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Power, water and climate
As the planet continues to warm, the twin challenges of diminishing water supply and growing energy demand will intensify. But water and energy are inextricably linked. For instance, nearly a fifth of California's energy goes toward water-related activities, while more than a tenth of the state's electricity comes from hydropower. As society tries to adapt to one challenge, it needs to ensure it d
20h
Arthritis drugs found to reduce risk of death in severe Covid-19 cases
Immunosuppressants tocilizumab and sarilumab also reduce stays in intensive care by at least seven days on average
20h
The odds of US climate progress just improved a bit
The outcomes in Georgia's runoff Senate elections hand the Democratic Party control of both chambers of Congress, easing the path for President-elect Joe Biden to achieve progress on his ambitious climate agenda, at least during the next two years. The dual victories of Democratic candidates Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock—which appeared highly improbable just weeks ago—puts Vice President–elect K
20h
Mercedes-Benz Unveils 56-Inch 'Hyperscreen' Dashboard Panel
Mercedes-EQ. MBUX Hyperscreen Ahead of the now-virtual CES 2021, Mercedes-Benz in Stuttgart has unveiled the MBUX Hyperscreen, a 56-inch-wide, curved cinematic display that stretches across the entire dashboard, even over the left and right air vents. The company said the AI software powering the display is capable of learning the driver and passenger's preferences and then adapting its suggestio
20h
MRI frequently underestimates tumor size in prostate cancer
Improving imaging processes will lead to more successful treatments and help reduce morbidity in men with the disease.
20h
Functional seizures associated with stroke, psychiatric disorders in EHR study
In a large-scale study of electronic health records reported in JAMA Network Open, Vanderbilt University Medical Center investigators determined the prevalence of functional seizures and characterized comorbidities associated with them. Functional seizures are sudden attacks or spasms that look like epileptic seizures but do not have the aberrant brain electrical patterns of epilepsy. The research
20h
Research confirms increase in river flooding and droughts in US, Canada
Research demonstrates that increases in the frequency of both high- and low-flow extreme streamflow events 'are, in fact, widespread.'
20h
What is surgical smoke and what can be done about it?
Surgical smoke poses a health risk to everyone in the operating room. Perioperative teams exposed to surgical smoke report twice as many respiratory health issues as the general public. The smoke can even contain viruses. Researchers suggest that policies and laws mandating the evacuation of surgical smoke from operating rooms are the best way to reduce the negative health impacts on perioperative
20h
How medical schools can transform curriculums to undo racial biases
Medical school curriculums may misuse race and play a role in perpetuating physician bias, a team of researchers found in an analysis of curriculum from the preclinical phase of medical education.
20h
Power, water and climate
As the planet continues to warm, the twin challenges of diminishing water supply and growing energy demand will intensify. But water and energy are inextricably linked. For instance, nearly a fifth of California's energy goes toward water-related activities, while more than a tenth of the state's electricity comes from hydropower. As society tries to adapt to one challenge, it needs to ensure it d
20h
Patterns in primordial germ cell migration
Whenever an organism develops and forms organs, a tumor creates metastases or the immune system becomes active in inflammation, cells migrate within the body. As they do, they interact with surrounding tissues which influence their function. The migrating cells react to biochemical signals, as well as to biophysical properties of their environment, for example whether a tissue is soft or stiff. Ga
20h
Researchers question fundamental study on the Kondo effect
The Kondo effect influences the electrical resistance of metals at low temperatures and generates complex electronic and magnetic orders. Novel concepts for data storage and processing, such as using quantum dots, are based on this. In 1998, researchers from the United States published spectroscopic studies on the Kondo effect using scanning tunneling microscopy, which are considered ground-breaki
20h
Mars missions, a super-powered telescope, and more exciting 2021 space events
An artist's impression of the James Webb Space Telescope, finally set to launch this year. (Northrop Grumman/) Like nearly everything else in the world, space exploration hit a coronavirus-sized pause button early last year. But we were still able to thrust our way into the cosmos in an otherwise difficult, stressful 2020. And 2021 looks to be a pretty busy time for space both on the ground and o
20h
Patterns in primordial germ cell migration
Whenever an organism develops and forms organs, a tumor creates metastases or the immune system becomes active in inflammation, cells migrate within the body. As they do, they interact with surrounding tissues which influence their function. The migrating cells react to biochemical signals, as well as to biophysical properties of their environment, for example whether a tissue is soft or stiff. Ga
20h
Active retirement keeps me involved in science and helps others
Nature, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00032-z Juergen K. V. Reichardt's continued engagement in academic work lets him enjoy his retirement without getting in the way of junior faculty members.
20h
Out-of-hospital heart attack deaths spiked during pandemic
While COVID-19 has claimed more than 13,000 lives in Michigan, many more likely died from cardiac arrest directly and indirectly attributable to the pandemic, researchers report. A new study examined out-of-hospital cardiac arrest records in Wayne, Oakland, and Macomb counties from March 23 through May 31, 2020. Researchers compared those records to data for the same period in 2019 and found that
20h
Delivering the news with humor makes young adults more likely to remember and share
In the early decades of televised news, Americans turned to the stern faces of newsmen like Walter Cronkite, Tom Brokaw, and Dan Rather as trusted sources for news of the important events in America and around the world, delivered with gravitas and measured voices. The rise of comedy-news programs, helmed by the likes of Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, John Oliver, Trevor Noah, and Samantha Bee, rai
20h
For the right employees, even standard information technology can spur creativity
In a money-saving revelation for organizations inclined to invest in specialized information technology to support the process of idea generation, new research suggests that even non-specialized, everyday organizational IT can encourage employees' creativity.
20h
Simple bioreactor makes 'gut check' more practical
Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers have found a way to mimic conditions in intestines, giving them a mechanical model for the real-time growth of bacterial infections.
20h
New challenges for wolf conservation
People view the wolf as either a threatening predator or a sign of a healthy natural habitat. Many proponents of nature and animal conservation welcome the spread of wolf populations in Germany. By contrast, farmers who graze herds directly impacted by the wolves' return are more critical.
20h
Simple bioreactor makes 'gut check' more practical
Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers have found a way to mimic conditions in intestines, giving them a mechanical model for the real-time growth of bacterial infections.
20h
New challenges for wolf conservation
People view the wolf as either a threatening predator or a sign of a healthy natural habitat. Many proponents of nature and animal conservation welcome the spread of wolf populations in Germany. By contrast, farmers who graze herds directly impacted by the wolves' return are more critical.
20h
Paper: Emotionally appealing ads may not always help consumer memory
Emotional appeals in advertisements may not always help improve consumers' immediate recall of a product, says a new paper co-written by Hayden Noel, a clinical associate professor of business administration at the Gies College of Business at Illinois.
20h
COVID-19 and dental and dental hygiene students' career plans
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted dental education and training. The study "COVID-19 and Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' Career Plans," published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research (JDR CTR), examined the short-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on dental hygiene and dental students' career intentions.
20h
Chemists invent shape-shifting nanomaterial with biomedical potential
Made of synthetic collagen, the new nanomaterial may have a range of biomedical applications, from controlled-release drug delivery to tissue engineering.
20h
IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia.
20h
Intelligence deficit: Conclusion from the mouse to the human being
Impaired intelligence, movement disorders and developmental delays are typical for a group of rare diseases that belong to GPI anchor deficiencies. Researchers now used genetic engineering methods to create a mouse that mimics these patients very well. Studies in this animal model suggest that in GPI anchor deficiencies, a gene mutation impairs the transmission of stimuli at the synapses in the br
20h
Power, water and climate
As the planet continues to warm, the twin challenges of diminishing water supply and growing energy demand will intensify. But water and energy are inextricably linked. For instance, nearly a fifth of California's energy goes toward water-related activities, while more than a tenth of the state's electricity comes from hydropower. As society tries to adapt to one challenge, it needs to ensure it d
20h
High-flux table-top source for femtosecond hard X-ray pulses
Femtosecond hard X-ray pulses are an important tool for unraveling structure changes of condensed matter on atomic length and time scales. A novel laser-driven X-ray source provides femtosecond copper Kα pulses at a 1 kHz repetition rate with an unprecedented flux of some 1012 X-ray photons per second.
20h
Spain surprised and delighted by rare snowfall
Heavy snow was falling across parts of Spain on Thursday which could cover up to half of the country in the coming days, forecasters said on Thursday
21h
North and south are not poles apart | Brief letters
Geophysics | Covid tests | Spring decorations | Manchester City goal | Severn Bridge naming Your claim that "at least north is still north" ( Terrawatch , 6 January) sounds as reassuring as it is wrong. I've always taught my students that opposite poles attract. The north pole of a free magnet will point north. Therefore the earth's north pole must be a south pole. Historically, north has sometim
21h
Researchers create comprehensive database of head and neck cancers
Researchers from the Johns Hopkins departments of pathology and oncology, the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and 18 other centers around the U.S. and Poland have clarified the contribution of key cancer-associated genes, proteins and signaling pathways in these cancers, while proposing possible new treatment avenues.
21h
How medical schools can transform curriculums to undo racial biases
Medical school curriculums may misuse race and play a role in perpetuating physician bias, a team led by Penn Medicine researchers found in an analysis of curriculum from the preclinical phase of medical education.
21h
Nanodroplets and ultrasound 'drills' prove effective at tackling tough blood clots
Engineering researchers have developed a new technique for eliminating particularly tough blood clots, using engineered nanodroplets and an ultrasound "drill" to break up the clots from the inside out. The technique has not yet gone through clinical testing. In vitro testing has shown promising results.
21h
Patterns in primordial germ cell migration
Biologists and mathematicians at the Universities of Münster and Erlangen-Nürnberg investigated how primordial germ cells behave in zebrafish embryos when not influenced by a guidance cue and developed software that merges 3D microscopy images of multiple organisms. This made it possible to recognise patterns in the cell distribution and thus to highlight tissues that influence cell migration. The
21h
Not just a guys' club: Resistance training benefits older women just as much as older men
Men and women aged over 50 can reap similar relative benefits from resistance training, a new study shows.
21h
World's fastest optical neuromorphic processor
A Swinburne-led team has demonstrated the world's fastest and most powerful optical neuromorphic processor for artificial intelligence. The neuromorphic processor operates faster than 10 trillion operations per second and is capable of processing ultra-large scale data.
21h
Hawai'i drought during El Niño winter? Not always, according to new research
El Niño events have long been perceived as a driver for low rainfall in the winter and spring in Hawai'i, creating a six-month wet-season drought. However, a recent study revealed the connection between Hawai'i winter rainfall and El Niño is not as straightforward as previously thought.
21h
A brain mechanism underlying 'vision' in the blind is revealed
Researchers observed slow spontaneous fluctuations in the brain's visual centers that preceded visual hallucinations in blind people.
21h
World's fastest optical neuromorphic processor
A Swinburne-led team has demonstrated the world's fastest and most powerful optical neuromorphic processor for artificial intelligence. The neuromorphic processor operates faster than 10 trillion operations per second and is capable of processing ultra-large scale data.
21h
Do I Have a Moral Obligation to Be On TikTok?
I'm only 30, and already feeling like I owe it to society to keep up.
21h
Tech giant technology is 'open source' for the pandemic, so why does it feel so closed?
COVID-19 has seen hardware developers pledge to make their technology 'open source' to support frontline services, but their designs are still far from open.
21h
School nutrition professionals' employee safety experiences during onset of the COVID-19 pandemic
A new study in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, published by Elsevier, explores real-time personal and employee safety experiences and perspectives of school nutrition professionals ranging from frontline staff to state leadership across the United States during the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic.
21h
Experts tap into behavioral research to promote COVID-19 vaccination in the US
Behavioral science and marketing researchers are laying out a range of strategies to help convince people to get vaccinated.
21h
Researchers question fundamental study on the Kondo effect
In 1998, spectroscopic studies on the Kondo effect using scanning tunnelling microscopy were published, which are considered ground-breaking and have triggered countless others of a similar kind. Many of these studies may have to be re-examined now that researchers from Jülich, Germany have shown that the Kondo effect cannot be proven beyond doubt by this method. Instead, another phenomenon is cre
21h
Simple bioreactor makes 'gut check' more practical
Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine researchers develop lab tool to mimic conditions in intestines, giving them a mechanical model for the real-time growth of bacterial infections.
