Netherlands), in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Torino (Italy), have developed a method to visualize and quantify alternative structures of RNA molecules. These alternative RNA 'shapes' can have important functional relevance in viruses and bacteria. The researchers used an algorithm to rapidly analyze large quantities of chemica
8h
Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer, according to the study published in the journ
8h
Potential regional declines in species richness of tomato pollinators under climate
About 70% of the world's main crops depend on insect pollination. Climate change is already affecting the abundance and distribution of insects, which could cause geographical mismatches between crops and their pollinators. Crops that rely primarily on wild pollinators (e.g., crops that cannot be effectively pollinated by commercial colonies of honey bees) could be particularly in jeopardy.
8h
Researchers discover potential new therapeutic targets on SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein
The COVID-19 pandemic has prompted considerable investigation into how the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein attaches to a human cell during the infection process, as this knowledge is useful in designing vaccines and therapeutics. Now, a team of scientists has discovered additional locations on the Spike protein that may not only help to explain how certain mutations make emerging variants more infectious
8h
Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for
Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to design new complexes with even stronger bonding. This
8h
The Atlantic Daily: Summer for Americans Could Feel 'Normal'
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . This summer may be one of hugs and hot dogs. We send you into the weekend with promising news (and a few suggestions for what to do). We're close—so close. My colleague James Hamblin cautiously f
8h
Discovery of a mechanism by which epithelial tumours cause developmental delays
– Conducted on the fly Drosophila, the study shows that tumours caused by chromosomal instability delay entry into the adult phase.- The tumours produce the Upd3 protein (equivalent to human Interleukin-6) to block the production of developmental steroid hormones.- The work of IRB Barcelona's Growth Control and Development laboratory has been published in the journal Current Biology.
9h
UConn researcher offers lessons learned from a pre-pandemic study of telemedicine use
With the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, telemedicine has become a new norm for many routine and non-emergency medical needs. But there are lessons to be learned from telemedicine's use – or lack thereof – prior to the pandemic, and a new study from a UConn School of Social Work researcher offers insight for policymakers, administrators, and public health officials when considering the implementat
9h
Cancer control: Non-DNA changes induce metabolism variations in hepatocellular carcinomas
Mechanisms underlying metabolic variations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a fast growing and invasive cancer, remain unclear. Now, researchers from Fudan University, China identified signatures of "m6A," the most abundant "post-transcriptional RNA modification," that segregate HCC into sub-types with distinct metabolic characteristics. They have also developed a novel m6A score that can quanti
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New catalyst could enable better lithium-sulfur batteries, power next-gen electronics
At the heart of most electronics today are rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). But their energy storage capacities are not enough for large-scale energy storage systems (ESSs). Lithium-sulfur batteries (LSBs) could be useful in such a scenario due to their higher theoretical energy storage capacity. They could even replace LIBs in other applications like drones, given their light weight and
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Immune-compromised people with HIV, APOE4 gene may have a compounded risk for Alzheimer's
People living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who have a history of severe immunosuppression and at least one copy of the Alzheimer's disease-related gene variant APOE4, might see a compounded adverse effect on the circuitry that impacts memory. This could eventually lead to an increased risk for dementia after age 65, according to Georgetown University Medical Center investigators and
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Elon Musk: "Good Chance" SpaceX Starship Will Fly This Week
Defrosted It's only February and it's already been a turbulent year for SpaceX's Starship project. The next prototype of the monstrous Mars-bound rocket will take to the skies in a matter of days, if all goes according to plan. The stainless steel tower, dubbed SN1o, has a "good chance of flying this week," according to a Sunday tweet by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk. Luckily, the weather is playing along
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Caffeine in pregnancy can have lasting effect on fetal brain
Caffeine consumed during pregnancy can change important brain pathways that could lead to behavioral problems later in life, according to new research. Researchers analyzed thousands of brain scans of nine and 10-year-olds, and revealed changes in the brain structure of children exposed to caffeine in utero. "I suppose the outcome of this study will be a recommendation that any caffeine during pr
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Statistical study: Geographical inequalities responsible for 16 causes of death in Spain
Miguel Ángel Martínez, professor at the Faculty of Mathematics of the University of Valencia (UV) is the coordinator of MEDEA3, a statistical study on the geographical distribution of mortality from 16 causes in 26 Spanish cities of 11 autonomous communities. The initiative, which has resulted in an interactive atlas of mortality and that 13 research groups from 36 institutions have taken part, co
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Absence of natural killer cell receptor associated with severe Covid-19
The course and severity of COVID-19 in individual patients is largely influenced by the interaction between the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus and the human immune system. The NKG2C receptor communicates with an infected cell via one of its specialised surface structures, HLA-E, which results in the destruction of virus-infected cells. However, due to a genetic variation, approximately 4% of the populatio
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Attachable skin monitors that wick the sweat away?
