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Upper ocean temperatures hit record high in 2020
The ocean temperatures continued a trend of breaking records in 2020. A new study, authored by 20 scientists from 13 institutes around the world, reported the highest ocean temperatures since 1955 from surface level to a depth of 2,000 meters.
8h
Ekstrem træthed og svage muskler: 76 procent af indlagte med covid-19 har senfølger et halvt år efter
Undersøgelsen af senfølger efter covid-19 er kinesisk, men passer med billedet herhjemme, vurderer danske forskere.
5h
Kinesisk elbil klar med solidstate-batterier i 2022
Ny kinesisk elbil vil få en rækkevidde på 1.000 km, når de sættes til salg i slutningen af 2022. Batterierne bliver af den nye kompakte type med fast elektrolyt, også kaldet solidstate.
3h

LATEST

How Law Enforcement Gets Around Your Smartphone's Encryption
New research has dug into the openings iOS and Android security provide for anyone with the right tools.
now
Physicists Outline Plan to Harvest Energy From Black Holes
Powering future human civilizations in deep space will be no easy feat. But thanks to new research, there might be a highly efficient way to harness the highly energetic particles emanating from black holes to help human colonists keep the lights on. According to a new study by researchers from Columbia University and Universidad Adolfo Ibanez in Chile, we could theoretically extract energy from
now
Wormholes may be lurking in the universe—and new studies are proposing ways of finding them
Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity profoundly changed our thinking about fundamental concepts in physics, such as space and time. But it also left us with some deep mysteries. One was black holes, which were only unequivocally detected over the past few years. Another was "wormholes"—bridges connecting different points in spacetime, in theory providing shortcuts for space travelers.
3min
Treatment may restore hand and arm control after spinal injury
A new treatment that combines physical therapy and a noninvasive method of stimulating nerve cells may offer some people with spinal cord injuries use of their hands and arms. Almost 18,000 Americans experience traumatic spinal cord injuries every year. Many of these people are unable to use their hands and arms and can't do everyday tasks such as eating, grooming, or drinking water without help.
5min
Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research examined the relationship between 'sense of coherence' (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the benefits of walking in urban gre
6min
Grey camouflage 'better than zebra stripes'
Dull, featureless camouflage provides better protection from predators than zebra stripes, according to a new study.
6min
Enhanced oral uptake of exosomes opens cell therapy alternative
Cell-derived exosomes are effective in treating disease when mixed with the dominant protein in breast milk and given orally, a new study of laboratory mice shows. The findings could help develop new oral medications for treating patients with muscular dystrophy and heart failure.
6min
Exploring the Gut-Brain Axis
Complex signaling events from the gut to the central nervous system influence brain health and disease!
6min
A niche for the eye
What if the degenerative eye conditions that lead to glaucoma, corneal dystrophy, and cataracts could be detected and treated before vision is impaired? Recent findings from the lab of Investigator Ting Xie, PhD, at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research point to the ciliary body as a key to unlocking this possibility.
8min
Study: Many summer camps don't require childhood immunizations
Nearly half of summer camps surveyed by researchers didn't have official policies requiring campers be vaccinated, and just 39% mandated staffers be vaccinated.
8min
What is a protein? A biologist explains
Editor's note: Nathan Ahlgren is a professor of biology at Clark University. In this interview, he explains exactly what proteins are, how they are made, and the wide variety of functions they perform in the human body.
9min
New Senate leadership could finally help us fight climate change
The Capitol Building has already made a lot of news recently, but it's in for even busier year. (Brett Sayles/Pexels/) The election of Democratic senators Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock in Georgia last week could pave the way to passing at least modest climate change measures in Congress. The election brought Democrats up to 50 senators, if you include Independents Bernie Sanders and Angus King,
10min
How Explainable Artificial Intelligence Can Help Humans Innovate
The field of artificial intelligence has created computers that can drive cars , synthesize chemical compounds , fold proteins , and detect high-energy particles at a superhuman level. However, these AI algorithms cannot explain the thought processes behind their decisions. A computer that masters protein folding and also tells researchers more about the rules of biology is much more useful than
11min
What is a protein? A biologist explains
Editor's note: Nathan Ahlgren is a professor of biology at Clark University. In this interview, he explains exactly what proteins are, how they are made, and the wide variety of functions they perform in the human body.