21h
Study examines attitudes toward long-acting injectable HIV therapy among women
A study led by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers examines attitudes toward long-acting injectable (LAI) HIV therapies, among women with a history of injection–including medical purposes and substance use. The findings appear in the journal AIDS Patient Care and STDs.
21h
Delivering the news with humor makes young adults more likely to remember and share
Could the merging of humor and news actually help inform the public? New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania and the School of Communication at Ohio State University found that young people were more likely to remember information about politics and government policy when it was conveyed in a humorous rather than non-humorous manner. They were also more willing to
21h
Cell Press papers to highlight research teams' inclusion and diversity efforts
Scientists who publish in Cell Press research journals will now have the option to include a short statement that highlights elements of the study design and/or author characteristics that are relevant to inclusion and diversity. The statement is generated based on information provided on a dedicated form that study authors complete as part of the acceptance process. This pilot initiative will als
21h
Alternative cancer cell fuel source targeted as therapeutic approach for breast cancer
Wistar scientists characterized an inhibitor that targets acetate metabolism in cancer cells. This molecule caused tumor growth inhibition and regression in preclinical studies, demonstrating the promise of this approach as a novel therapeutic strategy for solid tumors.
21h
China Is Launching Three Missions to Construct Its Space Station
Space Station China is set to launch three missions to kick off the construction of its space station, SpaceNews reports . The China Academy of Launch Vehicle Technology is putting the finishing touches on the rockets that are meant to launch the country's first space station module, as well as a cargo and refueling craft. According to SpaceNews , China is planning to construct its three-module s
21h
Boris Johnson's flawed coronavirus strategy
Striving to prevent the worst would have been better than trying to balance health and the economy
21h
A Newfound Source of Cellular Order in the Chemistry of Life
Imagine packing all the people in the world into the Great Salt Lake in Utah — all of us jammed shoulder to shoulder, yet also charging past one another at insanely high speeds. That gives you some idea of how densely crowded the 5 billion proteins in a typical cell are, said Anthony Hyman , a British cell biologist and a director of the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics
21h
Dog Domestication May Have Begun because Paleo Humans Couldn't Stomach the Original Paleo Diet
Unable to digest large amounts of protein, hunters likely left scraps that could have led to the taming of wolves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Rising lizard temperatures may change predator-prey relationship with snakes
Researchers have discovered that predation by snakes is pushing lizards to be active at warmer body temperatures on islands where snakes are present, in comparison to islands free from snakes. The findings show that lizard thermal biology is highly dependent on predation pressures and that body temperatures are rising suggest that such ectothermic predator-prey relationships may be changing under
21h
Peeking inside 'mini-brains' could boost understanding of the human brain
Revealing details of the internal structure of 'mini-brains' could help accelerate drug studies and may offer alternatives to some animal testing.
21h
Native biodiversity collapse in the Eastern Mediterranean
An international team quantified a dramatic biodiversity collapse of up to 95 per cent of native species in the Eastern Mediterranean.
21h
Faulty metabolism of Parkinson's medication in the brain linked to severe side effects
Until now, the reason why the drug levodopa (L-Dopa), which reduces the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, declines in efficacy after a few years' use has been unknown. A side effect that then often occur is involuntary movements. Scientists have now been able to connect the problems with defective metabolism of L-Dopa in the brain.
21h
Unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and pekin duck
Three studies uncovered the unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and Pekin duck. Platypus have five pairs of sex chromosomes forming an unusual chain shape, while the sex chromosomes of emu and duck are not as different between sexes as those of human.
21h
Dog Domestication May Have Begun because Paleo Humans Couldn't Stomach the Original Paleo Diet
Unable to digest large amounts of protein, hunters likely left scraps that could have led to the taming of wolves — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
The Capitol Riot Was an Attack on Multiracial Democracy
The Capitol building of the United States was breached yesterday by a mob seeking to overturn the results of the 2020 election at a sitting president's behest. Waving Trump banners and Confederate flags, it forced the evacuation of the building and temporarily delayed the timely ceremonial counting of the electoral votes. The immediate catalyst for the assault on the Capitol was the president him
21h
Facebook posts amplify false HPV vaccine risks
Posts on Facebook may add to the false belief that the human papillomavirus vaccine is dangerous to our health, according to a new study. The finding could inform the ongoing COVID-19 vaccine roll out and distribution, says health communication expert Monique Luisi. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US, according to the Centers for Disease Control
21h
Mediterranean diet may decrease risk of prostate cancer progression
In a study to examine a Mediterranean diet in relation to prostate cancer progression in men on active surveillance, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that men with localized prostate cancer who reported a baseline dietary pattern that more closely follows the key principles of a Mediterranean-style diet fared better over the course of their disease.
21h
For the right employees, even standard information technology can spur creativity
In a money-saving revelation for organizations inclined to invest in specialized information technology to support the process of idea generation, new research suggests that even non-specialized, everyday organizational IT can encourage employees' creativity.
21h
Proteogenomics offers insight to treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma
A new study identifies three molecular subtypes in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) that could be used to better determine appropriate treatment.
21h
Study reveals structure of protein and permits search for drugs against neglected diseases
Discovery by Brazilian scientists paves the way for the study of more potent molecules capable of directly destroying parasites underlying elephantiasis and cutaneous leishmaniasis, with fewer adverse side-effects.
21h
Protein that can be toxic in the heart and nerves may help prevent Alzheimer's
A protein that wreaks havoc in the nerves and heart when it clumps together can prevent the formation of toxic protein clumps associated with Alzheimer's disease, a new study led by a UT Southwestern researcher shows. The findings, published recently in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, could lead to new treatments for this brain-ravaging condition, which currently has no truly effective therap
21h
Columbia grad student faked data in study of socioeconomics and life experiences, says retraction notice
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin has retracted a 2018 paper because, according to a retraction notice, the first author changed data in a way that "resulted in incorrect and misleading results." The article, "Cardiovascular and self-regulatory consequences of SES-based social identity threat," claims to show that socioeconomic status-based "social identity threat can go from 'in … Contin
21h
Un-Consciousness
When you hear the word "consciousness", what did you think it is? All of what you experience and what you believe it is? Let me demonstrate something to you before you make up your mind. Imagine a day at work, where you: Had someone tap you repeatedly to get your attention, but only felt it […]
21h
The Wages of Motivated Reasoning
It can be tempting, as Adam Savage likes to say, to reject reality and substitute your own. The world is complex. There are difficult trade-offs. Sometimes we are wrong, our "tribe" is on the wrong side of history, or things just don't go our way. Any parent has seen how toddlers often respond when they don't get their way – the behavior can be described as a temper tantrum. Part of neurological
21h
Excess protein enabled dog domestication during severe Ice Age winters
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78214-4
22h
Authorities crack down on inaccurate rapid Covid antibody test kits in Australia
Therapeutic Goods Administration cancel approvals and issue fines after review finds many kits fail to match marketing hype NSW hotspots ; Victoria hotspots Covid restrictions state by state Follow the Australia coronavirus live blog Health authorities have cracked down on a number of wildly inaccurate rapid Covid-19 antibody test kits being pushed on to the Australian market, cancelling approval
22h
What happens when your brain can't tell which way is up or down?
What feels like up may actually be some other direction depending on how our brains process our orientation, according to psychology researchers at York University's Faculty of Health. In a new study published in PLoS One, researchers at York University's Centre for Vision Research found that an individual's interpretation of the direction of gravity can be altered by how their brain responds to v
22h
Perception of palliative care in South Asian populations
The results showed that seventy per cent of participants in the study had a lack of understanding of palliative care and forty-four per cent thought that palliative care went against their values and beliefs.
22h
Sleep is irreplaceable for the recovery of the brain
Researchers at the Medical Center – University of Freiburg demonstrate, for the first time directly, that active recovery processes take place in the brain during sleep that cannot be replaced by rest / Findings relevant for optimal performance
22h
Ancient DNA analysis reveals Asian migration and plague
Ancient DNA reveals a history of migrations, continuity, and diseases in northeastern Asia.
22h
Revisited: the clitoris coverup
Medical textbooks are full of anatomical pictures of the penis, but the clitoris barely rates a mention, with many medical professionals uncomfortable even talking about it. Reporter Calla Wahlquist and associate news editor Gabrielle Jackson explain the history and science of the clitoris, and speak to the scientists and artists dedicated to demystifying it This week, we are replaying some of ou
22h
'Hail to the queen': Saving the Caribbean queen conch
With an estimated lifespan between 25 to 40 years, the queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a prized delicacy long harvested for food and is revered for its beautiful shell. Second only to the spiny lobster, it is one of the most important benthic fisheries in the Caribbean region. Unfortunately, the species faces a challenge of survival: how to endure and thrive, as populations are in a steady state o
22h
Elon Musk Is Now Officially the Wealthiest Person on Earth
Top Dog Earlier this morning, we reported that mercurial billionaire Elon Musk was approaching the extraordinary milestone of becoming the wealthiest person on Earth. Now, just an hour later, it appears that he's already accomplished that goal, as Bloomberg reports . According to Bloomberg 's Billionaire Index , surging Tesla shares inflated Musk's net worth to a dizzying $188.5 billion as of Thu
22h
'Hail to the queen': Saving the Caribbean queen conch
With an estimated lifespan between 25 to 40 years, the queen conch (Strombus gigas) is a prized delicacy long harvested for food and is revered for its beautiful shell. Second only to the spiny lobster, it is one of the most important benthic fisheries in the Caribbean region. Unfortunately, the species faces a challenge of survival: how to endure and thrive, as populations are in a steady state o
22h
Researchers synthesize bio-based Methylcyclopentadiene with 3-Methylcyclopent-2-enone
Methylcyclopentadiene (MCPD) is an important monomer in the production of RJ-4 fuel, a high-energy-density rocket fuel, and various valuable products.
22h
The 1-minute secret to forming a new habit | Christine Carter
You know how resolutions often go: you set a goal and start strong … then the motivation runs out and feelings of frustration and shame creep in. The struggle is real — but what if it doesn't have to be? Sociologist Christine Carter shares a simple step to shift your mindset and keep you on track to achieving your grandest ambitions.
22h
Image: The sun in 2020
These 366 images of the sun were made by ESA's Proba-2 satellite in 2020.
22h
Research on Japanese Izu Islands finds rising lizard temperatures may change predator-prey relationship with snakes
In a study spanning four decades, researchers from the University of Hong Kong's Research Division for Ecology & Biodiversity (HKU) in the Faculty of Science, and Toho University's Department of Biology (Toho), Japan, have discovered that predation by snakes is pushing lizards to be active at warmer body temperatures on islands where snakes are present, in comparison to islands free from snakes. T
22h
Israeli researchers discover new bee species
There is no overestimating the importance of pollinators in our world today. While crop pollination relies mainly on managed colonies of the domesticated honey bee (Apis mellifera), wild, unmanaged pollinators were found to be highly effective, often critical contributors to pollination services in natural and agricultural systems. Among these wild pollinators, native bees are the most important p
22h
New challenges for wolf conservation
The predator's growing population could cause conflict with keepers of grazing animals and risk several conservation goals.
22h
How to mitigate the impact of a lockdown on mental health
The Covid-19 pandemic is impacting people's mental health. But what helps and hinders people in getting through a lockdown? A new study led by researchers at the University of Basel addressed this question using data from 78 countries across the world. The results hint at the pivots and hinges on which the individual's psyche rests in the pandemic.
22h
High-flux table-top source for femtosecond hard X-ray pulses
Researchers at the Max Born Institute (MBI) in Berlin have now accomplished a breakthrough in table-top generation of femtosecond X-ray pulses by demonstrating a stable pulse train at kilohertz repetition rate with a total flux of some 10^12 X-ray photons per second.
22h
Unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and duck
Three studies uncovered the unusual sex chromosomes of platypus, emu and Peking duck. Platypus have five pairs of sex chromosomes forming an unusual chain shape, while the sex chromosomes of emu and duck are not as different between sexes as those of human. The studies were led or co-led by Qi Zhou's group at the University of Vienna and Zhejiang University of China and are published as research p
22h
Mount Sinai researchers identify and characterize 3 molecular subtypes of Alzheimer's
Critical step toward developing precision medicine treatments
22h
Assessment of duplicate evidence in systematic reviews of imaging findings of children with COVID-19
This cross-sectional study maps a coronavirus research question to illustrate the overlap and shortcomings of the evidence syntheses in this area.
