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New Study Claims Dark Matter Doesn't Exist
The prevailing theory among scientists is that roughly three quarters of all the stuff in the universe is made up of "dark matter," a mysterious substance that interacts with visible matter via gravity. Despite its ubiquitousness, though, scientists have yet to find direct evidence of its existence. According to a new study by an international team of scientists however, this search could be for
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No Gender Bias in Peer Review: Study
An analysis of data from nearly 150 journals across scientific disciplines finds that, if anything, manuscripts authored by women are treated more favorably than those submitted by men.
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How Earth's oddest mammal got to be so bizarre
Often considered the world's oddest mammal, Australia's beaver-like, duck-billed platypus exhibits an array of bizarre characteristics: it lays eggs instead of giving birth to live babies, sweats milk, has venomous spurs and is even equipped with 10 sex chromosomes. Now, an international team of researchers led by University of Copenhagen has conducted a unique mapping of the platypus genome and f
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Israel can expect a major earthquake of 6.5 on the Richter scale in the coming years
A first-of-its-kind study conducted under the bed of the Dead Sea reveals that a devastating earthquake measuring 6.5 on the Richter scale is expected to hit the region in the coming years. The study showed that an earthquake of this magnitude occurs in the land of Israel on an average cycle of between 130 and 150 years, but there have been cases in history where the lull between one earthquake an
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The world's first integrated quantum communication network
Chinese scientists have established the world's first integrated quantum communication network, combining over 700 optical fibers on the ground with two ground-to-satellite links to achieve quantum key distribution over a total distance of 4,600 kilometers for users across the country. The team, led by Jianwei Pan, Yuao Chen, Chengzhi Peng from the University of Science and Technology of China in
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Shiga toxin's not supposed to kill you
E. coli food poisoning is one of the worst food poisonings, causing bloody diarrhea and kidney damage. But all the carnage might be just an unintended side effect, report researchers from UConn Health. Their findings might lead to more effective treatments for this potentially deadly disease.
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Majority of biotech companies completing an IPO from 1997-2016 achieved product approvals
A large scale study from Bentley University of the biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings from 1997-2016 estimates that 78% of these companies are associated with products that reach phase 3 trials and 52% are associated with new product approvals. The article, titled 'Late-stage product development and approvals by biotechnology companies after IPO, 1997-2016,' shows that
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CytoDel announces successful intra-neuronal antibody delivery without a viral vector
Preclinical data published in Science Translational Medicine showed that post-symptomatic administration of Cyto-111 produced antidotal rescue in three animal species following a lethal botulism challenge. Study authors concluded, " atoxic BoNT derivatives can be harnessed to deliver therapeutic protein moieties to the neuronal cytoplasm where they bind and neutralize intracellular targets in expe
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Scientists need to understand how gill development limits fish growth
The distribution and concentration of dissolved oxygen and water temperature in the oceans and freshwaters are usually far more influential in shaping the growth and reproduction of fish than the distribution of their prey.
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Scientists create ON-OFF switches to control CAR T cell activity
Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Mass General Cancer Center have created molecular ON-OFF switches to regulate the activity of CAR T cells, a potent form of cell-based immunotherapy that has had dramatic success in treating some advanced cancers, but which pose a significant risk of toxic side effects.
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Mental health of UK women, ethnic minorities especially affected during pandemic
In the UK, men from ethnic minorities and women may have experienced worse mental health declines than White British men, according to a study published January 6, 2021 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Eugenio Proto and Climent Quintana-Domeque of institutions including the University of Glasgow and the University of Exeter, UK.
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Modern microbes provide window into ancient ocean
Roughly two billion years ago, microorganisms called cyanobacteria fundamentally transformed the globe. Researchers are now stepping back to that pivotal moment in Earth's history.
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An analysis of 145 journals suggests peer review itself may not explain gender discrepancies in publication rates
An analysis of 145 scholarly journals found that, among various factors that could contribute to gender bias and lesser representation of women in science, the peer review process itself is unlikely to be the primary cause of publishing inequalities. However, Flaminio Squazzoni and colleagues emphasize that the study does not account for many other factors.
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Orange is the new 'block'
New research from Washington University in St. Louis reveals the core structure of the light-harvesting antenna of cyanobacteria or blue-green algae — including key features that both collect energy and block excess light absorption. Scientists built a model of the large protein complex called phycobilisome that collects and transmits light energy. Phycobilisomes allow cyanobacteria to take advan
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How to talk about death and dying
Our reluctance to think, talk or communicate about death is even more pronounced when we deal with others' loss compared to our own, new research finds, but either way we tend to frame attitudes and emotions in a sad and negative way. Teaching new more positive ways to address these difficult conversations is the focus of a new paper in PLOS ONE journal by palliative care specialists across Austra
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Investment risk & return from emerging public biotech companies comparable to non-biotech
Investing in biotech companies may not be any riskier than investing in other sectors, according to a new report from Bentley University's Center for Integration of Science and Industry. A large scale study of biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) from 1997-2016 demonstrates that these companies produced more than $100 billion in shareholder value and almost $100 b
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How Earth's oddest mammal got to be so bizarre
Often considered the world's oddest mammal, Australia's beaver-like, duck-billed platypus exhibits an array of bizarre characteristics: it lays eggs instead of giving birth to live babies, sweats milk, has venomous spurs and is even equipped with 10 sex chromosomes. Now, an international team of researchers led by University of Copenhagen has conducted a unique mapping of the platypus genome and f
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Competitive athletics: Detecting CRISPR/Cas gene doping
All athletes want to be at the top of their game when they compete, but some resort to nefarious approaches to achieve peak muscle growth, speed and agility. Recent developments in gene editing technology could tempt athletes to change their DNA to get an edge. Now, researchers demonstrate first steps toward detecting this type of doping both in human plasma and in live mice.
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3D printing of highly stretchable hydrogel with diverse UV curable polymers
Hydrogel-polymer hybrids have been widely used for various applications such as biomedical devices and flexible electronics. However, the current technologies constrain the geometries of hydrogel-polymer hybrid to laminates consisting of hydrogel with silicone rubbers. This greatly limits functionality and performance of hydrogel-polymer–based devices and machines. Here, we report a simple yet ve
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Structure of cyanobacterial phycobilisome core revealed by structural modeling and chemical cross-linking
In cyanobacteria and red algae, the structural basis dictating efficient excitation energy transfer from the phycobilisome (PBS) antenna complex to the reaction centers remains unclear. The PBS has several peripheral rods and a central core that binds to the thylakoid membrane, allowing energy coupling with photosystem II (PSII) and PSI. Here, we have combined chemical cross-linking mass spectrom
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Adiponectin receptor 1 variants contribute to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy that can be reversed by rapamycin
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogeneous genetic heart muscle disease characterized by hypertrophy with preserved or increased ejection fraction in the absence of secondary causes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that a substantial proportion of individuals with HCM also have comorbid diabetes mellitus (~10%). Whether genetic variants may contribute a combined phenotype of H
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Molecular subtyping of Alzheimers disease using RNA sequencing data reveals novel mechanisms and targets
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia, is recognized as a heterogeneous disease with diverse pathophysiologic mechanisms. In this study, we interrogate the molecular heterogeneity of AD by analyzing 1543 transcriptomes across five brain regions in two AD cohorts using an integrative network approach. We identify three major molecular subtypes of AD corresponding to different
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Heating events in the nascent solar system recorded by rare earth element isotopic fractionation in refractory inclusions
Equilibrium condensation of solar gas is often invoked to explain the abundance of refractory elements in planets and meteorites. This is partly motivated, by the observation that the depletions in both the least and most refractory rare earth elements (REEs) in meteoritic group II calcium-aluminum–rich inclusions (CAIs) can be reproduced by thermodynamic models of solar nebula condensation. We m
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Human population dynamics and Yersinia pestis in ancient northeast Asia
We present genome-wide data from 40 individuals dating to c.16,900 to 550 years ago in northeast Asia. We describe hitherto unknown gene flow and admixture events in the region, revealing a complex population history. While populations east of Lake Baikal remained relatively stable from the Mesolithic to the Bronze Age, those from Yakutia and west of Lake Baikal witnessed major population transfo
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The gill-oxygen limitation theory (GOLT) and its critics
The gill-oxygen limitation theory (GOLT) provides mechanisms for key aspects of the biology (food conversion efficiency, growth and its response to temperature, the timing of maturation, and others) of water-breathing ectotherms (WBEs). The GOLT's basic tenet is that the surface area of the gills or other respiratory surfaces of WBE cannot, as two-dimensional structures, supply them with sufficie
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Acoustohydrodynamic tweezers via spatial arrangement of streaming vortices
Acoustics-based tweezers provide a unique toolset for contactless, label-free, and precise manipulation of bioparticles and bioanalytes. Most acoustic tweezers rely on acoustic radiation forces; however, the accompanying acoustic streaming often generates unpredictable effects due to its nonlinear nature and high sensitivity to the three-dimensional boundary conditions. Here, we demonstrate acous
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Carbon isotope evidence for the global physiology of Proterozoic cyanobacteria
Ancestral cyanobacteria are assumed to be prominent primary producers after the Great Oxidation Event [2.4 to 2.0 billion years (Ga) ago], but carbon isotope fractionation by extant marine cyanobacteria (α-cyanobacteria) is inconsistent with isotopic records of carbon fixation by primary producers in the mid-Proterozoic eon (1.8 to 1.0 Ga ago). To resolve this disagreement, we quantified carbon i
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Peer review and gender bias: A study on 145 scholarly journals
Scholarly journals are often blamed for a gender gap in publication rates, but it is unclear whether peer review and editorial processes contribute to it. This article examines gender bias in peer review with data for 145 journals in various fields of research, including about 1.7 million authors and 740,000 referees. We reconstructed three possible sources of bias, i.e., the editorial selection
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Critical role of synovial tissue-resident macrophage niche in joint homeostasis and suppression of chronic inflammation
Little is known about the mechanisms regulating the transition of circulating monocytes into pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophages in chronic inflammation. Here, we took advantage of our novel mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis, in which Flip is deleted under the control of a CD11c promoter (HUPO mice). During synovial tissue homeostasis, both monocyte-derived F4/80 int and self-renewing F4/80 h
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Ultrabright Au@Cu14 nanoclusters: 71.3% phosphorescence quantum yield in non-degassed solution at room temperature
The photoluminescence of metal nanoclusters is typically low, and phosphorescence emission is rare due to ultrafast free-electron dynamics and quenching by phonons. Here, we report an electronic engineering approach to achieving very high phosphorescence (quantum yield 71.3%) from a [Au@Cu 14 (SPh t Bu) 12 (PPh(C 2 H 4 CN) 2 ) 6 ] + nanocluster (abbreviated Au@Cu 14 ) in non-degassed solution at
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Tb3+-doped fluorescent glass for biology
Optical investigation and manipulation constitute the core of biological experiments. Here, we introduce a new borosilicate glass material that contains the rare-earth ion terbium(III) (Tb 3+ ), which emits green fluorescence upon blue light excitation, similar to green fluorescent protein (GFP), and thus is widely compatible with conventional biological research environments. Micropipettes made
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Polarization-sensitive stimulated Raman scattering imaging resolves amphotericin B orientation in Candida membrane
Ergosterol-targeting amphotericin B (AmB) is the first line of defense for life-threatening fungal infections. Two models have been proposed to illustrate AmB assembly in the cell membrane; one is the classical ion channel model in which AmB vertically forms transmembrane tunnel and the other is a recently proposed sterol sponge model where AmB is laterally adsorbed onto the membrane surface. To
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Rotational Doppler cooling and heating
Doppler cooling is a widely used technique to laser cool atoms, molecules, and nanoparticles by exploiting the Doppler shift associated with translational motion. The rotational Doppler effect arising from rotational coordinate transformation should similarly enable optical manipulation of the rotational motion of nanosystems. Here, we show that rotational Doppler cooling and heating (RDC and RDH
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Partisan pandemic: How partisanship and public health concerns affect individuals social mobility during COVID-19
Rampant partisanship in the United States may be the largest obstacle to the reduced social mobility most experts see as critical to limiting the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Analyzing a total of just over 1.1 million responses collected daily between 4 April and 10 September reveals not only that partisanship is more important than public health concerns for explaining individuals' willingne
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Gene expression signatures of target tissues in type 1 diabetes, lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis
Autoimmune diseases are typically studied with a focus on the immune system, and less attention is paid to responses of target tissues exposed to the immune assault. We presently evaluated, based on available RNA sequencing data, whether inflammation induces similar molecular signatures at the target tissues in type 1 diabetes, systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, and rheumatoid arth
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Acoustic spin Hall effect in strong spin-orbit metals
We report on the observation of the acoustic spin Hall effect that facilitates lattice motion–induced spin current via spin-orbit interaction (SOI). Under excitation of surface acoustic wave (SAW), we find that a spin current flows orthogonal to the SAW propagation in nonmagnetic metals (NMs). The acoustic spin Hall effect manifests itself in a field-dependent acoustic voltage in NM/ferromagnetic
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Controlling electrochemical growth of metallic zinc electrodes: Toward affordable rechargeable energy storage systems
Scalable approaches for precisely manipulating the growth of crystals are of broad-based science and technological interest. New research interests have reemerged in a subgroup of these phenomena—electrochemical growth of metals in battery anodes. In this Review, the geometry of the building blocks and their mode of assembly are defined as key descriptors to categorize deposition morphologies. To
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Controlled emission time statistics of a dynamic single-electron transistor
Quantum technologies involving qubit measurements based on electronic interferometers rely critically on accurate single-particle emission. However, achieving precisely timed operations requires exquisite control of the single-particle sources in the time domain. Here, we demonstrate accurate control of the emission time statistics of a dynamic single-electron transistor by measuring the waiting
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Observation of chiral edge states in gapped nanomechanical graphene
Emerging in diverse areas of physics, edge states have been exploited as an efficient strategy of manipulating electrons, photons, and phonons for next-generation hybrid electro-optomechanical circuits. Among various edge states, gapless chiral edge states harnessing quantum spin/valley Hall effects in graphene or graphene-like materials are especially unique. Here, we report on an experimental d
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Dynamic thermal trapping enables cross-species smart nanoparticle swarms
Bioinspired nano/microswarm enables fascinating collective controllability beyond the abilities of the constituent individuals, yet almost invariably, the composed units are of single species. Advancing such swarm technologies poses a grand challenge in synchronous mass manipulation of multimaterials that hold different physiochemical identities. Here, we present a dynamic thermal trapping strate
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Isomer-specific kinetics of the C+ + H2O reaction at the temperature of interstellar clouds
The reaction C + + H 2 O -> HCO + /HOC + + H is one of the most important astrophysical sources of HOC + ions, considered a marker for interstellar molecular clouds exposed to intense ultraviolet or x-ray radiation. Despite much study, there is no consensus on rate constants for formation of the formyl ion isomers in this reaction. This is largely due to difficulties in laboratory study of ion-mo
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Mass spectrometry imaging identifies abnormally elevated brain L-DOPA levels and extrastriatal monoaminergic dysregulation in L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia
-DOPA treatment for Parkinson's disease frequently leads to dyskinesias, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. We used MALDI-MSI to map the distribution of -DOPA and monoaminergic pathways in brains of dyskinetic and nondyskinetic primates. We report elevated levels of -DOPA, and its metabolite 3- O -methyldopa, in all measured brain regions of dyskinetic animals and increases in dop
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Wait for me: Cell biologists decipher signal that ensures no chromosome is left behind
Cell biologists have found a key clue in the mystery of how chromosomes are inherited correctly every time a cell divides. Using a novel cell probe, they unraveled how a 'matchmaker' molecule stops cell division until components are ready to be split. Precise chromosome duplication is a key factor in proper cell division. If components are altered, even slightly, birth defects and certain cancers
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Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders
Two-dimensional materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, have been booming in research for years. They possess novel properties that can only be explained with the help of the laws of quantum mechanics. Researchers have now used ultracold atoms to gain new insights into previously unknown quantum phenomena. They found out that the magnetic orders between two coupled thin films of atoms co
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DNA-editing method shows promise to treat mouse model of progeria
Researchers have successfully used a DNA-editing technique to extend the lifespan of mice with the genetic variation associated with progeria, a rare genetic disease that causes extreme premature aging in children and can significantly shorten their life expectancy.
