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Buckyballs on DNA for harvesting light
Organic molecules that capture photons and convert these into electricity have important applications for producing green energy. Light-harvesting complexes need two semiconductors, an electron donor and an acceptor. How well they work is measured by their quantum efficiency, the rate by which photons are converted into electron-hole pairs.
4h
Politiet udvider massiv overvågning af biler
Politiet mangedobler den automatiske overvågning af bilers færden i Danmark og udvider ANPG-nettet drastisk i hele landet. Desuden oplyser Rigspolitiet, at indsamlingen også bruges til 'tværgående undersøgelser'.
7h

LATEST

Researchers find a single-celled slime mold with no nervous system that remembers food locations
Having a memory of past events enables us to take smarter decisions about the future. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPIDS) and Technical University of Munich (TUM) identify the basis for forming memories in the slime mold Physarum polycephalum—despite its lack of a nervous system.
21h
'Dare mighty things': hidden message found on Nasa Mars rover parachute
Social media users say message is encoded in red-and-white pattern on parachute Internet sleuths claim to have decoded a hidden message displayed on the parachute that helped Nasa's Perseverance Rover land safely on Mars last week. They claim that the phrase "Dare mighty things" – used as a motto by Nasa's Jet Propulsion Laboratory – was encoded on the parachute using a pattern representing lette
22h
Prototype Covid test delivers results three times faster than lateral flow
Test developed in France is as accurate as PCR test and does not require lab processing Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage French researchers have developed a coronavirus test that they say delivers results three times faster than rapid lateral flow antigen tests with – according to initial trial data – almost the same accuracy as more reliable, but slower, PCR tests. T
19h
US Army Testing Machine Gun-Style Laser Weapon That Vaporizes Targets
Laser Cannon The United States Army is developing a powerful new laser weapon capable of rapidly firing metal-vaporizing pulses, much like a machine gun. The new weapon, called the Tactical Ultrashort Pulsed Laser for Army Platforms, is expected to be about a million times stronger than any other laser weapon out there, New Scientist reports . Based on the military's plans for the weapon, the las
15h
Climate crisis hitting 'worst case scenarios', warns Environment Agency
Sir James Bevan says extreme flooding in UK indicates urgent need for change if humanity is to survive The climate emergency is already hitting "worst case scenario" levels that if left unchecked will lead to the collapse of ecosystems, with dire consequences for humanity, according to the chief executive of the Environment Agency. Warning that this is not "science fiction", Sir James Bevan said
16h
Israeli checkpoint killing of Palestinian was an execution, report claims
London-based group says video evidence casts doubt on claims Ahmad Erekat was conducting an attack Israeli forces executed a 26-year-old Palestinian at a checkpoint in the occupied West Bank last year, a report has alleged, challenging Israeli police claims that the man was a "terrorist" conducting an attack. Forensic Architecture , a British research body based at Goldsmiths, University of Londo
20h
Physicist Trashes Simulation Theory, Says It's Basically a Religion
Simulation Smackdown Simulation theory, or the notion that our entire reality is fabricated as part of an experiment or even a video game built by a civilization far more advanced than our own, makes for a fun thought experiment. But it falls squarely within the realm of pseudoscience , says physicist Sabine Hossenfelder. Hossenfelder, an author and theoretical physicist at the Frankfurt Institut
17h
Fauci: The US Has Pretty Much Done Worse Than Any Other Country
On Monday, president Joe Biden led a candlelit moment of silence as the United States passed a grim milestone: 500,000 American deaths as a result of COVID-19, despite the country's immense wealth. To many, it's a wake up call — and a stark reminder that the death toll could have been much, much smaller. Top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci, for instance, put the United States' failure to
18h
'The clouds cleared': what terminal lucidity teaches us about life, death and dementia
Just before Alex Godfrey's grandmother died from dementia, she snapped back to lucidity and regaled him with stories of her youth. Could moments like this teach us more about the workings of the brain? It was the red jelly that did it. It was Christmas 1999 in Rapid City, South Dakota, and Ward Porterfield, 83, was in a nursing home. He had been diagnosed with dementia three years earlier; he was
21h
Vaccine scepticism is as old as vaccines themselves. Here's how to tackle it
Instead of making this a polarised debate, a joined-up approach is needed to make sure the public are given clear information Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage There has been an explosion of medical misinformation since the pandemic began. It perhaps shouldn't come as a surprise. As a health crisis of epic proportions plays out before us, people want fast access to the
22h
Do 'Tight' Cultures Fare Better In The Pandemic Than 'Loose' Cultures?
That's the question posted by a study in The Lancet Planetary Health. In case you're wondering, the United States is characterized as "loose." And Singapore is "tight." (Image credit: Luke Dray/Getty Images; Kenzo Tribouillard/AFP via Getty Images; Mohd Rasfan / AFP; Getty Images)
10h
A Simple Rule of Thumb for Knowing When the Pandemic Is Over
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . In the middle of January, the deadliest month of the pandemic, one day after inauguration, the Biden administration put out a comprehensive national strategy for " beating COVID-19 ." The 200-page document includes many useful goals, such as "Restore trust with the American
11h
Fighter Pilots Blacked Out From Gs, Got Saved by AI Co-Pilot
Passed Out On two separate occasions last year, Air Force F-16 fighter jet pilots flying over Nevada lost their consciousness. Both would have faced certain death if it wasn't for sophisticated software that took over control, Popular Science reports . The pilots lost their consciousness after experiencing high Gs, an occurrence otherwise known as G-LOC (G-force induced loss of consciousness), wh
14h
EU tells six countries to lift Covid border restrictions
Belgium, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Hungary and Sweden put on notice over curbs to free movement Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Brussels has put six EU member states on notice that their tight Covid border restrictions, including exit and entry bans, should be lifted over fears of a wider breakdown in the bloc's free movement of people and goods. Belgium, Denmark, F
17h
Bitcoin Falls 11 Percent After Saucy Elon Musk Tweet
The value of bitcoin fell to just over $52,000 on Monday from heights of $58,000 earlier in the week — a nosedive that could be in large part due to a tweet by Tesla CEO and cryptocurrency buff Elon Musk and a comment made by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen. It's a reminder that the cryptocurrency is still highly susceptible to drastic changes in valuation. All it takes to topple the house of car
17h
Hancock criticised for claim there was never a national PPE shortage
Doctors and MPs say health secretary's comment about supply to NHS staff on Covid frontline is 'deeply insulting' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Matt Hancock has been criticised for a "disgustingly disrespectful" claim that there was never a national shortage of personal protective equipment during the pandemic. Doctors and MPs condemned the UK health secretary as "
17h
Stängda skolor under pandemin kan påverka elevers framtida löner
Stängda skolor och distansundervisning gör att elever har svårare att ta till sig kunskap visar forskning. Det kan också minska elevers chanser att få högavlönade jobb i framtiden, enligt Världsbanken. – De kommer in på universitet på samma sätt som tidigare, men kommer att ha sämre förkunskap, säger skolforskaren Martin Karlberg i Vetenskapens värld.
17h
Hancock says 'it's on all of us' to help ease Covid lockdown in England
Health secretary looks to personal responsibility to replace social distancing laws to get life back to normal Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK health secretary, Matt Hancock, has said everyone needs to play their part in order to meet the targets set for easing lockdown in England, with the aim to move to "personal responsibility" rather than having social dis
1d
Alaska thunderstorms may triple with climate change
Warming temperatures will potentially alter the climate in Alaska so profoundly later this century that the number of thunderstorms will triple, increasing the risks of widespread flash flooding, landslides, and lightning-induced wildfires, new research finds.