22h
Virtual care at cancer center during COVID-19
The outcomes of a cancer center-wide virtual care program launched in response to the COVID-19 pandemic were examined in this study.
22h
Speech recognition changes after cochlear implant
Researchers compared changes in preoperative aided speech recognition with postoperative speech recognition among individuals who received cochlear implants.
22h
Adapting to COVID-19 with outdoor intraocular pressure monitoring
To adapt to broader public health initiatives around COVID-19, researchers developed a drive-through intraocular pressure (IOP) screening clinic to minimize COVID-19 exposure for patients and clinicians by measuring eye pressure in the unconventional setting of a clinic parking lot.
22h
Examining association of age, household dysfunction, outcomes in early adulthood
Population data from Denmark were used to examine whether age at exposure to negative experiences in childhood and adolescence (parents' unemployment, incarceration, mental disorders, death and divorce, and the child's foster care experiences) was associated with outcomes in early adulthood.
22h
SARS-CoV-2 transmission from people without COVID-19 symptoms
Under a range of assumptions of presymptomatic transmission and transmission from individuals with infection who never develop symptoms, the model presented here estimated that more than half of transmission comes from asymptomatic individuals.
22h
Noncognitive skills — distinct from cognitive abilities — are important to success across the life
Noncognitive skills and cognitive abilities are both important contributors to educational attainment and lead to success across the life course, according to a new study from an international team. The research provides evidence for the idea that inheriting genes that affect things other than cognitive ability are important for understanding differences in people's life outcomes. Until now there
22h
NHGRI proposes an action agenda for building a diverse genomics workforce
The National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has released a new action agenda for a diverse genomics workforce. This ambitious set of goals, objectives, and implementation strategies details NHGRI's plans for enhancing the diversity of the genomics workforce by 2030.
22h
Selfish elements turn embryos into a battlefield
New toxin-antidote pairs discovered in nematode species – researchers from the Burga lab at IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences discover selfish elements that could facilitate populations becoming distinct species. The results are published in the journal Current Biology.
22h
Archaeology: sharing leftover meat may have contributed to early dog domestication
Humans feeding leftover lean meat to wolves during harsh winters may have had a role in the early domestication of dogs, towards the end of the last ice age (14,000 to 29,000 years ago), according to a study published in Scientific Reports .
22h
Stem cell therapy corrects skull, brain function in mouse model of childhood disorder
Using stem cells to regenerate parts of the skull, scientists corrected skull shape and reversed learning and memory deficits in young mice with craniosynostosis, a condition estimated to affect 1 in every 2,500 infants born in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
22h
Arthritis drugs could help save lives of Covid patients, research finds
Results suggest tocilizumab and sarilumab could cut relative risk of death of those in intensive care by 24% Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Two drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis could help to save the lives of one in 12 intensive care patients with severe Covid, researchers have found. The NHS will begin using tocilizumab to treat coronavirus patients from Fr
22h
Research on Japanese Izu Islands finds rising lizard temperatures may change predator-prey relationship with snakes
In a study spanning four decades, researchers from the University of Hong Kong's Research Division for Ecology & Biodiversity (HKU) in the Faculty of Science, and Toho University's Department of Biology (Toho), Japan, have discovered that predation by snakes is pushing lizards to be active at warmer body temperatures on islands where snakes are present, in comparison to islands free from snakes. T
22h
Israeli researchers discover new bee species
There is no overestimating the importance of pollinators in our world today. While crop pollination relies mainly on managed colonies of the domesticated honey bee (Apis mellifera), wild, unmanaged pollinators were found to be highly effective, often critical contributors to pollination services in natural and agricultural systems. Among these wild pollinators, native bees are the most important p
22h
Bumble bees in places with fewer flowers are sicker
Bumble bees found in low-quality landscapes—with a relative lack of spring flowers and quality nesting habitat—had higher levels of disease pathogens, according to new research. The researchers also found the same was the case for bumble bees in areas with higher numbers of managed honey bee hives. The results of the study, which examined how a variety of environmental and landscape characteristi
22h
Business this week
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Politics this week
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KAL's cartoon
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Why have so few Milky Way supernovae been observed over the last millennium?
Our galaxy hosts supernovae explosions a few times every century, and yet it's been hundreds of years since the last observable one. New research explains why: It's a combination of dust, distance and dumb luck.
22h
Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists in Gothenburg, Sweden have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease.
22h
Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists in Gothenburg, Sweden have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease.
22h
When galaxies collide: Hubble showcases six beautiful galaxy mergers
It is during rare merging events that galaxies undergo dramatic changes in their appearance and in their stellar content. These systems are excellent laboratories to trace the formation of star clusters under extreme physical conditions.
22h
Researchers repurpose 'damaged' polymer optical fibers to precisely measure magnetic fields
The invention of optical fibers has revolutionized not only telecommunications but also sensing technology. Optical fiber sensors can measure strain, temperature, pressure, and many other physical parameters along the fibers, but they are currently immune to electromagnetic noise—interference from other external electric or magnetic interactions. It is a desirable trait, until the effect of the el
22h
The Leftovers Route to Dog Domestication
If ancient hunters ate the juicy fat parts of their prey and gave wolves the lean meat, it could have been the beginning of a beautiful friendship.
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Trump Thrown Into Twitter Jail
Log Off After he instigated, encouraged, and ultimately failed to condemn an armed domestic terrorist insurrection Wednesday, Twitter locked President Donald Trump account in an unprecedented move. As Trump-supporting rioters broke into and looted the U.S. Capitol , the social network first flagged Trump's tweets and prevented users from interacting with them "due to a risk of violence." Later, t
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Sharing leftover meat may have contributed to early dog domestication
Humans feeding leftover lean meat to wolves during harsh winters may have had a role in the early domestication of dogs, towards the end of the last ice age (14,000 to 29,000 years ago), according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
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Selfish elements turn embryos into a battlefield
The battle to survive is fought down to the level of our genes. Toxin-antidote elements are gene pairs that spread in populations by killing non-carriers. Now, research by the Burga lab at IMBA and the Kruglyak lab at the University of California, Los Angeles shows that these elements are more common in nature than first thought and have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to force their inheritanc
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Hawai'i drought during El Niño winter? Not always, according to new research
El Niño events have long been perceived as a driver for low rainfall in the winter and spring in Hawai'i, creating a six-month wet-season drought. However, a recent study by researchers in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) revealed the connection between Hawai'i winter rainfall and El Niño is not as straightforward as previously thought.
22h
Machine-learning models of matter beyond interatomic potentials
Combining electronic structure calculations and machine learning (ML) techniques has become a common approach in the atomistic modeling of matter. Using the two techniques together has allowed researchers, for instance, to create models that use atomic coordinates as the only inputs to inexpensively predict any property that can be computed by the first-principles calculations that had been used t
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A new idea about how dogs were domesticated
They were beneficiaries of early human largesse
22h
How to map the seabed from the sky
A new type of sonar promises better oceanic cartography
22h
Herbal remedies can help to treat neglected tropical diseases
And a scientific approach will identify the best of them
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Selfish elements turn embryos into a battlefield
The battle to survive is fought down to the level of our genes. Toxin-antidote elements are gene pairs that spread in populations by killing non-carriers. Now, research by the Burga lab at IMBA and the Kruglyak lab at the University of California, Los Angeles shows that these elements are more common in nature than first thought and have evolved a wide range of mechanisms to force their inheritanc
22h
The social determinants of health, explained
Social determinants of health, such as income and access to healthy food, affect well-being long before people may enter medical facilities. They're one reason neighborhoods in the same city can maintain life expectancy gaps larger than a decade. With growing awareness of how societal ills determine health, medical professionals and their partners are devising more holistic approaches to health.
23h
Native biodiversity collapse in the Eastern Mediterranean
An international team led by Paolo G. Albano from the Department of Palaeontology at the University of Vienna quantified a dramatic biodiversity collapse of up to 95 per cent of native species in the Eastern Mediterranean. The study is published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences.
23h
Faulty metabolism of Parkinson's medication in the brain linked to severe side effects
Until now, the reason why the drug levodopa (L-Dopa), which reduces the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, declines in efficacy after a few years' use has been unknown. A side effect that then often occur is involuntary movements. A Swedish-French collaboration, led from Uppsala University, has now been able to connect the problems with defective metabolism of L-Dopa in the brain. The study is
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Peeking inside 'mini-brains' could boost understanding of the human brain
Revealing details of the internal structure of 'mini-brains' could help accelerate drug studies and may offer alternatives to some animal testing
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ACADEMIC, Can You Recall the Information? (Students, teachers)
This is a study on the effects of prior knowledge on the recall of students via a hand-drawn video lecture. It will take 10 minutes of your time. To participate fill in Form 1. In the study, you will fill in 2 more forms and watch a video lecture on "Does Speaking Two Or More Languages Make You Smarter? Following are the instructions for watching the video lecture: Instructions for Watching the V
23h
Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease.
23h
New hard disk write head analytical technology can increase hard disk capacities
Using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 – a large-scale synchrotron radiation facility – researchers have successfully imaged the magnetization dynamics of a hard disk drive (HDD) write head for the first time, with a precision of one ten-billionth of a second. The method makes possible precise analysis of write head operations, accelerating the development of the next-generation write heads and f
23h
Research shows rising lizard temperatures may change predator-prey relationship with snakes
Researchers from the University of Hong Kong and Toho University have discovered that predation by snakes is pushing lizards to be active at warmer body temperatures on islands where snakes are present, in comparison to islands free from snakes. The findings show that lizard thermal biology is highly dependent on predation pressures and that body temperatures are rising suggest that such ectotherm
23h
Significant number of patients with sudden loss of consciousness need pre-hospital critical care
Research from life-saving charity Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex (KSS) in partnership with the University of Surrey has shown the benefits of dispatching HEMS to patients with a sudden, unexplained LOC of medical origin and a high prevalence of acute neurological pathology.
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A brain mechanism underlying 'vision' in the blind is revealed
Researchers observed slow spontaneous fluctuations in the brain's visual centers that preceded visual hallucinations in blind people.
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Beating the bulge with a nice cup of tea
Researchers led by the University of Tsukuba found that healthy volunteers who consumed oolong tea every day had much higher levels of fat breakdown compared with the placebo group, and that the effects were most noticeable during sleep. Importantly, the volunteers developed a tolerance to caffeine over the 2-week study period, with their sleep patterns remaining unaffected by tea or caffeine cons
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Elon Musk Poised to Become the Richest Person in the World
Richie Rich According to Bloomberg 's Billionaire Index , Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk could soon surpass Amazon founder Jeff Bezos to become the richest person in the world. Share prices of Tesla surged this week, bringing Musk within "just" $3 billion of Bezos' net worth, according to the Index, which is estimated to be $184 billion. For perspective, that's the gross domestic product of a sma
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What's the scientific basis for delaying the Covid vaccine second dose?
UK health officials also allowing combining doses from different manufacturers Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage UK health officials have decided to delay giving second doses of Covid-19 vaccines and even permit combining doses from different manufacturers, prompting international concern. What is the scientific justification for this decision? Why has the UK decided t
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Most school reopenings didn't up COVID hospitalizations
In most cases, reopening K-12 schools in the United States did not result in an increase in hospitalizations because of COVID-19, a new study shows. The study is the first to examine how reopening schools in-person has affected COVID-19 health outcomes. Researchers found no evidence that reopening schools in-person or in a hybrid form increased COVID hospitalizations in the 75% of counties that h
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Does it matter which COVID-19 vaccine you get?
The Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines have many similarities. But is one better than the other? (Deposit Photos/) At this time last year, most Americans had not yet heard of a strange cluster of pneumonia cases affecting people in Wuhan, China. A full year later, scientists have identified and isolated the virus that causes this disease, COVID-19, and have developed multiple successful vaccine
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The Earth has been spinning faster lately
Scientists around the world have noted that the Earth has been spinning on its axis faster lately—the fastest ever recorded. Several scientists have spoken to the press about the unusual phenomenon, with some pointing out that this past year saw some of the shortest days ever recorded.
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Drug combination increases susceptibility to chemotherapy in cases of severe neuroblastoma
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg now suggest a possible cure for children with hard-to-treat forms of neuroblastoma using a new combination of drugs. In a new study in the journal Cancer Research, they describe how a two small molecule-based drug combination likely inhibit the tumor's growth.