12min
Steve McQueen's Ethos of Generosity
ANA CUBA / The New York Times / Re​dux Steve McQueen has an eye for the tiniest of details. The British director's first short film, Bear , depicts how a series of looks exchanged between two men builds into a physical showdown. His debut feature, Hunger , tells the real-life story of an Irish nationalist who died on a hunger strike through jarring bits of minutiae about his physical deterioratio
14min
Limits of atomic nuclei predicted: Scientists simulate large region of the chart of nuclides
Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. In an article published in Physical Review Letters, scientists from TU Darmstadt, the University of Washington, the Canadian laboratory TRIUMF, and the University of Mainz report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large
15min
Compound from medicinal herb kills brain-eating amoebae in lab studies
Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a deadly disease caused by the "brain-eating amoeba" Naegleria fowleri, is becoming more common in some areas of the world, and it has no effective treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have found that a compound isolated from the leaves of a traditional medicinal plant, Inula viscosa or "false yellowhead," kills the amoebae b
15min
Compound from medicinal herb kills brain-eating amoebae in lab studies
Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a deadly disease caused by the "brain-eating amoeba" Naegleria fowleri, is becoming more common in some areas of the world, and it has no effective treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have found that a compound isolated from the leaves of a traditional medicinal plant, Inula viscosa or "false yellowhead," kills the amoebae b
21min
The mysterious extinction of the dire wolf
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00072-5 DNA clues point to how dire wolves went extinct, and a round-up of the main impacts of Brexit on science.
26min
Astronomers find signature of magnetar outbursts in nearby galaxies
Apart from black holes, magnetars may be the most extreme stars in the universe. With a diameter less than the length of Manhattan, they pack more mass than that of our sun, wield the largest magnetic field of any known object—more than 10 trillion times stronger than a refrigerator magnet—and spin on their axes every few seconds.
27min
NASA missions unmask magnetar eruptions in nearby galaxies
On April 15, 2020, a brief burst of high-energy light swept through the solar system, triggering instruments on many NASA spacecraft. Scientists think the blast came from a supermagnetized stellar remnant located in a neighboring galaxy.
29min
Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes
New probes allow scientists to see four-stranded DNA interacting with molecules inside living human cells, unravelling its role in cellular processes.
29min
What are the links between violence and mental illness? Update from Harvard Review of Psychiatry
When there is news of a violent attack, we sometimes hear that it could be related to mental illness – which may make us ask whether the violence could have been predicted or prevented. Current research and perspectives on associations between violence and mental illness are presented in the special January/February issue of Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published in the Lippincott
29min
Compound from medicinal herb kills brain-eating amoebae in lab studies
Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a deadly disease caused by the "brain-eating amoeba" Naegleria fowleri, is becoming more common in some areas of the world, and it has no effective treatment. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Chemical Neuroscience have found that a compound isolated from the leaves of a traditional medicinal plant, Inula viscosa or "false yellowhead," kills the amoebae b
29min
Rare star's giant gamma-ray burst GRB 204015A captured close to our home galaxy
Earth gets blasted by mild gamma ray bursts most days. But sometimes a giant flare like GRB 200415A arrives at our galaxy, sweeping along energy that dwarfs our sun. It erupted from a rare, powerful neutron star called a magnetar – giving new clues to GRB origins – and from relatively nearby. The extreme explosions from these bursts can disrupt mobile phone reception, and can also be messengers fr
29min
Study looks at how land acquisitions affect climate change
In 2007, an increase in world food prices led to a global rush for land in the form of land grabs or large-scale land acquisitions. Over the last two decades, such acquisitions have resulted in millions of hectares of land changing hands in developing nations. Although such changeover can increase the cultivation of crops needed to feed the world's growing population and spark new agricultural pra
33min
Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table
Many students, especially non-science majors, dread chemistry. The first lesson in an introductory chemistry course typically deals with how to interpret the periodic table of elements, but its complexity can be overwhelming to students with little or no previous exposure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Chemical Education introduce an innovative way to make learning about the elemen
33min
Saver or spender? People are not as financially responsible as they may think, study shows
Financial responsibility means managing money in a relatively sensible way by minimizing superfluous or unnecessary spending. But according to new research from the University of Notre Dame, people think they are more financially responsible than they actually are.
33min
Mathematics explains how giant whirlpools form in developing egg cells
Egg cells are among the largest cells in the animal kingdom. If moved only by the random jostlings of water molecules, a protein could take hours or even days to drift from one side of a forming egg cell to the other. Luckily, nature has developed a faster way: cell-spanning whirlpools in the immature egg cells of animals such as mice, zebrafish and fruit flies. These vortices enable cross-cell co
33min
New study of Earth's crust shows global growth spurt three billion years ago
Researchers have used ancient crystals from eroded rocks found in stream sediments in Greenland to successfully test the theory that portions of Earth's ancient crust acted as 'seeds' from which later generations of crust grew.
34min
Rare star's giant gamma-ray burst GRB 204015A captured close to our home galaxy
Earth gets blasted by mild short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) most days. But sometimes, a giant flare like GRB 200415A arrives at our galaxy, sweeping along energy that dwarfs our sun. In fact, the most powerful explosions in the universe are gamma-ray bursts.
39min
Blød paragraf giver politiet vide rammer til at inficere danske mobiler med malware
Den danske lov er upræcis og giver politiet brede beføjelse, fortæller forsker.
40min
Astronomers find signature of magnetar outbursts in nearby galaxies
Magnetars in the Milky Way have a distinctive X-ray signature, which allowed astronomers to associate rare giant gamma-ray bursts with these neutron stars. But how to identify extragalactic magnetars, which are too distant to display the faint signal that characterizes galactic magnetars? A recently discovered short gamma ray burst was localized to a star-forming region in a nearby galaxy, leading
50min
Aggressive video games: Effects on mental health and behaviors in young people
Aggressive video games are not a risk factor for mental health problems, according to a new study of more than 3,000 youth
50min
Saver or spender? People are not as financially responsible as they may think, study shows
According to new research from the University of Notre Dame, people think they are more financially responsible than they actually are.