A new preparation technique fabricates thin, silicone-based patches that rapidly wick water away from the skin. The technique could reduce the redness and itching caused by wearable biosensors that trap sweat beneath them. The technique was developed by bioengineer and professor Young-Ho Cho and his colleagues at KAIST and reported in the journal Scientific Reports last month.
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Plant responses to climate are lagged
Plant responses to climate drivers such as temperature and precipitation may become visible only years after the actual climate event. This is a key result of new research led by the German Centre of Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) published in Global Change Biology. The results
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Terrestrial laser scanning for monitoring hydrological cycle of trees
Water is an essential element for all living things. Understanding the dynamics of water in trees is crucial for understanding the consequences of climate change and altered water availability for forest ecosystems. A joint research project with Samuli Junttila PhD, and Professor Masato Katoh of Shinshu University's Institute for Mountain Science and others demonstrates a new laser scanning based
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Scientists claim that all high-energy cosmic neutrinos are born by quasars
Scientists of the P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (LPI RAS), the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT) and the Institute for Nuclear Research of RAS (INR RAS) studied the arrival directions of astrophysical neutrinos with energies more than a trillion electronvolts (TeV) and came to an unexpected conclusion: all of them are born near black holes in t
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Big Data to model the evolution of the cosmic web
The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) has led an international team which has developed an algorithm called COSMIC BIRTH to analyse large scale cosmic structures. This new computation method will permit the analysis of the evolution of the structure of dark matter from the early universe until the formation of present day galaxies. This work was recently published in the journal Monthly N
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The quest for the magic angle
Stack two layers of graphene, twisted at slightly different angles to each other, and the material spontaneously becomes a superconductor. Science still can't explain how something so magical can happen, but physicists use special equipment to reveal what is taking place under the surface.
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Permanently storing digital archaeological datasets
It is the end of your archaeological research project, and you may be wondering where to deposit your data. After the excavation, all of the finds are drawn, scanned, digitized, and the database is completed. Perhaps you have also accumulated a lot of data through further scientific analysis of the archaeological remains. Some of the archaeological data will make it into the publication, but what
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Continuous cover forestry is financially profitable in spruce-dominated peatland forests
A recent study by the Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), the Russian Academy of Sciences and the University of Eastern Finland examined the profitability of continuous cover forestry (CCF) in peatland forests. In a mature spruce-dominated peatland forest, CCF may be a financially more profitable option than conventional rotation forestry (RF).
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Magnetic effect without a magnet
Electric current is deflected by a magnetic field – this leads to the so-called Hall effect. A surprising discovery has now been made at TU Wien: an exotic metal was examined and a giant Hall effect was found to be produced by the material, in the total absence of any magnetic field.
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Concept for a new storage medium
Physicists from Switzerland, Germany and Ukraine have proposed an innovative new data storage medium. The technique is based on specific properties of antiferromagnetic materials that had previously resisted experimental examination.