16h
Fishing selects small, shy fish for survival
Fishing primarily removes larger and more active fish from populations. It thus acts as a selection factor that favors shy fish, as a recent study by the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) shows. The promotion of rather small, shy and overall harder to catch fish has consequences for the quality of the fishery and makes it difficult to accurately survey the developm
16h
Scientists Invent Artificial Muscle That Gets Stronger With Exercise
SwoleBot 9000 Scientists have developed a new gel that they say gets stronger as it "exercises," just like biological muscles. The new material could help lead to a new generation of soft robots that can actually build up or increase their own capabilities over time, New Scientist reports , depending on the specific tasks they're built for. Making machines that could adapt and grow like animals d
16h
Fishing selects small, shy fish for survival
Fishing primarily removes larger and more active fish from populations. It thus acts as a selection factor that favors shy fish, as a recent study by the Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) shows. The promotion of rather small, shy and overall harder to catch fish has consequences for the quality of the fishery and makes it difficult to accurately survey the developm
16h
'Missing ice problem' finally solved
During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers. Using innovative new calculations, a team of climate researchers led by the Alfred Wegener Institute has now managed to explain this discrepancy. The study, which
16h
NASA Hid a Clever Secret Message in Its Mars Rover's Parachute
Parachute Code The engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) managed to hide a clever message in the red and white colors of the Perseverance rover's parachute that it used to successfully land on Mars late last week. An incredible video uploaded by NASA showed Perseverance screaming through the thin Martian atmosphere below before opening its parachute and deploying its Skycrane to gen
16h
The Awful Intimacy of Allen v. Farrow
Watching Allen v. Farrow , HBO's new four-part miniseries about the 29-year-old allegations of child molestation against the director Woody Allen, I kept having a feeling that I couldn't entirely identify. Since revelations about Harvey Weinstein emerged in late 2017— broken, in part , by Allen's son, Ronan Farrow—harrowing stories about abusive men in the workplace have been reported one after a
18h
The magic angle of twisted graphene
Graphene, a two-dimensional material composed exclusively of carbon, has revealed extraordinary properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity, transparency, and flexibility. When combined, these properties become particularly interesting in the age of touch screens and flexible electronics. "Unlike 3-D materials, graphene has a height reduced to the ultimate dimension of the atom. It's
18h
Listen to the first sounds recorded from the surface of Mars
NASA has just released the first videos and images taken by the Perseverance rover as it landed—as well as the first sounds ever recorded from the surface of Mars. What happened: On February 18, NASA's Perseverance rover landed safely on Mars , the end of a journey that began last July. The spacecraft survived its " seven minutes of terror "—its entry through the Martian atmosphere and descent to
23h
To stop climate disaster, make ecocide an international crime. It's the only way | Jojo Mehta and Julia Jackson
Outlawing ecocide would hold governments and corporations accountable for environmental negligence. We can't wait The Paris agreement is failing. Yet there is new hope for preserving a livable planet: the growing global campaign to criminalize ecocide can address the root causes of the climate crisis and safeguard our planet – the common home of all humanity and, indeed, all life on Earth. Nearly
2h
Climate-friendly foam building insulation may do more harm than good
The use of the polymeric flame retardant PolyFR in "eco-friendly" foam plastic building insulation may be harmful to human health and the environment, according to a new commentary in Environmental Science & Technology. The authors' analysis identifies several points during the lifecycle of foam insulation that may expose workers, communities, and ecosystems to PolyFR and its potentially toxic bre
21h
ALS neuron damage reversed with new compound
Scientists have identified the first compound that eliminates the ongoing degeneration of upper motor neurons that become diseased and are a key contributor to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), a swift and fatal neurodegenerative disease that paralyzes its victims. In ALS, movement-initiating nerve cells in the brain and muscle-controlling nerve cells in the spinal cord die. After administering
21h
The Ultimate Symbol of America's Diminished Soft Power
A mong the visible remnants of Donald Trump's presidency is a blank patch of wall along a hallway a short distance from Capitol Hill. Just eight months ago, that wall in the headquarters of the United States Agency for Global Media, the independent body charged with overseeing the country's five federally funded international broadcasters, held a portrait of the agency's first CEO, John Lansing,
21h
For years, I've tried to work my way back into the middle class
Early this winter, I took a long walk in the Salt Lake City park in which I had been arrested for bathing in a river when I was homeless. About 30 minutes into that walk, I stood across from the park's granite meditation temple, thinking: Three and a half years ago, I slept under that building's awning. I can still feel how hard that temple's cold stone floor was; I remember how people strolled b
21h
The forecasts that spooked Boris Johnson into slowing exit from lockdown
PM's hands tied by gloomy prediction that rapid easing would lead to even fuller hospitals than in January Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On Monday, Boris Johnson announced his roadmap for lifting all Covid restrictions by 21 June but faced criticism from some Conservative MPs for not providing for a speedier return to normal life. Here is some of the evidence the g
3h
'Cockeyed' map shows both glamour and margins of 1930s Hollywood
Maps are the safest way to travel during the pandemic – old maps even allow for time travel. This 1930s view of Hollywood captures the film factories of Los Angeles in their Golden Age. But it's not all glitz and glamour: look to the margins for the hard work done by immigrants. Maps as time machines If maps allow our imagination to travel without care or trouble, then maps of the past do one bet
11h
The United Airlines Flight 328 engine failure, explained
The aircraft, seen here with the engine damage visible on February 22, is a Boeing 777-200. (NTSB/) On Saturday, February 20, a United Airlines flight lifted off from Denver International Airport, bound for Hawaii. Just minutes after departure, its number-two engine—the one on the right side—suffered a major failure. Dramatic footage of the heavily damaged and flaming engine circulated on Twitter
13h
See Mars through Perseverance's eyes
The first high-resolution color image to be sent back by the Hazard Cameras (Hazcams) on the underside of NASA's Perseverance Mars rover. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/) After a journey lasting seven months, the Perseverance rover touched down on the surface of Mars last week. And in its first few days, it's already sent us Earthlings some detailed images of the red world. On Monday, NASA released a video sh
16h
The surprising ways your immune system adapts to the flu virus you got as a kid
The viruses you get as a kid influence your susceptibility later in life. (Pixabay/) The swine flu of 2009 is often remembered as the pandemic that cried wolf. After dire warnings about the virus, closely related to the 1918 pandemic strain, the year's flu season ended up being about as deadly as a typical year. But the toll hit young people especially hard: more than half of cases were among peo
19h
Learning From the New Deal—For the Next Recovery
A few days ago, I was talking with the mayor of a medium-sized "red state" city about how his town was weathering today's public-health and financial crises. I told him I was mainly curious about his observations, rather than looking for on-the-record quotes. We talked over some details about his town, and then I asked him about prospects for post recovery, in the broadest sense: restoring lost j
1d
Were rocks on the menu for these ancient birds?
Bohaiornis guoi An X-ray of the crystals preserved in the Bohaiornis guoi 's stomach helps build a rough timeline of how the quartz was fossilized. (Liu et al, IVPP/) If you went back in time 120 million years, the majority of the birds flying overhead would be part of the now-extinct group known as Enantiornithes. These creatures looked a lot like the visitors at our feeders today, but with toot
11h
This Wearable Uses Your Body Heat as an Energy Source
A team of researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder have developed a wearable that can tap into its wearer's natural body heat to virtually turn the human body into a battery, no lithium-ion battery required. The bendy device can shape itself to be in contact with the contours of the skin and can be worn like a ring or bracelet. "In the future, we want to be able to power your wearable
13h
Whistleblowers: Flawed Software Held Hundreds of Prisoners Past Release Dates
Delayed Release Whistleblowers at the Arizona Department of Corrections (ADC) say that hundreds of incarcerated people are being held past their release dates because the prison management software simply doesn't work right. The ADC spent over $24 million on software called the Arizona Correctional Information System (ACIS), which it deployed in November 2019 despite multiple known bugs and probl
14h
Cre-Controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. T
16h
Cre-Controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. T
16h
Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient com
16h
NHS app could show Covid vaccine status or latest test result
Government mulls ban on businesses making access to services conditional on vaccinations Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People could have their vaccine status or their latest Covid test result put on their NHS app – though the government is considering whether to ban businesses from making access to services conditional on vaccinations. Boris Johnson said he underst
18h
Whale Sharks show remarkable capacity to recover from injuries
A new study has for the first time explored the extraordinary rate at which the world's largest fish, the endangered whale shark, can recover from its injuries. The findings reveal that lacerations and abrasions, increasingly caused through collisions with boats, can heal in a matter of weeks and researchers found evidence of partially removed dorsal fins re-growing.
19h
Black-footed ferret cloned to help preserve endangered species
A team of researchers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, ViaGen, Revive & Restore, Pets & Equine, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and San Diego Zoo Global has worked together to clone a black-footed ferret as part of an effort to preserve the endangered species. The work by the team has been chronicled on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.
19h
Black-footed ferret cloned to help preserve endangered species
A team of researchers from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, ViaGen, Revive & Restore, Pets & Equine, the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and San Diego Zoo Global has worked together to clone a black-footed ferret as part of an effort to preserve the endangered species. The work by the team has been chronicled on the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service website.
19h
Homeroom: How to Teach Your Kid to Love Reading
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, We have two daughters, one in fourth grade, the other in second. Our fourth grader, whom I'll refer to as "Em," loves reading. She stays up late to finish a chapter of whatever series she's enjoying at the mo
22h
A new global ice sheet reconstruction for the past 80 000 years
Nature Communications, Published online: 23 February 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-21469-w The configuration of past ice sheets, and therefore sea level, is highly uncertain. Here, the authors provide a global reconstruction of ice sheets for the past 80,000 years that allows to test proxy based sea level reconstructions and helps to reconcile disagreements with sea level changes inferred from mod
23h
Game theory may be useful in explaining and combating viruses
A team of researchers concludes that a game-theory approach may offer new insights into both the spread and disruption of viruses, such as SARS-CoV-2. Its work, described in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, applies a "signaling game" to an analysis of cellular processes in illuminating molecular behavior.
10h
Black Holes May Devour Stars From the Inside, Like Cancer
Space Parasites A team of scientists has a new hunch on where to look to finally find dark matter, the mysterious invisible stuff that appears to make up most of the matter in the universe. They suspect that it could be taking the form of endoparasitic black holes, according to research shared in the preprint server ArXiv last week, that formed inside of neutron stars and are feasting on them fro
13h
Transforming urban systems: Toward sustainability
Urban areas are on the rise and changing rapidly in form and function, with spillover effects on virtually all areas of the Earth. The UN estimates that by 2050, 68% of the world's population will reside in urban areas. In the inaugural issue of npj Urban Sustainability, a new Nature Partner Journal out today, a team of leading urban ecologists outlines a practical checklist to guide interventions
13h
Announcing the MIT Technology Review Covid Inequality Fellowships
Early in the pandemic, some headlines argued that covid-19 was the great equalizer—because anyone, no matter their circumstance, could catch it. In reality, it was clear that the virus was affecting some groups of Americans in disproportionate, devastating ways. Black Americans, Hispanic Americans, Indigenous communities, and other people of color have been affected the most, and are dying at muc
13h
We have a new word for that feeling when travel makes everything new
On a double-decker bus from Dublin airport to Drumcondra early one June morning, a young lad stretched out on the back seat and started to rap. What he lacked in talent he made up for in gusto. I was with a dozen of my students who were travelling from DePaul University in Chicago on a study abroad trip and this was their very first impression of Ireland. I cringed and tried to ignore the atonal
14h
A trip down the Ohio River reveals the oil and gas industry's next big move
Melissa Mason, a volunteer in a clean-up crew, picks up a piece of discarded plastic in Millvale, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. (Teake Zuidema/Nexus Media News/) Teake Zuidema is a writer and photographer based in Savannah, Georgia. This story originally featured on Nexus Media , a nonprofit climate change news service. Hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic, Royal Dutch Shell saw its profits drop
14h
Getz glaciers on the run
Using a 25-year record of satellite observations over the Getz region in West Antarctica, scientists have discovered that the pace at which glaciers flow towards the ocean is accelerating. This new research, which includes data from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission and ESA's CryoSat mission, will help determine if these glaciers could collapse in the next few decades and how this would affect fut
15h
Risk of tipping the overturning circulation due to increasing rates of ice melt [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Central elements of the climate system are at risk for crossing critical thresholds (so-called tipping points) due to future greenhouse gas emissions, leading to an abrupt transition to a qualitatively different climate with potentially catastrophic consequences. Tipping points are often associated with bifurcations, where a previously stable system state loses…
16h
No One Has Seen a Mars Landing Quite Like This
The descent of a little rover from the top of the Martian atmosphere to the surface is one of the most notoriously stressful occasions in space exploration. When NASA's newest rover, Perseverance, took the plunge last week, the engineers at mission control braced themselves. They knew just how much had to go right—and how much could go terribly wrong—in the next seven minutes. The spacecraft came
17h
Measuring hemoglobin levels with AI microscope, microfluidic chips
One of the most performed medical diagnostic tests to ascertain the health of patients is a complete blood count, which typically includes an estimate of the hemoglobin concentration. The hemoglobin level in the blood is an important biochemical parameter that can indicate a host of medical conditions including anemia, polycythemia, and pulmonary fibrosis.