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Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems.
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Skip the wearables and track your sleep with these 5 apps
Knowing exactly how much sleep you're getting each night will help you sleep better. (Somnox Sleep/Unsplash/) Good sleep means good health , and you can ensure you get the right quality and amount of shut-eye by using one of the many gadgets designed for the task—from the Apple Watch to the Fitbit Sense . But not everyone wants to wear a watch or a fitness band to bed, so if you're looking for a
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Will Increasing Traffic to the Moon Contaminate Its Precious Ice?
Scientists seek guidance on exploring frozen caches at the lunar poles responsibly — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientists need to understand how gill development limits fish growth
The distribution and concentration of dissolved oxygen and water temperature in the oceans and freshwaters are usually far more influential in shaping the growth and reproduction of fish than the distribution of their prey.
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Investment risk and return from emerging public biotech companies comparable to non-biotech
Investing in biotech companies may not entail higher risk than investing in other sectors, according to a new report from Bentley University's Center for Integration of Science and Industry. A large scale study of biotechnology companies that completed Initial Public Offerings (IPOs) from 1997-2016 demonstrates that these companies produced more than $100 billion in shareholder value and almost $1
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Orange is the new 'block': Structure reveals key features that help block excess light absorption during photosynthesis
Photosynthetic organisms tap light for fuel, but sometimes there's too much of a good thing.
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Modern microbes provide window into ancient ocean
Step into your new, microscopic time machine. Scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered that a type of single-celled organism living in modern-day oceans may have a lot in common with life forms that existed billions of years ago—and that fundamentally transformed the planet.
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Resist the resistance: fighting the good fight against bacteria
Drug-resistant bacteria could lead to more deaths than cancer by 2050, according to a report commissioned by the United Kingdom in 2014 and jointly supported by the U.K. government and the Wellcome Trust. In an effort to reduce the potential infection-caused 10 million deaths worldwide, Penn State researcher Scott Medina has developed a peptide, or small protein, that can target a specific pathoge
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Protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 could last eight months or more
The findings, based on analyses of blood samples from 188 COVID-19 patients, suggest that responses to the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, from all major players in the "adaptive" immune system, which learns to fight specific pathogens, can last for at least eight months after the onset of symptoms from the initial infection.
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Scientists need to understand how gill development limits fish growth
The distribution and concentration of dissolved oxygen and water temperature in the oceans and freshwaters are usually far more influential in shaping the growth and reproduction of fish than the distribution of their prey.
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Orange is the new 'block': Structure reveals key features that help block excess light absorption during photosynthesis
Photosynthetic organisms tap light for fuel, but sometimes there's too much of a good thing.
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Modern microbes provide window into ancient ocean
Step into your new, microscopic time machine. Scientists at the University of Colorado Boulder have discovered that a type of single-celled organism living in modern-day oceans may have a lot in common with life forms that existed billions of years ago—and that fundamentally transformed the planet.
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New strategy to fight world's most potent poison passes first tests in animals
Tamed botulinum toxin ferries miniature antibodies into nerves to reverse paralysis
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Beijing blocks WHO's Covid investigation team
Director-general says he is 'very disappointed' following visas setback
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Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems.
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China Denies Access to WHO Team Investigating COVID Origin
The World Health Organization has been working with Chinese officials to plan an investigation into the origins of the coronavirus since July. But when it came time for investigators to enter the country this week, they found themselves barred at the gate. The problem seems to be that their visas weren't cleared by the Chinese government, according to the BBC . And while Chinese officials are pla
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For first time in 5 years, US gas mileage down, emissions up
A new government report says gas mileage for new vehicles dropped and pollution increased in model year 2019 for the first time in five years.
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A prognostic Alzheimer's disease blood test in the symptom-free stage
Using a blood test, a research team has predicted the risk of Alzheimer's disease in people who were clinically diagnosed as not having Alzheimer's disease but who perceived themselves as cognitively impaired (Subjective Cognitive Declined, SCD). The researchers analyzed blood samples from an SCD cohort. Using a newly developed test, they identified all 22 subjects at study entry who developed Alz
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Neuronal circuits for fine motor skills
Writing, driving a screw or throwing darts are only some of the activities that demand a high level of skill. How the brain masters such exquisite movements has now been described. A map of brainstem circuits reveals which neurons control the fine motor skills of the arm and hand.
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These Are the 17 Must-Watch TV Shows of 2021
From Marvel hopefuls to mind-bending dramas, here are all the series you'll need to keep an eye on this year.
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You're not alone in eating more comfort food during COVID
During the first three months of the pandemic, food-secure people did not change their eating habits very much, although some of them turned a bit more to comfort foods, new research shows. The study also serves as a cautionary tale for how people might want to eat in future pandemics. The researchers conducted a national online survey of more than 3,000 food-secure people from March to May 2020.
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The Cold Case of What's Heating Up Yellowstone's Steamboat Geyser
Scientists ruled out earthquakes and excessive snowfall as culprits in the series of outbursts from the world's tallest active geyser.
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Solo seniors with cognitive impairment hit hard by pandemic
The pandemic has exacerbated isolation and fears for one very vulnerable group of Americans: the 4.3 million older adults with cognitive impairment who live alone.
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The best heated chairs for pain relief and maximum comfort
Indoor and outdoor heated chair options to keep your warm. (Andre Ouellet via Unsplash/) For those who find sitting for any period of time unbearable, heated chairs could be the fix. Heat dilates blood vessels that surround the lumbar region of your spine, increasing the flow of oxygen to your back muscles and stimulating sensory receptors in your skin to help heal damaged tissue and relieve disc
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'What changes is the commitment.' Biden adviser on the next phase of U.S. pandemic response
Luciana Borio, who worked in Trump's White House, is now on Biden's team
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The Price Republicans Paid in Georgia
The probability that Republicans will lose both of this week's Senate runoff elections in Georgia crystallizes the risk the party has accepted by allowing Donald Trump to refashion the GOP in his image. In a state that hasn't elected a Democratic senator since 2000, Democrats now appear to have elected two on a single day by dominating the largest population centers, particularly the Atlanta metr
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U.S. Is Blind to Contagious New Virus Variant, Scientists Warn
It's not too late to curb the contagious variant's spread in the U.S., experts say — but only with a national program for genetic sequencing.
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LA hospitals take drastic steps to grapple with Covid-19 crisis
Winter surge 'has begun' officials warn as California faces ambulance and oxygen shortages
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Powerful stain removers to fight tough blemishes
Save your clothes from stains. (Josh Calabrese via Unsplash/) Finding a stain-removing companion for your typical cleaning products and detergents can often be a trial-and-error process that leaves your home interior or wardrobe at risk. With a myriad of products on the market, finding one that fits your lifestyle and washing needs is a challenge. Below is a compilation of incredibly effective st
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Daily briefing: Meet the species new to science in 2020
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00028-9 A fist-sized lemur, a mushroom unearthed near Heathrow airport and a primate species with a penetrating gaze. Plus, precious Moon ice and what the last-minute Brexit deal means for science.
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You can test positive for COVID-19 after a vaccine—but that doesn't mean the shots don't work
As effective as the two authorized COVID-19 vaccines have been in clinical trials, they don't work instantaneously. You can still catch COVID-19 shortly after getting vaccinated. (Pexels/) Since the first round COVID-19 vaccines became available in the United States in December 2020, several healthcare workers have reported testing positive within a few days of receiving their first shot. However
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UCI study first to link disparities and 'pharmacy deserts' in California
In the United States, Black, Latino and low-income communities have historically lacked nearby access to pharmacy services. To provide the first record of these 'pharmacy deserts' in Los Angeles County, a University of California, Irvine study identified communities where the nearest pharmacy was at least one mile away.
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A Virologist Helps Keep Uruguay Safe from COVID with a Homegrown Test
Gonzalo Moratorio assists his country in steering a more adept response than that mounted in Argentina and Brazil — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Why the platypus sweats milk and is so weird
Mapping the complete genome of the quirky duck-billed platypus reveals how it became what many consider the world's oddest mammal. Australia's beaver-like platypus exhibits an array of bizarre characteristics: it lays eggs instead of giving birth to live babies; it sweats milk; has venomous spurs; and is the only animal to have 10 sex chromosomes. It has baffled scientists ever since Europeans fi
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Self-controlled kids tend to be healthier adults
In a new study, researchers found people who had higher levels of self-control as children were aging more slowly than their peers at age 45. Their bodies and brains were healthier and biologically younger, the researchers report. Self-control, the ability to contain one's own thoughts, feelings and behaviors, and to work toward goals with a plan, is one of the personality traits that makes a chi
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Trump's new rule restricting EPA's use of certain science could have short life
Democrats in Congress might be able to quickly revoke policy
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Wait for me: Cell biologists decipher signal that ensures no chromosome is left behind
UC San Diego cell biologists have found a key clue in the mystery of how chromosomes are inherited correctly every time a cell divides. Using a novel cell probe, they unraveled how a 'matchmaker' molecule stops cell division until components are ready to be split. Precise chromosome duplication is a key factor in proper cell division. If components are altered, even slightly, birth defects and cer
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Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders
Two-dimensional materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, have been booming in research for years. They possess novel properties that can only be explained with the help of the laws of quantum mechanics. Researchers have now used ultracold atoms to gain new insights into previously unknown quantum phenomena. They found out that the magnetic orders between two coupled thin films of atoms co
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Citizenship tasks tax women physicians
Women physicians feel pressured to spend more time in work-related citizenship tasks, based largely on their age and race. Nearly half of women perceived that they spent more time on citizenship tasks than their male colleagues
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Dual smoking and vaping doesn't cut cardiovascular risk: Boston University study
Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death associated with smoking cigarettes. But as use of e-cigarettes ("vaping") becomes more popular, including as a way to cut back on cigarettes, little is known about its effect on cardiovascular health. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study, published in the journal Circulation, finds that vaping may not cut risk of ca
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The biggest chemistry stories of 2020
2020 was an eventful year, with science at the front and center of most news cycles. As this seemingly long year wraps up, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, is highlighting the biggest chemistry stories, top research trends and predictions for the coming year.
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Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Vocal learning leads to modification of call structure in a multi-level baboon society.
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Gut microbe may promote breast cancers
A microbe found in the colon and commonly associated with the development of colitis and colon cancer also may play a role in the development of some breast cancers, according to new research.
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The Bitter Reality of the Post-Trump GOP
Mitt Romney's flight to Washington, D.C., hadn't even taken off yesterday when the chants from the back of the plane began: " TRAI-TOR! TRAI-TOR! TRAI-TOR! " The Republican senator from Utah is used to angering Donald Trump's most die-hard fans. But Romney's latest sin against MAGA orthodoxy—the one that had so riled his fellow passengers—is especially egregious: He's refused to go along with a p
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Climate Expert: Don't Give Up, We Can Still Fix the Environment
Looking Ahead Last year was pretty bad, as far as the global environment is concerned. Massive wildfires , dangerous storms, and record-breaking temperatures all hit the planet in 2020. But falling into climate despair, or a sense of fatalism about the planet, is counterproductive, argues University of Toronto political scientist and environmental policy expert Matthew Hoffman. In a new essay in
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South African Covid variant may affect vaccine efficacy, warn scientists
Mutation reduces ability of antibodies to bind to virus and could make some shots less effective
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Without leadership on vaccine rollout, scams are inevitable
To say the first few weeks of vaccine delivery have been turbulent would be an understatement. States across the US have found themselves struggling with underdeveloped logistics that have caused problems in delivery and made rollout slower than promised . Meanwhile, the debacle at Stanford Medical Center , where a system to rank potential vaccine recipients managed to ignore frontline doctors, w
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Detecting CRISPR/Cas gene doping
All athletes want to be at the top of their game when they compete, but some resort to nefarious approaches to achieve peak muscle growth, speed and agility. Recent developments in gene editing technology could tempt athletes to change their DNA to get an edge. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry demonstrate first steps toward detecting this type of doping both in human plasma
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Young adults say porn is their most helpful source of information about how to have sex
Young adults ages 18-24 years old in the U.S. say that porn is their most helpful source of information about how to have sex, according to a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher published in the journal Archives of Sexual Behavior.
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Light-carrying chips advance machine learning
An international team of researchers found that so-called photonic processors, with which data is processed by means of light, can process information very much more rapidly and in parallel than electronic chips. The results have been published in the scientific journal "Nature".