23h
Autoimmune diseases: similar molecular signatures in target tissues
A study conducted by Professor Decio L. Eizirik's group – ULB Center for Diabetes Research – and published in Sciences Advances shows that autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes, must be studied in their entirety, taking into account not only the immune system but also the target tissues. Indeed, the key mechanisms induced by inflammation, potentially shared between type 1 diabetes, system
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When galaxies collide: Hubble showcases six beautiful galaxy mergers
To celebrate a new year, the NASA/ESA Space Telescope has published a montage of six beautiful galaxy mergers. Each of these merging systems was studied as part of the recent HiPEEC survey to investigate the rate of new star formation within such systems. These interactions are a key aspect of galaxy evolution and are among the most spectacular events in the lifetime of a galaxy.
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Machine-learning models of matter beyond interatomic potentials
The calculation of machine learning models that can predict properties beyond the interactions between atoms might eventually allow integrated ML models to replace costly electronic structure calculations entirely. In the paper Learning the electronic density of states in condensed matter researchers take a step in that direction with a new ML framework for predicting the electronic density of sta
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Hawai'i drought during El Niño winter? Not always, according to new research
El Niño events have long been perceived as a driver for low rainfall in the winter and spring in Hawai'i, creating a six-month wet-season drought. However, a recent study by researchers in the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa revealed the connection between Hawai'i winter rainfall and El Niño is not as straightforward as previously thought.
23h
Swinburne-led research team demonstrates world's fastest optical neuromorphic processor
A Swinburne-led team has demonstrated the world's fastest and most powerful optical neuromorphic processor for artificial intelligence. The neuromorphic processor operates faster than 10 trillion operations per second and is capable of processing ultra-large scale data.
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Vaccine myths on social media can be effectively reduced with credible fact checking
Researchers found that fact-check tags located immediately below or near a social media post can generate more positive attitudes toward vaccines than misinformation alone, and perceived source expertise makes a difference.
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Not just a guys' club: Resistance training benefits older women just as much as older men
Sure, everything might come down to sex – but not when strength training is concerned.
23h
SETI: New Signal Excites Alien Hunters—Here's How We Could Find Out if It's Real
The $100 million Breakthrough Listen Initiative , founded by Russian billionaire, technology and science investor Yuri Milner and his wife Julia, has identified a mysterious radio signal that seems to come from the nearest star to the sun, Proxima Centauri. This has generated a flood of excitement in the press and among scientists themselves. The discovery, which was reported by the Guardian but
23h
Jellyfish Build Walls of Water to Swim Around the Ocean
One of nature's most simple creatures has an elegant approach to propulsion.
23h
Author Correction: Successful breeding predicts divorce in plovers
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81033-w
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Palliative care boosts quality of life for people with advanced leukemia
Including palliative care early in the course of cancer therapy for patients with advanced acute myeloid leukemia results in substantial improvements in quality of life, mood, and end-of-life care, according to a new study. The findings demonstrate the benefits of early integration of palliative care for symptoms and stress into oncology care for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AM
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Fighting food insecurity during a global pandemic
As the COVID-19 pandemic cripples food systems worldwide, governments must evolve and cooperate to heal the crisis, Johns Hopkins Professor Jessica Fanzo argues in a recent Nature op-ed.
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Finds in Tanzania's Olduvai Gorge reveal how ancient humans adapted to change
The ability to adapt to changing environments has deep roots. In a technology-driven world, people tend to conflate adaptability with technological change, especially when it comes to navigating adverse climates and places. But not every technological revolution is a result of environmental change.
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Trump åbnede i dag auktion for Alaska, men oliegiganterne holdt sig væk
Miljøorganisationen Alaska Wilderness League kalder torsdagens auktion for en »episk fiasko« for Trump-administrationen.
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Extremely fast electrochromic supercapacitors
During materials engineering, a network of tiny holes or pores can improve the energy storage capacity of materials for applications as smart windows. Smart windows are platforms whose light transmission properties can be altered when light, voltage or heat is applied. Scientists can control the fraction of light passing through the material using an electrical voltage to electrically switch from
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Research: Round-faced, big-eyed cats are cute, but you can't tell how they feel
For decades, humans have been selectively breeding cats and dogs to exhibit exaggerated features—particularly in their faces. When it comes to cats, the very flat, round faces of the modern Persian and Exotic Shorthair are classic examples. These breeds are likely a result of humans' preference for infant-like features that may directly tap in to our nurturing instincts.
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Analysis: Peer review process unlikely to be primary cause of gender publishing inequalities in scholarly journals
An international team of analysts reports evidence that suggests it is not likely that the peer review process is to blame for gender publishing inequalities in scholarly journals. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of the peer review process for 145 scholarly journals to determine if there were gender biases and what they found.
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Study uses computer modelling to identify 'vulnerable sites' on coronavirus protein
Scientists have used computer modeling to identify potential 'vulnerable sites' on a key protein found in coronavirus—paving the way for possible new drug treatments in the future.
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Elon Musk's six secrets to business success
Six principles that have helped Elon Musk become the richest person on the planet.
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Research: Round-faced, big-eyed cats are cute, but you can't tell how they feel
For decades, humans have been selectively breeding cats and dogs to exhibit exaggerated features—particularly in their faces. When it comes to cats, the very flat, round faces of the modern Persian and Exotic Shorthair are classic examples. These breeds are likely a result of humans' preference for infant-like features that may directly tap in to our nurturing instincts.
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Study uses computer modelling to identify 'vulnerable sites' on coronavirus protein
Scientists have used computer modeling to identify potential 'vulnerable sites' on a key protein found in coronavirus—paving the way for possible new drug treatments in the future.
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Response to infection therapy better understood thanks to a new technique
A sequencing-based solution can be utilised to determine infection clearance and microbiota recovery. Next, the researchers will apply the technique to investigate the coronavirus disease.
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Study explains role of bone-conducted speech transmission in speech production and hearing
The perception of our own voice depends on sound transmission through air (air-conducted) as well as through the skull bone (bone-conducted or BC). The transmission properties of BC speech are, however, not well understood. Now, scientists from Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology report their latest findings on BC transmission under the influence of oral cavity sound pressure, which
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Genomes reveal insights into much-loved Aussie animals
Researchers have brought together expertise in bioinformatics, cytogenetics, developmental and molecular biology to produce and analyse the first ever echidna genome and a greatly improved, high quality platypus genome sequence.
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New hard disk write head analytical technology can increase hard disk capacities
Using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8 – a large-scale synchrotron radiation facility – Tohoku University, Toshiba Corporation, and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI) have successfully imaged the magnetization dynamics of a hard disk drive (HDD) write head for the first time, with a precision of one ten-billionth of a second. The method makes possible precise analysis of w
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A subtle change in the DNA may predispose to polyneuropathy after gut infection
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) identified a novel genetic variant associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). By analyzing the DNA sequence of patients with the disease, the researchers identified two novel variants of the ganglioside-binding protein Siglec-10 accumulated in the patients. They found that one of these variants impairs the function of the protein, pre
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Where antibiotic resistance comes from
By comparing thousands of bacterial genomes, scientists in Gothenburg, Sweden have traced back the evolutionary history of antibiotic resistance genes. In almost all cases where an origin could be determined, the gene started to spread from bacteria that, themselves, can cause disease.
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Consultation launched over gene edited food in England
The UK government launches a public consultation on using gene editing to modify livestock and crops.
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Old silicon learns new tricks
Researchers fabricated regular arrays of iron-coated silicon crystals that are atomically smooth. The defect-free pyramidal composition of the crystals impart magnetic properties that will enhance the functionality of 3D spintronics and other technologies.
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Ten Innovators to Watch in 2021
These visionaries are imagining an exciting future with chicken-less eggs, self-piloting ships and more
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Behold the world's tallest trees
It takes centuries of slow growth for the world's tallest trees to reach heights far beyond the tops of their surrounding forests. As they stretch for the sky, the giants nurture ever-changing ecosystems of plants and animals. Since 2015, Steven Pearce and Jennifer Sanger, a Tasmanian ­photographer-and-­ecologist duo, have been documenting Earth's unique and underappreciated behemoths. The pair u
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Australia's Black Summer a climate wake-up call
The 2019/20 Black Summer bushfires are a "wake up call" demonstrating the extreme effects of climate change in Australia, according to a group of experts who've published a new study examining the factors that caused the disaster.
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New hard disk write head analytical technology can increase hard disk capacities
Using synchrotron radiation at SPring-8—a large-scale synchrotron radiation facility—Tohoku University, Toshiba Corporation, and the Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI) have successfully imaged the magnetization dynamics of a hard disk drive (HDD) write head for the first time, with a precision of one ten-billionth of a second. The method makes possible precise analysis of write
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The first evidence of top quark production in nucleus-nucleus collisions
The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Collaboration, a large group of researchers from different institutes worldwide, has recently gathered the very first evidence of top quark production in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Their work, outlined in a paper published in Physical Review Letters, was based on lead-lead collision data gathered by the CMS particle detector, at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC).
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Unique X-ray microscope reveals dazzling 3-D cell images
The planet comprises continents and islands, each with unique cultures and resources. One area may be well known for growing food, another for manufacturing building materials, and yet despite their differences and distance from one another, the regions are linked by global processes. Living cells are built on a similar concept. For example, one part of the cell produces fuel that powers life, and
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What is a margin of error? This statistical tool can help you understand vaccine trials and political polling
In the last year, statistics have been unusually important in the news. How accurate is the COVID-19 test you or others are using? How do researchers know the effectiveness of new therapeutics for COVID-19 patients? How can television networks predict the election results long before all the ballots have been counted?
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Unique X-ray microscope reveals dazzling 3-D cell images
The planet comprises continents and islands, each with unique cultures and resources. One area may be well known for growing food, another for manufacturing building materials, and yet despite their differences and distance from one another, the regions are linked by global processes. Living cells are built on a similar concept. For example, one part of the cell produces fuel that powers life, and
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Chemists invent shape-shifting nanomaterial
Chemists have developed a nanomaterial that they can trigger to shape shift—from flat sheets to tubes and back to sheets again—in a controllable fashion. The Journal of the American Chemical Society published a description of the nanomaterial, which was developed at Emory University and holds potential for a range of biomedical applications, from controlled-release drug delivery to tissue engineer
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Study tracks changes to fishing, culture on island in Bahamas
Interviews with fishermen and women on Andros, the largest island in the Bahamas, reveal how tourism and modern development helped change the island's culture and environment. The island, which contains undeveloped natural areas with high biodiversity and important ecological features, has a history of artisanal fishing.
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Nanodroplets and ultrasound 'drills' prove effective at tackling tough blood clots
Engineering researchers have developed a new technique for eliminating particularly tough blood clots, using engineered nanodroplets and an ultrasound "drill" to break up the clots from the inside out. The technique has not yet gone through clinical testing. In vitro testing has shown promising results.
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Researchers synthesize bio-based Methylcyclopentadiene with 3-Methylcyclopent-2-enone
Scientists from DICP synthesized bio-based MCPD via direct hydrodeoxygenation of 3-methylcyclopent-2-enone (MCP) derived from cellulose.
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Researchers repurpose 'damaged' polymer optical fibers to precisely measure magnetic fields
Optical fiber sensors can measure strain, temperature, pressure, and many other physical parameters along the fibers, but they are currently immune to electromagnetic noise — interference from other external electric or magnetic interactions. It is a desirable trait, until the effect of the electromagnetic field on the fibers needs to be measured. An international research team has used what was
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Focused ultrasound shows promise for Parkinson's disease
A scalpel-free alternative to brain surgery has the potential to benefit people with Parkinson's disease symptoms that are much more severe on one side of the body, new research suggests.
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Want to diagnose brain diseases? A mass spectrometry imaging may one day help you
Researchers from Osaka University used mass spectrometry imaging to quantitate the distribution of fat molecules in mouse brain sections. With further development, this will help medical practitioners reliably diagnose diseases without damaging the tissue.