18h
Mount Etna: footage captures volcano erupting at night, illuminating sky – video
Spectacular eruptions of red lava from Mount Etna, on the Italian island of Sicily, continued overnight from Monday into Tuesday, illuminating the night sky. The volcano's lava fountains soared to 1,500 metres, according to the Etna Observatory at Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology Mount Etna illuminates night sky with 1,500-metre lava fountain Continue reading…
18h
Cloud-Making Aerosol Could Devastate Polar Sea Ice
To climate scientists, clouds are powerful, pillowy paradoxes: They can simultaneously reflect away the sun's heat but also trap it in the atmosphere; they can be products of warming temperatures but can also amplify their effects. Now, while studying the atmospheric chemistry that produces clouds, researchers have uncovered an unexpectedly potent natural process that seeds their growth. They fur
18h
Facial Recognition Drones Will Use AI to Take the Perfect Picture of You
Facial recognition technology has been banned by multiple US cities, including Portland , Boston, and San Francisco. Besides the very real risk of the tech being biased against minorities, the technology also carries with it an uneasy sense that we're creeping towards a surveillance state. Despite these concerns, though, work to improve facial recognition tech is still forging ahead, with both pr
19h
Ion-optics-based quantum microscope can image individual atoms
A team of researchers at Universität Stuttgart has developed an ion-optics-based quantum microscope that is capable of creating images of individual atoms. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group explains how they built their microscope and how well it worked when tested.
20h
High-resolution, terahertz-driven atom probe tomography
Materials scientists must be able to exert ultrafast control of matter using a strong electromagnetic field on the atomic scale to understand the ionization dynamics and excitations in solids. Researchers can couple picosecond duration terahertz pulses to metallic nanostructures to generate extremely localized and intense electric fields. In a new report now on Science Advances, Angela Vella and a
20h
Ultraluminous X-ray pulsar M51 ULX-7 inspected by researchers
Using NASA's Swift and Chandra space observatories, astronomers have investigated an ultraluminous X-ray pulsar known as M51 ULX-7. The study, detailed in a paper published February 16 on the arXiv pre-print server, sheds more light on the X-ray variability of this source.
20h
Filter paper can reveal species under the sea
A new study from Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, in waters off the Western Australian coast has showed floating a special kind of filter paper in seawater can reveal which species are present in an area.
20h
New sensor paves way to low-cost sensitive methane measurements
Researchers have developed a new sensor that could allow practical and low-cost detection of low concentrations of methane gas. Measuring methane emissions and leaks is important to a variety of industries because the gas contributes to global warming and air pollution.
20h
The Atlantic Daily: Texas Failed in 3 Big Ways
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . As if a deadly pandemic, one that's claimed more than half a million lives in the U.S. as of today , wasn't enough, Texans continue to face dangerous conditions brought on by a mix of snow and po
20h
Martian moons have a common ancestor
Mars's two moons, Phobos and Deimos, have puzzled researchers since their discovery in 1877. They are very small: Phobos's diameter of 22 kilometers is 160 times smaller than that of our moon, and Deimos is even smaller, with a diameter of only 12 kilometers. "Our moon is essentially spherical, while the moons of Mars are very irregularly shaped—like potatoes," says Amirhossein Bagheri, a doctoral
21h
Communicating While Dreaming
We remember our dreams to varying degrees, but we all dream. Even people who never remember dreaming, dream . Dreaming is detected clinically by what is called REM sleep, for rapid-eye movements. When we dream a part of our brain stem (the locus ceruleus) reduces our response to external stimuli and also is involved in inhibiting our voluntary movements below the brainstem so that we don't act ou
21h
Post-pandemic seafood could be more sustainable. Here's how tech is driving the change.
A fisherman drops anchor at the first stop in a long night. (Tom Fowlks/) Workdays can begin hours before dawn in Guaymas, Mexico, where a small cohort of locals launch modest fiberglass-and-wood boats from the rocky shore into waters that will gleam azure at sunrise. From their pangas, crafts about 20 feet long with little more than three bench seats and an outboard motor, the 38 members of the
23h
Whale sharks show remarkable capacity to recover from injuries
A new study has for the first time explored the extraordinary rate at which the world's largest fish, the endangered whale shark, can recover from its injuries. The findings reveal that lacerations and abrasions, increasingly caused through collisions with boats, can heal in a matter of weeks and researchers found evidence of partially removed dorsal fins re-growing.
21h
Whale sharks show remarkable capacity to recover from injuries
A new study has for the first time explored the extraordinary rate at which the world's largest fish, the endangered whale shark, can recover from its injuries. The findings reveal that lacerations and abrasions, increasingly caused through collisions with boats, can heal in a matter of weeks and researchers found evidence of partially removed dorsal fins re-growing.
21h
Did an ancient magnetic pole flip change life on Earth? – podcast
What would it be like if the Earth's magnetic pole switched? Migrating animals and hikers would certainly need to reset their compasses, but could it play real havoc with life on Earth? Analysing the rings of an ancient tree pulled from a bog in New Zealand, researchers have been investigating what happened the last time north and south flipped – 42,000 years ago. Nicola Davis speaks to Prof Chri
23h
The Weekly Planet: The Great Climate Bill of 2021 Is Being Shaped Now
Every Tuesday, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . President Joe Biden's legislative climate agenda has kind of fallen out of the news. Lawmakers are focused on what the Biden administration calls the
11h
A third of claims since universal credit began made during pandemic
Charities say new figures show £20-a-week Covid benefit top-up should be extended beyond March Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The scale of the hardship caused by Covid-19 has been laid bare with new figures showing that more than a third of claims since universal credit was introduced have been made during the pandemic. The number of people claiming the payment has
15h
Sony's compact FX3 cinema camera has a built-in cooling system
The full-frame sensor sets it apart from Blackmagic's cinema cameras. (Sony /) Just about every mirrorless camera on the market at the moment—except for oddballs like the weirdly wonderful Fujifilm X-Pro3—works as both a still and video camera. But, heavy-duty video shooting typically requires cinema-specific features like more robust accessory mounts and built-in cooling systems outside the scop
16h
Gatorbulin-1, a distinct cyclodepsipeptide chemotype, targets a seventh tubulin pharmacological site [Pharmacology]
Tubulin-targeted chemotherapy has proven to be a successful and wide spectrum strategy against solid and liquid malignancies. Therefore, new ways to modulate this essential protein could lead to new antitumoral pharmacological approaches. Currently known tubulin agents bind to six distinct sites at α/β-tubulin either promoting microtubule stabilization or depolymerization. We…
16h
Australia urged to manufacture mRNA Covid vaccines onshore to guard against supply disruption
Without the technology to produce mRNA vaccines such as the Pfizer jab, Australia and region remain 'vulnerable to supply shocks', scientists warn Leading Australian scientists have called on the federal government to urgently develop additional onshore Covid vaccine manufacturing capability to protect against supply disruption as the country completes its second day of vaccinations. In a pre-bud
1d
Red light put moths in the mood
Do you dim the lighting and turn on the red light for a romantic night in with your partner? It turns out moths aren't so different in that regard. A new study published in Frontiers in Genetics shows that dim red light boosts sexual activity in a model species, the yellow peach moth Conogethes punctiferalis (family Crambidae), by selectively activating a genetic pathway related to olfaction in th
4h
Red light put moths in the mood
Do you dim the lighting and turn on the red light for a romantic night in with your partner? It turns out moths aren't so different in that regard. A new study published in Frontiers in Genetics shows that dim red light boosts sexual activity in a model species, the yellow peach moth Conogethes punctiferalis (family Crambidae), by selectively activating a genetic pathway related to olfaction in th
4h
Terahertz imaging of graphene paves the way to industrialisation
X-ray scans revolutionized medical treatments by allowing us to see inside humans without surgery. Similarly, terahertz spectroscopy penetrates graphene films allowing scientists to make detailed maps of their electrical quality, without damaging or contaminating the material. The Graphene Flagship brought together researchers from academia and industry to develop and mature this analytical techni
16h
Could playing video games be linked to lower depression rates in kids?
A new study published by a UCL researcher has demonstrated how different types of screen time can positively (or negatively) influence young people's mental health. Young boys who played video games daily had lower depression scores at age 14 compared to those who played less than once per month or never. The study also noted that more frequent video game use was consistently associated with fewe
10h
Five ways parents can help kids avoid gender stereotypes
In the last century, significant progress has been made in advancing gender equity in the United States. Women gained the right to vote, fathers have become more involved parents and more people and institutions recognize gender identities beyond the binary categories of male and female.
15h
Chemical evidence for the persistence of wine production and trade in Early Medieval Islamic Sicily [Chemistry]
Although wine was unquestionably one of the most important commodities traded in the Mediterranean during the Roman Empire, less is known about wine commerce after its fall and whether the trade continued in regions under Islamic control. To investigate, here we undertook systematic analysis of grapevine products in archaeological ceramics,…
16h
For selenium in rivers, timing matters
Selenium contamination of freshwater ecosystems is an ongoing environmental health problem around the world. A naturally occurring trace element, selenium levels are high in some geologic formations like sedimentary shales that form much of the bedrock in the Western United States. Soils derived from this bedrock, and weathering of shale outcrops, can contribute high levels of selenium to surround
15h
First DNA extracted from modern, ancient and fossil tropical shells
In Wonderland, Alice drank a potion to shrink herself. In nature, some animal species shrink to escape the attention of human hunters, a process that takes from decades to millennia. To begin to understand the genetics of shrinking, scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama successfully extracted DNA from marine shells. Their new technique will not only she
18h
First DNA extracted from modern, ancient and fossil tropical shells
In Wonderland, Alice drank a potion to shrink herself. In nature, some animal species shrink to escape the attention of human hunters, a process that takes from decades to millennia. To begin to understand the genetics of shrinking, scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) in Panama successfully extracted DNA from marine shells. Their new technique will not only she
18h
Drinking coffee while pregnant alters the fetal brain
Neuroregulating caffeine easily crosses the placental barrier. A study finds that the brains of children born to mothers who consumed coffee during pregnancy are different. The observed differences may be associated with behavioral issues. As one human body gives birth to another, so many things have to, and usually do, go right. It's known that substances a mother ingests can influence the succe
16h
Recent Australian emissions cuts likely to be reversed in recovery from Covid and drought
Scott Morrison says Coalition is 'getting on with' reductions, but analysis finds end of lockdowns and drought will reverse trend Most of the reduction in Australia's greenhouse gas emissions last year is likely to be wiped out as transport rebounds after Covid-19 lockdowns and farming recovers from the long-term-drought, according to an audit of national climate data. Scott Morrison told the Nat
1d
Taking the pandemic's temperature
Last March, as covid-19 ripped through communities across the country, Inder Singh, MBA '06, SM '07, realized he had information that could help officials respond. For years Singh's company, Kinsa Health, had tracked fevers using data from its network of thousands of smartphone-­connected thermometers. As the potential scope of the covid-19 outbreak became clear, Singh subtracted the typical cold
6h
Delayed radio flares from a tidal disruption event
A team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HUJI) led by Dr. Assaf Horesh have discovered the first evidence of radio flares emitted only long after a star is destroyed by a black hole. Published in the periodical Nature Astronomy, the discovery relied upon ultra-powerful radio telescopes to study these catastrophic cosmic events in distant galaxies called Tidal Disruption Event
16h
Best WiFi booster: Always have internet no matter where you are
Make sure you have connection everywhere in your home. (Bram Naus via Unsplash /) The coronavirus has forced us to reevaluate how we use our personal space and cyberspace. Wireless routers that used to be enough for surfing the web and streaming Netflix are reaching their limits as we repurpose every nook and cranny into a home office, a school workstation, a yoga studio, a movie theater, or all
13h
Regulation of neonatal IgA production by the maternal microbiota [Immunology and Inflammation]
Infants are prone to enteric infections due to an underdeveloped immune system. The maternal microbiota, through shaping the neonatal microbiota, helps establish a strong immune system in infants. We and others have observed the phenomenon of enhanced early neonatal immunoglobulin A (IgA) production in preweaning immunocompetent mice nursed by immunodeficient…
16h
Researchers are turning kitchen waste into biofuels
When we eat, our bodies convert food into energy that fuels our lives. But what happens to the energy stored in the 80 billion pounds of food thrown away annually in America? As part of advancing sustainable energy solutions, scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory are converting food waste into clean, renewable fuel that could power our planes, trains and au
20h
Machine learning aids in simulating dynamics of interacting atoms
A revolutionary machine-learning (ML) approach to simulate the motions of atoms in materials such as aluminum is described in this week's Nature Communications journal. This automated approach to "interatomic potential development" could transform the field of computational materials discovery.