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In changing oceans, sea stars may be 'drowning'
New Cornell University-led research suggests that starfish, victims of sea star wasting disease (SSWD), may actually be in respiratory distress – literally 'drowning' in their own environment – as elevated microbial activity derived from nearby organic matter and warm ocean temperatures rob the creatures of their ability to breathe.
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Old silicon learns new tricks
Researchers from Nara Institute of Science and Technology fabricated regular arrays of iron-coated silicon crystals that are atomically smooth. The defect-free pyramidal composition of the crystals impart magnetic properties that will enhance the functionality of 3D spintronics and other technologies.
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'Sniffing out' fruity thiols in hoppy beers
Hoppy beers such as pale ales are becoming increasingly popular. One reason is their pleasant fruity aroma that partially stems from compounds called thiols. Brewers have been looking for an accurate way to track thiols in beer, but current methods typically are not sensitive enough or require use of potentially harmful substances. Now, researchers in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistr
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The best fabric armchairs for your living room
Relish in the comfort. (Mackenzie Martin via Unsplash/) Settling into your favorite armchair with a book, or lounging back to catch up on your streaming – are the kinds of things most of us look forward to at the end of a long day. The right chair can make a living room both comfortable and stylish, make for easier everyday living, and make gatherings with your family and friends possible. Fabric
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Competing magnetic orders in a bilayer Hubbard model with ultracold atoms
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03058-x A bilayer Fermi–Hubbard model is realized in two coupled two-dimensional layers of fermionic ultracold atoms by tuning the interlayer coupling strength to create a crossover between magnetic orderings.
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Control of osteoblast regeneration by a train of Erk activity waves
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03085-8 The rate of scale regeneration in zebrafish is controlled by the frequency of rhythmic travelling waves of Erk activity, which are broadcast from a central source to induce ring-like patterns of osteoblast tissue growth.
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Design of biologically active binary protein 2D materials
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03120-8 Design of a two-component protein array enables robust formation of complex large-scale ordered biologically active materials.
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Gut-licensed IFNγ+ NK cells drive LAMP1+TRAIL+ anti-inflammatory astrocytes
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03116-4 A subpopulation of astrocytes characterized by the expression of LAMP1 and TRAIL limits inflammation in the central nervous system through a mechanism involving the microbiota-modulated expression of IFNγ in meningeal natural killer cells.
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Structures of the glucocorticoid-bound adhesion receptor GPR97–Go complex
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03083-w The authors report on the structure of a glucocorticoid-bound adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor–G protein complex.
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Poleward and weakened westerlies during Pliocene warmth
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03062-1 Analysis of dust from marine sediments in the North Pacific shows that warm periods during the Pliocene witnessed weaker and more poleward westerlies than during subsequent glacial periods.
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Platypus and echidna genomes reveal mammalian biology and evolution
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03039-0 New reference genomes of the two extant monotreme lineages (platypus and echidna) reveal the ancestral and lineage-specific genomic changes that shape both monotreme and mammalian evolution.
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In vivo base editing rescues Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome in mice
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03086-7 In a mouse model of progeria, an adenine base editor delivered with adeno-associated virus corrects the pathogenic mutation in LMNA, rescues vascular pathology and markedly extends the lifespan of the mice.
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An integrated space-to-ground quantum communication network over 4,600 kilometres
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03093-8 A quantum network that combines 700 fibre and two ground-to-satellite links achieves quantum key distribution between more than 150 users over a combined distance of 4,600 kilometres.
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Origins of structural and electronic transitions in disordered silicon
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03072-z Machine learning models enable atomistic simulations of phase transitions in amorphous silicon, predict electronic fingerprints, and show that the pressure-induced crystallization occurs over three distinct stages.
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11 TOPS photonic convolutional accelerator for optical neural networks
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03063-0 An optical vector convolutional accelerator operating at more than ten trillion operations per second is used to create an optical convolutional neural network that can successfully recognize handwritten digit images with 88 per cent accuracy.
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Genomic basis of geographical adaptation to soil nitrogen in rice
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03091-w OsTCP19 is a modulator of the tillering response to nitrogen in rice, and introgression of an allele of OsTCP19 associated with a high tillering response into modern rice cultivars markedly improves their nitrogen-use efficiency.
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Single-defect phonons imaged by electron microscopy
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03049-y State-of-the-art electron energy-loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope maps the detailed phonon spectra of single defects in silicon carbide
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Parallel convolutional processing using an integrated photonic tensor core
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03070-1 An integrated photonic processor, based on phase-change-material memory arrays and chip-based optical frequency combs, which can operate at speeds of trillions of multiply-accumulate (MAC) operations per second, is demonstrated.
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Activation and disruption of a neural mechanism for novel choice in monkeys
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03115-5 The primate medial frontal cortex has a key role in mediating the ability to choose between new options based on little or no direct experience.
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Core-collapse supernova explosion theory
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03059-w The factors affecting how and why supernovae occur are discussed, and the current status of core-collapse supernova explosion theory is reviewed.
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Mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery operates by β-barrel switching
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03113-7 Proteins are inserted into the outer mitochondrial membrane by the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery, two structural forms of which are presented here, suggesting the mechanism involved.
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A functional map for diverse forelimb actions within brainstem circuitry
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03080-z This study reveals a functional map for skilled forelimb movements within the lateral rostral medulla of the brainstem on the basis of the identification of specific neuronal populations by axonal targets.
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Base editor repairs mutation found in the premature-ageing syndrome progeria
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03573-x No cure exists for the lethal premature-ageing condition Hutchinson–Gilford progeria. A gene-editing tool — adenine base editors — offers a way to treat the condition in mice. Could this approach lead to an effective therapy?
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Machine learning reveals the complexity of dense amorphous silicon
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03574-w Transitions between amorphous forms of solids and liquids are difficult to study. Machine learning has now provided fresh insight into pressure-induced transformations of amorphous silicon, opening the way to studies of other systems.
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Artificial intelligence accelerated by light
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03572-y The explosive growth of artificial intelligence calls for rapidly increasing computing power. Two reported photonic processors could meet these power requirements and revolutionize artificial-intelligence hardware.
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Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Musical masterworks such as the Queen of the Night's Aria from Mozart's The Magic Flute, are examples of the sounds trained human voices can produce. The precondition for vocal virtuosity as well as for any spoken word is vocal learning, the ability to imitate auditory input. Some songbirds and bats can do this, but humans excel. We can acquire new languages into old age.
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Researcher cracks the hidden strengthening mechanism in biological ceramics
Ling Li, an assistant professor in mechanical engineering at Virginia Tech, has found insights into building stronger and tougher ceramics by studying the shells of bivalve mollusks.
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Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Musical masterworks such as the Queen of the Night's Aria from Mozart's The Magic Flute, are examples of the sounds trained human voices can produce. The precondition for vocal virtuosity as well as for any spoken word is vocal learning, the ability to imitate auditory input. Some songbirds and bats can do this, but humans excel. We can acquire new languages into old age.
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Manufacturing process of ultra-thin sensor for smart contact lenses
Smart contact lenses could soon become mainstream thanks to a new manufacturing process that has allowed researchers to develop a multifunctional ultra-thin sensor layer.
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Will global warming bring a change in the winds? Dust from the deep sea provides a clue
Climate researchers describe a new method of tracking the ancient history of the westerly winds–a proxy for what we may experience in a future warming world.
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Ineffective 'learning styles' theory persists in education
A new review by Swansea University reveals there is widespread belief, around the world, in a teaching method that is not only ineffective but may actually be harmful to learners. For decades educators have been advised to match their teaching to the supposed 'learning styles' of students. However, a new paper by Professor Phil Newton, of Swansea University Medical School, highlights that this ine
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Identifying strategies to advance research on traumatic brain injury's effect on women
New work reveals gaps in and opportunities for research to improve understanding of the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in women.
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Link between dietary fiber and depression partially explained by gut-brain interactions
Fiber is a commonly recommended part of a healthy diet. That's because it's good for your health in so many ways — from weight management to reducing the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. A new study also finds that it might be linked with a reduced risk of depression, especially in premenopausal women.
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COVID-19 unmasked: Math model suggests optimal treatment strategies
A biology-based mathematical model indicates why COVID-19 outcomes vary widely and how therapy can be tailored to match the needs of specific patient groups.
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Diet and lifestyle guidelines can greatly reduce gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms
Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition affecting 30 percent of the US population and often controlled with medication. While doctors commonly recommend specific dietary and lifestyle changes to control symptoms, there is little evidence about their effectiveness. Results of a large-scale study suggest such changes, including regular exercise, can reduce symptoms substantially.
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Biden Climate Team Says It Underestimated Trump's Damage
Agency reviews have found greater budget cuts, staff losses and elimination of climate programs than initially thought — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ring lights that will make your selfies pop
See yourself better. (Mike Marquez via Unsplash/) You don't need to be a YouTube or Instagram influencer to invest in a lighting set up that makes you look amazing—especially when it's this simple. A ring light produces such flattering images because it acts as a filler light, banishing unattractive shadows, and putting the spotlight on you regardless of the other lights (or lack of lights) in th
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CES trends to look out for at this year's virtual conference
It seems unlikely we'll get back to this kind of CES crowd any time soon. (Stan Horaczek /) When the tech world converged on Las Vegas roughly one year ago, the Consumer Electronics Show was a much different animal. This year, COVID-19 has caused the annual gadget bacchanal to go fully online. With the 2021 virtual show kicking off next week, now seems like the perfect time to look back at the 20
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Whitehaven coal mine: Government refuses to call in plans
The government rejects holding an inquiry into plans for a coal mine, meaning it can progress.
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New research finds ginger counters certain autoimmune diseases in mice
The main bioactive compound of ginger root lowers autoantibody production and helps halt disease progression in mice with antiphospholipid syndrome and lupus.
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'Sniffing out' fruity thiols in hoppy beers
Hoppy beers such as pale ales are becoming increasingly popular. One reason is their pleasant fruity aroma that partially stems from compounds called thiols. Brewers have been looking for an accurate way to track thiols in beer, but current methods typically are not sensitive enough or require use of potentially harmful substances. Now, researchers in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistr
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Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
The University of Wyoming team created an environment in a microwave oven to successfully convert raw coal powder into nano-graphite, which is used as a lubricant and in items ranging from fire extinguishers to lithium ion batteries.
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How Earth's oddest mammal got to be so bizarre
Often considered the world's oddest mammal, Australia's beaver-like, duck-billed platypus exhibits an array of bizarre characteristics: it lays eggs instead of giving birth to live babies, sweats milk, has venomous spurs and is even equipped with 10 sex chromosomes. Now, an international team of researchers led by University of Copenhagen has conducted a unique mapping of the platypus genome and f
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A better pen-and-ink system for drawing flexible circuits
Conductive ink is a great tool for printing flexible electronic circuits on surfaces. But these inks can be costly, they do not work on some materials, and devices to apply them can plug up. Now, scientists report in ACS Applied Electronic Materials that they have developed inexpensive conductive inks for clog-free ballpoint pens that can allow users to 'write' circuits almost anywhere — even on
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Detecting CRISPR/Cas gene doping
All athletes want to be at the top of their game when they compete, but some resort to nefarious approaches to achieve peak muscle growth, speed and agility. Recent developments in gene editing technology could tempt athletes to change their DNA to get an edge. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Analytical Chemistry demonstrate first steps toward detecting this type of doping both in human plasma
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Businesses stand to benefit from sustainable restructuring
Is it profitable for a company to switch to sustainable production? Researchers conclude that it probably often is.
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How can we help victims of torture?
Torture victims often reap less benefit from ordinary treatment. New insight might give new hope.
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The Way Americans Remember the Blackwell Sisters Shortchanges Their Legacy
Elizabeth and Emily Blackwell deserve to have their incredible stories told in full
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Researchers fabricate arrays of atomically smooth iron-coated silicon pyramids with unusual magnetic properties
Ultra-small integrated circuits have revolutionized mobile phones, home appliances, cars, and other everyday technologies. To further miniaturize electronics and enable advanced functions, circuits must be reliably fabricated in three dimensions. Achieving ultrafine 3-D shape control by etching into silicon is difficult, because even atomic-scale damage reduces device performance. Researchers at N
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Wanna Go Out In Public? Check Out This Ridiculous Biohazard Suit
Darth Helmet YouTuber Lewis Hilsenteger, who runs the channel Unbox Therapy, just got his hands on a particularly apocalyptic take on the future: a BioVYZR "personal air-purifying shield." The device, essentially a $379 helmet-backpack-contraption, claims to filter out nasty coronavirus particles using filters on its vents. An electric fan circulates air to make sure the "shield" won't fog up imm
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Researcher cracks the hidden strengthening mechanism in biological ceramics
In addition to adding strength, this design allows the structure to use its crack patterns to minimize damage into the inner shell.
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Alpha-ray missile therapy: Tumor cells attacked from intracellular region
Researchers have developed a technique of attacking cancer cells with lethal alpha rays from within by using a nutrient transporter to deliver radionuclides into malignant tumors.
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Researcher cracks the hidden strengthening mechanism in biological ceramics
In addition to adding strength, this design allows the structure to use its crack patterns to minimize damage into the inner shell.
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COVID-19 generally 'mild' in young children: Evidence review
Babies and asymptomatic cases account for up to half of COVID-19 infections in the under-five age group, which has implications for vaccination programs, a new study has found.
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Smoking associated with increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms
Smoking is associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms and smokers are more likely to attend hospital than non-smokers, a study has found.
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America Is Nearing the End of Law
Today, members of the House of Representatives and the Senate will meet in a special joint session for the final official stage of the 2020 presidential election: the counting of the electoral votes. In any remotely normal election, this moment would pass with little notice, a mere formality. But not so this year, because Donald Trump and his allies in Congress refuse to accept that he lost the e
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EU approves Moderna jab amid tensions over slow rollout of vaccines
Move should ease frustrations over low supplies of Pfizer vaccine and EU's longer authorisation process Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The European Medicines Agency has approved the Moderna vaccine, making it the second coronavirus shot to be cleared for general use across the EU, as tensions continued to rise over the slow progress of vaccination programmes in the
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Britain could be mass-producing its Covid shot. Shame we junked our industrial base | Aditya Chakrabortty
The dire state of UK manufacturing has left us dependent on other nations. We may soon find out why some call this a 'national security risk' Everything now hinges on a vaccine: how many more Britons die, whether the NHS finally breaks, how long the UK stays locked down. All depends on how fast the country can get vaccinated against this plague. Yet we're in this position in large part because of
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UK Covid death toll rises by 1,041 – a record rise for second wave
Highest daily figure since 21 April brings number of people to have died from virus to 77,346 Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage For the first time, the British government has announced more than 1,000 Covid deaths in its daily report on the virus, and revealed another record rise in cases. It said a further 1,041 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for C
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Why we use our smartphone at cafés
Why do people fiddle with their smartphones when they're with other people? Researchers have identified three main reasons.