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'Hail to the queen' – saving the Caribbean queen conch
Second only to the spiny lobster, the queen conch is a prized delicacy long harvested for food and is revered for its beautiful shell. Conch populations have dwindled so low, creating a dire and urgent situation in ecological and economic terms. To preserve this significant molluscan fishery in the Caribbean, the world's leading expert on queen conch aquaculture has published an 80-page, step-by-s
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Black people with type 1 diabetes, COVID-19 are four times more likely to be hospitalized for diabetic ketoacidosis
Black and Hispanic people with COVID-19 and diabetes are more likely than Caucasians to die or have serious complications, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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Low risk of severe COVID-19 in children
Sweden kept preschools, primary and lower secondary schools open during the spring of 2020. So far, little research has been done on the risk of children being seriously affected by COVID-19 when the schools were open. A study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has now shown that one child in 130,000 was treated in an intensive care unit on account of COVID-19 during March-June. The study has be
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Study tracks changes to fishing, culture on island in Bahamas
Interviews with fishermen and women on Andros, the largest island in the Bahamas, reveal how tourism and modern development helped change the island's culture and environment. The island, which contains undeveloped natural areas with high biodiversity and important ecological features, has a history of artisanal fishing.
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Open burning of solid waste is a global threat to human health and safety that requires urgent action
A major global study of what happens to consumer goods and other engineered products at the end of their useful life has found widespread use of unsafe management and disposal practices and calls for urgent action to address the risks posed to human life and health.
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Want to diagnose brain diseases? A mass spectrometry imaging may one day help you
Medical professionals all want to be able to quickly and correctly diagnose diseases. Their future ability to do so will depend on identifying what biochemicals are present in tissue sections, where the biomolecules are, and at what concentrations. For this purpose, mass spectrometry imaging—which can identify multiple biochemicals in a single experiment—will be useful. However, the stability of b
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Like investors, bacteria, viruses and cancer cells hedge their bets
QUT mathematicians from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers applied financial risk management theory to the study of biological population dynamics to better understand an emergent 'cellular hedging' strategy that maximizes the expected growth rate of bacteria and other microorganisms.
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Breatharian bacteria breakdown greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants
Soil bacteria play a much greater role in regulating our atmosphere than previously thought.
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Scientists capture the moving parts of the portal to the cell's nucleus
The nucleus of a cell is well-shielded by a double membrane to protect its most sensitive possession—its DNA. Anything that enters or exits must pass through the nuclear pores, cylindrical structures made of hundreds of proteins. Scientists have made great advances in figuring out the architecture of the pore by reconstructing each of its parts in the lab. But they have struggled to understand how
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Scientists create first computational model of entire virus responsible for COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Chicago have created the first usable computational model of the entire virus responsible for COVID-19—and they are making this model widely available to help advance research during the pandemic.
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Klimaforskere: CO2-udledning gør det umuligt at overholde Parisaftalen
Det er allerede nu umuligt at begrænse den globale opvarmning til under to grader, men CO2'ens effekter kan forsinkes i flere århundreder, konkluderer ny undersøgelse.
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Next-generation particle beam cooling experiment under way at Fermilab accelerator
Before researchers can smash together beams of particles to study high-energy particle interactions, they need to create those beams in particle accelerators. And the tighter the particles are packed in the beams, the better scientists' chances of spotting rare physics phenomena.
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How chaos and tendency to reach thermal equilibrium arise from fundamental laws of physics
Normally the word "chaos" evokes a lack of order: a hectic day, a teenager's bedroom, tax season. And the physical understanding of chaos is not far off. It's something that is extremely difficult to predict, like the weather. Chaos allows a small blip (the flutter of a butterfly wing) to grow into a big consequence (a typhoon halfway across the world), which explains why weather forecasts more th
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Promoting equity in virtual learning
Over the past nine months, we've witnessed the largest disruption of the U.S. education systems in history. As parents review report cards and face another semester of learning amid a global crisis, Jennifer Darling-Aduana, assistant professor of learning technologies at Georgia State's College of Education & Human Development, is looking at what we've learned about virtual instruction and what is
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Like investors, bacteria, viruses and cancer cells hedge their bets
QUT mathematicians from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Frontiers applied financial risk management theory to the study of biological population dynamics to better understand an emergent 'cellular hedging' strategy that maximizes the expected growth rate of bacteria and other microorganisms.
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Breatharian bacteria breakdown greenhouse gases and toxic pollutants
Soil bacteria play a much greater role in regulating our atmosphere than previously thought.
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Scientists capture the moving parts of the portal to the cell's nucleus
The nucleus of a cell is well-shielded by a double membrane to protect its most sensitive possession—its DNA. Anything that enters or exits must pass through the nuclear pores, cylindrical structures made of hundreds of proteins. Scientists have made great advances in figuring out the architecture of the pore by reconstructing each of its parts in the lab. But they have struggled to understand how
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Insights through atomic simulation
A recent special issue of the Journal of Chemical Physics highlights Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) contributions to developing two prominent open-source software packages for computational chemistry used by scientists around the world.
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Scientists create first computational model of entire virus responsible for COVID-19
Researchers at the University of Chicago have created the first usable computational model of the entire virus responsible for COVID-19—and they are making this model widely available to help advance research during the pandemic.
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Researchers develop broadband X-ray source needed to perform new measurements at NIF
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed an X-ray source that can diagnose temperature in experiments that probe conditions like those at the very center of planets.
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Oldest hominins of Olduvai Gorge persisted across changing environments
Olduvai (now Oldupai) Gorge, known as the Cradle of Humankind, is a UNESCO World Heritage site in Tanzania, made famous by Louis and Mary Leakey. New interdisciplinary field work has led to the discovery of the oldest archaeological site in Oldupai Gorge, which shows that early human used a wide diversity of habitats amidst environmental changes across a 200,000 year-long period.
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Why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs.
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New drug form may help treat osteoporosis, calcium-related disorders
Innovators have developed a stabilized form of human calcitonin, which is a peptide drug already used for people with osteoporosis. Researchers created a prodrug form of the peptide hormone to increase its effectiveness as an osteoporosis treatment.
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Supercomputer models describe chloride's role in corrosion
Researchers have been studying chloride's corrosive effects on various materials for decades. Now thanks to high-performance computers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at UC San Diego and the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), detailed models have been simulated to provide new insight on how chloride leads to corrosion on structrual metals, resulting in economic and environmental
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Deliberately Spoiled Vaccines: Conspiracy thinking and health professionals
A Wisconsin pharmacist is facing charges after deliberately tampering with a batch of COVID-19 vaccines, demonstrating that a health professional's education is no vaccine against conspiracy beliefs. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Deep learning helps predicting occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer
A new study led by the Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology (SIAT) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences shows that deep learning can help predicting the occult peritoneal metastasis in stomach cancer. It provides a novel and noninvasive approach for stomach cancer patients and may inform individualized surgical management of stomach cancer.
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We may have caused 2 degrees of warming already
Past emissions have already set into motion global warming in excess of 2 degrees Celsius, report researchers. The planet is committed to global warming in excess of 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) just from greenhouse gases that have already been added to the atmosphere, according to new research by scientists from Texas A&M University, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) an
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Author Correction: A small Cretaceous crocodyliform in a dinosaur nesting ground and the origin of sebecids
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81062-5
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Author Correction: Chemogenetic generation of hydrogen peroxide in the heart induces severe cardiac dysfunction
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20668-1
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Optimal COVID-19 quarantine and testing strategies
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20742-8 Safely reducing the necessary duration of quarantine for COVID-19 could lessen the economic impacts of the pandemic. Here, the authors demonstrate that testing on exit from quarantine is more effective than testing on entry, and can enable quarantine to be reduced from fourteen to seven days.
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Ten Celestial Events to Look Forward to in 2021
Eclipses, meteor showers and dazzling views of planets will excite amateur and professional astronomers alike in North America
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'Massive-scale mobilization' necessary for addressing climate change, scientists say
A year after a global coalition of more than 11,000 scientists declared a climate emergency, Oregon State University researchers who initiated the declaration released an update today that points to a handful of hopeful signs, but shares continued alarm regarding an overall lack of progress in addressing climate risks.
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Research: Poorer pupils most likely to be away from school at the end of 2020
Poorer pupils were most likely to be away from school at the end of 2020, experts analyzing the learning loss caused by coronavirus have found.
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Genome study of people living Asia from Stone Age through Medieval period
An international team of researchers has conducted a genomic study of 40 human remains recovered from parts of upper east Asia in what is now mostly Siberia. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study and what it demonstrated about population shifts and migration in the region.
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France plans mass duck slaughter as bird flu hits foie gras
French producers of foie gras called Thursday for a mass preventive cull of ducks to try to halt the spread of a severe strain of bird flu that is ripping through poultry farms in the southwest of the country.
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Optical network shapes pulses of light
A team of UCLA engineers and researchers has developed a new method to shape light pulses by creating physical networks that are composed specially engineered layers. These layers are designed using deep learning and then fabricated using 3-D printing and stacked together, one following another, forming an optical network that is capable of performing various computational tasks using optical wave
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Genome study of people living Asia from Stone Age through Medieval period
An international team of researchers has conducted a genomic study of 40 human remains recovered from parts of upper east Asia in what is now mostly Siberia. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study and what it demonstrated about population shifts and migration in the region.
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Speeding up machine learning by means of light
Scientists have developed a pioneering new approach that will rapidly speed up machine learning—using light.
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France steps up duck cull as bird flu hits foie gras farms
French authorities plan to expand their culls of ducks reared for the controversial delicacy foie gras as an outbreak of bird flu rips through the southwest of the country, a producers' federation said Thursday.
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Danmark har fået klimavenlige kostråd: Du kan mindske din CO2-udledning med op til 50 procent
Det kræver dog, at de fleste af os omlægger kosten og begrænser vores madspild.
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Journal article reviews century of data showing COVID-19 likely to impact the brain
Decades of data paint a compelling case for why COVID-19 survivors, even those with few symptoms, could experience long-term effects on the brain and central nervous system.
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Protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 could last eight months or more
The findings, based on analyses of blood samples from 188 COVID-19 patients, suggest that responses to the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, from all major players in the 'adaptive' immune system, which learns to fight specific pathogens, can last for at least eight months after the onset of symptoms from the initial infection.
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NASA SPHEREx Space Telescope Will Probe Secrets of the Big Bang
The chronically delayed James Webb Space Telescope might get most of the attention, but NASA has other space telescope projects active and in the planning phases. The latest one is known as SPHEREx, and it just reached an important development milestone . When launched, this device could help us explore the earliest moments of the universe and unravel some of the mysteries surrounding the Big Ban
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7 things to know about the NASA rover about to land on Mars
With only about 50 million miles (80 million kilometers) left to go in its 293-million-mile (471-million-kilometer) journey, NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover is nearing its new planetary home. The spacecraft has begun its approach to the Red Planet and in 43 days, on Feb. 18, 2021, Perseverance will blaze through Mars' atmosphere at about 12,100 mph (19,500 kph), touching down gently on the sur
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A new NASA space telescope, SPHEREx, is moving ahead
NASA's upcoming space telescope, the Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization and Ices Explorer, or SPHEREx, is one step closer to launch. The mission has officially entered Phase C, in NASA lingo. That means the agency has approved preliminary design plans for the observatory, and work can begin on creating a final, detailed design, as well as on building the hard
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London hospitals admitting 800 Covid patients everyday
NHS presentation to senior doctors forecasts 2,000-bed shortfall in 'best-case scenario' by January 19
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Oldest hominins of Olduvai Gorge persisted across changing environments
Olduvai (now Oldupai) Gorge, known as the Cradle of Humankind, is a UNESCO World Heritage site in Tanzania, made famous by Louis and Mary Leakey. New interdisciplinary field work has led to the discovery of the oldest archaeological site in Oldupai Gorge as reported in Nature Communications, which shows that early human used a wide diversity of habitats amidst environmental changes across a 200,00
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Image: A good GRASP on the New Year
NASA astronaut Mike Hopkins performs the Grasp experiment in the Columbus module of the International Space Station ahead of the New Year. The experiment studies how the central nervous system, specifically hand-eye coordination, adapts to microgravity.
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Woman Grows Hairs Out of Her Gums in an Extremely Rare Medical Case
It's only the sixth time doctors have recorded this happening.