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A research team identifies a metabolic footprint associated with the perception of satiety
The study was carried out in 140 volunteers suffering from overweight and obesity, and has showed that higher concentrations of glycine and linoleic acid are associated with a greater sensation of satiety, while saccharose and some sphingomyelins are negatively associated (that is to say, with a lower perception of satiety). Although metabolomics has been widely used in nutritional research, this
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Tinnitus: A tingling mystery to be decrypted
According to a research conducted by JCDR, at least 9 out of 10 adults suffer from low health literacy in India. Health literacy is a vital aspect of any nation's growth – be it developed, underdeveloped or a developing nation. A team of researchers lead by Ruban Nersisson, at the School of Electrical Engineering,
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Advanced imaging technology captures translation of the maternal genome
An international collaboration among researchers from Finland, Sweden, UK and the USA has captured ribosomes translating messenger RNA expressed from the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome. Utilising the latest advances in cryo-electron microscopy, the group discovered a novel mechanism that mitochondrial ribosomes use for the synthesis and delivery of newly made proteins to prevent prematu
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Controlling deflection in construction beams
In civil engineering, flexural beams are used to control the effect of vibrations that can cause cracks to appear in surfaces (concrete slabs) and beams. This is particularly important in buildings that require high tensile strength and where the use of machinery can cause a lot of vibrations that can disturb structural integrity.
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New catalyst could enable better lithium-sulfur batteries, power next-gen electronics
Lithium-sulfur batteries, given their light weight and theoretical high capacities, are a promising alternative to conventional lithium-ion batteries for large-scale energy storage systems, drones, electric vehicles, etc. But at present, they suffer from poor battery life, limiting their applicability. Now, scientists from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Korea, have discovered a new c
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Biological therapy has proved a suitable alternative to antibiotics
Tel Aviv University researchers have developed a biological substitute for the treatment of tuberculosis, which in the future could serve as an alternative for the traditional "chemical" antibiotic therapy. Dr. Freund: "Advances in molecular medicine enable us to develop new tools to rout microbes, which can also solve the problem of drug-resistant germs". This groundbreaking study has been publis
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Low-loss single-mode hybrid-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fiber
Inhibited-coupling hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers (IC-HCPCF) are proving to be serious candidates for next-generation optical fiber. However, the difficulty in simultaneously attaining ultra-low loss, single-mode, polarization-maintaining hinders this prospect. In recent publication, Fetah Benabid and co-workers developed a novel IC-HCPCF. The fiber is based on hybrid Kagome-tubular cladding,
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Rapid evolution may help species adapt to climate change and competition
A study shows that a fruit fly species can adapt rapidly to an invader and this evolutionary change can affect how they deal with a stressful climate. Over a few months, the naturalized species adapted to the invasive species' presence. This affected how the flies adapted to cold weather. The flies exposed to invasive species evolved in the fall to be larger, lay fewer eggs and develop faster than
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Ten lessons from the virus crisis
A mixture of smaller countries led by New Zealand, Vietnam, Taiwan, Thailand, Cyprus, Rwanda and Iceland led the world 's Top 10 countries to manage their COVID-19 response well, according to a new study. In the study, published in The BMJ, lead researcher Flinders University's Professor Fran Baum joined experts from around the world to reflect upon the Global Health Security Index (October 2019)
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Improving immunotherapies for blood cancers: real-time exploration in the tumor
Monoclonal antibodies are part of the therapeutic arsenal for eliminating cancer cells. Some make use of the immune system to act and belong to a class of treatment called "immunotherapies." But how do these antibodies function within the tumor? And how can we hope to improve their efficacy? Using innovative in vivo imaging approaches, scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm visualized in
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CUHK physicists discover new route to active matter self-organisation
An international team led by Professor Yilin Wu, Associate Professor of the Department of Physics at The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) has made a novel conceptual advance in the field of active matter science. The team discovered a new route in which the self-organisation of active fluids in space and time can be controlled by a single material property called viscoelasticity.