50min
Study looks at how land acquisitions affect climate change
In a newly published study in the journal Nature Food, researchers looked at what drives large-scale land acquisitions and how the implementation of large-scale land acquisitions for agricultural development affect carbon emissions, and in turn, climate change.
50min
Approximately half of AD dementia cases are mild, one-fifth are severe
What percent of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) currently have severe dementia? Do more people have mild disease? Or are the majority suffering with moderate dementia? A new study using data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) sheds light on these trends.
50min
Rethinking urban planning for sub-Saharan African cities
For his thesis project at EPFL, Armel Kemajou studied the peri-urban areas of Lomé, Togo, and Yaoundé, Cameroon, where populations are expected to double in 20 years. He observed construction strategies that reflected coherent individual and collective approaches to planning, although they lay outside existing legal frameworks. Kemajou gives proposals for incorporating such an approach to construc
51min
Bacteria carried by mosquitoes may protect them against pesticides
A common bacterial species naturally infecting mosquitoes may actually be protecting them against specific mosquito pesticides, a study has found.
51min
Anisotropy of surface oxide formation influences the transient activity of a surface reaction
Metal surfaces play a role as catalysts for many important applications—from fuel cells to the purification of car exhaust gases. However, their behavior is decisively affected by oxygen atoms incorporated into the surface.
51min
Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity
People worldwide want their coffee to be both satisfying and reasonably priced. To meet these standards, roasters typically use a blend of two types of beans, arabica and robusta. But, some use more of the cheaper robusta than they acknowledge, as the bean composition is difficult to determine after roasting. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have develo
53min
The Atlantic Hires Katherine Wu as Staff Writer
As The Atlantic continues its work at the forefront of reporting on the coronavirus, editor in chief Jeffery Goldberg announced today that Katherine J. Wu has been hired as a staff writer covering the pandemic. Wu will join The Atlantic later this month from The New York Times , where she has reported on the science of COVID-19 along with the human fallout of the virus. "Katie is joining the best
55min
Bacteria carried by mosquitoes may protect them against pesticides
A common bacterial species naturally infecting mosquitoes may actually be protecting them against specific mosquito pesticides, a study has found.
56min
Cancer microbiome reveals which bacteria live in tumors
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised an algorithm to remove contaminated microbial genetic information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). With a clearer picture of the microbiota living in various organs in both healthy and cancerous states, researchers will now be able to find new biomarkers of disease and better understand how numerous cancers affect the human body.
56min
Asian butterfly populations show different mimicry patterns thanks to genetic 'switch'
A new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and the City College of New York (CCNY) has identified a unique, genetic "mimicry switch" that determines whether or not male and female Elymnias hypermnestra palmflies mimic the same or different species of butterflies. The results indicate that sexual dimorphism has repeatedly emerged in different palmfly populations, and linked the trait t
56min
Error-protected quantum bits entangled for the first time
For the first time, physicists from the University of Innsbruck have entangled two quantum bits distributed over several quantum objects and successfully transmitted their quantum properties. This marks an important milestone in the development of fault-tolerant quantum computers. The researchers published their report in Nature.
59min
Cancer microbiome reveals which bacteria live in tumors
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised an algorithm to remove contaminated microbial genetic information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). With a clearer picture of the microbiota living in various organs in both healthy and cancerous states, researchers will now be able to find new biomarkers of disease and better understand how numerous cancers affect the human body.
59min
Wetland methane cycling increased during ancient global warming event
Wetlands are the dominant natural source of atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas which is second only to carbon dioxide in its importance to climate change. Anthropogenic climate change is expected to enhance methane emissions from wetlands, resulting in further warming. However, wetland methane feedbacks were not fully assessed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth
59min
Team turns pyrolyzed ash into graphene for improving concrete, other compounds
Pyrolyzed plastic ash is worthless, but perhaps not for long.