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A prognostic Alzheimer's disease blood test in the symptom-free stage
Using a blood test, a German-Dutch research team has predicted the risk of Alzheimer's disease in people who were clinically diagnosed as not having Alzheimer's disease but who perceived themselves as cognitively impaired (Subjective Cognitive Declined, SCD). The researchers analyzed blood samples from an SCD cohort supervised at the Alzheimer Center Amsterdam. Using a test developed in Bochum, th
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Long-term study finds dozens of new genetic markers associated with lifetime bone growth
A multidisciplinary team of researchers has discovered several genetic markers associated with bone mineral accrual, which could ultimately help identify causes of eventual osteoporosis earlier in life through genetic testing.
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Advancing the study of T cells to improve immunotherapy
DALLAS – Jan. 6, 2020 – UT Southwestern scientists have developed a new method to study the molecular characteristics of T cells, critical immune cells that recognize and attack invaders in the body such as viruses, bacteria, and cancer.
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Gut microbe may promote breast cancers
A microbe found in the colon and commonly associated with the development of colitis and colon cancer also may play a role in the development of some breast cancers, according to new research from investigators with the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and its Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy.
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Israel can expect a major earthquake of 6.5 on the Richter scale in the coming years
The researchers warn: In the coming years, it is likely that a devastating earthquake will hit, causing hundreds of deaths.
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New paper describes use of geographic monitoring for early COVID cluster detection
Researchers describe development of a near-real time spatial assessment of COVID-19 cases to help guide local medical responses to clusters of outbreaks of the virus at the local level, in a paper, entitled 'Geographic monitoring for early disease detection (GeoMEDD),' in Nature Scientific Reports
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Guinea baboons grunt with an accent
Vocal learning leads to modification of call structure in a multi-level baboon society
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How Much Alcohol Is Too Much?
Binge drinking isn't the only harmful booze habit. Other forms of heavy drinking come with consequences, too.
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Trump Lost Everything for the Republicans
"If we nominate Trump, we will get destroyed … and we will deserve it," Senator Lindsey Graham tweeted on May 16, 2016 . The South Carolinian's prediction didn't age well at first. Come January 2017, the Republican Party was in the catbird seat. With Trump's upset win over the Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton, it controlled the White House, the Senate, and the House of Representatives. Trump
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How a Dwarf Giraffe Discovery Surprised Scientists
Like someone put a giraffe's head and neck on a horse's body.
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'Incredible' gene-editing result in mice inspires plans to treat premature-aging syndrome in children
Gene therapy using "base editor" derived from CRISPR extends life span, preserved aortas in mice with progeria
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Surrey unveils breakthrough manufacturing process of ultra-thin sensor for smart contact lenses
Smart contact lenses could soon become mainstream thanks to a new manufacturing process that has allowed the University of Surrey to develop a multifunctional ultra-thin sensor layer.
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Study: Black Americans, women, conservatives more hesitant to trust COVID-19 vaccine
A survey of approximately 5,000 Americans suggests that 31.1 percent of the US public does not intend to get the COVID-19 vaccine once it becomes available to them – and the likelihood of vaccine refusal is highest among Black Americans, women and conservatives.
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Mighty morphing 3D printing
Engineers at the University of Maryland have created a new shape-changing or "morphing" 3D printing nozzle, which offers researchers new means for 3D printing "fiber-filled composites."
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New evidence: Effects of Huntington's disease mutation may begin in childhood
Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that there is a neurodevelopmental component to late-onset neurodegeneration occurring in the brain of huntingtin gene (HTT) mutation carriers, and this increased susceptibility to brain cell death begins during childhood. Experts discuss evidence that the HTT gene mutation affects brain and body growth based on a unique study of children at risk for HD, th
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Researcher cracks the hidden strengthening mechanism in biological ceramics
In addition to adding strength, this design allows the structure to use its crack patterns to minimize damage into the inner shell.
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It's getting hot in here: Warming world will fry power plant production in coming years
During the year's hottest months, many people rely on electricity-generated cooling systems to remain comfortable. But the power plants that keep air conditioners pushing out cold air could soon be in a vicious cycle in a warming world-not able to keep up with growing demands on hotter days and driving up greenhouse gas emissions to dangerous levels.
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The world's first integrated quantum communication network
Chinese scientists have established the world's first integrated quantum communication network, combining over 700 optical fibers on the ground with two ground-to-satellite links to achieve quantum key distribution over a total distance of 4,600 kilometers for users across the country.
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Chinese scientists uncover gene for rice adaption to low soil nitrogen
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have found a gene that plays an important role in helping rice adapt to low soil nitrogen.
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Neuronal circuits for fine motor skills
Writing, driving a screw or throwing darts are only some of the activities that demand a high level of skill. How the brain masters such exquisite movements has now been described in the journal "Nature" by a team of researchers at the University of Basel and the Friedrich Miescher Institute for Biomedical Research. A map of brainstem circuits reveals which neurons control the fine motor skills of
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Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, fatalities in Detroit area during COVID-19 pandemic
Changes in out-of-hospital cardiac arrests and fatalities in the Detroit area during the COVID-19 pandemic are compared with year-earlier events for the same period in this observational study.
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COVID-19 maps, public knowledge, risk perceptions and behavioral intentions
The findings of this survey study suggest that simply providing maps with COVID-19 case information wasn't necessarily associated with improved public knowledge, risk perception or reported intent to adhere to health guidelines.
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Will global warming bring a change in the winds? Dust from the deep sea provides a clue
In a new paper published in Nature, climate researchers from Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory describe a new method of tracking the ancient history of the westerly winds–a proxy for what we may experience in a future warming world.
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Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems.
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DNA-editing method shows promise to treat mouse model of progeria
Researchers have successfully used a DNA-editing technique to extend the lifespan of mice with the genetic variation associated with progeria, a rare genetic disease that causes extreme premature aging in children and can significantly shorten their life expectancy.
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When Uber and Lyft enter cities, vehicle ownership increases
When ridesourcing companies Uber and Lyft show up in urban areas, vehicle registrations per capita increase by 0.7% on average, increasing even more in car-dependent cities. Researchers made this discovery by analyzing data from major US cities between 2011 to 2017, comparing trends in cities where Uber and Lyft entered with those where they didn't. They also found that Uber and Lyft displace tran
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Scientists Worried New COVID Strain Will Cause Devastating New Wave
As the more infectious strain of SARS-CoV-2 recently identified in England continues to spread, experts are concerned that we're in store for a devastating new wave of COVID. Scientists don't yet have a perfect understanding of the B.1.1.7 variant of the coronavirus, Science Magazine reports , but the data they do have suggests that it's considerably more infectious than the strains that have thu
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Infections data provide glimmers of hope in UK's coronavirus crisis
The worst-hit areas are no longer deteriorating and 'excess deaths' are lower than last spring
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Researchers discover a novel mechanism of recruiting ARF family proteins
The small GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family are key initiators of various physiological processes including secretion, endocytosis, phagocytosis and signal transduction. Arf family proteins function to mediate recruitment of cytosolic effectors to specific subcellular compartments. This process facilitates Arf effectors to perform cargo recognition, lipid modification or other ce
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Newly observed monovalent calcium ion displays unexpected metallicity and ferromagnetism
Calcium ions are present in rocks, bones, shells, biominerals, geological deposits, ocean sediments, and many other important materials. Calcium ions also play major roles in the retention of carbon dioxide in natural waters, water hardness, signal transduction and tissue generation. As one of the alkaline earth metals, the calcium atom has two valence electrons according to the octet rule. Up to
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Researchers discover a novel mechanism of recruiting ARF family proteins
The small GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family are key initiators of various physiological processes including secretion, endocytosis, phagocytosis and signal transduction. Arf family proteins function to mediate recruitment of cytosolic effectors to specific subcellular compartments. This process facilitates Arf effectors to perform cargo recognition, lipid modification or other ce
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First global study shows uneven urbanization among large cities in the last two decades
The world has experienced dramatic urbanization in recent decades. According to the latest report from the United Nations (UN), the global population in 2018 was 7.6 billion and the urban population was 4.2 billion. By 2050, the global population is expected to soar to 9.7 billion, with 68% of the population living in urban areas.
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A bit too much: Reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing
Given a list of cities and the distances between each pair of cities, how do you determine the shortest route that visits each city exactly once and returns to the starting location? This famous problem is called the 'traveling salesman problem' and is an example of a combinatorial optimization problem. Solving these problems using conventional computers can be very time-consuming, and special dev
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The revelation of the crustal geometry of the western Qilian Mountains, NE Tibetan Plateau
As the largest orogenic plateau on Earth, the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau was caused by a complex crustal deformation process during the continuous collision and compression process between the Indian and Eurasian continents starting at least 60-50 Ma ago. The formation of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau records the collision of the two continents and the deformation process and mechanism within the continent
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New review says the ineffective 'learning styles' theory persists in education
A new review by Swansea University reveals there is widespread belief, around the world, in a teaching method that is not only ineffective but may actually be harmful to learners.
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Can blocking enzymes reverse Alzheimer's memory loss?
Inhibiting certain enzymes involved in abnormal gene transcription may offer a way to restore memory loss associated with Alzheimer's disease, a new study in mice suggests. The findings could pave the way toward new treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD). "By treating AD mouse models with a compound to inhibit these enzymes, we were able to normalize gene expression, restore neuronal function, a
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The new face of the Antarctic
In the future, the Antarctic could become a greener place and be colonized by new species. At the same time, some species will likely disappear. 25 researchers recently presented these and many other findings in a major international project, in which they analyzed hundreds of articles on the Antarctic published in the past ten years. By doing so, the team have provided an exceptionally comprehens
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Producing milk from yeast that looks and tastes like cow's milk
Might a new technological development of researchers from Tel Aviv University soon revolutionize the dairy products we consume? The initiators of the development believe that in the not-too-distant future we will be able to buy dairy products in the supermarket that are identical in taste and color to the ordinary dairy products that we consume today, but with one small difference: the dairy produ
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New work provides insight into the relationship between complexity and diversity
Most forms of life—species of mammals, birds, plants, reptiles, amphibians, etc.—are most diverse at Earth's equator and least diverse at the poles. This distribution is called the latitudinal gradient of biodiversity.
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Researchers discover how a bio-pesticide works against spider mites
Scientists have uncovered why a food-ingredient-based pesticide made from safflower and cottonseed oils is effective against two-spotted spider mites that attack over a thousand species of plants while sparing the mites' natural predators.
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Scientists uncover gene for rice adaption to low soil nitrogen
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have found a gene that plays an important role in helping rice adapt to low soil nitrogen.
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Sådan er verdens mærkeligste pattedyr blevet så bizart
Næbdyret er ofte blevet kåret som verdens mærkeligste pattedyr. Det lille ande-bæver-agtige…
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The new face of the Antarctic
In the future, the Antarctic could become a greener place and be colonized by new species. At the same time, some species will likely disappear. 25 researchers recently presented these and many other findings in a major international project, in which they analyzed hundreds of articles on the Antarctic published in the past ten years. By doing so, the team have provided an exceptionally comprehens
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Producing milk from yeast that looks and tastes like cow's milk
Might a new technological development of researchers from Tel Aviv University soon revolutionize the dairy products we consume? The initiators of the development believe that in the not-too-distant future we will be able to buy dairy products in the supermarket that are identical in taste and color to the ordinary dairy products that we consume today, but with one small difference: the dairy produ
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New work provides insight into the relationship between complexity and diversity
Most forms of life—species of mammals, birds, plants, reptiles, amphibians, etc.—are most diverse at Earth's equator and least diverse at the poles. This distribution is called the latitudinal gradient of biodiversity.
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Researchers discover how a bio-pesticide works against spider mites
Scientists have uncovered why a food-ingredient-based pesticide made from safflower and cottonseed oils is effective against two-spotted spider mites that attack over a thousand species of plants while sparing the mites' natural predators.
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Scientists uncover gene for rice adaption to low soil nitrogen
Chinese scientists from the Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have found a gene that plays an important role in helping rice adapt to low soil nitrogen.
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The Problem With a 50–50 Senate
W hen the networks declared Joe Biden the winner of the presidential election, his agenda seemed stillborn. Because most observers assumed that Republicans would win at least one of the two Georgia Senate runoffs and retain control of the upper chamber, they thought that Biden wouldn't get much of anything done. But Raphael Warnock defeated Kelly Loeffler in Georgia last night, and Jon Ossoff cur
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When Uber and Lyft enter cities, vehicle ownership increases
When ridesourcing companies Uber and Lyft show up in urban areas, vehicle registrations per capita increase by 0.7% on average, increasing even more in car-dependent cities. Researchers reporting in the journal iScience on January 6 made this discovery by analyzing data from major US cities between 2011 to 2017, comparing trends in cities where Uber and Lyft entered with those where they didn't. T
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Proteins engineered to form honeycomb structures can block uptake of receptors from the surface of cells
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors.
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Will global warming bring a change in the winds? Dust from the deep sea provides a clue
The westerlies—or westerly winds—play an important role in weather and climate both locally and on a global scale, by influencing precipitation patterns, impacting ocean circulation and steering tropical cyclones. So, finding a way to assess how they will change as the climate warms is crucial.
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How to turn moments into momentum | Renee Montgomery
Inspired by the rising movement against racism in the US, WNBA champion Renee Montgomery made an unexpected decision: she opted out of her dream job. As she says in this stirring talk, she wanted to "make it felt," and that meant turning her attention from the court to the community. But you don't have to be a basketball star to make it felt; anyone can turn important moments into meaningful momen
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Proteins engineered to form honeycomb structures can block uptake of receptors from the surface of cells
A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors.