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Republicans Own This Insurrection
The scene that unfolded at the U.S. Capitol yesterday—an insurrection in all of its ugliness, all of its violence, and all of its kaleidoscopic horror—is the responsibility of Donald Trump. But it doesn't stop there. It is also the responsibility of countless of his aides and supporters, those in right-wing media and Trump's evangelical backers, "intellectuals" and pseudo-historians, Republicans
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Climate Change Is Turning Cities Into Ovens
A new model estimates that by 2100, cities across the world could warm as much as 4.4 degrees Celsius. It's a deadly consequence of the heat-island effect.
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How to Find the Perfect Music and Podcasts, Faster
Choosing just the right thing to listen is tricky. Here's how to navigate your options and set the mood.
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Is the Schrödinger Equation True?
Just because a mathematical formula works does not mean it reflects reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Best Evidence for How to Overcome COVID Vaccine Fears
Social science offers valuable lessons about ways to convince those who are hesitant about the shots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Is This How Greatness Ends?
What a tawdry coup attempt. What a fitting end to a presidency. This was not shocking in the same way as attempted and successful coups elsewhere—Egypt in 2013, Thailand in 2014, Turkey in 2016—which were serious, planned, meticulous. This, it seemed from afar at least, was an orgy of anger whipped up by a deluded and bitter man. It was closer to one of those videos you sometimes get sent of a fi
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The Best Evidence for How to Overcome COVID Vaccine Fears
Social science offers valuable lessons about ways to convince those who are hesitant about the shots — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nu skal teknologi være almendannelse: Danske Gymnasier foreslår helt nyt fag
Det nye teknologi-fag skal ikke specialisere eleverne, men give dem en bred forståelse for teknologiens rolle i samfundet og på arbejdsmarkedet.
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Dansk tænketank: EU's Digital Services Act kan få konsekvenser for ytringsfriheden
Den nyligt indgåede Digital Services Act, som EU fremlagde i december måned har mange gode intentioner, men lovpakken giver anledning til bekymring hos tænketanken Justitia, der frygter for ytringsfriheden, skriver K-News.
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Vanddetektiver finder fejlkoblinger – og sparer mange penge
PLUS. Uvedkommende vand er dyrt at pumpe og rense; hos Klar Forsyning er over halvdelen af vandet på renseanlægget ikke spildevand. Men nu er man mere systematisk begyndt at opspore spildevand i regnvandssystemet samt havvand, grundvand og regnvand i spildevandssystemet. Især det sidste kan betale sig.
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Ny forskning: Dansk landbrug udleder pesticiddampe, der regner ned over landet
PLUS. Ny undersøgelse fra Aarhus Universitet peger på, at størstedelen af den fordampede prosulfocarb, der spreder sig i atmosfæren over Danmark, kommer fra vores eget landbrug. Prosulfocarben falder også ned over landet som regn.
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Black Voters Understood What the Stakes Were
Chiseled into the side of Stone Mountain, a quartz monzonite dome in Georgia that arches nearly 1,700 feet toward the sky, are the likenesses of three Confederate leaders—President Jefferson Davis and Generals Robert E. Lee and Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson. Each is shown holding his hat over his heart, and each rides on the back of a horse whose body melts into the stone. This is the largest Confed
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Europe at tipping point with Covid running rampant, says WHO
Europe director Hans Kluge says rapid spread of new variant is cause for alarm Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Europe is at a tipping point in the course of the pandemic, the World Health Organization has said, warning that the coronavirus is spreading very fast across the continent and the arrival of a new variant has created an "alarming situation". Related: Corona
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The Sun Is Up. Impeach and Convict.
Updated at 6:48 a.m. ET on January 7, 2021. The U.S. government is relatively coup-proof because, like the president who heads its executive branch, it is bloated and sluggish, and due to its sheer inertia resistant to being jostled far out of position. That does not stop some from occasionally trying—and yesterday a crowd of deranged seditionists, encouraged by specific Republican officials, too
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What Trump and His Mob Taught the World About America
We have promoted democracy in our movies and books. We speak of democracy in our speeches and lectures. We even sing about democracy, from sea to shining sea, in our national songs. We have entire government bureaus devoted to thinking about how we can help other countries become and remain democratic. We fund institutions that do the same. And yet by far the most important weapon that the United
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"This retraction is one of the fastest I ever experienced after reporting a paper to a journal editor."
A researcher who has had more than 40 papers questioned by scientific sleuths has lost a second to retraction. On December 14, Elisabeth Bik reported problems in 39 papers coauthored by Hua Tang, of Tianjin Medical University in China, to the editors of the journals that had published the papers. PubPeer commenters found problems in … Continue reading
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Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs.
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Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs.
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Birmingham research paves the way for new anti-fibrotic therapy for glaucoma
Researchers showed that novel low molecular weight dextran-sulphate, ILB®, can normalise matrix deposition inside the eye and lower IOP in a pre-clinical model of human glaucoma, paving the way for new anti-fibrotic therapies to be developed for the disease.
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Research explains why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs
New research by scientists at the University of Bristol explains how a 'stop-start' pattern of evolution, governed by environmental change, could explain why crocodiles have changed so little since the age of the dinosaurs.
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Oldest hominins of Olduvai Gorge persisted across changing environments
Olduvai (now Oldupai) Gorge, known as the Cradle of Humankind, is a UNESCO World Heritage site in Tanzania, made famous by Louis and Mary Leakey. New interdisciplinary field work has led to the discovery of the oldest archaeological site in Oldupai Gorge as reported in Nature Communications, which shows that early human used a wide diversity of habitats amidst environmental changes across a 200,00
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Earliest Olduvai hominins exploited unstable environments ~ 2 million years ago
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20176-2 Oldupai Gorge, Tanzania is a key site for understanding early human evolution. Here, the authors report a multiproxy dataset from the Western basin of Oldupai Gorge dating to 2 million years ago, enabling the in situ comparison of lithic assemblages, paleoenvironments and hominin behavioral adaptability.
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TgAP2IX-5 is a key transcriptional regulator of the asexual cell cycle division in Toxoplasma gondii
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20216-x The control of the proper timing of emergence of apicomplexan parasite daughter cells during replication is crucial for their proliferation. Here, Khelifa et al. identify a key transcriptional regulator in the model Apicomplexa Toxoplasma gondii, which regulates the expression of transcription factors necessa
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Retraction Note: The melanocortin signaling cAMP axis accelerates repair and reduces mutagenesis of platinum-induced DNA damage
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80467-y
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Mapping leaf metal content over industrial brownfields using airborne hyperspectral imaging and optimized vegetation indices
Scientific Reports, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79439-z
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U.S. Disaster Costs Doubled in 2020, Reflecting Costs of Climate Change
The $95 billion in damage came in a year marked by a record number of named Atlantic storms, as well as the largest wildfires recorded in California.
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Vaccinet utnäms till årets forskningframsteg
2020 var ett händelserikt år, inte minst på vetenskapsfronten. Nobelveckan hölls för första gången digitalt. Samtidigt samarbetade forskare från hela världen för att utveckla ett vaccin med rekordfart. Här sammanfattar vi några av de största vetenskapsupptäckterna från året som gått.
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Spelberoende – med livet som insats
Varje år mister 1 300 människor sitt liv till följd av suicid i Sverige – men långt fler gör ett självmordsförsök. Spelberoende medför en 15-faldig ökning av risken att dö av suicid än vanliga befolkningen. Anna Karlsson, läkare vid Skånes universitetssjukhus och doktorand inom beroendemedicin vid Lunds universitet, skriver här om sin forskning om detta ämne.
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Tredobling i gå- og vandreture: Selv med en lille indsats kan du få en stor gevinst
En jævnlig gåtur kan nedsætte din risiko for op imod 35 sygdomme.
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Hemligheter gav liv åt Frimurarorden
Låt säga att det i slutet av denna text finns en hemlighet som ingen på denna jord tidigare fått höra. Blir du nyfiken?
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Looking up in wonder: humanity and the cosmos (part two) – podcast
There is something undeniably appealing about the cosmos that has kept humans staring upwards in awe – from our Palaeolithic ancestors to modern astronomers. Humans are natural stargazers, but with light pollution increasingly obscuring our view of the heavens, is our relationship with the night sky set to change? In the second of two episodes , Linda Geddes is joined by the author of The Human C
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Looking up in wonder: humanity and the cosmos (part two)
There is something undeniably appealing about the cosmos that has kept humans staring upwards in awe – from our Palaeolithic ancestors to modern astronomers. Humans are natural stargazers, but with light pollution increasingly obscuring our view of the heavens, is our relationship with the night sky set to change? In the second of two episodes, Linda Geddes is joined by the author of The Human Cos
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Campaigners hail Mexican ban on genetically modified corn
Environmental campaigners have welcomed a Mexican ban on growing genetically modified maize and the phasing out of a controversial weedkiller—a step that has met opposition in the private sector.
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Campaigners hail Mexican ban on genetically modified corn
Environmental campaigners have welcomed a Mexican ban on growing genetically modified maize and the phasing out of a controversial weedkiller—a step that has met opposition in the private sector.
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Beijing freezes as temperature hits five decade lows
Temperatures in the Chinese capital plunged to their lowest for more than five decades on Thursday, as Beijing was hit by gale-force winds and bitter conditions.
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Indonesia's Merapi volcano spews hot clouds, 500 evacuate
Indonesia's Mount Merapi volcano spewed avalanches of hot clouds Thursday morning as hundreds more residents were evacuated from its fertile slopes.
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Human migration patterns connected to vitamin D deficiencies today
A new study in the Oxford Economic Papers finds that migration flows the last 500 years from high sunlight regions to low sunlight regions influence contemporary health outcomes in destination countries.
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Human migration patterns connected to vitamin D deficiencies today
A new study in the Oxford Economic Papers finds that migration flows the last 500 years from high sunlight regions to low sunlight regions influence contemporary health outcomes in destination countries.
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FCA warns 4,000 financial firms risk failure due to Covid
Industry-wide survey finds six in 10 expect coronavirus pandemic to reduce their net income
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Environment department scientist calls for biotechnology debate
Gideon Henderson says debate needed on GM crops and gene editing of plants and animals Gideon Henderson, chief scientist at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, believes the time is ripe for a new public debate on biotechnology, the science of manipulating genes in crops and animals . "The last time we had an extensive public discussion was in the 1990s," he notes. Then, public
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Global heating could stabilize if net zero emissions achieved, scientists say
Climate disaster could be curtailed within a couple of decades if net zero emissions are reached, new study shows The world may be barreling towards climate disaster but rapidly eliminating planet-heating emissions means global temperatures could stabilize within just a couple of decades, scientists say. For many years it was assumed that further global heating would be locked in for generations
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Australia accelerates vaccine plan as fears grow over new Covid strains
BioNTech/Pfizer jab to be rolled out next month after criticism from doctors and opposition
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Gene editing of crops and livestock may soon be permitted in England
Government has launched consultation to change current strict EU rules for the first time under a consultation launched by the government on Thursday. Ministers said changing the current strict rules , which originate from the EU and make gene editing for crops and livestock almost impossible , would bring widespread benefits to consumers and farmers, including healthier food, environmental impr
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Human migration patterns connected to vitamin D deficiencies today
A new study in the Oxford Economic Papers finds that migration flows the last 500 years from high sunlight regions to low sunlight regions influence contemporary health outcomes in destination countries.
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Harbor porpoises on the decline in the German North Sea
The harbor porpoise population is declining in the German North Sea, according to a recent study which surveyed the species over a 20-year time period. Harbor porpoises are known as a "sentinel species" – animals which indicate the health of an ecosystem and point to potential risks (think of the canary in the coal mine) – and their decreasing numbers indicate the extent to which human activities
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Harbor porpoises on the decline in the German North Sea
The North Sea is a heavily trafficked area, with major shipping routes crossing its waters, and fisheries, offshore oil rigs, and wind farms populating its waves. All this activity inevitably has an effect on marine wildlife, and scientists are particularly interested in how the harbor porpoise population has fared in the face of such disturbances.
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Harbor porpoises on the decline in the German North Sea
The North Sea is a heavily trafficked area, with major shipping routes crossing its waters, and fisheries, offshore oil rigs, and wind farms populating its waves. All this activity inevitably has an effect on marine wildlife, and scientists are particularly interested in how the harbor porpoise population has fared in the face of such disturbances.
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Vaccine scepticism among medics sparks alarm in Europe and US
Health workers' reluctance to have jab gives countries battling Covid another headache
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European capitals follow UK with school closures as virus surges
Move to remote learning likely to stir debate in US where more schools remain open
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Har fokus på både din sundhed og klimaet: Sådan ser de nye, danske kostråd ud
Mindre kød og mælk, flere bælgfrugter og planter. Klimaet er kommet med i de officielle kostråd.