59min
Asian butterfly populations show different mimicry patterns thanks to genetic 'switch'
A new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and the City College of New York (CCNY) has identified a unique, genetic "mimicry switch" that determines whether or not male and female Elymnias hypermnestra palmflies mimic the same or different species of butterflies. The results indicate that sexual dimorphism has repeatedly emerged in different palmfly populations, and linked the trait t
59min
Pollinators not getting the 'buzz' they need in news coverage
A dramatic decline in bees and other pollinating insects presents a threat to the global food supply, yet it's getting little attention in mainstream news.That's the conclusion of a study from researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, published this week in a special issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study was based on a search of nearly 25 million
59min
A fly's eye view of evolution
The fascinating compound eyes of insects consist of hundreds of individual eyes known as "facets". In the course of evolution, an enormous variety of eye sizes and shapes has emerged, often representing adaptations to different environmental conditions. Scientists, led by an Emmy Noether research group at the University of Göttingen, together with scientists from the Andalusian Centre for Developm
59min
Pollinators not getting the 'buzz' they need in news coverage
A dramatic decline in bees and other pollinating insects presents a threat to the global food supply, yet it's getting little attention in mainstream news.That's the conclusion of a study from researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, published this week in a special issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study was based on a search of nearly 25 million
1h
A fly's eye view of evolution
The fascinating compound eyes of insects consist of hundreds of individual eyes known as "facets". In the course of evolution, an enormous variety of eye sizes and shapes has emerged, often representing adaptations to different environmental conditions. Scientists, led by an Emmy Noether research group at the University of Göttingen, together with scientists from the Andalusian Centre for Developm
1h
Researchers uncover viral small RNAs in mosquito cells
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provide a new genomics resource that details the small RNA transcriptomes (gene expression) of four bio-medically important mosquito species.
1h
Scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a 'run-and-tumble' method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change directi
1h
Author Correction: NELL-1 in the treatment of osteoporotic bone loss
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20933-x
1h
Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers at York University have found.
1h
Researchers uncover viral small RNAs in mosquito cells
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provide a new genomics resource that details the small RNA transcriptomes (gene expression) of four bio-medically important mosquito species.
1h
Scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a 'run-and-tumble' method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change directi
1h
The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals
A recent Point of Reference article, "," published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, points at synthetic chemical cocktails being emitted from cattle feed yards into the environment and how they can impact our ecosystem and our health.
1h
Evolution in a test tube: These bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely.
1h
How will we achieve carbon-neutral flight in future?
Carbon-neutral aviation is possible, but in future, aircraft are likely to continue to be powered by fossil fuels. The CO2 they emit must be systematically stored underground. This is the most economical of various approaches researchers have compared in detail.
1h
Colleges can prevent 96 percent of COVID-19 infections with common measures, study finds
The combined effectiveness of three COVID-prevention strategies on college campuses — mask-wearing, social distancing, and routine testing — are as effective in preventing coronavirus infections as the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines approved by US FDA, according to a new study from Case Western Reserve University.
1h
Conflict between divorced parents can lead to mental health problems in children, study finds
A study has found that when children are exposed to conflict between their divorced or separated parents, they experience fear of abandonment. This worry about being abandoned in response to interparental conflict was associated with future mental health problems in children, especially for children who had strong relationships with their fathers.
1h
Parker Makes a Deal with Tony | Gold Rush
Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram!
1h
Raman spectroscopy shows promise for diagnosing oral cancer
In a new study, researchers show that a light-based analytical technique known as Raman spectroscopy could aid in early detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC).
1h
Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table
Many students, especially non-science majors, dread chemistry. The first lesson in an introductory chemistry course typically deals with how to interpret the periodic table of elements, but its complexity can be overwhelming to students with little or no previous exposure. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Chemical Education introduce an innovative way to make learning about the elemen
1h
Mathematics explains how giant whirlpools form in developing egg cells
Cell-spanning whirlpools in the immature egg cells of animals such as mice, zebrafish and fruit flies quickly mix the cells' innards, but scientists didn't know how these flows form. Using mathematical modeling, researchers have found an answer. The gyres result from the collective behavior of rodlike molecular tubes called microtubules that extend inward from the cells' membranes, the researchers
1h
Scoring system to redefine how U.S. patients prioritized for liver transplant
Researchers with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are collaborating with faculty at the University of Pennsylvania to develop a risk score that more comprehensively prioritizes liver cancer patients for transplantation.
1h
The cancer microbiome reveals which bacteria live in tumors
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have devised an algorithm to remove contaminated microbial genetic information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). With a clearer picture of the microbiota living in various organs in both healthy and cancerous states, researchers will now be able to find new biomarkers of disease and better understand how numerous cancers affect the human body.
1h
Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity
People worldwide want their coffee to be both satisfying and reasonably priced. To meet these standards, roasters typically use a blend of two types of beans, arabica and robusta. But, some use more of the cheaper robusta than they acknowledge, as the bean composition is difficult to determine after roasting. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have develo
1h
Luxembourg Has Had Enough of Trump
Lucky are the foreign ministers of very small, very consensus-driven countries, for those who play their cards right sometimes get to hold office for many years. One of the luckiest card players out there is Jean Asselborn, the amusing polyglot who has been the foreign minister of Luxembourg since 2004. Although his country is tiny (population 613,000), the longevity of Luxembourg's top diplomat
1h
Investigate Him
Much of the discussion right now about how to hold President Donald Trump accountable for his role in the attack on the Capitol last week is focused on impeachment and the Twenty-Fifth Amendment. But criminal accountability is another option, and a criminal investigation is warranted on the publicly known facts. To briefly review: In tweets leading up to January 6, the president repeatedly urged
1h
Samsung's new robots will do the dishes and nag you to get offline
He could make a huge mess and those robots would clean it, but they would also judge him for it. (Samsung /) Imagine a robot the size of a kitchen trash can is rolling around your home, nagging you to get off the computer and go outside before you get into the fourth hour of watching Twitch streamers open old packs of Pokemon cards. Then, a different robot sets a table for a nice meal before doin
1h
Wetland methane cycling increased during ancient global warming event
Wetland methane cycling increased during a rapid global warming event 56 million years ago and could foreshadow changes the methane cycle will experience in the future, according to new research led by the University of Bristol.