1h
Contact cravings
After months of social distancing, it's not surprising that many people have felt starved for human companionship. Now a study from MIT has found that to our brains, the longings we feel during isolation are indeed similar to the food cravings we feel when hungry. After subjects endured one day of total isolation, looking at pictures of people having fun together activated the same brain region t
6h
Media Lab's new head
After a worldwide search that turned up 60 candidates, the MIT Media Lab has announced that Dava Newman, SM '89, SM '89, PhD '92, an MIT professor of astronautics, will become its new director on July 1. Newman, whose work has integrated engineering, design, and biomedical research with an eye to improving human performance in space, is well known for developing the BioSuit, an advanced "second s
6h
White House taps two MIT leaders
On January 15, President-elect Joseph Biden named Broad Institute director Eric Lander and MIT's vice president for research, Maria Zuber, to top science and technology posts in his administration. Biden appointed Lander presidential science advisor, a position he elevated to the Cabinet level. He also nominated him to serve as director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). Lande
6h
Encoding memory in tube diameter hierarchy of living flow network [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The concept of memory is traditionally associated with organisms possessing a nervous system. However, even very simple organisms store information about past experiences to thrive in a complex environment—successfully exploiting nutrient sources, avoiding danger, and warding off predators. How can simple organisms encode information about their environment? We here follow…
16h
Automatic for the robots
Robot design is usually a painstaking process, but MIT researchers have developed a system that helps automate the task. Once it's told which parts you have—such as wheels, joints, and body segments—and what terrain the robot will need to navigate, RoboGrammar is on the case, generating optimized structures and control programs. To rule out "nonsensical" designs, the researchers developed an anim
6h
Storm force
Scientists have known for decades that thunderstorms are often stronger where there are high concentrations of aerosols — airborne particles too small to see with the naked eye. Lightning flashes are more frequent along shipping routes, where freighters emit particulates into the air, than in the surrounding ocean. And the most intense thunderstorms in the tropics brew up over land, where aerosol
6h
"She saw something in me"
Listening to Angelika Amon teach my cancer biology class in the spring of 2001 felt like diving into the depths of a vivid novel, with dramatic moments and elaborate bursts of detail. She somehow brought each area of the cell to life, spinning the tale of its function into a compelling story. In this pivotal period in biology's history, just before Eric Lander and colleagues published the human g
6h
Three ways to build a winter survival shelter
The author works on building a bark-roofed lean-to shelter. (Jim Baird/) This story was originally featured on Field & Stream . Shelter, fire, water, and food are the four pillars of survival—and if you run into trouble, you want to prioritize them in that order too. There is some debate, however, between shelter and fire and which one should come first. For example, if you were to take an accide
21h
A sponge to soak up carbon dioxide in the air
Human activity is now leading to the equivalent of 40 billion tons of carbon dioxide emitted into the atmosphere each year, putting us on track to increase the planet's temperature by 1.5 degrees Celsius over pre-industrial levels by 2040. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), we must limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius to avoid the most dangerous impacts of cl
20h
Researchers develop two new rapid COVID-19 diagnostic tests
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have developed two new rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19—one to detect COVID-19 variants and one to help differentiate with other illnesses that have COVID-19-like symptoms. The findings were recently published in the journal Bioengineering.
16h
Social psychologist offers key to ending racism
Social psychologist Robert Livingston has spent decades studying racism and advising businesses and nonprofits how to confront it in their workplaces. In a new book, "The Conversation: How Seeking and Speaking the Truth About Racism Can Radically Transform Individuals and Organizations," the Harvard Kennedy School lecturer in public policy argues that racism can be battled with constructive dialog
20h
Bromodomain proteins regulate human cytomegalovirus latency and reactivation allowing epigenetic therapeutic intervention [Microbiology]
Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) from latency is a major health consideration for recipients of stem-cell and solid organ transplantations. With over 200,000 transplants taking place globally per annum, virus reactivation can occur in more than 50% of cases leading to loss of grafts as well as serious morbidity and…
16h
Protective ship coatings as an underestimated source of microplastic pollution
Shipping traffic can be a major source of tiny plastic particles floating in the sea, especially out in the open ocean. In a paper published in the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology, a team of German environmental geochemists based at the University of Oldenburg's Institute of Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment and led by Dr. Barbara Scholz-Boettcher for the first
16h
Extraterrestrial engineering
In the fall of 1951, about 20 MIT engineering students received a missive from a planet more than 30 light-years from Earth. Confidential documents and memos, printed on letterhead dated 1,000 years in the future, detailed the discovery of intelligent life on a planet called Arcturus IV and outlined what humans knew about their alien brethren. The Methanians, as this alien race would be known, we
6h
Biopolymer-coated nanocatalyst can help realize a hydrogen fuel-driven future
To combat climate change, shifting from fossil fuels to clean and sustainable energy sources is imperative. A popular candidate in this regard is hydrogen, an eco-friendly fuel that produces only water when used. However, the efficient methods of hydrogen production are usually not eco-friendly. The eco-friendly alternative of splitting water with sunlight to produce hydrogen is inefficient and su
16h
Nonconscious brain modulation to remove fears, increase confidence
Machine learning-based training of brain activity has led to exciting developments: reduce fears, change one's preferences, or even increase one's confidence. Unfortunately, data to better understand the mechanisms of brain self-regulation remain scarce. A group of researchers from Japan, the US and Canada have joined forces to release the largest existing dataset of the sort.
23h
TBE-virus ger långvariga symtom
Huvudvärk och problem med balans och minne är bara några av de problem som kan finnas kvar i flera år efter fästingburen hjärninflammation, TBE. För många patienter är problemen så stora att de har svårt att klara av sin vardag och sitt arbetsliv. Fästingburen hjärninflammation, TBE (tick-borne encephalitis), orsakas av TBE-virus, som finns i delar av Europa och Asien och huvudsakligen sprids av
22h
Best LED ring light for vlogging, TikTok, and selfies
Light yourself the way you want. (Eduardo Gorghetto via Unsplash/) LED ring lights were once considered a very specialized piece of lighting equipment for photographers, but these days a ring light is a must have for vloggers, makeup artists, TikTok stars, and video calls. An LED ring light delivers flattering shadow-free lighting, striking circular catchlights in the eyes, and is an excellent to
17h
Breast milk offers different bacteria over time
The mix of beneficial bacteria passed from passed via breast milk changes significantly over time, report researchers. This bacterial cocktail could act like a daily booster shot for infant immunity and metabolism. The research, published in Frontiers in Microbiology , has important implications for infant development and health. Researchers discovered a range of microbiome species never before i
14h
Operando characterization of conductive filaments during resistive switching in Mott VO2 [Applied Physical Sciences]
Vanadium dioxide (VO2) has attracted much attention owing to its metal–insulator transition near room temperature and the ability to induce volatile resistive switching, a key feature for developing novel hardware for neuromorphic computing. Despite this interest, the mechanisms for nonvolatile switching functioning as synapse in this oxide remain not understood….
16h
Self-monitoring using digital health tools is associated with weight loss
A systematic review of multiple randomized controlled studies among adults with overweight or obesity showed that greater engagement in self-monitoring using digital health tools was associated with significant weight loss, according to a paper published online in Obesity, The Obesity Society's flagship journal. This is the first comprehensive systematic review to examine the relationship between
1h
Ancestry estimation perpetuates racism, white supremacy
Ancestry estimation—a method used by forensic anthropologists to determine ancestral origin by analyzing bone structures—is rooted in "race science" and perpetuates white supremacy, according to a new paper by a forensic anthropologist at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
2h
Tissue-engineered implants provide new hope for vocal injuries
New technology from Purdue University and Indiana University School of Medicine innovators may one day help patients who suffer devastating vocal injuries from surgery on the larynx. A collaborative team consisting of Purdue biomedical engineers and clinicians from IU has tissue-engineered component tissue replacements that support reconstruction of the larynx.