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Link between dietary fiber and depression partially explained by gut-brain interactions
Fiber is a commonly recommended part of a healthy diet. That's because it's good for your health in so many ways–from weight management to reducing the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and some types of cancer. A new study also finds that it might be linked with a reduced risk of depression, especially in premenopausal women. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The Nor
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Sexual dysfunction hits some women harder than others as they age
Sexual dysfunction often accompanies the menopause transition. Yet, not all women experience it the same. A new study identified the determinants that affect a woman's risk of sexual dysfunction and sought to determine the effectiveness of hormone therapy in decreasing that risk and modifying sexual behavior. Study results are published online in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopa
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Watch a moon jellyfish make walls of water to glide along
Strategy provides extra push through water
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FT Health: Priorities for 2021
FT writers and readers identify global challenges and WHO chief outlines case for investing in public health
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2D CaCl crystals with +1 calcium ions displaying unexpected metallicity and ferromagnetism
Counter to conventional wisdom that the only valence state of Ca ions under ambient conditions is +2 and corresponding crystals are insulating and nonferromagnetic, scientists in China made exciting discoveries of two-dimensional CaCl crystals with +1 calcium ions, which have unexpected metallicity, room-temperature ferromagnetism, heterojunction, piezoelectricity-like property, and distinct hydro
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Retraction Note: Mass–Energy Equivalence Extension onto a Superfluid Quantum Vacuum
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80949-z
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New work provides insight into the relationship between complexity and diversity
Parts of the planet that are diverse biologically and culturally are even more diverse than you'd expect. A group of researchers developed a theory to show why richer environments are also more complex environments, where you tend to find more species and languages.
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A bit too much: Reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing
Quantum annealers are devices that physically implement a quantum system called the 'Ising model' to solve combinatorial optimization problems. However, the coefficients of the Ising model often require a large bit width, making it difficult to implement physically. Now, scientists demonstrate a method to reduce the bit width of any Ising model, increasing the applicability and versatility of quan
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First global study shows uneven urbanization among large cities in the last two decades
In the first-ever study on the characteristics of urbanization in large cities around the world, researchers at the University of Hong Kong analyzed cities' urban built-up areas (BUAs) expansion, population growth and greening BUA changes, and revealed a hugely uneven pace of urbanization in those cities in the last two decades. They warn against major challenges posed to sustainable development i
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Drone lugter sig frem med antenne fra møl
Med et møls antenne monteret på en drone har amerikanske forskere udviklet bio-dronen 'Smellicopter'. Den skal i fremtiden lugte sig frem til sprængstoffer.
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Scientists Want to Send a Robot Made of Ice to Another Planet
IceBot A team of researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are trying to figure out if we can send robots that are made out of ice to another planet, IEEE Spectrum reports . The idea is to create a robot design that can leverage local resources to repair itself in case it ever breaks down. As detailed in a new paper presented at the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and
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Identifying strategies to advance research on traumatic brain injury's effect on women
Analysis from a workshop convened by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) in 2017 reveals gaps in and opportunities for research to improve understanding of the effects of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in women. A new paper in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation summarizes and updates the findings presented during the 'Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury in Wom
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Researchers discover how a bio-pesticide works against spider mites
Scientists have uncovered why a food-ingredient-based pesticide made from safflower and cottonseed oils is effective against two-spotted spider mites that attack over a thousand species of plants while sparing the mites' natural predators.
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Analysis of SARS-CoV-2 immune response several months post-infection hints at protective immunity
Researchers who studied antibody and immune cell responses in more than 180 men and women who had recovered from COVID-19 report these patients' immune memory to the virus – across all immune cell types studied – was measurable for up to 8 months after symptoms appeared.
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New review says the ineffective 'learning styles' theory persists in education
A new review by Swansea University reveals there is widespread belief, around the world, in a teaching method that is not only ineffective but may actually be harmful to learners.For decades educators have been advised to match their teaching to the supposed 'learning styles' of students. However, a new paper by Professor Phil Newton, of Swansea University Medical School, highlights that this inef
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HKUST Researchers Discover a Novel Mechanism of Recruiting Arf Family Proteins to specific subcellular localizations
Researchers of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) recently uncovered a novel molecular mechanism that regulates the subcellular localizations of Arf proteins, shedding light on the mechanism underlying various inherited diseases and offering new insight to the treatment of them.
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A bit too much: Reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing
Quantum annealers are devices that physically implement a quantum system called the 'Ising model' to solve combinatorial optimization problems. However, the coefficients of the Ising model often require a large bit width, making it difficult to implement physically. Now, scientists demonstrate a method to reduce the bit width of any Ising model, increasing the applicability and versatility of quan
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Galaxy-Size Bubbles Discovered Towering Over the Milky Way
When Peter Predehl , an astrophysicist at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany, first laid eyes on the new map of the universe's hottest objects, he immediately recognized the aftermath of a galactic catastrophe. A bright yellow cloud billowed tens of thousands of light-years upward from the Milky Way's flat disk, with a fainter twin reflected below. The structure was
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'Virtual biopsies' could replace tissue biopsies in future thanks to new technique
A new advanced computing technique using routine medical scans to enable doctors to take fewer, more accurate tumor biopsies, has been developed by cancer researchers. This is an important step towards precision tissue sampling for cancer patients to help select the best treatment. In future the technique could even replace clinical biopsies with 'virtual biopsies', sparing patients invasive proce
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The new face of the Antarctic
In the future, the Antarctic could become a greener place and be colonized by new species. At the same time, some species will likely disappear.
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Patient-reported loss of smell in 86 percent of mild COVID-19 cases, study finds
A reduced sense of smell, or olfactory dysfunction, is one of the most common symptoms of COVID-19. A recent study has examined the symptom's prevalence and recovery in patients with varying degrees of severity of COVID-19.
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In 2021, as ever, the best diets are simple
Each of these servings is quite large, but they're full of healthy grains and veggies. (Ella Olsson/Pexels/) Every year, as millions of people around the world forge new resolutions to eat healthier and lose weight, US News & World Report releases a conveniently timed ranking of the best diets. A panel of experts in obesity, nutrition, diabetes, heart disease, and food psychology rigorously rate
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Revealing hungry salmon with sound waves
In recent years, Norwegian aquaculture has put a lot of effort into aiming to reduce production costs and increase production efficiency, while at the same time trying to minimize environmental impacts and ensure fish welfare.
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Study demonstrates the quenching of an antiferromagnet into high resistivity states
Antiferromagnetism is a type of magnetism in which parallel but opposing spins occur spontaneously within a material. Antiferromagnets, materials that exhibit antiferromagnetism, have advantageous characteristics that make them particularly promising for fabricating spintronic devices.
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Start the New Year Right: By Watching These Robots' Awesome Dance Moves
2020 was a tough year. There was almost nothing good about it, and we saw it off with a "good riddance" and hopes for a better 2021. But robotics company Boston Dynamics took a different approach to closing out the year: when all else fails, why not dance? The company released a video last week that I dare you to watch without laughing—or at the very least, cracking a pretty big smile. Because da
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Smoking associated with increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms
Smoking is associated with an increased risk of COVID-19 symptoms and smokers are more likely to attend hospital than non-smokers, a study has found.
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The new face of the Antarctic
In the future, the Antarctic could become a greener place and be colonised by new species. At the same time, some species will likely disappear.
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Majority of media stories fail to label 'preprint' COVID-19 research — study
A new SFU-led study finds that less than half of media stories in early 2020 featuring COVID-19 "preprint" research–research that has not yet been peer-reviewed–accurately framed the studies as being preprints or unverified research.
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Researchers featured in Medical Research Journal for Artificial Intelligence Studies
A paper written by Arash Shaban-Nejad, PhD, MPH, an assistant professor, and Nariman Ammar, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow, both at the Center for Biomedical Informatics in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, was recently published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research – Medical Informatics. The paper discussed how an artificial intelligence system
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Nanoparticle drug-delivery system developed to treat brain disorders
To facilitate successful delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain, a team of bioengineers and physicians created a nanoparticle platform, which can facilitate therapeutically effective delivery of encapsulated agents in mice with a physically breached or intact BBB. In a mouse model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), they observed that the delivery system showed three times more accumulation in b
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Revealing hungry salmon with sound waves
In recent years, Norwegian aquaculture has put a lot of effort into aiming to reduce production costs and increase production efficiency, while at the same time trying to minimize environmental impacts and ensure fish welfare.
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
PHYSIOLOGY Illustration of seasonal diapause in flesh fly pupae. Flesh flies spend the winter in pupal diapause (Top). When conditions warm in spring, pupae initiate adult development (Middle), and emerge as adults in late spring to early summer (Bottom). Image credit: Erin Kelso (University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO). Regulation…
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Robots in the air and on the water could improve shellfish farming
Aquaculture is the world's fastest-growing animal-protein production sector, and the use of robots in many industries is growing quickly, as well. At North Carolina State University, researchers are finding ways to build on these trends to increase marine aquaculture yields, ensure food safety and decrease the pressure to harvest wild seafood.
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Why feral cats are such a threat to Australian wildlife
A team of researchers at the University of Tasmania has determined why feral cats are such a threat to wildlife in Australia. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes comparing the behavior of feral cats in Tasmania with a native predator—the spotted-tail quoll—and what they learned from it.
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The Biden Presidency Now Stands a Chance
Updated at 9:45 a.m. J oe Biden is poised to begin his presidency with a Democratic majority in both chambers of Congress and a freer hand to install his government and pursue—if not necessarily enact—an expansive legislative agenda. Reverend Raphael Warnock defeated Senator Kelly Loeffler in the Georgia runoff last night, and challenger Jon Ossoff may be declared the victor over David Perdue tod
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Robots in the air and on the water could improve shellfish farming
Aquaculture is the world's fastest-growing animal-protein production sector, and the use of robots in many industries is growing quickly, as well. At North Carolina State University, researchers are finding ways to build on these trends to increase marine aquaculture yields, ensure food safety and decrease the pressure to harvest wild seafood.
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Why feral cats are such a threat to Australian wildlife
A team of researchers at the University of Tasmania has determined why feral cats are such a threat to wildlife in Australia. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes comparing the behavior of feral cats in Tasmania with a native predator—the spotted-tail quoll—and what they learned from it.
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The empire strikes back: Resurging imperialism threatens geopolitical stability
In recent years, nationalist leaders have staked claims on lost territories in order to restore the glory of former empires. Lars-Erik Cederman believes that this rise in revanchist nationalism poses a threat to geopolitical stability.
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Publisher Correction: Distinct hypothalamic control of same- and opposite-sex mounting behaviour in mice
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03143-1
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'Virtual biopsies' could replace tissue biopsies in future thanks to new technique
A new advanced computing technique using routine medical scans to enable doctors to take fewer, more accurate tumour biopsies, has been developed by cancer researchers at the University of Cambridge. This is an important step towards precision tissue sampling for cancer patients to help select the best treatment. In future the technique could even replace clinical biopsies with 'virtual biopsies',
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COVID-19 generally 'mild' in young children: Evidence review
Babies and asymptomatic cases account for up to half of COVID-19 infections in the under-five age group, which has implications for vaccination programs, a new UNSW study has found.
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Brain evolution may have allowed our cognitive process to extend to technology
Emiliano Bruner, a researcher at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published a review article on the evolution of the human brain during the Middle Pleistocene offering a perspective on paleoneurology and functional craniology, with a model analyzing the spatial relationships between the anatomical elements of the brain-braincase system.
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No more material world? A seismic shift in post-pandemic consumerism
The pandemic has changed many aspects of our lives. Not least is how we decide what to buy and the social responsibility we expect from companies.
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A CRISPR picture emerges on European Union GMO directive
A European Court ruling widely interpreted to mean that all gene-edited organisms are GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) may not be as prescriptive as many first assumed.
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New research sheds light on early mechanisms driving diatom bloom formation
Scientists have discovered how diatoms (a globally important group of eukaryotic algae) sense the availability of phosphorus, a vital macronutrient that controls diatom growth and productivity in the oceans.
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This geyser woke up, but no Yellowstone blast
The reawakening of Steamboat Geyser does not foretell Yellowstone volcanic eruptions, researchers report. When Yellowstone National Park's Steamboat Geyser—which shoots water higher than any active geyser in the world—reawakened in 2018 after three and a half years of dormancy, some speculated that it was a harbinger of possible explosive volcanic eruptions within the surrounding geyser basin. Th
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Brain evolution may have allowed our cognitive process to extend to technology
Emiliano Bruner, a researcher at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just published a review article on the evolution of the human brain during the Middle Pleistocene offering a perspective on paleoneurology and functional craniology, with a model analyzing the spatial relationships between the anatomical elements of the brain-braincase system.
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A CRISPR picture emerges on European Union GMO directive
A European Court ruling widely interpreted to mean that all gene-edited organisms are GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) may not be as prescriptive as many first assumed.
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New research sheds light on early mechanisms driving diatom bloom formation
Scientists have discovered how diatoms (a globally important group of eukaryotic algae) sense the availability of phosphorus, a vital macronutrient that controls diatom growth and productivity in the oceans.
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Study of nebula IRAS 00500+6713 suggests its central star is unlike any seen before
A team of researchers from Potsdam University and Kazan Federal University has found evidence of a previously unknown kind of star in nebula IRAS 00500+6713. In their paper published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the group describes their study of the nebula and its central star and what they believe it represents.
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First global study shows uneven urbanization among large cities in the last two decades
In the first-ever study on the characteristics of urbanization in large cities around the world, researchers at the University of Hong Kong analyzed cities' urban built-up areas (BUAs) expansion, population growth and greening BUA changes, and revealed a hugely uneven pace of urbanization in those cities in the last two decades. They warn against major challenges posed to sustainable development i
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A bit too much: reducing the bit width of Ising models for quantum annealing
Quantum annealers are devices that physically implement a quantum system called the 'Ising model' to solve combinatorial optimization problems. However, the coefficients of the Ising model often require a large bit width, making it difficult to implement physically. Now, scientists from Japan demonstrate a method to reduce the bit width of any Ising model, increasing the applicability and versatil
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Liver cancer cells manipulate stromal cells involved in fibrosis to promote tumor growth
Researchers led by Osaka University have found that liver cancer cells induce autophagy in hepatic stellate cells, causing them to produce a growth factor called GDF15 that promotes tumor growth. GDF15 was more highly expressed in tumor tissue than normal liver tissue, and patients with higher levels of GDF15 had a poorer prognosis. New therapies targeting GDF15 may help prevent the development an
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The revelation of the crustal geometry of the western Qilian Mountains, NE Tibetan Plateau
The western Qilian Mountains in the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau is an ideal place to test the crustal deformation mechanisms of the plateau. The study revealed the detailed crustal deformation pattern in the junction of western Qilian Mountains and the Jiuxi Corridor. This result has a great significant to understand the crustal deformation of the plateau. This study was reported in
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New work provides insight into the relationship between complexity and diversity
Parts of the planet that are diverse biologically and culturally are even more diverse than you'd expect. A group of Santa Fe Institute collaborators developed a theory to show why richer environments are also more complex environments, where you tend to find more species and languages.