1h
Pollinators not getting the 'buzz' they need in news coverage
A dramatic decline in pollinating insects threatens the global food supply, yet it's getting "vanishingly low levels of attention" in mainstream news, even compared to coverage of climate change. That's the conclusion of a study titled "No buzz for bees," published this week in a special issue of PNAS. University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign researchers analyzed nearly 25 million news items from s
1h
Flashing plastic ash completes recycling
Rice University's flash graphene process, adapted to convert worthless pyrolyzed plastic ash, could be used to strengthen concrete and toughen plastics used in medicine, energy and packaging applications.
1h
Asian butterfly mimics other species to defend against predators
Many animal and insect species use Batesian mimicry — mimicking a poisonous species — as a defense against predators. The common palmfly Elymnias hypermnestra — a species of satyrine butterfly that is found throughout wide areas of tropical and subtropical Asia — adds a twist to this evolutionary strategy.
1h
We Need to Know Who Is Getting Vaccinated
A year into the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, we still lack a complete understanding of who is getting sick, and where, and when. Demographic data from many states are astonishingly incomplete , and even widely collected information, such as the age of patients at the time of diagnosis or death, is so inconsistently presented that it has been impossible to assemble into a clear natio
1h
Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction.
1h
Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves, New Genetic Clues Reveal
The extinct giant canids were a remarkable example of convergent evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
A fly's eye view of evolution
The fascinating compound eyes of insects consist of hundreds of individual eyes known as "facets". In the course of evolution, an enormous variety of sizes and shapes has emerged, often adaptations to different environmental conditions. Scientists, led by a research group at Göttingen University have now shown that these differences can be caused by very different changes in the genome of fruit fl
1h
Scientists find antibody that blocks dengue virus
The research team used the Advanced Photon Source to confirm an effective antibody that prevents the dengue virus from infecting cells in mice, and may lead to treatments for this and similar diseases.
1h
GSA publishes seven new research articles on COVID-19 and aging
The Gerontological Society of America's highly cited, peer-reviewed journals are continuing to publish scientific articles on COVID-19. The following were published between December 5 and January 6; all are free to access.
1h
KU studies show breakfast can improve basketball shooting performance
In a pair of studies, University of Kansas sport science researchers have found that consuming breakfast can improve basketball shooting performance, significantly in some cases. Another study found that college players' lower body strength and performance can predict professional potential as well.
1h
Medication shows promise for weight loss in patients with obesity, diabetes
A new study confirms that treatment with Bimagrumab, an antibody that blocks activin type II receptors and stimulates skeletal muscle growth, is safe and effective for treating excess adiposity and metabolic disturbances of adult patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes.
1h
Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers at York University have found. Those lakes include large bays in some of the deepest of the Great Lakes, such as Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, which could permanently become ice fr
1h
Shine on: Avalanching nanoparticles break barriers to imaging cells in real time
A team of researchers co-led by Berkeley Lab and Columbia University has developed a new material called avalanching nanoparticles that, when used as a microscopic probe, offers a simpler approach to taking high-resolution, real-time snapshots of a cell's inner workings at the nanoscale.
1h
High insulin levels during childhood a risk for mental health problems in adulthood, study suggests
Researchers have shown that the link between physical and mental illness is closer than previously thought. Certain changes in physical health, which are detectable in childhood, are linked with the development of mental illness in adulthood.
1h
Scientists reveal mechanism that causes irritable bowel syndrome
KU Leuven researchers have identified the biological mechanism that explains why some people experience abdominal pain when they eat certain foods. The finding paves the way for more efficient treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and other food intolerances. The study, carried out in mice and humans, was published in Nature.
1h
Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth.
1h
Red and green snow algae increase snowmelt in the Antarctic Peninsula
Red and green algae that grow on snow in the Antarctic Peninsula cause significant extra snowmelt on par with melt from dust on snow in the Rocky Mountains, according to a first-of-its-kind scientific research study. This could have serious impacts on regional climate, snow and ice melt, freshwater availability and ecosystems, yet is not accounted for in current global climate models.
1h
Asian butterfly populations show different mimicry patterns thanks to genetic 'switch'
A new study by researchers at the University of Chicago and the City College of New York (CCNY) has identified a unique, genetic "mimicry switch" that determines whether or not male and female Elymnias hypermnestra palmflies mimic the same or different species of butterflies.
1h
Error protected quantum bits entangled
For the first time, physicists from the University of Innsbruck have entangled two quantum bits distributed over several quantum objects and successfully transmitted their quantum properties. This marks an important milestone in the development of fault-tolerant quantum computers. The researchers published their report in Nature.