4h
Buckyballs on DNA for harvesting light
Researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology show that DNA can serve as a scaffold for light-harvesting supramolecules, where fluorescent dyes work as electron donors and buckyballs as electron acceptors. The DNA's regular 3D structure increases the light-to-electrons conversion efficiency by reducing so-called self-quenching. Such DNA-based supramolecules could be used in future organic
4h
Vaginal pessaries prove effective in treating pelvic organ prolapse long-term
CLEVELAND, Ohio (Feb 24, 2021)–The aging population combined with increasing obesity rates has resulted in more women experiencing pelvic organ prolapse. Common treatment options include pelvic reconstructive surgery or the use of pessaries to prop up descending organs. A new study evaluated the long-term effectiveness of pessaries, as well as reasons why women discontinued their use. Study resul
4h
Red light put moths in the mood
Study show for the first time that dim red light activates olfactory gene pathways in the antennae of a model species, the yellow peach moth, increasing the sensitivity of males to female sex pheromones, and ultimately promoting reproductive behavior
4h
Data-driven workplace design
Diane Hoskins '79 grew up with plenty of exposure to "beautiful, incredible buildings," both in Chicago's famously photogenic downtown and in the pages of Architectural Record, where her mother worked. It was only natural that she should become an architect herself. For the past 15 years, she's been co-CEO of Gensler, the world's largest architecture and design firm, known for its focus on workpl
6h
Retired rear admiral equips the pandemic's frontline fighters
Last March, Osie V. Combs Jr., OE '77, SM '77, called a meeting with his colleagues at Pacific Engineering Inc. (PEI), a small Nebraska-based defense contractor. "We asked how we could use our knowledge and capabilities to help wage war against covid-19," says Combs, the company's president, who retired from the US Navy as a rear admiral. "Because this is a war. And you can't fight today's war wi
6h
Guarding the welfare of wild horses
Sarah Low '03 studied architecture at MIT, but now she spends most days either in the operating room or outdoors as a veterinarian. Her area of interest is free-roaming horses, a population that is growing in the United States: the number of federally managed mustangs in the western states is projected to reach 2.8 million by 2040 if no action is taken. "They're competing with other truly wild sp
6h
A citizen's guide to viruses
The deluge of news about covid-19 can be overwhelming, but chemical engineering professor Arup Chakraborty has written a guide to help: Viruses, Pandemics, and Immunity (MIT Press, 2021, $19.95), coauthored with Genentech scientist Andrey Shaw. "People who read the book will now have a conceptual framework and facts to think about how viruses emerge to cause infectious diseases, how they spread,
6h
Don't focus on genetic diversity to save our species
Scientists have challenged the common assumption that genetic diversity of a species is a key indicator of extinction risk. The scientists demonstrate that there is no simple relationship between genetic diversity and species survival. But researchers conclude the focus shouldn't be on genetic diversity anyway; it should be on habitat protection.
7h
Depressed and out of work? Therapy may help you find a job
If depression is making it more difficult for some unemployed people to land a job, one type of therapy may help, research suggests. In a new study, 41% of unemployed or underemployed people undergoing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) found a new job or went from part- to full-time work by the end of the 16-week treatment for depression.
7h
Regeringen vil øge krav til virksomheders CO2-rapportering
PLUS. Det er ifølge Erhvervsministeriet »for tidligt at svare på«, om et krav til standardiserede CO2-nøgletal i virksomheders årsrapporter kommer til at omfatte værdikædeemissioner. Enhedslisten vil have ufravigelige krav til, at alle emissionerne fra værdikæden skal rapporteres.
8h
ALS neuron damage reversed with new compound
Scientists have identified the first compound that eliminates the ongoing degeneration of upper motor neurons that become diseased and are a key contributor to ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), a swift and fatal neurodegenerative disease that paralyzes its victims. In ALS, movement-initiating nerve cells in the brain and muscle-controlling nerve cells in the spinal cord die. After administering
8h
Climate impacts drive east-west divide in forest seed production
Younger, smaller trees that comprise much of North America's eastern forests have increased their seed production under climate change. But older, larger trees that dominate western forests have been less responsive, a new study warns. This continental divide could limit western forests' ability to regenerate following large-scale diebacks linked to rising temperatures and intensifying droughts. O
8h
Drifter or homebody? Study first to show where whitespotted eagle rays roam
It's made for long-distance travel, yet movement patterns of the whitespotted eagle ray remain a mystery. Between 2016 and 2018, scientists fitted 54 rays with acoustic transmitters and tracked them along both the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic coasts of Florida, which differ in environmental characteristics. Results of the study reveal striking differences in travel patterns on the Atlantic coast co
9h
New material is next step toward stable high-voltage long-life solid-state batteries
A team of researchers designed and manufactured a new sodium-ion conductor for solid-state sodium-ion batteries that is stable when incorporated into higher-voltage oxide cathodes. This new solid electrolyte could dramatically improve the efficiency and lifespan of this class of batteries. A proof of concept battery built with the new material lasted over 1000 cycles while retaining 89.3% of its c
9h
TBE patients' lasting problems
Impaired memory, reduced motivation, and declining motor skills. These are some of the problems that may persist several years after people contract tick-borne encephalitis, a recent thesis shows.
9h
Some open ocean waters teeming with an abundance of life
Since Charles Darwin's day, the abundance of life on coral reefs has been puzzling, given that most oceanic surface waters in the tropics are low in nutrients and unproductive. But now research has confirmed that the food web of a coral reef in the Maldives relies heavily on what comes in from the open ocean.
9h
This Kit Lets Kids Build Their Own Retro Game Console While Learning Basic STEM
We all know the importance of STEM education. The trick is figuring out how to get kids interested. After all, it's not like you can reason with kids. You can't just sit down and patiently explain that STEM instills creativity, critical thinking, and problem solving skills, or that, in our ever-changing and increasingly technological world, STEM skills will prepare them for the jobs of the future
10h
Incarceration is strongly linked with premature death in US
A new study of US county-level data found a strong association between jail incarceration and death rates from infectious diseases, chronic lower respiratory disease, drug use, and suicide. The study is the first to examine the link between the expansion of the jail population and multiple specific causes of death at the county level, and adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that decarc
10h
The Lancet Public Health: Jail incarceration strongly linked with several causes of premature death in US counties
County jail incarceration rates in the USA are potential drivers of many causes of death in the communities where they are located, with particularly pronounced effects on the number of deaths caused by infectious and respiratory diseases, drug overdose, and suicide, according to a long-term analysis of jail incarceration and county-level mortality across 1,094 counties between 1987 and 2017, publ
10h
Fighting fit cockroaches have 'hidden strength'
A new study has discovered that not all cockroaches are equal and "super athletes" are more likely to win physical mating battles.The researchers scored aggressive interactions and carried out CT-scans. They found that dominant males have larger respiratory systems than submissive males of an identical size. The increased ability to deliver oxygen to their body tissue may enhance the fighting abil
10h
How outdoor pollution affects indoor air quality
Just when you thought you could head indoors to be safe from the air pollution that plagues the Salt Lake Valley, new research shows that elevated air pollution events, like horror movie villains, claw their way into indoor spaces.
11h
Traditional hydrologic models may misidentify snow as rain, new citizen science data shows
Normally, we think of the freezing point of water as 32°F – but in the world of weather forecasting and hydrologic prediction, that isn't always the case. In the Lake Tahoe region of the Sierra Nevada, the shift from snow to rain during winter storms may actually occur at temperatures closer to 39.5°F, according to new research from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), Lynker Technologies, and cit
11h
Toddler sleep patterns matter
Researchers found that children with inconsistent sleep schedules have higher body mass index (BMI) percentiles. Her research also found that children from households with greater poverty had more overall inconsistent sleep onset times. But for families living in poverty, consistent bedtime scheduling may not be easily done, especially if a caregiver is the only parent, juggling multiple jobs, par
11h
Tweaking corn kernels with CRISPR
Corn has a highly complex genome, making it a challenge to apply genome-editing techniques to it. Researchers used CRISPR to tinker with the corn genome promoter regions and modify stem cell growth. They figured out which sections influence kernel yield, and they hope to make targeted genome-editing in corn more precise and efficient.
11h
Waitlist policies may contribute to racial disparities in kidney transplant access
Racial disparities in access to kidney transplantation persist in the United States. New research indicates that registering Black patients on the kidney transplant waitlist at a slightly higher level of kidney function compared with white patients might lessen racial inequality in patients' wait time prior to kidney failure onset, and ultimately improve racial equity in access to kidney transplan
11h
Best L-shaped desk for any office layout
No matter your style or the size of your office, here are some great desk options that let you fit more gear. (Radek Grzybowski via Unsplash/) If you're looking to upgrade your home-office design or simply need a new setup at work, an L-shaped desk could be the solution. The best L-shaped desk will give you more room to multitask, store documents, start new projects, and finally finish the old on
12h
Genomic insights into the origin of pre-historic populations in East Asia
East Asia today harbors more than a fifth of the world's population and some of the most deeply branching modern human lineages outside of Africa. However, its genetic diversity and deep population history remain poorly understood relative to many other parts of the world. In a new study, researchers analyzes genome-wide data for 166 ancient individuals spanning 8,000 years and 46 present-day grou
12h
Oxidation processes in combustion engines and in the atmosphere take the same routes
Alkanes, an important component of fuels for combustion engines and an important class of urban trace gases, react via another reaction pathways than previously thought. These hydrocarbons, formerly called paraffins, thus produce large amounts of highly oxygenated compounds that can contribute to organic aerosol and thus to air pollution in cities. The results of this interdisciplinary work provid
12h
Transformed by light: Fast photochromism discovered in an inexpensive inorganic material
Photochromic materials can reversibly change their color and optical properties when irradiated with ultraviolet or visible light. However, they are made from organic compounds that are expensive to synthesize. Fortunately, for the first time, scientists from Ritsumeikan University, Japan, have discovered fast-switching photochromism in an inexpensive inorganic material: copper-doped zinc sulfide
12h
You've got to move it, move it
Research from Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Sciences at UC San Diego suggests that light-intensity physical activity, including shopping or a casual walk, may protect against mobility disability in older women.
12h
This Smart Ear Wax Remover Lets You See Inside Your Ear as You Clean It
One of the most common side effects of getting older is hearing loss , but oftentimes we're not actually going deaf. In fact, as we age, a buildup of earwax can begin to affect our hearing in ways we do not expect. According to a study published in the National Library of Medicine , ear wax accumulation can affect the hearing of almost 10-percent of people, with an even higher percentage for impa
13h
What is the legacy of "Abundance" going on 10 years later?
In 2012, X-Prize winner and entrepreneur, Peter Diamandis and journalist Steven Kotler published the book "Abundance: The Future is Better Than You Think" which poised "techno-philanthropists" as the driving forces for good in the world while arguing that fears over issues such as the wealth gap and depletion of natural resources were overblown. The book certainly helped create the world we live
13h
Recommended books on intelligence enhancement?