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Debates intensify over dosing plans for authorized COVID-19 vaccines
Proposals to halve doses or delay boosters seek to expand number of people who can quickly get at least one vaccine shot
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Debates over dosing plans for authorized COVID-19 vaccine intensify
Proposals to halve doses or delay boosters seeks to expand number of people who can quickly get at least one vaccine shot
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Efter Version2-afsløring: Datatilsynet indleder sag mod Aarhus Kommune om ulovlige dataoverførsler
Version2 kunne i går fortælle, at Aarhus Kommune bevidst går på kompromis med skolebørns databeskyttelse, når man bruger Googles G Suite for Education i undervisningen. Nu har Datatilsynet indledt en sag mod kommunen.
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How Joe Biden Watched the Capitol Assault
WILMINGTON, Del.—What, exactly, is Joe Biden supposed to do with this? What is he supposed to say? Today in Washington, D.C., a mob urged on by President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol. Trump's decisions led to police tear-gassing protesters in front of the White House in June. His decisions led to the same outcome in the Capitol Rotunda today, and Vice President Mike Pence and Vice Presid
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Stor udvidelse af wifi forsinkes i Danmark: S-toget holder i vejen
PLUS. Mens store dele af Europa står klar til den største kapacitetsudvidelse af wifi i over ti år, så må danske internetbrugere væbne sig med tålmodighed. Der er endnu ikke fundet en løsning, så S-togsnettets signalsystem kan fungere side om side med wifi-udstyr i 6 GHz-frekvensbåndet.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Siege of the U.S. Capitol
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Getty Congress fled. A mob took the Capitol, took the Senate floor, took souvenirs . Confederate flags flew. A woman died. Today, Americans watched the unfathomable, but not unexpected, unfold. I
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Trump's Internet Is Celebrating
Updated at 11:12 a.m. ET on January 7, 2020. The internet is real life. This was the lesson of Pizzagate in 2016, which made clear that conspiracy theorizing on message boards can lead to a man carrying a rifle into a restaurant. This was the lesson of the deadly Charlottesville rally in 2017, which made clear that online hate is a precursor to offline violence. This was the lesson of the Christc
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Mass Delusion in America
Insurrection Day, 12:40 p.m.: A group of about 80 lumpen Trumpists were gathered outside the Commerce Department, near the White House. They organized themselves in a large circle, and stared at a boombox rigged to a megaphone. Their leader and, for some, savior—a number of them would profess to me their belief that the 45th president is an agent of God and his son, Jesus Christ—was rehearsing hi
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Humans Have Gotten Nicer and Better at Making War – Issue 94: Evolving
In 1991 two hikers in the Italian Alps stumbled on a mummified body buried in the ice. The Iceman, it turned out, died more than 5,000 years ago. At first, archeologists assumed he'd fallen in a snowstorm and frozen to death. Then they discovered various cuts and bruises on his body and an arrowhead embedded in his shoulder. They also found traces of blood on the stone knife he was carrying. Most
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We Didn't Evolve for This – Issue 94: Evolving
When a Weddell seal, native to Antarctica, plummets 400 meters beneath the ice on one of its hour-long dives, an ensemble of adaptations come together to keep it alive. The seal's heart rate slows. At this pace, it will burn through its deep reserve of oxygen—provided by extra-large volumes of blood and hemoglobin—more slowly. The seal's muscles free massive stores of trapped oxygen from another
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Humans Have Rights and So Should Nature – Issue 94: Evolving
Humans once lived in harmony with the natural world. Consider timekeeping. Until relatively recently, the human notion of time was based on the natural rhythms of nature. Time was measured by a new moon, the first snow, a migrating bird, or the ebb and flow of a river. Time meant situating ourselves as part of a larger web of life. Western society has since lost its connection to nature. Human-cr
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Twitter locked Trump's account. Insiders say it needs to go further.
As a mob of right-wing extremists occupied the US Capitol building on Tuesday, President Trump posted a short video message to his loyal supporters on social media: "We had an election that was stolen from us," he said, repeating a lie he has promoted for months. "Go home. We love you; you're very special," he said. "I know how you feel, but go home and go home in peace." Initially, Twitter only
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Republicans Meet Their Monster
The Ellipse was a deep sea of delusion. Thousands of President Donald Trump's supporters drove or bused or flew from all corners of the United States to meet here, in the treeless space beside the White House, in their quest to overturn the results of the 2020 election with the help of congressional Republicans. "As I live and die, we will never give up until we have a fair-and-square election!"
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US states urged to be more flexible distributing Covid-19 jabs
Health secretary calls for wider access to vaccines to ensure they do not go unused
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Mouse study finds link between gut disease and brain injury in premature infants
Working with mice, researchers have identified an immune system cell that they say travels from the gut to the brain and attacks cells rather than protect them as it normally does.
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Scenes From an American Insurrection
This afternoon, a mob of pro-Trump extremists stormed the Capitol, where Congress had convened to certify Joe Biden's victory in the 2020 election. The insurrectionists clashed with police, scaled walls, broke windows, and carried Confederate and Trump flags throughout the Capitol's halls. Members of Congress and their staffers sheltered in place before being evacuated from the building. Collecte
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COVID-19 infection linked with higher death rate in acute heart failure patients
Patients with acute heart failure nearly double their risk of dying if they get COVID-19, according to research published today in ESC Heart Failure, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).1 The small, single centre study highlights the need for patients with heart failure to take extra precautions to avoid catching COVID-19."Our results support prioritising heart failure patients f
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The social determinants of health, explained
Social determinants of health, such as income and access to healthy food, affect well-being long before people may enter medical facilities. They're one reason neighborhoods in the same city can maintain life expectancy gaps larger than a decade. With growing awareness of how societal ills determine health, medical professionals and their partners are devising more holistic approaches to health.
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Quantized charge fractionalization at quantum Hall Y junctions in the disorder dominated regime
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20395-7 Previous work has focused on charge fractionalization in quantum Hall edge channels coupled by Coulomb interaction without inter-channel tunneling. Here, the authors investigate the regime of disorder-induced tunneling, demonstrating robust fractionalization in the hole-conjugate state at filling factor 2/3.
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England to consult on enabling gene-edited foods post-Brexit
Significant departure possible from EU policy on agricultural technology
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The Lancet Planetary Health: Meeting India's air quality targets across south Asia may prevent 7% of pregnancy losses, modelling study estimates
Poor air quality is associated with a considerable proportion of pregnancy loss in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh, according to a modelling study published in The Lancet Planetary Health journal.
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Remove Trump Tonight
This is a moment of shame and grief. If we are not very careful, it will also be a terrible moment of opportunity for President Donald Trump. The violence Trump incited could be his pretext for further abuses of presidential power. As so often with Trump, he has indicated the plan in advance: Use the Insurrection Act to somehow interfere with the transition of power. He could try it this very day
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An epidemic of overdiagnosis: Melanoma diagnoses sky rocket
In a Sounding Board article, Welch and colleagues present evidence for why they believe that increased diagnostic scrutiny is the primary driver of the rapid rise in melanoma diagnoses.
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New type of dual-acting antibiotic shows promise
Antibiotic resistance is a big problem, but not many new drugs are currently under development. A recent discovery may give us a new antibiotic that is effective against a wide range of germs, including those resistant to other drugs. The new drug's mechanism also appears to signal the immune system, helping to amplify its response. Antibiotic resistance is a major problem , but one that seems to
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Twitter Censors Trump Tweet "Due to Risk of Violence"
Trump's Coup Hundreds of Trump supporters stormed the Capitol building in Washington, DC today, breaking windows and stealing property. Egging them on, as recently as earlier today, has been President Donald Trump himself, who has refused to concede the election even in the face of overwhelming evidence that he lost to challenger Joe Biden. "Our country has had enough." Trump told a crowd today.
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Covid-19 immunity likely lasts for years
Covid-19 patients who recovered from the disease still have robust immunity from the coronavirus eight months after infection, according to a new study. The result is an encouraging sign that the authors interpret to mean immunity to the virus probably lasts for many years, and it should alleviate fears that the covid-19 vaccine would require repeated booster shots to protect against the disease
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Study Says Blood Plasma Reduces Risk of Severe Covid-19 if Given Early
Thousands of people received convalescent plasma as an experimental treatment for Covid. A new study shows that it works — but only when given within a few days of the onset of illness.
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Developmental Biologist Kathryn Anderson Dies at 68
The Sloan Kettering researcher used mutagenic screening to probe genes and molecular pathways, including Toll and Hedgehog, essential to development in fruit flies and mice.
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Are Face Masks Here to Stay?
Some countries shifted their cultures after pandemics to embrace mask-wearing in public. Will the same thing happen to the U.S.?
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Developmental Biologist Kathryn Anderson Dies at 68
The Sloan Kettering researcher used mutagenic screening to probe genes and molecular pathways, including Toll and Hedgehog, essential to development in fruit flies and mice.
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Impeach Trump Again
T he president of the United States summoned his supporters to Washington, D.C., today, and then stood in front of the White House and lied to them, insisting that he had won the election and that extraordinary measures were necessary to vindicate his win. They took his message to heart, marching up the National Mall toward Capitol Hill. Breaking through barricades and police lines, Confederate b
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Developmental Biologist Kathryn Anderson Dies at 68
The Sloan Kettering researcher used mutagenic screening to probe genes and molecular pathways, including Toll and Hedgehog, essential to development in fruit flies and mice.
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Government Facial Recognition Can Identify 96 Percent of Masked People
Eye Contact A powerful new facial recognition system can recognize and identify people 96 percent of the time — even when they're wearing a mask to protect against the coronavirus. When the pandemic really took hold, it became clear that the facial recognition systems already on the market weren't up to the challenge of identifying people who covered the bottom half of their head with a face mask
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U.S. law sets stage for boost to artificial intelligence research
Congress authorizes ramp up in AI spending and backs planning for a national cloud computing resource
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When Uber and Lyft enter a new city, vehicle ownership goes up, not down
submitted by /u/fotogneric [link] [comments]
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The future of remote work?
Remote working is not only a different way of working but also a different way of living. Remote life style could be the future of our work and life. It is predicted that 38% of full-time workers will work remotely in the next decade, and remote work has increased by 115% since 2005. According to a report by the International Remote Work Association, the demand for remote work will increase by 30
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How India's Renewable Energy Sector Survived and Thrived in a Turbulent 2020
submitted by /u/SoUnProfessional [link] [comments]
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Mining the sky for CO2 with metal trees, towers and pumps
submitted by /u/Memetic1 [link] [comments]
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Microsoft Could Bring You Back From The Dead… As A Chat Bot
submitted by /u/Eswar14a9 [link] [comments]
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2021 Could Be a Banner Year for AI—If We Solve These 4 Problems
submitted by /u/izumi3682 [link] [comments]
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The Pentagon Has 6 Months to Disclose What It Knows About UFOs
submitted by /u/Gari_305 [link] [comments]
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Journey Through the Universe
submitted by /u/vibice1j [link] [comments]
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2021 Will Be the Year of Basic Income Experiments
submitted by /u/Youaresowronglolumad [link] [comments]
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Should we recognize privacy as a human right?
submitted by /u/Sumit316 [link] [comments]
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A third of U.S. families face a different kind of poverty
Before the pandemic, one-third of U.S. households with children were already "net worth poor," lacking enough financial resources to sustain their families for three months at a poverty level, finds new research from Duke University.
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For 50 years, biologist has studied bottlenose dolphins from a research center on Florida's Gulf Coast
Beginning his work in marine biology, Randy Wells thought he was a shark guy.
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For 50 years, biologist has studied bottlenose dolphins from a research center on Florida's Gulf Coast
Beginning his work in marine biology, Randy Wells thought he was a shark guy.
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Cell biologists decipher signal that ensures no chromosome is left behind
Starting as a single cell, organisms undergo millions of generations of divisions to ultimately generate the bones, heart, brain and other components that make up a living being. The mainspring within this intricate process is the transfer of DNA through each subsequent cell split within discrete packets called chromosomes.