1h
Columbia engineers first to observe avalanches in nanoparticles
Columbia Engineering researchers report the first nanomaterial that demonstrates "photon avalanching," a process that is unrivaled in its combination of extreme nonlinear optical behavior and efficiency. The realization of photon avalanching in nanoparticle form opens up a host of sought-after applications, from real-time super-resolution optical microscopy, precise temperature and environmental s
1h
Ancient DNA reveals secrets of Game of Thrones wolves
Extinct dire wolves split off from other wolves nearly six million years ago and were only a distant relative of today's wolves, according to new research published in Nature.
1h
Study finds neglected mutations may play important role in autism spectrum disorder
Mutations that occur in certain DNA regions, called tandem repeats, may play a significant role in autism spectrum disorders, according to research led by Melissa Gymrek, assistant professor in the UC San Diego Department of Computer Science and Engineering and School of Medicine. The study, which was published in Nature on Jan. 14, was co-authored by UCLA professor of human genetics Kirk Lohmuell
1h
The dire wolf was a distinct species, different from the gray wolf, biologists discover
The iconic, prehistoric dire wolf, which prowled through the Americas over 11 millennia ago, was a distinct species from the smaller gray wolf, an international team of scientists reports today in the journal Nature. The study, which puts to bed a mystery that biologists have pondered for more than 100 years, was led by researchers from UCLA, along with colleagues from Durham University in the UK,
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The compound that makes chili peppers spicy also boosts perovskite solar cell performance
Research publishing January 13 in the journal Joule, determined that sprinkling capsaicin, the compound that makes peppers spicy, into the precursor of methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) perovskite during the manufacturing process led to a greater abundance of electrons (instead of empty placeholders) to conduct current at the semiconductor's surface. The addition resulted in polycrystalline M
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Pandemic-driven shift to home work carries risks, UN says
The shift to home-working triggered by the coronavirus pandemic looks set to endure long-term, making it vital to protect employees' rights and avoid blurred lines between on-the-clock hours and personal time, the United Nations said Wednesday.
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Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves, New Genetic Clues Reveal
The extinct giant canids were a remarkable example of convergent evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Green earplugs
Through the window, you hear the traffic noise from down the street, a train rumbles in the distance—that is the everyday life for many of us. Almost 75% of the European population lives in urban areas and only a quarter in rural areas. Noise pollution from cars, trains and planes poses a health problem that should not be underestimated. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), increased
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Dire Wolves Were Not Really Wolves, New Genetic Clues Reveal
The extinct giant canids were a remarkable example of convergent evolution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Man Injected Himself With Mushrooms and the Fungi Took Over His Blood
A man found himself in the hospital with severe organ failure after grossly misunderstanding how to consume psychedelic mushrooms. Instead of ingesting the psylocibin, he injected them directly into his bloodstream, according to Insider . And while the man did try to boil the shrooms first, he must not have killed them off entirely, because they started to grow inside his bloodstream, taking hold
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The legendary dire wolf may not have been a wolf at all
North America's "top dog" traveled a lonely evolutionary path
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What causes IBS pain? It may be a local immune reaction
New study suggests the condition is akin to an allergic reaction in the gut
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4 tips to kickstart honest conversations at work | Betsy Kauffman
Why is it so hard to speak up and productively disagree at work? Leadership and organization coach Betsy Kauffman shows how to bring the candid conversations that usually happen at the watercooler out into the open with four practical strategies you can implement right now to have honest, transparent discussions with your colleagues.
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Tandsten afslører stofmisbrug
Forskere inden for retsmedicin ved Aarhus Univeristet har udviklet en metode, der kan påvise brug af euforiserende stoffer i små mængder i tandsten. Den spås stor anvendelse inden for arkæologi.
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Scientists Have Sequenced Dire Wolf DNA. Thanks, Science!
The creatures made famous by Game of Thrones went extinct some 13,000 years ago. Now geneticists know a little more about where they come from.
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The Real Dire Wolf Ran Into an Evolutionary Dead End
The species' remarkable genetic isolation from other wolves may have contributed to its demise.
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Giant nonlinear optical responses from photon-avalanching nanoparticles
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03092-9 Room-temperature photon avalanching realized in single thulium-doped upconverting nanocrystals enables super-resolution imaging at near-infrared wavelengths of maximal biological transparency and provides a material platform potentially suitable for other optical technologies.
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m6A RNA methylation regulates the fate of endogenous retroviruses
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03135-1 A CRISPR screen in mouse embryonic stem cells shows that transcripts derived from endogenous retroviruses are destabilized by m6A RNA methylation.
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A bright γ-ray flare interpreted as a giant magnetar flare in NGC 253
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03076-9 The γ-ray burst GRB 200415A is probably a giant flare emitted from a magnetar in the nearby starburst galaxy NGC 253.
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Entangling logical qubits with lattice surgery
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03079-6 Two logical qubits are encoded in ensembles of four physical qubits through the surface code, then entangled by lattice surgery, which is a protocol for carrying out fault-tolerant operations.