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Computer model shows that preventing extortion is more efficient than fighting it
Francisco Grimaldo, professor at the Department of Computer Science at the University of Valencia (UV), together with Mexican researchers, has developed a computer model that allows simulating the effect of extortion on companies and analyzing aspects such as GDP, the unemployment rate or the inflation. Research shows that the negative effects of extortion are milder when the population does not c
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Future ocean warming boosts tropical rainfall extremes
Climate models predict that the difference between El Niño and La Niña related tropical rainfall will increase over the next 80 years, even though the temperature difference between El Niño and La Niña may change only very little in response to global warming. A new study uncovers the reasons for this surprising fact.
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Five ideas for teaching at a distance in a different way
The COVID-19 health crisis has made remote teaching a reality for all, but not without difficulty. At our University, our students have been learning remotely for almost a year and the successive lockdowns have taken their toll. At the start, we battled with technical difficulties, poor Internet connections and insufficient IT equipment while we struggled to isolate ourselves from others.
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Binary stars are all around us, new map of solar neighborhood shows
A UC Berkeley doctoral student has mined the most recent Gaia survey for all binary stars near Earth and created a 3D atlas of 1.3 million of them. The last local survey included about 200 binary pairs. With such census data, astronomers can conduct statistical analyses on binary populations. For pairs that contain white dwarfs, it's possible to determine the age of their main-sequence companion,
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Ris och ros till svenska som andraspråk
Elever som läser svenska som andraspråk är kluvna till ämnet. Å ena sidan upplever de att de får en stämpel som invandrare trots att de kan vara födda i Sverige och har svenska som vardagsspråk. Å andra sidan är de medvetna om att bättre kunskaper ger högre betyg vilket ökar deras chanserna till en bättre framtid. Frida Siekkinen har studerat hur elever på en högstadieskola upplever att särskilja
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Dust particles from Mars can make little sparks
Friction that results from dry Martian dust particles making contact with each other may produce electrical discharge at the surface and in the planet's atmosphere, say researchers. However, such sparks are likely to be small and pose little danger to future robotic or human missions to the red planet, they report in a paper in the journal Icarus . Viking landers in the 1970s and orbiters since t
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Genetic risk for IBD differs by ancestry
In African Americans, the genetic risk landscape for inflammatory bowel disease is very different from that of people with European ancestry, according to new findings. These results of the first whole-genome study of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in African Americans show that future clinical research on IBD needs to take ancestry into account, say the researchers. Findings of the multi-cente
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Humble pie: Soul food for the best leaders
When it comes to the best leaders, a slice of humble pie might be just what the CEO ordered, as research from the University of South Australia shows that humility is a critical leadership trait for cultivating cohesive, high performing teams.
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Colorful connection found in coral's ability to survive higher temperatures
Anyone who visits the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, Southeast Asia's coral triangle, or the reefs of Central America will surely speak of the stunning and vibrant environments. Indeed, coral reefs are believed to house more biodiversity than any other ecosystem on the planet, with the coral providing protection and shelter for hundreds of species of fish and crustaceans.
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Colorful connection found in coral's ability to survive higher temperatures
Anyone who visits the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, Southeast Asia's coral triangle, or the reefs of Central America will surely speak of the stunning and vibrant environments. Indeed, coral reefs are believed to house more biodiversity than any other ecosystem on the planet, with the coral providing protection and shelter for hundreds of species of fish and crustaceans.
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Closing in on a complete human genome
Nature, Published online: 22 February 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00462-9 Advances in sequencing technology mean that scientists are on the verge of finally finishing an end-to-end human genome map.
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Land, lava, and disaster create a social dilemma after the 2018 eruption of Kīlauea volcano
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21455-2 The unprecedented cost of the 2018 eruption in Hawai'i reflects an intersection of disparate physical and social phenomena: widely spaced, highly destructive eruptions, and atypically high population growth. These were linked and the former indirectly drove the latter with unavoidable consequences.