It's difficult to find good books on this topic because of how loaded and prone to pseudoscience the topic of intelligence in general is. The only book I have been recommended explicitly so far is https://www.wiley.com/en-us/Enhancing+Human+Capacities-p-9781405195812 , though I haven't read it yet. Can anyone recommend good books on intelligence enhancement, written by sensible people? submitted
13h
School of Community Health Sciences publishes study on sugar-sweetened beverage taxes
A new research study out of the University of Nevada, Reno's School of Community Health Sciences has just been published by the American Journal of Public Health and addresses state preemption of local sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) taxes, issuing an emerging public health threat. Assistant Professor Eric Crosbie examines commercial determinants of health and public health policy, specifically in
13h
Scientists found in marine mold substance that antidotes paraquat
Biologically active compounds from the marine fungus Penicillium dimorphosporum protect cells from paraquat, the highly toxic herbicide with no remedy, and might enhance the action of some drugs. The fungus was isolated from soft coral collected in the South China Sea during an expedition on the Akademik Oparin research vessel. Scientists of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) and G. B. Elyakov
13h
Managing suicide risk in research study participants
Although suicide screening tools are widely available for patients in emergency, hospital and primary care settings and have been used in research, there is a "significant gap" in the availability of published suicide risk management protocols for use in research studies, which is why UIC researchers wrote a protocol for risk assessment in research participants.
14h
High-throughput screening for Weyl semimetals with S4 symmetry
A new topological invariant χ is defined in systems with S4 symmetry to diagnose the existence of Weyl fermions. By calculating χ, the computational cost for searching Weyl semimetals is greatly reduced. Recently, Gao et al. implemented this method in the high-throughput screening and found a lot of new Weyl semimetal candidates with exotic properties, providing realistic platforms for future expe
14h
New strategy blocks chronic lung disease in mice
A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has uncovered a previously unknown role for exosomes in inflammatory respiratory diseases. The study has implications for finding new therapies. Exosomes are tiny compartments released from cells that carry different types of cargo, including inflammatory chemicals called cytokines that can drive lung disease.
14h
Monoclonal antibodies against MERS coronavirus show promise in phase 1 NIH-sponsored trial
A randomized, placebo-controlled Phase 1 clinical trial of two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against the coronavirus that causes MERS found that they were well tolerated and generally safe when administered simultaneously to healthy adults. The experimental mAbs target the MERS coronavirus (MERS CoV) spike protein used by the virus to attach to and infect target cells. The mAbs were discov
14h
Give the heart a ketone? It may be beneficial
There is growing evidence that ketone bodies may be beneficial to heart disease patients regardless of the method of delivery used to increase ketone delivery to the heart. A Journal of the American College of Cardiology review paper examines emerging evidence regarding ketone bodies' effects on the heart and the potential for ketone therapy as a cardiovascular intervention in heart disease patien
14h
Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for the degradation of a potent greenhouse gas
Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to design new complexes with even stronger bonding. This
14h
Types of rashes associated with MIS-C
Researchers describe the array of rashes seen in MIS-C patients at their hospital through late July 2020, providing photos and information that could help doctors diagnose future cases.
14h
Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer.
14h
Sleep may be how the brain ties emotions to memory
When you slip into sleep, it's easy to imagine that your brain shuts down, but new research in mice suggests that groups of neurons activated during prior learning keep humming, tattooing memories into your brain. Researchers have been studying how memories associated with a specific sensory event are formed and stored in mice. In a study conducted prior to the coronavirus pandemic and recently p
15h
Scientists propose a new heavy particle similar to the Higgs boson
Unlike the Higgs boson, discovered at CERN's Large Hadron Collider in 2012 after a 40-year quest, the new particle proposed by these researchers is so heavy that it could not be produced directly even in this colliderThe University of Granada is among the participants in this major scientific advancement in Theoretical Physics, which could help unravel the mysteries of dark matter
15h
Synthesis of a rare metal complex of nitrous oxide opens new vistas for the degradation of a potent greenhouse gas
Like its chemical relative carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and the dominant ozone-depleting substance. Strategies for limiting its emissions and its catalytic decomposition with metals are being developed. A study indicates that nitrous oxide can bind to metals similarly to carbon dioxide, which helps to design new complexes with even stronger bonding. This
15h
Screening for macrocyclic peptides
Macrocyclic peptides are promising candidates for pharmaceuticals, but their screening is difficult. Scientists have now developed an easy-to-use, high-throughput screening assay for cyclic peptides with affinity to ubiquitin, a protein that helps to degrade proteins and induce cell death. The results could lead to novel drug candidates against cancer.
15h
Kittens hold clues to deadly diarrhea in children
Kittens could be a model for understanding infectious, sometimes deadly, diarrheal disease in both animals and kids, according to new research. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) bacteria cause lethal diarrheal disease in children worldwide, killing up to 120,000 children under the age of five annually. Atypical enteropathic Escherichia coli (aEPEC) are a form of DEC increasingly associated wit
15h
Visualizing the process of digestion in the oldest known animal-microbe symbiosis
Marine biologists have been able to visualize for the first time how tropical sponges and their symbiotic bacteria work together to consume and recycle organic food. The research led by Meggie Hudspith and Jasper de Goeij from the University of Amsterdam, was a collaborative project with colleagues from the Australian Universities of Sydney, Queensland and Western Australia, and the research insti
15h
Visualizing the process of digestion in the oldest known animal-microbe symbiosis
Marine biologists have been able to visualize for the first time how tropical sponges and their symbiotic bacteria work together to consume and recycle organic food. The research led by Meggie Hudspith and Jasper de Goeij from the University of Amsterdam, was a collaborative project with colleagues from the Australian Universities of Sydney, Queensland and Western Australia, and the research insti
15h
Are women more likely to keep campaign promises?
Governments with strong female representation are more likely to deliver on campaign promises, according to new research. The study also shows that promises are even more likely to be kept when women in government assume leadership roles. The study examines campaign promises and subsequent policymaking by parties in power in 10 European countries, the United States, and Canada along with data on
15h
New catalyst could enable better lithium-sulfur batteries, power next-gen electronics
Lithium-sulfur batteries, given their light weight and theoretical high capacities, are a promising alternative to conventional lithium-ion batteries for large-scale energy storage systems, drones, electric vehicles, etc. But at present, they suffer from poor battery life, limiting their applicability. Now, scientists have discovered a new catalyst material's ability to significantly improve lithi
16h
Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae
Using viruses instead of antibiotics to tame troublesome drug-resistant bacteria is a promising strategy, known as bacteriophage or "phage therapy." Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used two different bacteriophage viruses individually and then together to successfully treat research mice infected with multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258). The bac
16h
Scientists use DNA origami to monitor CRISPR gene targeting
The remarkable genetic scissors called CRISPR/Cas9, the discovery that won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, sometimes cut in places that they are not designed to target. Though CRISPR has completely changed the pace of basic research by allowing scientists to quickly edit genetic sequences, it works so fast that it is hard for scientists to see what sometimes goes wrong and figure out how to imp
16h
Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae
Using viruses instead of antibiotics to tame troublesome drug-resistant bacteria is a promising strategy, known as bacteriophage or "phage therapy." Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used two different bacteriophage viruses individually and then together to successfully treat research mice infected with multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258). The bac
16h
Scientists use DNA origami to monitor CRISPR gene targeting
The remarkable genetic scissors called CRISPR/Cas9, the discovery that won the 2020 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, sometimes cut in places that they are not designed to target. Though CRISPR has completely changed the pace of basic research by allowing scientists to quickly edit genetic sequences, it works so fast that it is hard for scientists to see what sometimes goes wrong and figure out how to imp
16h
Best snowboard goggles: Stay protected on the slopes
Make sure you have a better view of those bumps and trees. (Joshua Reddekopp via Unsplash /) Every year when winter rolls around, we can't wait to hit the slopes with our new snow gear. Snowboarding is a great activity to get your body moving, spend time with friends, breathe in some fresh air, and try out new tricks. Every snowboarder needs to be outfitted in the right equipment to stay safe and
16h
How women, migrants and workers are represented in the German Bundestag
Members of the German Bundestag who belong to underrepresented groups are more active in the legislative process and, early on, typically tend to advocate more for the interests of their groups. However, a current study by the universities in Konstanz, Basel, Geneva and Stuttgart indicates that, after a few years, most of them do move on to other political fields. This is tied to the career-relate
16h
Unifying chemical and biological perspectives of carbon accumulation in the environment [Ecology]
Heterotrophic microorganisms are fiendishly clever at degrading all shapes and sizes of organic compounds to extract the energy they need to build biomass. Every year marine phytoplankton fix ∼50 billion tons of carbon dioxide into organic matter, and every year marine heterotrophs respire nearly all of this organic matter back…
16h
Linking human behaviors and infectious diseases [Population Biology]
Human behaviors determine outbreak trajectories of infectious diseases. This fundamental relationship underlies why broad behavioral interventions (BIs) are effective tools in outbreak management. BIs target an overall reduction in contacts and behaviors that enable pathogen transmission as a nonspecific solution for preventing new infections. Despite that, there is a lot…
16h
Primitive selection of the fittest emerging through functional synergy in nucleopeptide networks [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Many fundamental cellular and viral functions, including replication and translation, involve complex ensembles hosting synergistic activity between nucleic acids and proteins/peptides. There is ample evidence indicating that the chemical precursors of both nucleic acids and peptides could be efficiently formed in the prebiotic environment. Yet, studies on nonenzymatic replication, a…
16h
Heritability of individualized cortical network topography [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Human cortex is patterned by a complex and interdigitated web of large-scale functional networks. Recent methodological breakthroughs reveal variation in the size, shape, and spatial topography of cortical networks across individuals. While spatial network organization emerges across development, is stable over time, and is predictive of behavior, it is not…
16h
Rapid Ca2+ channel accumulation contributes to cAMP-mediated increase in transmission at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses [Neuroscience]
The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent potentiation of neurotransmitter release is important for higher brain functions such as learning and memory. To reveal the underlying mechanisms, we applied paired pre- and postsynaptic recordings from hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 synapses. Ca2+ uncaging experiments did not reveal changes in the intracellular Ca2+ sensitivity for…
16h
A tandem activity-based sensing and labeling strategy enables imaging of transcellular hydrogen peroxide signaling [Biochemistry]
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are transient species that have broad actions in signaling and stress, but spatioanatomical understanding of their biology remains insufficient. Here, we report a tandem activity-based sensing and labeling strategy for H2O2 imaging that enables capture and permanent recording of localized H2O2 fluxes….