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Loop extrusion mediates physiological Igh locus contraction for RAG scanning
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03121-7 Long-distance V(D)J recombination is facilitated by contraction of the Igh locus and linear RAG scanning along chromatin, both driven by cohesin-mediated loop extrusion, which allows recombination of widely separated gene segments to occur.
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Functional refolding of the penetration protein on a non-enveloped virus
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03124-4 Electron cryomicroscopy and cryotomography studies reveal that rotaviruses attach to a target cell through the outer-layer protein VP4, which—following cleavage—rearranges to enable perforation of the membrane and delivery of the viral genome into the host cell.
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Rapid spectral variability of a giant flare from a magnetar in NGC 253
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03077-8 Observations of a giant flare associated with the starburst galaxy NGC 253 suggest that the flare is probably associated with relativistic plasma in the magnetic field of a magnetar.
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Structure and function of a neocortical synapse
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03134-2 Electrophysiology combined with correlated light and electron microscopy confirms the long-standing assumption that the size of a synapse is proportional to its strength, and reveals that neocortical synapses may have greater computational capacity than thought.
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Dire wolves were the last of an ancient New World canid lineage
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03082-x Dire wolves split from living canids around 5.7 million years ago and originated in the New World isolated from the ancestors of grey wolves and coyotes, which evolved in Eurasia and colonized North America only relatively recently.
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Antarctic icebergs reorganize ocean circulation during Pleistocene glacials
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03094-7 Iceberg-trajectory models along with multi-proxy evidence from sediment cores from the Indian Ocean show that northward shifts in Antarctic iceberg melt redistributed freshwater in the Southern Ocean during the Pleistocene.
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Local immune response to food antigens drives meal-induced abdominal pain
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03118-2 In mice, oral tolerance to food antigens can break down after enteric infection, and this leads to food-induced pain resembling irritable bowel syndrome in humans.
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Patterns of de novo tandem repeat mutations and their role in autism
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03078-7 A bioinformatics pipeline to identify tandem repeat mutations is developed and used to characterize precise changes in repeat copy number associated with autism spectrum disorder.
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STING controls nociception via type I interferon signalling in sensory neurons
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03151-1 Studies using mouse and non-human primate models identify the innate immune regulator STING—acting via type I interferons—as a key regulator of nociception, suggesting new targets for the treatment of chronic pain.
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Repeat DNA expands our understanding of autism spectrum disorder
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03658-7 A link has been found between repetitive stretches of DNA called tandem repeats and autism spectrum disorder. The discovery might inform approaches to studying tandem repeats in a wide range of other human disorders.
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Giant photon avalanches observed in nanoparticles
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03659-6 In some materials, the absorption of a single photon can trigger a chain reaction that produces a large burst of light. The discovery of these photon avalanches in nanostructures opens the way to imaging and sensing applications.
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Food for thought about the immune drivers of gut pain
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03661-y Debilitating gut pain is common, but the underlying cause is often unclear. It emerges that gut infection triggers localized immune responses that cause normally innocuous foods to be perceived as harmful, leading to persistent pain.
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Cosmic electromagnetic bomb sheds light on the origins of γ-ray bursts
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03657-8 Celestial eruptions known as giant magnetar flares have been seen in our cosmic backyard, but were so bright they blinded observational instruments. The discovery of a more distant flare finally reveals details of these emissions.
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Chili piffar upp solceller
En nypa chili kan piffa upp morgondagens solceller. Det hävdar en svensk- kinesisk forskargrupp, som har visat att både effektivitet och hållbarhet kan förbättras med rätt kryddning.
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Could we harness energy from black holes?
Physicists have found a new way to extract energy from black holes by breaking and rejoining magnetic field lines near the event horizon.
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Lipid biomarkers in urine can determine the type of asthma
In a new study, researchers have used a urine test to identify and verify a patient's type of asthma. The study lays the foundation for a more personalized diagnosis and may result in improved treatment of severe asthma in the future.
2h
Catalysts: Why do metal oxide surfaces behave differently?
Metal surfaces play a role as catalysts for many important applications – from fuel cells to the purification of car exhaust gases. However, their behavior is decisively affected by oxygen atoms incorporated into the surface. This phenomenon has been known for a long time, but until now it has been impossible to precisely investigate the role of oxygen in complex surfaces point by point in order t
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Temple researchers identify cardiac protein that causes different types of heart failure
Heart damage typically progresses, owing to oxidative stress and toxic lipids that alter heart cell energetics and the heart's ability to function normally.Oxidative stress occurs when harmful oxygen-containing molecules outnumber helpful antioxidants, leading to damaging reactions with proteins, DNA, and other cell components. Temple researchers show that in the heart, Kruppel-like factor-5, fuel
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Infection biology: How one pathogen evades the immune system
A research team of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munch led by Nicolai Siegel has uncovered a mechanism that enables theparasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans to escape the attention of the immune system. The finding may also be relevant to other infectious diseases.
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The meat of the matter: Environmental dissemination of beef cattle agrochemicals
A recent Point of Reference article, "," published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry , points at synthetic chemical cocktails being emitted from cattle feed yards into the environment and how they can impact our ecosystem and our health.