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2020 was a terrible year for climate disasters, but there are reasons for hope in 2021
Climate disasters started early in 2020—and kept on coming.
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No, COVID-19 hasn't 'skipped' Africa
New research in Zambia's capital city challenges the common belief that Africa somehow "dodged" the COVID-19 pandemic. The study in Lusaka, Zambia last summer finds that as many as 19% of recently deceased people tested positive for COVID-19. "Our findings cast doubt on the assumption that COVID-19 somehow skipped Africa…" The findings indicate that low numbers of reported infections and deaths a
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Drone-based early detection system to monitor changes in the Amazon
The Amazon basin, home to the largest rainforest in the world, plays a crucial role in maintaining the planet's carbon budget, absorbing and storing billions of tons of carbon dioxide annually. But a tipping point looms—one that may turn this vital carbon sink into one of the largest sources of carbon dioxide on the planet.
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How an embryo tells time
It is estimated that the majority of pregnancies that fail do so within the first seven days after fertilization, before the embryo implants into the uterus. In this time period, a complicated cascade of events occurs with precise timing. One particularly important process is called polarization, when the individual cells that make up the embryo become asymmetrical. Polarization occurs at 2.5 days
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Researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
Scientists at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new deep-learning framework that predicts gene regulation at the single-cell level.
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How an embryo tells time
It is estimated that the majority of pregnancies that fail do so within the first seven days after fertilization, before the embryo implants into the uterus. In this time period, a complicated cascade of events occurs with precise timing. One particularly important process is called polarization, when the individual cells that make up the embryo become asymmetrical. Polarization occurs at 2.5 days
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Researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
Scientists at the University of California, Irvine have developed a new deep-learning framework that predicts gene regulation at the single-cell level.
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Early Biden Climate Test: Groups Demand Tougher Rules on Building
A new push for stricter rules in flood zones could force Biden's team to choose: Increase construction costs, or leave people exposed to climate change.
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Leave the bread at home: What to feed ducks, according to science
The simple things in life sometimes bring the greatest joy—like feeding the ducks at your local pond. The next time you pay your feathered friends a visit, consider introducing some variety into the food you give them. Just like for us humans, a balanced diet is important for wild animals. The large amounts of bread that people feed wild birds may be well-intentioned, but they could be doing them
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3 ways our view of animals shapes our connection to them
One of the consequences of the current coronavirus pandemic is that it has brought us face-to-face with our own mortality. Not only are we vulnerable to disease, but we can also share diseases with other animals.
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Statins may protect the heart from chemotherapy treatment of early breast cancer
Women who take statins, the common cholesterol-lowering medication, during chemotherapy with anthracyclines for early-stage breast cancer are half as likely to require emergency department visits or hospitalization for heart failure in the 5 years after chemotherapy.
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Fidgeting can relax your body and brain—if you do it right
Fidget spinners may have died off as a cultural phenomenon, but they could still be useful for some people. (David Bartus via Pexels /) For a brief time in 2017, fidget spinners were inescapable. They lined the shelves of department stores and gas stations, and teachers struggled to manage the sudden influx of twirling plastic devices in classrooms. But fidgeting didn't start with the spinner. Wh
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Leave the bread at home: What to feed ducks, according to science
The simple things in life sometimes bring the greatest joy—like feeding the ducks at your local pond. The next time you pay your feathered friends a visit, consider introducing some variety into the food you give them. Just like for us humans, a balanced diet is important for wild animals. The large amounts of bread that people feed wild birds may be well-intentioned, but they could be doing them
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3 ways our view of animals shapes our connection to them
One of the consequences of the current coronavirus pandemic is that it has brought us face-to-face with our own mortality. Not only are we vulnerable to disease, but we can also share diseases with other animals.
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Ticketmaster Pays Up for Hacking a Rival Company
Employees admitted to using stolen passwords and URL guessing to access confidential data.
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Supergiant eclipsing binary IGR J18027–2016 investigated in detail
Using data from ESA's XMM-Newton and NASA's Swift spacecraft, astronomers have conducted a detailed temporal and spectral study of an eclipsing supergiant X-ray binary known as IGR J18027–2016. Results of this research provide important insights into the properties of this system. The study was published December 28 on arXiv.org.
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Bæredygtige begravelser: Holland vil næste år godkende 'vandkremering'
PLUS. Den hollandske regering vil i løbet af næste år godkende et mere bæredygtig alternativ til begravelser og kremeringer kaldet for 'vandkremering', fremgår det i et brev fra landets indenrigsminister.
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Meet the Animals That Self-Medicate
From clay-chomping gorillas to reindeer that munch on hallucinogenic mushrooms.
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Lyme Regis Mary Anning statue designs released
The statue to palaeontologist Mary Anning will stand near her birthplace on Lyme Regis seafront.
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Ice arches holding Arctic's 'last ice area' in place are at risk, researcher says
Snugged up against the upper edges of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Greenland lies the oldest and thickest sea ice in the world, covering hundreds of thousands of square kilometers of ocean. Arctic sea ice grows and shrinks with the seasons, but this ice has so far lasted even through the warmest summers on record.
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Humpback whales impacted by climate change
The breeding success of humpback whales in the Gulf of St Lawrence has fallen significantly, according to a new study led by the University of St Andrews.
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Humpback whales impacted by climate change
The breeding success of humpback whales in the Gulf of St Lawrence has fallen significantly, according to a new study led by the University of St Andrews.
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Drönare skjuter pil med sensorer
Det senaste sättet att fästa ­sensorer på otillgängliga platser är att låta en drönare skjuta iväg dem med pilar. Det är forskare vid Imperial College London som utvecklar metoden. Inom miljöövervakning används sensorer för att mäta temperatur, luftfuktighet, ljus, rörelser och halten av olika ­ämnen. Men ibland är det svårt att få sensorerna på plats – miljön kan vara både otillgänglig och farlig
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Climate change: Alaskan wilderness opens up for oil exploration
The Trump administration pushes ahead with first oil lease sales in an Arctic wildlife refuge.
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Curiosity rover: Watching an eclipse from Mars
What do eclipses look like on Mars? Nasa rovers see the planet's moons pass in front of the Sun.
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Islanders help rescue orca stranded on Orkney beach
Volunteers led the rescue effort to save the young 11ft-long stranded orca in Orkney.
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Imminent sudden stratospheric warming to occur, bringing increased risk of snow over coming weeks
A new study helps to shed light on the winter weather we may soon have in store following a dramatic meteorological event currently unfolding high above the North Pole.
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The fortune teller of Kepler Station
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03623-4 It's written in the stars.
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In situ sequencing of the fully structured genome
There is a sense in which the information encoded in a gene sequence can be represented by two bits per base pair location. The reality, however, is that this is far from a complete description. Although many academically and medically interesting things might be done from the minimalist sequence data, no real organism is going self-construct in developmental real time at this data rate no matter
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In situ sequencing of the fully structured genome
There is a sense in which the information encoded in a gene sequence can be represented by two bits per base pair location. The reality, however, is that this is far from a complete description. Although many academically and medically interesting things might be done from the minimalist sequence data, no real organism is going self-construct in developmental real time at this data rate no matter
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How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah
Researchers help farmers in Namibia avoid costly cattle losses by tracking big cat hangouts
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How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah
Researchers help farmers in Namibia avoid costly cattle losses by tracking big cat hangouts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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For mRNA vaccines, we should stick to the schedule | Angela Rasmussen and Ilan Schwartz
Vaccines are our best hope for controlling Covid-19. But they should be delivered in ways that we know are effective Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The Covid-19 pandemic has been fraught with uncertainty and missteps, and for every scientific advancement that has moved us forward, failures to appreciate and clearly communicate the nuances have set us back. This mont
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Natural products with potential efficacy against lethal viruses
Researchers describe the biology of three families of RNA viruses including Coronavirus, Ebola, and Zika and the natural products that have been shown to have capabilities to inhibit them. The review provides a guide that could accelerate drug discovery in response to future epidemics.
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Razor's E-Scooter Isn't Much of a Kick
This electric scooter offers a stable ride at a relatively affordable price, though its bulky design isn't the best for apartment-dwelling city slickers.
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Is indoor dining safe? Five health experts weigh in.
Many states, like North Carolina, have kept indoor dining open, even as COVID-19 continue to explode. (Nathan Bingle/) This story originally featured on The Conversation . Earlier this fall, many of the nation's restaurants opened their doors to patrons to eat inside, especially as the weather turned cold in places. Now, as COVID-19 cases surge across the country, some cities and towns have banne
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Eradicating a Democracy Movement
The days in Hong Kong have recently been bookended by two numbers, neither of them comforting. One, the day's COVID-19 infections, is announced at a set time by health officials, and despite the city's relatively low numbers compared with Europe and the United States, remains stubbornly high compared with some regional neighbors . The other is compiled more chaotically and is in many ways more wo
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How to Avoid Becoming a Meal for a Cheetah
Researchers help farmers in Namibia avoid costly cattle losses by tracking big cat hangouts — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The New SARS-CoV-2 Variants
Two new variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been detected that are more infectious. What are the implications? The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Solving desalination mystery paves way for cheaper clean water
Researchers have solved a complex problem with water desalination that had baffled scientists for decades, until now. The work could make it possible to produce clean water at a lower cost. Desalination membranes remove salt and other chemicals from water , a process critical to the health of society, cleaning billions of gallons of water for agriculture, energy production, and drinking. The idea
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Taking tenuous helium molecules for a spin
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03653-y Zapping helium 'dimers' with lasers allows a glimpse into a fleeting relationship.
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Palm cockatoo: Why a unique 'drumming' bird is in peril
The palm cockatoo is thought to be the only bird to use tools musically to attract a mate.
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Climate change taking toll on Oregon, but state has many options for adaptation
The effects of a changing climate continue to significantly affect Oregonians and the state's resources and infrastructure, the latest biennial report released today by the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute concludes.
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Vog forecasting critical during new Kīlauea eruption
The recent eruption activity on Kilauea has prompted renewed efforts by the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa's Vog Measurement and Prediction (VMAP) Project. The team's focus is to create forecasts of dispersion and trajectories of volcanic smog, referred to as vog, which are available in real time online.
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Scientists find hints for how a fatty compound functions in the cell's powerhouse
In a study of yeast, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found how a fatty compound called cardiolipin helps create cellular energy. The researchers say their findings will help shed light on conditions that impact human metabolism, such as heart disease, diabetes and Barth syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that weakens the heart.
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Scientists find hints for how a fatty compound functions in the cell's powerhouse
In a study of yeast, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found how a fatty compound called cardiolipin helps create cellular energy. The researchers say their findings will help shed light on conditions that impact human metabolism, such as heart disease, diabetes and Barth syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that weakens the heart.
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How the Trump border wall sapped a desert oasis dry
After heavy construction last summer and fall, during which wildlife were cleared and a natural pond was diverted, the US-Mexico border wall now covers the entire southern edge of Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona. (Laiken Jordahl/) Amidst the towering saguaro and pronged organ pipe cacti of southern Arizona's Sonoran Desert, a 30-foot-tall fence snakes through the vegetation, shadow
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Virtual reality in education is topic of journal special issue
Technology is providing educators with unimaginable tools that are rapidly coming to the fore especially because of restrictions due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Writing in an editorial in the International Journal of Smart Technology and Learning, Charles Xiaoxue Wang and Michele Garabedian of the Stork College of Education at Florida Gulf Coast University in Fort Myers, U.S., discuss the po
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Novel sensor to measure atmospheric aerosols and nitrogen dioxide simultaneously
Recently, Prof. Gao Xiaoming's group from the Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics (AIOFM) of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) designed and manufactured a photoacoustic spectroscopy-based sensor to measure aerosols and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) simultaneously.
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Carbon-based catalysts used for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis
Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is an essential approach to convert coal, biomass, and shale gas into fuels and chemicals, such as lower olefins, gasoline, and diesel.
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How and what do bats hear?
A new study published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B provides the most comprehensive comparative assessment of bat hearing capacity to date and highlights the evolutionary pressures acting on their sensory perception. Scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin studied bat hearing in both high and low frequency ranges used for echolocation and social communication and demonstrated that
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How giant dinosaurs may have spread seeds in prehistoric world
A new study from the University of Auckland looks at the animals' roles in moving seeds from one place to another.
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Performance fiber with color-changing coating makes mechanical stress visible
High-performance fibers that have been exposed to high temperatures usually lose their mechanical properties undetected and, in the worst case, can tear precisely when lives depend on them. For example, safety ropes used by fire brigades or suspension ropes for heavy loads on construction sites. Empa researchers have now developed a coating that changes color when exposed to high temperatures thro
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When a Senate Democrat Tried to Challenge an Election
Several Republican members of Congress plan to formally object to the outcome of the 2020 election today. The move is controversial, even among Republicans. "Adults don't point a loaded gun at the heart of legitimate self-government," wrote Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska in an open letter to his colleagues at the end of December. Republicans didn't invent the idea of holding up election certificat
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How and what do bats hear?
A new study published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B provides the most comprehensive comparative assessment of bat hearing capacity to date and highlights the evolutionary pressures acting on their sensory perception. Scientists from the Museum für Naturkunde Berlin studied bat hearing in both high and low frequency ranges used for echolocation and social communication and demonstrated that
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Danske tomater klimasviner otte gange mere end sydeuropæiske
Drivhuse bruger energi og madspild taler for at anvende forarbejdede tomatprodukter uden for sæsonen.
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Activists Publish a Vast Trove of Ransomware Victims' Data
WikiLeaks successor DDoSecrets has amassed a controversial new collection of corporate secrets and is sharing them in the name of transparency.
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For Marginalized Groups, Being Studied Can Be a Burden
Academics often research minority communities in the hope of helping them. But too much time under the microscope can cause its own harms.
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The US Needs More Foreign Artificial Intelligence Know-How
Jason Furman, a top economic adviser to President Obama, says good ideas come from everywhere—but Trump has dissuaded tech workers from coming to the US.