16h
Oviposition-promoting pars intercerebralis neurons show period-dependent photoperiodic changes in their firing activity in the bean bug [Physiology]
Animals show photoperiodic responses in physiology and behavior to adapt to seasonal changes. Recent genetic analyses have demonstrated the significance of circadian clock genes in these responses. However, the importance of clock genes in photoperiodic responses at the cellular level and the physiological roles of the cellular responses are poorly…
16h
Unique dynamics and exocytosis properties of GABAergic synaptic vesicles revealed by three-dimensional single vesicle tracking [Neuroscience]
Maintaining the balance between neuronal excitation and inhibition is essential for proper function of the central nervous system. Inhibitory synaptic transmission plays an important role in maintaining this balance. Although inhibitory transmission has higher kinetic demands compared to excitatory transmission, its properties are poorly understood. In particular, the dynamics and…
16h
ELF3 activated by a superenhancer and an autoregulatory feedback loop is required for high-level HLA-C expression on extravillous trophoblasts [Immunology and Inflammation]
HLA-C arose during evolution of pregnancy in the great apes 10 to 15 million years ago. It has a dual function on placental extravillous trophoblasts (EVTs) as it contributes to both tolerance and immunity at the maternal–fetal interface. The mode of its regulation is of considerable interest in connection with…
16h
Cross-reactivity of a pathogenic autoantibody to a tumor antigen in GABAA receptor encephalitis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Encephalitis associated with antibodies against the neuronal gamma-aminobutyric acid A receptor (GABAA-R) is a rare form of autoimmune encephalitis. The pathogenesis is still unknown but autoimmune mechanisms were surmised. Here we identified a strongly expanded B cell clone in the cerebrospinal fluid of a patient with GABAA-R encephalitis. We expressed…
16h
A machine-learning approach to map landscape connectivity in Aedes aegypti with genetic and environmental data [Evolution]
Mapping landscape connectivity is important for controlling invasive species and disease vectors. Current landscape genetics methods are often constrained by the subjectivity of creating resistance surfaces and the difficulty of working with interacting and correlated environmental variables. To overcome these constraints, we combine the advantages of a machine-learning framework and…
16h
Probabilistic pragmatics explains gradience and focality in natural language quantification [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
An influential view in philosophy and linguistics equates the meaning of a sentence to the conditions under which it is true. But it has been argued that this truth-conditional view is too rigid and that meaning is inherently gradient and revolves around prototypes. Neither of these abstract semantic theories makes…
16h
The quiet crossing of ocean tipping points [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Anthropogenic climate change profoundly alters the ocean's environmental conditions, which, in turn, impact marine ecosystems. Some of these changes are happening fast and may be difficult to reverse. The identification and monitoring of such changes, which also includes tipping points, is an ongoing and emerging research effort. Prevention of negative…
16h
The battle between harvest and natural selection creates small and shy fish [Evolution]
Harvest of fish and wildlife, both commercial and recreational, is a selective force that can induce evolutionary changes to life history and behavior. Naturally selective forces may create countering selection pressures. Assessing natural fitness represents a considerable challenge in broadcast spawners. Thus, our understanding about the relative strength of natural…
16h
Unfolded and intermediate states of PrP play a key role in the mechanism of action of an antiprion chaperone [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Prion and prion-like diseases involve the propagation of misfolded protein conformers. Small-molecule pharmacological chaperones can inhibit propagated misfolding, but how they interact with disease-related proteins to prevent misfolding is often unclear. We investigated how pentosan polysulfate (PPS), a polyanion with antiprion activity in vitro and in vivo, interacts with mammalian…
16h
African burned area and fire carbon emissions are strongly impacted by small fires undetected by coarse resolution satellite data [Environmental Sciences]
Fires are a major contributor to atmospheric budgets of greenhouse gases and aerosols, affect soils and vegetation properties, and are a key driver of land use change. Since the 1990s, global burned area (BA) estimates based on satellite observations have provided critical insights into patterns and trends of fire occurrence….
16h
Real-time measurements of aminoglycoside effects on protein synthesis in live cells [Biochemistry]
The spread of antibiotic resistance is turning many of the currently used antibiotics less effective against common infections. To address this public health challenge, it is critical to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Aminoglycoside drugs bind the bacterial ribosome, and decades of results from…
16h
The inverse variance-flatness relation in stochastic gradient descent is critical for finding flat minima [Computer Sciences]
Despite tremendous success of the stochastic gradient descent (SGD) algorithm in deep learning, little is known about how SGD finds generalizable solutions at flat minima of the loss function in high-dimensional weight space. Here, we investigate the connection between SGD learning dynamics and the loss function landscape. A principal component…
16h
On the evolutionary origins of host-microbe associations [Evolution]
Many microorganisms with high prevalence in host populations are beneficial to the host and maintained by specialized transmission mechanisms. Although microbial promotion of host fitness and specificity of the associations undoubtedly enhance microbial prevalence, it is an open question whether these symbiotic traits are also a prerequisite for the evolutionary…
16h
Metastable-solid phase diagrams derived from polymorphic solidification kinetics [Applied Physical Sciences]
Nonequilibrium processes during solidification can lead to kinetic stabilization of metastable crystal phases. A general framework for predicting the solidification conditions that lead to metastable-phase growth is developed and applied to a model face-centered cubic (fcc) metal that undergoes phase transitions to the body-centered cubic (bcc) as well as the…
16h
Structure of a bacterial OapB protein with its OLE RNA target gives insights into the architecture of the OLE ribonucleoprotein complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The OLE (ornate, large, and extremophilic) RNA class is one of the most complex and well-conserved bacterial noncoding RNAs known to exist. This RNA is known to be important for bacterial responses to stress caused by short-chain alcohols, cold, and elevated Mg2+ concentrations. These biological functions have been shown to…
16h
Acetogenic bacteria utilize light-driven electrons as an energy source for autotrophic growth [Applied Biological Sciences]
Acetogenic bacteria use cellular redox energy to convert CO2 to acetate using the Wood–Ljungdahl (WL) pathway. Such redox energy can be derived from electrons generated from H2 as well as from inorganic materials, such as photoresponsive semiconductors. We have developed a nanoparticle-microbe hybrid system in which chemically synthesized cadmium sulfide…
16h
Sea spray aerosol concentration modulated by sea surface temperature [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Natural aerosols in pristine regions form the baseline used to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic aerosols on climate. Sea spray aerosol (SSA) is a major component of natural aerosols. Despite its importance, the abundance of SSA is poorly constrained. It is generally accepted that wind-driven wave breaking is the principle…
16h
Do we understand the solid-like elastic properties of confined liquids? [Physical Sciences]
Recently, in polymeric liquids, unexpected solid-like shear elasticity has been discovered, which gave rise to a controversial discussion about its origin (1–3). The observed solid-like shear modulus G depends strongly on the distance L between the plates of the rheometer according to a power law G∝L−p with a nonuniversal exponent…
16h
Depletion of H3K36me2 recapitulates epigenomic and phenotypic changes induced by the H3.3K36M oncohistone mutation [Medical Sciences]
Hotspot histone H3 mutations have emerged as drivers of oncogenesis in cancers of multiple lineages. Specifically, H3 lysine 36 to methionine (H3K36M) mutations are recurrently identified in chondroblastomas, undifferentiated sarcomas, and head and neck cancers. While the mutation reduces global levels of both H3K36 dimethylation (H3K36me2) and trimethylation (H3K36me3) by…
16h
Glucagon blockade restores functional {beta}-cell mass in type 1 diabetic mice and enhances function of human islets [Medical Sciences]
We evaluated the potential for a monoclonal antibody antagonist of the glucagon receptor (Ab-4) to maintain glucose homeostasis in type 1 diabetic rodents. We noted durable and sustained improvements in glycemia which persist long after treatment withdrawal. Ab-4 promoted β-cell survival and enhanced the recovery of insulin+ islet mass with…
16h
Reply to Angelani et al.: The G' ~ L-3 law for the elasticity of confined liquids can be proved exactly [Physical Sciences]
Angelani et al. (1) suggest an alternative derivation of the relation between low-frequency shear modulus G′ and confinement length L derived in ref. 2. They seem to imply that an integral over plane waves in three-dimensional (3D) isotropic media can be decoupled into a separate integral over kz (z component…
16h
Continuous electrochemical water splitting from natural water sources via forward osmosis [Chemistry]
Electrochemical water splitting stores energy as equivalents of hydrogen and oxygen and presents a potential route to the scalable storage of renewable energy. Widespread implementation of such energy storage, however, will be facilitated by abundant and accessible sources of water. We describe herein a means of utilizing impure water sources…
16h
An increase in dendritic plateau potentials is associated with experience-dependent cortical map reorganization [Neuroscience]
The organization of sensory maps in the cerebral cortex depends on experience, which drives homeostatic and long-term synaptic plasticity of cortico-cortical circuits. In the mouse primary somatosensory cortex (S1) afferents from the higher-order, posterior medial thalamic nucleus (POm) gate synaptic plasticity in layer (L) 2/3 pyramidal neurons via disinhibition and…
16h
Compartmentalization of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate metabolism into plasma membrane liquid-ordered/raft domains [Cell Biology]
Possible segregation of plasma membrane (PM) phosphoinositide metabolism in membrane lipid domains is not fully understood. We exploited two differently lipidated peptide sequences, L10 and S15, to mark liquid-ordered, cholesterol-rich (Lo) and liquid-disordered, cholesterol-poor (Ld) domains of the PM, often called raft and nonraft domains, respectively. Imaging of the fluorescent…
16h
Correction to Supporting Information for Chibaya et al., Mdm2 phosphorylation by Akt regulates the p53 response to oxidative stress to promote cell proliferation and tumorigenesis [SI Correction]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Mdm2 phosphorylation by Akt regulates the p53 response to oxidative stress to promote cell proliferation and tumorigenesis," by Loretah Chibaya, Baktiar Karim, Hong Zhang, and Stephen N. Jones, which first published January 19, 2021; 10.1073/pnas.2003193118 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 118, e2003193118). The…
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Correction for Alam et al., Upregulation of reduced folate carrier by vitamin D enhances brain folate uptake in mice lacking folate receptor alpha [Corrections]
PHARMACOLOGY Correction for "Upregulation of reduced folate carrier by vitamin D enhances brain folate uptake in mice lacking folate receptor alpha," by Camille Alam, Susanne Aufreiter, Constantine J. Georgiou, Md. Tozammel Hoque, Richard H. Finnell, Deborah L. O'Connor, I. David Goldman, and Reina Bendayan, which first published August 12, 2019;…
16h
Correction to Supporting Information for Senior et al., Global associations between macronutrient supply and age-specific mortality [SI Correction]
POPULATION BIOLOGY Correction to Supporting Information for "Global associations between macronutrient supply and age-specific mortality," by Alistair M. Senior, Shinichi Nakagawa, David Raubenheimer, and Stephen J. Simpson, which first published November 16, 2020; 10.1073/pnas.2015058117 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 30824–30835). The authors note that Fig. S2 in the SI…
16h
Influence of a COVID-19 vaccine's effectiveness and safety profile on vaccination acceptance [Medical Sciences]
Although a safe and effective vaccine holds the greatest promise for resolving the COVID-19 pandemic, hesitancy to accept vaccines remains common. To explore vaccine acceptance decisions, we conducted a national survey of 1,000 people from all US states in August of 2020 and a replication in December of 2020. Using…
16h
Richer color vocabulary is correlated with color memory, but its relation to perception is unknown [Social Sciences]
Hasantash and Afraz (1) investigate the influence of language on perception and memory. Their study improves on prior studies by including a perceptual and a memory task within the same experiment, by taking a within-language individual differences approach, and by including a few other modifications to the design. While the…
16h
Elastic amplification of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solidifying melts [Engineering]
The concomitant mechanical deformation and solidification of melts are relevant to a broad range of phenomena. Examples include the preparation of cotton candy, the atomization of metals, the manufacture of glass fibers, and the formation of elongated structures in volcanic eruptions known as Pele's hair. Usually, solid-like deformations during solidification…
16h
There is no one-size-fits-all road to sustainability on 'Patchwork Earth'
In a world as diverse as our own, the journey towards a sustainable future will look different depending on where in the world we live, according to a recent article. There are many regional pathways to a more sustainable future, but our lack of understanding about how these complex and sometimes contradictory pathways interact (and in particular when they synergize or compete with one another) li
16h
Investment needed to bring down pancreatic cancer death rates in Europe
Researchers have called on European policymakers to make adequate resources available to tackle pancreatic cancer, a disease that is almost invariably fatal and where little progress has been made over the past 40 years. The latest predictions for cancer deaths in the EU and UK for 2021 show that pancreatic death rates are predicted to remain approximately stable for men, but continue to rise in w
16h
The unveiling of a novel mechanism of resistance to immunotherapy targeting HER2
VHIO investigators report how HER2 breast cancer cells adopt a strategy to resist clearance by redirected lymphocytes. Findings evidence that the disruption of interferon-gamma signaling confers resistance to these immunotherapies and promotes disease progression. Reported in Nature Communications, these results could help to potentiate future immune-based strategies and more precisely identify th
16h
Study finds COVID risk communication targeting younger adults may have biggest impact
A study of adults in the United States finds that – broadly speaking – the older you are, the more concerned you are about COVID-19, and the more steps you take to reduce your risk from COVID-19. The study suggests that the biggest boost in risk reduction would stem from communication efforts aimed at raising awareness of COVID-19 risks among U.S. adults under the age of 40.