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Coupled nitrification and N2 gas production as a cryptic process in oxic riverbeds
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21400-3 The N cycle involves complex, microbially-mediated shuttling between ammonium, nitrite and nitrate, with climatically important greenhouse gas byproducts. Here the authors use isotope labeling experiments in river sediments and find a cryptic new step in the N cycle between nitrification and the removal of f
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Causal role for sleep-dependent reactivation of learning-activated sensory ensembles for fear memory consolidation
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21471-2 Learning-activated engram neurons play a critical role in memory recall but the role of these neurons in offline memory consolidation is unclear. The authors show that sleep-associated reactivation of learning-activated sensory neurons is necessary for memory consolidation.
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Checkpoint inhibition through small molecule-induced internalization of programmed death-ligand 1
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21410-1 Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) is involved in the inhibition of antigen specific T cells via ligation of programmed death 1 (PD-1). Here, the authors show checkpoint inhibition by use of small molecule inhibition of PD-L1 which in a humanised mouse model was shown to restore T cell responses and reduced t
13h
RING domains act as both substrate and enzyme in a catalytic arrangement to drive self-anchored ubiquitination
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21443-6 The mechanism by which RING E3-anchored ubiquitin chains are formed is not well understood. Here, the authors solve a crystal structure of the RING E3 enzyme TRIM21 trapped in the process of self-anchored chain elongation and provide biochemical and cellular insights into the mechanism of ubiquitin conjugati
13h
Future ocean warming boosts tropical rainfall extremes
Climate models predict that the difference between El Niño and La Niña related tropical rainfall will increase over the next 80 years, even though the temperature difference between El Niño and La Niña may change only very little in response to global warming. A new study uncovers the reasons for this surprising fact.
14h
Long-term exposure to low levels of air pollution increases risk of heart and lung disease
Analysis of records for more than 63 million Medicare enrollees from 2000 to 2016 finds long-term exposure to air pollution had a significant impact on the number of people hospitalized for cardiac and respiratory conditions.Researchers examined three components of air pollution: fine particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide and ozone. Even levels lower than national standards affected heart and respi
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Kärnkraft på nytt sätt med små reaktorer
Har kärnkraften en framtid i Sverige? Ja, det är många som tror det. Men då kan det handla om en ny typ av reaktorer. Istället för stora höghusliknande byggen längs kusterna kan vi få många små reaktorer – kylda av hett bly. Forskningen kring kärnkraft har gått på sparlåga de senaste decennierna, men nu startar ett projekt där målet är att bygga en liten reaktor av en modell som är ny för Sverige
14h
Bakterieproteiner bryter ner onkogenen MYC och motverkar cancer
En upptäckt gjord av forskare vid Lunds universitet visar att bakterier selektivt påverkar den välkända onkogenen MYC, som är involverad i många cancersjukdomar. "Vi såg att bakterierna selektivt bryter ned MYC i de mänskliga cellerna och detta är mycket intressant" säger Catharina Svanborg, professor vid Lunds universitet.
15h
Can mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines cause prion disease or Alzheimer's?
Antivax immunologist J. Bart Classen published a paper claiming that mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines can cause prion disease leading to neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's dementia. What are prions, and can these vaccines cause prion disease? (Spoiler alert: The answer to the second question is almost certainly no. It's speculation based on highly implausible biology.) The post first appear
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Tips från e-sportare avlastar Chalmerslärare
När covid-19 slog till fick lärarna på Chalmers tekniska högskola i Göteborg ställa om till distansundervisning med bara en veckas varsel. Många upplevde att arbetsbördan ökade, till exempel genom att behöva paketera hela föreläsningar i invecklade power point-presentationer. – Jag provade att sända en del föreläsningar live med video, men märkte att det var mycket svårare än jag trott, säger Phil
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