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The Autonomous-Car Chaos of the 2004 Darpa Grand Challenge
The self-driving vehicles smashed, burned, flipped, and tipped. But the ambitious race through the Mojave launched an industry.
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There Should Be a Nobel Prize for Vaccine Logistics
Immunization against Covid-19 is not going perfectly, but at least it's going. Let's give credit where it's due.
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The Climate Emergency: 2020 in Review
Despite some promising developments, the need for action has grown even more urgent — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Can Free Community College Unite a Divided U.S.?
The incoming Biden-Harris administration wants to launch a new era in higher education that will make it open to everyone — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Derfor giver forurening og skovbrande kraftige tordenstorme
Forskere fra MIT mener at have opklaret i hvert fald en del af mysteriet om, hvorfor små partikler fra blandt andet skovbrande, vulkanudbrud og forurening medfører mere kraftfulde tordenstorme.
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Terma skal levere beskyttelse til flere afgørende flytyper fra USAs militær
Terma skal levere systemer til amerikanske militærfly de næste 10 år.
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Can Free Community College Unite a Divided U.S.?
The incoming Biden-Harris administration wants to launch a new era in higher education that will make it open to everyone — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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My January 6 Nightmare
Today a group of my fellow Americans will travel to the nation's capital, gather in large numbers, refuse to wear masks, and infect one another with COVID-19. That's my nightmare, but it's also a plausible reality. Outside is much safer than inside, but in close enough quarters, transmission of the disease is still possible, and a new, ultra-contagious strain is in circulation now. I fear the pro
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What Buddhism can do for AI ethics
The explosive growth of artificial intelligence has fostered hope that it will help us solve many of the world's most intractable problems. However, there's also much concern about the power of AI, and growing agreement that its use should be guided to avoid infringing upon our rights. Many groups have discussed and proposed ethical guidelines for how AI should be developed or deployed: IEEE, a g
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Warming driving Eastern Mediterranean species collapse: study
Populations of marine molluscs have collapsed in recent decades in parts of the eastern Mediterranean as warming waters have made conditions unsuitable for native species, new research showed Wednesday.
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Which aspects of your current situation are you focusing on? Are you fixated on something negative?
Try focusing on a different aspect. Maybe you will see things differently. definition source: https://thedecisionlab.com/biases/ How has reframing a situation in your life affected you positively or negatively? submitted by /u/so_Joe [link] [comments]
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Warming driving Eastern Mediterranean species collapse: study
Populations of marine molluscs have collapsed in recent decades in parts of the eastern Mediterranean as warming waters have made conditions unsuitable for native species, new research showed Wednesday.
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Techtopia #175: Hvordan forhindrer vi, at kunstig intelligens tager magten i vores liv?
Kunstneren Cecilie Wagner Falkenstrøm udforsker med kunstige intelligenser, hvad der sker, hvis vi ikke længere ved, om vi taler med en maskine eller et menneske.
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JAMA journal retracts its first paper, on exercise and heart disease
The authors of a 2019 meta-analysis in a JAMA journal on exercise and heart disease have retracted the paper after discovering that a quarter of the studies they'd used in the analysis did not belong. The retraction is the first for the journal, which had published some 2,800 articles before having to pull one, Frederick … Continue reading
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A Shot In the Dark: Endangered Ferrets Get Experimental Vaccine
Fearing that they may be extremely vulnerable to Covid-19, scientists in Colorado created a vaccine for one of the most endangered mammals in North America: the black-footed ferret. Nearly half of the captive population has now been inoculated with purified spike protein that appears to generate antibodies.
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Global climate action needs trusted finance data
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03646-x An agreed system for measuring funding of green projects in poorer nations will be vital to achieving action on climate change in 2021.
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This tool lets you confuse Google's ad network, and a test shows it works
We've all been there by now: surfing the web and bumping into ads with an uncanny flavor. How did they know I was thinking about joining a gym? Or changing careers? Or that I need a loan? You might wonder if Google can read your mind. Google even boasts that it knows you better than you know yourself. Google can't read your mind, of course. But it can read your search history. It tracks a lot of
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Common drug may protect hearts from damage caused by breast cancer chemotherapy
New research from UHN's Peter Munk Cardiac Centre (PMCC) shows statins, commonly prescribed to lower cholesterol and reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke, may also protect the heart from damaging side-effects of early breast cancer treatment.
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Statins may protect the heart from chemotherapy treatment of early breast cancer
Women who take statins, the common cholesterol-lowering medication, during chemotherapy with anthracyclines for early-stage breast cancer are half as likely to require emergency department visits or hospitalization for heart failure in the 5 years after chemotherapy.
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Author Correction: Entanglement Availability Differentiation Service for the Quantum Internet
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-75950-5
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Daily supplementation with the Lab4P probiotic consortium induces significant weight loss in overweight adults
Scientific Reports, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78285-3
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Power shift in Senate could bring major changes in U.S. science and climate policy
Democratic takeover would help end Trump regulations and advance environmental legislation
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Governments need to intervene to ramp up vaccine production
Private manufacturers currently have little financial interest in expanding capacity massively
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Banebrydende nyt låg løser damvarmelagrenes største svaghed
PLUS. Med et nyt skalerbart design af isolerende låg til damvarmelagre er teknologiens største svaghed umiddelbart blevet løst. Nu er lande i Europa begyndt at vise interesse for den danske damvarme-lagerteknologi.
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Spørg Fagfolket: Kan man kickstarte den kolde motor ved at tænde blæseren?
En læser har hørt, at man kan få en kold bil i gang om morgenen ved at tænde blæseren først. Men er det blot en skrøne? Det har vi spurgt FDM om.
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Rare white tiger born at Nicaragua zoo
A rare white tiger, named "Nieve" (snow in Spanish) was born at the Nicaragua zoo, and is being raised by humans after its mother rejected it, the director of the zoo told AFP.
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COVID lockdowns and Europe's science spending
Nature, Published online: 06 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03648-9 The latest science news, in brief.
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UK vaccine minister vows 'massive uplift' in number of jabs this week
Nadhim Zahawi says 'absolute focus' is to get 13.9 million people inoculated by mid-February Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK vaccine minister, Nadhim Zahawi, has pledged a "massive uplift" in the number of coronavirus vaccinations carried out this week as he said reaching the government's target of 13.9m jabs offered by February would be "challenging". Zahawi,
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Rare white tiger born at Nicaragua zoo
A rare white tiger, named "Nieve" (snow in Spanish) was born at the Nicaragua zoo, and is being raised by humans after its mother rejected it, the director of the zoo told AFP.
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Indonesian baby sea turtles make a break for freedom
Newly hatched, dozens of baby turtles flipped and flopped their way down a beach towards the crashing waves of the Indian Ocean, under the watchful gaze of conservationists at an Indonesian national park.
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China to launch carbon emissions trading scheme next month
China's delayed carbon trading system will start operating in February, the environment ministry has said, as the world's biggest polluter takes steps towards decarbonising its economy by 2060.
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Indonesian baby sea turtles make a break for freedom
Newly hatched, dozens of baby turtles flipped and flopped their way down a beach towards the crashing waves of the Indian Ocean, under the watchful gaze of conservationists at an Indonesian national park.
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How market incumbents can navigate disruptive technology change
Researchers from University of Texas at San Antonio and University of Southern California published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines the difficult choices industry incumbents and new entrants face during times of potentially disruptive technological change.
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Cattle grazing and soybean yields
By late fall, much of the Midwest is a pleasing landscape of dry, harvested corn fields. It makes for a bucolic rural scene on highway drives. But the corn litter that's left over doesn't seem useful, at least to untrained eyes.
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Cattle grazing and soybean yields
By late fall, much of the Midwest is a pleasing landscape of dry, harvested corn fields. It makes for a bucolic rural scene on highway drives. But the corn litter that's left over doesn't seem useful, at least to untrained eyes.
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Understanding disease-induced microbial shifts may reveal new crop management strategies
While humanity is facing the COVID-19 pandemic, the citrus industry is trying to manage its own devastating disease, Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. HLB is the most destructive citrus disease in the world. In the past decade, the disease has annihilated the Florida citrus industry, reducing orange production for juice and other products by 72%. Candidatus Liberibacter a
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Understanding disease-induced microbial shifts may reveal new crop management strategies
While humanity is facing the COVID-19 pandemic, the citrus industry is trying to manage its own devastating disease, Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening disease. HLB is the most destructive citrus disease in the world. In the past decade, the disease has annihilated the Florida citrus industry, reducing orange production for juice and other products by 72%. Candidatus Liberibacter a
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Sydney to host Test cricket match despite Covid outbreak
Doctors warn Australia-India game threatens to become 'super spreading' event
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Terrawatch: the South Atlantic Anomaly – a growing weak spot in Earth's magnetic field
Researchers have been studying this area for clues as to when the magnetic field might flip entirely Last year was a tumultuous one, but at least north is still north. Deep inside our planet liquid iron continues to flow the same way, generating a magnetic field that protects us against harmful radiation from the sun. Every so often the flow changes and the magnetic field flips. The last time thi
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Seb Falk's The Light Ages: book review
This is my review of the book "The Light Ages" by Seb Falk. Turns out, there was much learning and scientific inquiry going on in the Middle Ages!
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Country diary: worms lose their grip in a deadly tug-of-war
Bishop Auckland, County Durham: The earthworms have little defence against marauding birds in this uneven struggle amid the mud Mud: boot-sucking liquid earth, the winter hazard that country walk footpath guides never mention. And it looks like horses have welcomed every rambler who crossed this stile, surrounding it with a morass of water-filled hoof-holes. Too far from home now to turn back, so
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New drug form may help treat osteoporosis, calcium-related disorders
Purdue University innovators developed a stabilized form of human calcitonin, which is a peptide drug already used for people with osteoporosis. Researchers at Purdue created a prodrug form of the peptide hormone to increase its effectiveness as an osteoporosis treatment.
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Antibiotics not needed after most sinus surgeries: randomized controlled trial
Randomized controlled trial comparing antibiotics and placebo after routine endoscopic sinus surgery found no difference in outcomes including infection rates and symptoms. More gastrointestinal side effects were reported in patients taking antibiotics.
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How market incumbents can navigate disruptive technology change
Market disruption is neither always quick nor universal because new technologies sometimes coexist as partial substitutes of the old technologies.
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Cattle grazing and soybean yields
Each corn harvest leaves behind leaves, husks and cobs. Research shows cattle can take advantage of this food resource without damaging field productivity.
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Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy affects self-criticism and self-assurance in individuals with depression
Findings from a recent study of individuals with depression suggest that Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) can improve how patients feel about themselves in difficult situations in ways that may help protect against relapse of depressive symptoms. The findings are published in Counselling and Psychotherapy Research.
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Living alone may increase risk of dying after hip fracture
Individuals face a higher risk of dying following hip fractures. A new study published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research has found that living alone after experiencing a hip fracture may further elevate this risk.
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Hydroxychloroquine blood levels predict clotting risk in patients with lupus
A new study in Arthritis & Rheumatology shows that monitoring patients' blood levels of hydroxychloroquine can predict their clotting risk.
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Study finds rising rates of food insecurity among older adults
From 2007 to 2016, food insecurity — or limited access to nutritious foods because of a lack of financial resources — increased significantly from 5.5% to 12.4% among older US adults, and the increase was more pronounced among individuals with lower income. The findings come from a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society.
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How effective are educational support programs for children with cancer?
As children undergo treatment for cancer, they may miss school and risk falling behind in their education. An analysis published in Pyscho-Oncology has examined the educational support programs provided to children with cancer.
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Study reports patient-reported loss of smell in 86% of mild COVID-19 cases
A reduced sense of smell, or olfactory dysfunction, is one of the most common symptoms of COVID-19. A recent study published the Journal of Internal Medicine has examined it prevalence and recovery in patients with varying degrees of severity of COVID-19.
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Skin-to skin contact with fathers may help newborns after caesarean delivery
Separating infants and their mothers after a Caesarean section delivery is common. A new study published in Acta Paediatrica has found that providing skin-to-skin contact with the father may provide benefits to a newborn.
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Does a mother's pre-pregnancy weight affect her children's future fertility?
A recent study published in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica found that sons born to mothers who fell within the overweight range were more likely to be diagnosed with infertility during adulthood than sons of mothers with normal-range weight.
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Victoria's border unlikely to open this month as thousands stuck in NSW wait on exemptions
Some Victorians stranded in NSW fear homelessness as government warns border shutdown could last until February NSW hotspots ; Victoria hotspots Covid restrictions state by state Follow the Australia Covid live blog Thousands of Victorians set to isolate after Covid case visited the cricket Victoria is unlikely to lift its hard border with New South Wales until at least the end of the month, as t
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China blocks WHO team sent to probe Covid's origins
International investigation stymied by lack of access to Wuhan amid calls for transparency
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Skarp kritik af Aarhus Kommune: Sender børnedata ulovligt til Google
Aarhus kommuner bryder loven ved med åbne øjne at gå på kompromis med omkring 24.000 skolebørns databeskyttelse. Det vurderer flere eksperter i persondataret, men kommunen vil fortsætte med at bruge Googles tjeneste G Suite for Education, oplyser digitaliseringschef.
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Astronomers Find The Oldest, Most Distant Galaxy to Date
Its light took 13.4 billion years to reach us.
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New Zealand's first quarantine-free flight to Queensland to leave on Thursday
Passengers returning to New Zealand will still need to quarantine for two weeks, at their own expense Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The first quarantine-free flight to the Australian state of Queensland from New Zealand is set to touch down in Brisbane on Thursday. Air New Zealand flight NZ147 is scheduled to depart Auckland at 7.40am local time for Brisbane with p
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In-utero exposures associated with increased risk of thyroid cancer
Maternal health, in-utero, and perinatal exposures and risk of thyroid cancer in offspring.
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Potential treatment for an aggressive form of lung cancer
Researchers have discovered a new metabolic vulnerability in a highly aggressive form of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). These findings could pave the way for new treatments for patients with mutations in two key genes – KRAS and LKB1. Patients whose tumors contain both of these mutations, known as KL tumors, have poor outcomes and usually do not respond to immunotherapy.
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New clues why gold standard treatment for bipolar disorder doesn't work for majority of patients
Lithium is considered the gold standard for treating bipolar disorder (BD), but nearly 70 percent of people with BD don't respond to it. This leaves them at risk for debilitating, potentially life-threatening mood swings. Researchers have found that the culprit may lie in gene activity — or lack of it.