16h
College students displaced from campus due to COVID-19 show worse psychological outcomes
In a new study of 791 undergraduate and graduate students, surveyed between April 9 and August 4, 2020, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston University's School of Social Work, and McLean Hospital revealed that students forced to relocate during the spring were more likely to report COVID-19-related grief, loneliness and generalized anxiety symptoms than students who did not reloc
16h
Distinguishing between two very similar pediatric brain conditions
Slight differences in clinical features can help physicians distinguish between two rare but similar forms of autoimmune brain inflammation in children, a new study by UT Southwestern scientists suggests. The findings, published online in Pediatric Neurology , could provide patients and their families with a better prognosis and the potential to target treatments specific to each condition in the
16h
'Missing ice problem' finally solved
During glacial periods, the sea level falls, because vast quantities of water are stored in the massive inland glaciers. To date, however, computer models have been unable to reconcile sea-level height with the thickness of the glaciers.
16h
Saki monkeys get screen time for more control over their lives in captivity
Scientists have designed and built an on-demand video device for white-faced saki monkeys to activate as and when they like. It's up to the animals to decide whether they want to step inside the device – the equivalent of pressing play – to watch the video of the week, from sealife like fish and jellyfish to wiggly worms and other zoo animals to abstract art and lush forests.
16h
Immunsystemet kan förvärra vid svår covid-19
Vid svår covid-19 löper det medfödda immunsystemet (INIS) amok. Överreaktionen kan ligga bakom proppbildning och försämrad syresättning som covid-patienter drabbas av, visar en studie. Om INIS är drivkraften finns redan godkända läkemedel för att behandla svår covid-19, uppger forskarna vid Uppsala universitet. Blodet innehåller ett stort antal proteiner som utgör kroppens första barriär för att
17h
A memory without a brain
Having a memory of past events enables us to take smarter decisions about the future. Researchers at the Max-Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now identified how the slime mold Physarum polycephalum saves memories – although it has no nervous system.
17h
Biopolymer-coated nanocatalyst can help realize a hydrogen fuel-driven future
While popular as an eco-friendly fuel, hydrogen is difficult to produce efficiently in an eco-friendly manner (through sunlight-induced decomposition of water) due to stability issues of catalysts (chemical reaction facilitators). In a new study, scientists demonstrate water splitting under sunlight using polydopamine-coated zinc sulfide nanorods as a catalyst. In their paper, they report a remark
17h
'Good bacteria' in breast milk changes over time
The cocktail of beneficial bacteria passed from mother to infant through breast milk changes significantly over time and could act like a daily booster shot for infant immunity and metabolism. The research, conducted by scientists from Montreal and Guatemala and published in Frontiers in Microbiology, has important implications for infant development and health.
17h
Protective ship coatings as an underestimated source of microplastic pollution
Shipping traffic can be a major source of microplastics, especially out in the open ocean. In a new study, a team of environmental geochemists from the University of Oldenburg (Germany) for the first time provides an overview of microplastics mass distribution in the North Sea. The scientists found that most of the plastic particles in water samples taken in the south-eastern North Sea originate f
17h
Humor verktyg i feministisk kamp mot sexism på nätet
Schablonbilden av en feminist som en humorlös "glädjedödare" utmanas. I själva verket använder feminister humorn som ett verktyg i kampen mot sexism och trakasserier i sociala medier, visar forskning. – Humor och skratt är kanske inte det första man tänker på i samband med feministisk politik och motstånd. Det är nog snarare den förmodat humorbefriade feministen och feministen som "glädjedödare"
17h
Parasitic plants conspire to keep hosts alive
The plant that encourages kissing at Christmas is in fact a parasite, and new research reveals mistletoe has an unusual feeding strategy. When two mistletoes invade the same tree, they increase photosynthesis to get the nutrients they need, essentially sharing the tree and causing it less harm.
17h
Low-level jets create winds of change for turbines
Global wind power capacity has increased more than fivefold over the past decade, leading to larger turbines, but low-level jets are one cause for concern. The effects of these strong, energetic wind flows depend on how high the wind flows are in relation to the turbines. In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy , researchers considered three different scenarios in which the LLJs were ab
17h
Simply speaking while infected can potentially spread COVID-19
COVID-19 can spread from asymptomatic but infected people through small aerosol droplets in their exhaled breath. Most studies of the flow of exhaled air have focused on coughing or sneezing; however, speaking while near one another is also risky. In Physics of Fluids, scientists used smoke and laser light to study the flow of expelled breath near and around two people conversing in various relati
17h
COVID-19 communication
In this narrative medicine essay, a medical school professor expresses gratitude for the caring and empathy expressed by the team caring for her mother hospitalized with COVID-19 and emphasizes the importance of humanity and compassion over facts and statistics for families physically separated from their critically ill loved ones.
17h
Measuring hemoglobin levels with AI microscope, microfluidic chips
A complete blood count can help ascertain the health of a patient and typically includes an estimate of the hemoglobin concentration, which can indicate several conditions, including anemia, polycythemia, and pulmonary fibrosis. In AIP Advances , researchers describe a AI-powered imaging-based tool to estimate hemoglobin levels. The setup was developed in conjunction with a microfluidic chip and a
17h
Preterm babies may struggle with school later
Babies who are born early are likely to face educational and behavioral setbacks as they go from kindergarten through high school, according to new research. A full-term birth is typically between 37 and 42 weeks of pregnancy, but births between 32 and 36 weeks are considered moderate to late preterm births. And those seemingly short few weeks may result in serious education lags and behavioral i
17h
Is your COVID stress eating actually a disorder?
In times of stress—like a full year of coping with COVID-19—many people turn to food for a source of comfort or control. While modifications to typical diets are to be expected, living in a state of tension can cause a resurgence of disordered eating patterns. National Eating Disorders Awareness Week, February 22-28, brings attention to a specific type of mental illness that affects people from a
17h
Why there's no such thing as objective reality | Greg Anderson
In the grand scheme of history, modern reality is a bizarre exception when compared to the worlds of ancient, precolonial and Indigenous civilizations, where myths ruled and gods roamed, says historian Greg Anderson. So why do Westerners today think they're right about reality and everybody else is wrong? Anderson tears into the fabric of objective reality to reveal the many universes that lie bey
18h
Best portable desk: work from nearly anywhere
Have the ability to work comfortably from anywhere. (Sincerely Media via Unsplash/) The verdict is out on sitting at one immobile desk all day. It's not good for you. Having to stay seated in one location all day wrecks your back and overall health. Getting up on your feet and gaining the ability to move around will not only make you healthier, but will create a happier, more flexible work enviro
18h
Mouse study shows bacteriophage therapy could fight drug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae
Using viruses instead of antibiotics to tame troublesome drug-resistant bacteria is a promising strategy, known as bacteriophage or "phage therapy." Scientists at the National Institutes of Health have used two different bacteriophage viruses individually and then together to successfully treat research mice infected with multidrug-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae sequence type 258 (ST258).
18h
Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient com
18h
Cre-controlled CRISPR: Conditional gene inactivation just got easier
The ability to turn a gene off only in a specific cell type is essential to modern life science. Thanks to the Cre-Controlled CRISPR it has just became simpler. The new method developed by researchers from the Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden (CRTD) at TU Dresden with support from the DRESDEN-concept Genome Center (DCGC) offers a fast and easy approach for conditional gene inactivation. T
18h
ET phones home!
A team of researchers from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem has discovered the first evidence of radio flares emitted only long after a star is destroyed by a black hole.
18h
For students of color, online racism leads to real-world mental health challenges
For college students of color who encounter online racism, the effect of racialized aggressions and assaults reaches far beyond any single social media feed and can lead to real and significant mental health impacts – even more significant than in-person experiences of racial discrimination, according to a recently published study from researchers at UConn and Boston College.
18h
Drifter or homebody? Study first to show where whitespotted eagle rays roam
Its muscular body shape and large pectoral fins are perfect for long-distance travel, yet movement patterns of the whitespotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) remain a mystery. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in collaboration with Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium, the University of Florida and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissi
18h
Drifter or homebody? Study first to show where whitespotted eagle rays roam
Its muscular body shape and large pectoral fins are perfect for long-distance travel, yet movement patterns of the whitespotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) remain a mystery. Researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in collaboration with Mote Marine Laboratory & Aquarium, the University of Florida and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissi
18h