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Physicists observe competition between magnetic orders
They are as thin as a hair, only a hundred thousand times thinner—so-called two-dimensional materials, consisting of a single layer of atoms, have been booming in research for years. They became known to a wider audience when two Russian-British scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2010 for the discovery of graphene, a building block of graphite. The special feature of such materi
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Cell biologists decipher signal that ensures no chromosome is left behind
Starting as a single cell, organisms undergo millions of generations of divisions to ultimately generate the bones, heart, brain and other components that make up a living being. The mainspring within this intricate process is the transfer of DNA through each subsequent cell split within discrete packets called chromosomes.
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New strategy to fight botulinum toxin – expert available
Published research shows a new "Trojan horse" approach that produces strong antidotal efficacy in treating lethal botulism.
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A third of US families face a different kind of poverty
Before the pandemic, one-third of U.S. households with children were already "net worth poor," lacking enough financial resources to sustain their families for three months at a poverty level, finds new research from Duke University. In 2019, 57 percent of Black families and 50 percent of Latino families with children were poor in terms of net worth. By comparison, the rate for White families was
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The link between opioid medication and pancreatic cancer
Using Center for Disease Control's national population health and cancer statistics datasets, Rush University Medical Center researchers determined that a state's opioid death rate significantly predicted the trend in the incidence of pancreatic cancer years later. This is the first study showing opioid use may be a risk factor contributing to the increasing incidence of pancreatic cancer
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In changing oceans, sea stars may be 'drowning'
For more than seven years, a mysterious wasting disease has nearly killed off sea star populations around the world. Some of these species stand at the brink of extinction.
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Nuclear fusion group calls for building a pilot plant by the 2040s
The main criticism about nuclear fusion has been that its vast potential as a commercial source of energy has always been just out of reach.
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Businesses stand to benefit from sustainable restructuring
The Earth is populated by an increasing number of people who demand more and more products, which is simply not viable in the long run. Our planet does not have unlimited resources. Emissions are harming the environment in various ways.
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Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
Using copper foil, glass containers and a conventional household microwave oven, University of Wyoming researchers have demonstrated that pulverized coal powder can be converted into higher-value nano-graphite.
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In changing oceans, sea stars may be 'drowning'
For more than seven years, a mysterious wasting disease has nearly killed off sea star populations around the world. Some of these species stand at the brink of extinction.
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Bird protections lifted in last-minute Interior Department rule change
Companies in the petroleum and other industries will not be held legally responsible for killing migratory birds as long as they did not mean to, the Trump administration said Tuesday, drawing swift condemnation from animal welfare and conservation groups.
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Bird protections lifted in last-minute Interior Department rule change
Companies in the petroleum and other industries will not be held legally responsible for killing migratory birds as long as they did not mean to, the Trump administration said Tuesday, drawing swift condemnation from animal welfare and conservation groups.
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7 research-based resolutions that will help strengthen your relationship in the year ahead
The new year is going to be better. It has to be better. Maybe you're one of the 74% of Americans in one survey who said they planned on hitting the reset button on Jan. 1 and resolving to improve. Those New Year's resolutions most commonly focus on eating healthier, exercising, losing weight and being a better person. Admirable goals, to be sure. But focusing on body and mind neglects something
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A new approach to study autoimmune diseases
A team of researchers led by the Indiana Biosciences Research Institute Diabetes Center's Scientific Director Decio L. Eizirik, MD, PhD, has found that identifying new treatments for autoimmune diseases requires studying together the immune system AND target tissues. This study, "Gene expression signatures of target tissues in type 1 diabetes, lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid
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Mouse study finds link between gut disease and brain injury in premature infants
Working with mice, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the University of Lausanne in Switzerland have identified an immune system cell that they say travels from the gut to the brain and attacks cells rather than protect them as it normally does.
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Bryan Sykes, Who Saw the Ancient Past in Genes, Dies at 73
An Oxford scientist with a flair for the dramatic, he introduced millions of people to the secrets of their ancestry through his books and TV appearances.
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uOttawa study shows that mindfulness can help ease the pain of breast cancer survivors
A study led by University of Ottawa researchers provides empirical evidence that mindfulness has a significant impact on the brain of women suffering from neuropathic pain related to breast cancer treatment. The researchers showed that mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) helps modulate neuropathic pain.
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Light-based processors boost machine-learning processing
An international team of scientists have developed a photonic processor that uses rays of light inside silicon chips to process information much faster than conventional electronic chips. Published in Nature , the breakthrough study was carried out by scientists from EPFL, the Universities of Oxford, Münster, Exeter, Pittsburgh, and IBM Research – Zurich.
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Tornado-inspired acoustic vortex tweezer for trapping and manipulating microbubbles [Medical Sciences]
Spatially concentrating and manipulating biotherapeutic agents within the circulatory system is a longstanding challenge in medical applications due to the high velocity of blood flow, which greatly limits drug leakage and retention of the drug in the targeted region. To circumvent the disadvantages of current methods for systemic drug delivery,…
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Negative selection on human genes underlying inborn errors depends on disease outcome and both the mode and mechanism of inheritance [Evolution]
Genetic variants underlying life-threatening diseases, being unlikely to be transmitted to the next generation, are gradually and selectively eliminated from the population through negative selection. We study the determinants of this evolutionary process in human genes underlying monogenic diseases by comparing various negative selection scores and an integrative approach, CoNeS,…
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ACTL6A promotes repair of cisplatin-induced DNA damage, a new mechanism of platinum resistance in cancer [Biochemistry]
Cisplatin is a mainstay of systemic therapy for a variety of cancers, such as lung cancer, head and neck cancer, and ovarian cancer. However, resistance to cisplatin represents one of the most significant barriers for patient outcome improvement. Actin-like 6A (ACTL6A) is a component of several chromatin remodeling complexes, including…
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Opinion: Standardizing gene product nomenclature—a call to action [Genetics]
The current lack of a standardized nomenclature system for gene products (e.g., proteins) has resulted in a haphazard counterproductive system of labeling. Different names are often used for the same gene product; the same name is sometimes used for unrelated gene products. Such ambiguity causes not only potential harm to…
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Discovery of an insulating ferromagnetic phase of electrons in two dimensions [Applied Physical Sciences]
The two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) realized in semiconductor heterostructures has been the focus of fruitful study for decades. It is, in many ways, the paradigmatic system in the field of highly correlated electrons. The list of discoveries that have emerged from such studies and have opened new fields of physics…
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Modern microbes provide window into ancient ocean
Roughly two billion years ago, microorganisms called cyanobacteria fundamentally transformed the globe. Researchers are now stepping back to that pivotal moment in Earth's history.
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Resist the resistance: Fighting the good fight against bacteria
Drug-resistant bacteria could lead to more deaths than cancer by 2050, according to a report commissioned by the United Kingdom in 2014 and jointly supported by the U.K. government and the Wellcome Trust. In an effort to reduce the potential infection-caused 10 million deaths worldwide, Penn State researcher Scott Medina has developed a peptide, or small protein, that can target a specific pathoge
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Heat treatment may make chemotherapy more effective
The study found that 'loading' a chemotherapy drug on to tiny magnetic particles that can heat up the cancer cells at the same time as delivering the drug to them was up to 34% more effective at destroying the cancer cells than the chemotherapy drug without added heat.
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Magnets dim natural glow of human cells, may shed light on how animals migrate
New research shows how X-Men villain Magneto's super powers could really work. Researchers have made the first observations of biological magnetoreception – live, unaltered cells responding to a magnetic field in real time. This discovery is a crucial step in understanding how animals from birds to butterflies navigate using Earth's magnetic field and addressing the question of whether weak electr
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UK health leaders call for clarity on Covid vaccine supplies
Doctors fear shortages will jeopardise timetable for immunising the most vulnerable
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This Is a Coup
Updated on January 6 at 4:30 p.m. Insurrectionists are attacking the seat of American government in an attempted coup, urged on by the president of the United States. Saying that feels melodramatic, ridiculous, and overwrought, but there's no plainer way to describe what is currently unfolding. Tens of thousands of supporters of outgoing President Donald Trump gathered in Washington, D.C., where
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OpenAI's 'DALL-E' Generates Images From Text Descriptions
Artificial intelligence has gotten very good at some things — it's even approaching the capability of people when it comes to recognizing objects and generating text. What about art? OpenAI has devised a new neural network called DALL-E (it's like Dali with a nod to beloved Pixar robot WALL-E). All you need to do is give DALL-E some instructions, and it can draw an image for you. Sometimes the re
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Scientists Want to Give Neural Networks Virtual Drugs
Psychedelic Upload A team of scientists has an unusual plan for figuring out how psychedelic drugs affect our brains: giving virtual versions of the substances to neural network algorithms and watching what happens. The idea, PsyPost reports , is that by recreating the psychedelic hallucinations caused by DMT in a neural net modeled after the human brain, scientists may be able to better uncover
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Toxin chimeras slip therapeutics into neurons to treat botulism in animals
Taking advantage of the chemical properties of botulism toxins, two teams of researchers have fashioned non-toxic versions of these compounds that can deliver therapeutic antibodies to treat botulism, a potentially fatal disease with few approved treatments.
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Et årti med fest og ballade: Tiden efter corona kan blive som i 1920'erne
Verden har tidligere haft økonomiske og kulturelle opsving efter store kriser med krig eller sygdom.
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25 Movies to Look Forward to in 2021
Curating a film preview for 2021 involves all the necessary caveats. Because the cinema industry remains deeply in flux and many theaters have yet to reopen, this year will likely be full of schedule changes and surprise decisions to move some projects to streaming. One major studio, Warner Bros., plans to debut each of its films simultaneously in theaters and on the streaming service HBO Max; ot
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Shiga toxin's not supposed to kill you
E. coli food poisoning is one of the worst food poisonings, causing bloody diarrhea and kidney damage. But all the carnage might be just an unintended side effect, report researchers. Their findings might lead to more effective treatments for this potentially deadly disease.
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How Earth's oddest mammal got to be so bizarre
Often considered the world's oddest mammal, Australia's beaver-like, duck-billed platypus exhibits an array of bizarre characteristics: it lays eggs instead of giving birth to live babies, sweats milk, has venomous spurs and is even equipped with 10 sex chromosomes. Now, an international team of researchers has conducted a unique mapping of the platypus genome and found answers regarding the origi
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New research finds ginger counters certain autoimmune diseases in mice
The main bioactive compound of ginger root lowers autoantibody production and helps halt disease progression in mice with antiphospholipid syndrome and lupus.
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Light-carrying chips advance machine learning
Researchers found that so-called photonic processors, with which data is processed by means of light, can process information very much more rapidly and in parallel than electronic chips.
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A better pen-and-ink system for drawing flexible circuits
Conductive ink is a great tool for printing flexible electronic circuits on surfaces. But these inks can be costly, they do not work on some materials, and devices to apply them can plug up. Now, scientists report that they have developed inexpensive conductive inks for clog-free ballpoint pens that can allow users to 'write' circuits almost anywhere — even on human skin.
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Researchers turn coal powder into graphite in microwave oven
Researchers created an environment in a microwave oven to successfully convert raw coal powder into nano-graphite, which is used as a lubricant and in items ranging from fire extinguishers to lithium ion batteries.
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'Sniffing out' fruity thiols in hoppy beers
Hoppy beers such as pale ales are becoming increasingly popular. One reason is their pleasant fruity aroma that partially stems from compounds called thiols. Brewers have been looking for an accurate way to track thiols in beer, but current methods typically are not sensitive enough or require use of potentially harmful substances. Now, researchers present an automated, solvent-less process to ass
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In changing oceans, sea stars may be 'drowning'
New research suggests that starfish, victims of sea star wasting disease (SSWD), may actually be in respiratory distress – literally 'drowning' in their own environment – as elevated microbial activity derived from nearby organic matter and warm ocean temperatures rob the creatures of their ability to breathe.
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Long-term study finds dozens of new genetic markers associated with lifetime bone growth
A multidisciplinary team of researchers has discovered several genetic markers associated with bone mineral accrual, which could ultimately help identify causes of eventual osteoporosis earlier in life through genetic testing.
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Competitive athletics: Detecting CRISPR/Cas gene doping
All athletes want to be at the top of their game when they compete, but some resort to nefarious approaches to achieve peak muscle growth, speed and agility. Recent developments in gene editing technology could tempt athletes to change their DNA to get an edge. Now, researchers demonstrate first steps toward detecting this type of doping both in human plasma and in live mice.
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