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Dental experts discover biological imbalance is the link between gum and kidney disease
An imbalance of the body's oxygen producing free radicals and its antioxidant cells could be the reason why gum disease and chronic kidney disease affect each other, a new study has found.
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Increase in pleasurable effects of alcohol over time can predict alcohol use disorder
A new study following young adult drinkers for 10 years has found that individuals who reported the highest sensitivity to alcohol's pleasurable and rewarding effects at the start of the trial were more likely to develop an alcohol use disorder (AUD) over the course of the study.
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Study resolves long-running controversy over critical step in gene silencing
Researchers have identified a molecular 'address' that explains how the cancer-related protein PRC2 binds to RNA to silence genes. The study resolves a longstanding debate about the contradictory behavior between PRC2 and RNA. The findings could have important implications for development of drugs to treat cancer and other diseases.
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Fires, flooding before settlement may have formed the Amazon's rare patches of fertility
Phosphorous, calcium and charcoal in spotty patches of fertile soil in the Amazon rainforest suggest that natural processes such as fires and river flooding, not the ingenuity of indigenous populations, created rare sites suitable for agriculture, according to new research.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Last Days of Trump
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . ANDREW HARNIK / AP President Donald Trump may still be pushing to overturn the election results, but the staff of 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue know it's over. "None of the advisers and aides I've spo
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Severe climate-driven loss of native molluscs reported off Israel's coast
Mediterranean study finds subtidal populations of cockles, whelks and other species have collapsed by 90% The world's most devastating climate-driven loss of ocean life has been reported in the eastern Mediterranean, one of the fastest warming places on Earth. Native mollusc populations along the coast of Israel have collapsed by about 90% in recent decades because they cannot tolerate the increa
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This Isn't Just Political Theater
If people "define situations as real, they are real in their consequences," William Isaac Thomas and Dorothy Swaine Thomas wrote in 1928. That sociological insight—often referred to as the Thomas theorem—offers the best way to think about this peculiar moment in American politics. It's what the "senior Republican official" quoted by The Washington Post in early November, on how to respond to Pres
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Grammys postpone awards show as Covid pandemic grips LA
City imposes strict restrictions with authorities saying hospitals are becoming overwhelmed with sick and dying
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Peer inside the solar system's largest canyon
A close-up view of Tithonium Chasma, which is feature of Valles Marineris, the solar system's largest canyon. (NASA/JPL/UArizona/) Stretching 18 miles wide and averaging 4,000 feet deep, the Grand Canyon is absolutely humbling to us wee humans. But it seems pitiful in comparison to the Valles Marineris canyon on Mars, which is roughly ten times longer and five times deeper than the Grand Canyon—s
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Want Americans to graduate college? Make it affordable.
Many of the fastest-growing jobs in the U.S. require a postsecondary education, while college tuition rates continue to climb. Recent research finds that making college more affordable improves bachelor degree attainment. Aid recipients who benefit most are students from historically underrepresented groups. The benefits bestowed by a college degree are well-known. Degrees open access to job oppo
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Gum disease-causing bacteria borrow growth molecules from neighbors to thrive
The human body is filled with friendly bacteria. However, some of these microorganisms, such as Veillonella parvula, may be too nice. These peaceful bacteria engage in a one-sided relationship with pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, helping the germ multiply and cause gum disease, according to a new study.
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In Chaotic Project, Mechanic Installs Gas Engine in Tesla
Electric to Gas YouTuber and renowned Tesla tinkerer Rich Rebuilds has tackled his latest project: replacing the clean, electric powertrain of a junkyard Tesla Model S with a gasoline-guzzling V8 engine block. The hardware he transplanted is a 6.2-liter LS3 rear-wheel-drive car engine made by General Motors — courtesy of a totaled 2010 Chevrolet Camaro — with 426 horsepower. That's comparable to
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Understanding disease-induced microbial shifts may reveal new crop management strategies
Currently, the only thing citrus growers can do to protect their crops from HLB is control the insect vector. Dozens of researchers are trying to find ways to manage the disease, using strategies ranging from pesticides to antibiotics to CLas-sniffing dogs. Understanding the plant microbiome, an exciting new frontier in plant disease management, is another strategy.
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Dungeness crab fishing industry response to climate shock
Fishermen contend with regulations, natural disasters, and the ups and downs of the stocks they fish, along with many other changes. As a result, fishing communities are quite resilient. That is, they can withstand, recover from, and adapt to change.
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Facebook posts help facilitate belief that HPV vaccine is dangerous to health
Social media has a history of being a popular place for sexual health discussions, and the HPV vaccine is one of the most discussed vaccines on the internet. Monique Luisi, an assistant professor in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, suggests some HPV vaccine-related Facebook posts can help facilitate beliefs that the HPV vaccine is dangerous to one's health. She believes it could in
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Gum disease-causing bacteria borrow growth molecules from neighbors to thrive
The human body is filled with friendly bacteria. However, some of these microorganisms, such as Veillonella parvula, may be too nice. These peaceful bacteria engage in a one-sided relationship with pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, helping the germ multiply and cause gum disease, according to a new University at Buffalo-led study.
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Natural products with potential efficacy against lethal viruses
Researchers describe the biology of three families of RNA viruses including Coronavirus, Ebola, and Zika and the natural products that have been shown to have capabilities to inhibit them. The review provides a guide that could accelerate drug discovery in response to future epidemics.
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Will increasing traffic to the Moon contaminate its precious ice?
Nature, Published online: 05 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03262-9 Scientists seek guidance on exploring frozen caches at the lunar poles responsibly.
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The counterintuitive way to be more persuasive | Niro Sivanathan
What's the best way to make a good point? Organizational psychologist Niro Sivanathan offers a fascinating lesson on the "dilution effect," a cognitive quirk that weakens our strongest cases — and reveals why brevity is the true soul of persuasion.
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Hotels that promote women perceived as fairer, less discriminatory
Hotel managers have something in common beyond their reputations for charming dispositions and excellent listening skills—they're predominantly men, despite women making up the majority of the accommodations workforce. New research led by the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management suggests hotel companies that promote a woman over an equally qualified man
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NASA's first mission to the Trojan asteroids integrates its second scientific instrument
NASA's Lucy mission is one step closer to launch as L'TES, the Lucy Thermal Emission Spectrometer, has been successfully integrated on to the spacecraft.
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Identifying Canada's key conservation hot spots highlights problem
To stop biodiversity loss, Canada recently committed to protecting 30% of its land and sea by 2030. But making conservation decisions about where to locate new protected areas is complicated. It depends on data both about biodiversity and about a range of benefits (e.g. freshwater, climate regulation, recreation) that people get from nature. Surprisingly, despite the size of the country, new mappi
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Some English bulldogs thought to have cancer may have newly identified syndrome
Some English bulldogs diagnosed with a common cancer may instead have a newly described, non-cancerous syndrome called polyclonal B‐cell lymphocytosis. The discovery was made by Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University during a study to better understand B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL). The team published their findings in the Journal of Veterinary Intern
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Two months at sea to explore the Southern Ocean's contribution to climate regulation
A team coordinated by two CNRS researchers and involving colleagues from Sorbonne University, Toulouse III–Paul Sabatier University, the University of Western Brittany and Aix-Marseille University, will traverse the Southern Ocean from January 11 to March 8, 2021, aboard the Marion Dufresne II research vessel chartered by the French Oceanographic Fleet. Their goal is to better understand the seque
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How to build snowshoes on the fly—and 4 other tips for surviving deep snow
Knowing how to build a set of primitive snowshoes is one skill that can help you find your way out of a frozen wilderness. (Tim MacWelch/) This story was originally featured in Outdoor Life . If you're ever caught off-guard in the wilderness, and the snow is deep, getting back to civilization may not be easy. Not only will you have to deal with the cold temperatures, you'll have to find a way to
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Some English bulldogs thought to have cancer may have newly identified syndrome
Some English bulldogs diagnosed with a common cancer may instead have a newly described, non-cancerous syndrome called polyclonal B‐cell lymphocytosis. The discovery was made by Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at Colorado State University during a study to better understand B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL). The team published their findings in the Journal of Veterinary Intern
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Dungeness crab fishing industry response to climate shock
Fishermen contend with regulations, natural disasters, and the ups and downs of the stocks they fish, along with many other changes. As a result, fishing communities are quite resilient. That is, they can withstand, recover from, and adapt to change.
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Echoes of Another Pandemic: How The Times Covered the 1918 Flu
The influenza outbreak killed more than 20,000 New Yorkers and 675,000 Americans. It might have dominated the news, if not for World War I.
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AI algorithms detect diabetic eye disease inconsistently
In a paper published Jan. 5 in Diabetes Care , researchers compared seven algorithms to detect diabetic retinopathy against the diagnostic expertise of retina specialists.
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COVID-19 unmasked: math model suggests optimal treatment strategies
For older patients with COVID-19 infections, the clot-preventing drug heparin and immunity-enhancing drugs may improve outcomes. Patients with conditions such as obesity, diabetes and high blood pressure may benefit from anti-inflammatory drugs and drugs used to control blood pressure and vascular resistance.
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Trump EPA Erects New Barriers To Crucial Science
Studies based on private health data are crucial to understanding dangers posed by pollution. A new rule makes it harder for the EPA to consider many studies when setting safeguards. (Image credit: DKAR Images/Getty Images)
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Every COVID Patient in Egyptian ICU Dies When Oxygen Supply Fails
Every coronavirus patient in the intensive care unit of Egypt's Al-Husseiniya Central Hospital reportedly died on Saturday after the ward ran out of oxygen. The tragic event, caught on camera by a patient's relative, happened when oxygen levels dropped to about two percent of capacity, according to the Middle East Monitor . There wasn't enough oxygen and air pressure to continue treating the COVI
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EPA Finalizes Much-Criticized "Transparency" Rule
The regulation, which requires that the agency give preference to dose-response studies in which the underlying data are available, could downplay findings key to defining the dangers of pollution.
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China blocks entry to WHO team studying Covid's origins
Officials say visas not yet approved for World Health Organization delegation due to visit Wuhan Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage China has blocked the arrival of a team from the World Health Organization investigating the origins of the coronavirus pandemic , claiming that their visas had not yet been approved even as some members of the group were on their way. The
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Viral mutations may cause another 'very, very bad' COVID-19 wave, scientists warn
Growing evidence that U.K. variant spreads faster triggers calls for tighter control measures
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A Startup Is Planning Pig-to-Human Organ Transplants This Year
Maryland-based biotech company United Therapeutics is planning to begin transplanting organs from genetically modified pigs into humans — and as soon as this year, as Medium-owned publication Future Human reports . "We're right on that cusp. We're looking to get into humans within the next year or two," David Ayares — the chief scientific officer of United Therapeutics' subsidiary Revivicor — tol
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UK Covid jab rollout may not hit target pace for two weeks, say officials
News narrows chances of hitting goal of protecting more than 13 million of most vulnerable people by 15 February Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health officials have warned that supply "delays" mean the Covid vaccination programme is only set to hit its target pace in the second half of this month, narrowing the chances of hitting the goal of protecting more than 13
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Hotels that promote women perceived as fairer, less discriminatory
New research led by the University of Houston Conrad N. Hilton College of Hotel and Restaurant Management suggests hotel companies that promote a woman over an equally qualified man are perceived as fairer and less discriminatory, creating a stronger organizational culture and higher financial performance.
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FDA Begs Doctors to Follow Vaccine Instructions
So far, distribution of the COVID-19 vaccines has been slow and confusing , to say the least. Both coronavirus vaccines that have been approved by the FDA require two injections, spaced weeks apart, in order to reach the high levels of protection demonstrated in clinical trials. But in order to help speed up the distribution process, some experts have suggested spreading the initial shots out ove
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Experts agree on new global definition of 'fermented foods'
Interdisciplinary scientists have come together to create the first international consensus definition of fermented foods. Their paper, published in Nature Reviews Gastroenterology & Hepatology , defines fermented foods as: "foods made through desired microbial growth and enzymatic conversions of food components".
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Routine eye scans may give clues to cognitive decline in diabetes
As they age, people with diabetes are more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease and other cognitive disorders than are people without diabetes. Scientists now have shown that routine eye imaging can identify changes in the retina that may be associated with cognitive disorders in older people with type 1 diabetes. These results may open up a relatively easy method for early detection of cognitive
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Identifying Canada's key conservation hot spots highlights problem
To stop biodiversity loss, Canada recently committed to protecting 30% of its land and sea by 2030. But making conservation decisions about where to locate new protected areas is complicated. It depends on data both about biodiversity and about a range of benefits (e.g. freshwater, climate regulation, recreation) that people get from nature. Despite the size of the country, new mapping suggests th
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One in every 50 people in England has coronavirus, says Johnson
Ministers warn new lockdown could be extended into March as Sunak sets out new £4.6bn financial package
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The Guardian view on Boris Johnson's mutant virus plan: needs more than PR | Editorial
The prime minister aims to be credible rather than accountable in a time of Covid. That's a mistake It was during the Vietnam war that the euphemism " credibility gap " was coined to describe the Lyndon Johnson administration. The phrase was used instead of saying what everyone thought – that the US government was systematically lying. The president's team reasoned that to restore "credibility",
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Frontline UK teams query ability to vaccinate most vulnerable
Staff levels will hamper government's 'ambitious' jab pledge, health professionals suggest
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Could astronauts on Mars make their own fuel for the trip home?
Researchers may have come up with a solution to one of the most pressing challenges of a Mars voyage: How do we get enough fuel for the flight back to Earth? Houlin Xin , an assistant professor in physics and astronomy at the University of California, Irvine, and his team have discovered a more efficient way of creating methane-based rocket fuel theoretically on the surface of Mars, which can mak
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This avocado armchair could be the future of AI
With GPT-3 , OpenAI showed that a single deep-learning model could be trained to use language in a variety of ways simply by throwing it vast amounts of text. It then showed that by swapping text for pixels , the same approach could be used to train an AI to complete half-finished images. GPT-3 mimics how humans use words; Image GPT-3 predicts what we see. Now OpenAI has put these ideas together
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Advanced materials in a snap
A research team has successfully used machine learning — computer algorithms that improve themselves by learning patterns in data — to complete cumbersome materials science calculations more than 40,000 times faster than normal.
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Julius Schachter, Leading Expert on Chlamydia, Dies at 84
He played a major role in combating trachoma, a chlamydia-related disease. He died of complications of Covid-19.
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