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How to keep drones flying when a motor fails
Robotics researchers at the University of Zurich show how onboard cameras can be used to keep damaged quadcopters in the air and flying stably — even without GPS.
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BU researchers uncover viral small RNAs in mosquito cells
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) provide a new genomics resource that details the small RNA transcriptomes (gene expression) of four bio-medically important mosquito species.
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Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap
Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using electroencephalography (EEG), they recorded the brain activity of romantic couples at home while they cuddled, kissed or talked about happy memories together. The results conf
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NIH scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a "run-and-tumble" method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change directi
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The dire wolf was a distinct species, different from the gray wolf, biologists discover
The iconic, prehistoric dire wolf, which prowled through Los Angeles and elsewhere in the Americas over 11 millennia ago, was a distinct species from the slightly smaller gray wolf, an international team of scientists reports today in the journal Nature.
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Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age, scientists find
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth.
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The Crooked Geometry of Round Trips
Have you ever wondered what life would be like if Earth weren't shaped like a sphere? We take for granted the smooth ride through the solar system and the seamless sunsets afforded by the planet's rotational symmetry. A round Earth also makes it easy to figure out the fastest way to get from point A to point B : Just travel along the circle that goes through those two points and cuts the sphere i
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The dire wolf was a distinct species, different from the gray wolf, biologists discover
The iconic, prehistoric dire wolf, which prowled through Los Angeles and elsewhere in the Americas over 11 millennia ago, was a distinct species from the slightly smaller gray wolf, an international team of scientists reports today in the journal Nature.
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What We've Lost: The Species Declared Extinct in 2020
Dozens of frogs, fish, orchids and other species—many unseen for decades—may no longer exist due to humanity's destructive effects on the planet. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Engineers observe avalanches in nanoparticles for the first time
Researchers at Columbia Engineering report today that they have developed the first nanomaterial that demonstrates "photon avalanching," a process that is unrivaled in its combination of extreme nonlinear optical behavior and efficiency. The realization of photon avalanching in nanoparticle form opens up a host of sought-after applications, from real-time super-resolution optical microscopy, preci
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Red and green snow algae increase snowmelt in the Antarctic Peninsula
Red and green algae that grow on snow in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP) cause significant extra snowmelt on par with melt from dust on snow in the Rocky Mountains, according to a first-of-its-kind scientific research study led by Alia Khan, affiliate research scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and assistant professor at Western Washington University. Algal blooms are likely t
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APS upgrade takes first practice run building modules for the new storage ring
If you ever built a complex model out of LEGOs, you know the value of assembling parts of that model in pieces before attaching them to the whole. That same strategy is being used to upgrade the electron storage ring at the heart of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility at Argonne National Laboratory.
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These tiny oceanic creatures are essential to tackling climate change
The ocean withdraws about one third of the CO₂ in the atmosphere, mitigating climate change and making life possible on Earth. An important share of this CO2 is removed thanks to phytoplankton, tiny marine creatures that use light to do photosynthesis, just as plants or trees on land. These cells fix CO2 to build up biomass and multiply, and take it down to the deep ocean when they die and sink. P
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Researchers at Brazil's space institute discover why lightning branches and flickers
Researchers at Brazil's National Space Research Institute (INPE), in partnership with colleagues in the United States, United Kingdom and South Africa, have recorded for the first time the formation and branching of luminous structures by lightning strikes.
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Inventors Create Working Hoverboard
Great Scott The engineers behind the popular YouTube account Hacksmith Industries have created a functional hoverboard that actually lifts off the ground using magnets — and isn't some marketing stunt or hoax , like hoverboard projects of yesteryear. But it's not exactly the hoverboard from the 1989 sci-fi flick "Back to the Future Part II." It needs to be hovering over a sheet of steel to work,
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High-sensitivity nanophotonic sensors with passive trapping of analyte molecules in hot-spots
Optical sensors can quantitatively analyze chemical and biological samples by measuring and processing the optical signals produced by the samples. Optical sensors based on infrared absorption spectroscopy can achieve high sensitivity and selectivity in real time, and therefore play a crucial role in a variety of application areas such as environmental sensing, medical diagnostics, industrial proc
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Perceptions of police using PPE during the pandemic
A Simon Fraser University study on public perceptions of police officers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during the current pandemic finds that most PPE renders positive perceptions of police, while some equipment, including full-face respirator masks, may be viewed more negatively. The research was published January 9 in the Journal of Experimental Criminology.
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Changes in political administration come with increased danger of international conflict
A new leader takes office and foreign rivals begin to test the waters. How tough is this new leader? Are they willing to risk war, or just full of bluster?
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The scent of sickness: 5 questions answered about using dogs – and mice and ferrets – to detect disease
Editor's note: As COVID-19 continues to spread worldwide, scientists are analyzing new ways to track it. One promising approach is training dogs to detect people who are infected by smelling samples of human urine or sweat. Research scientist Glen Golden, who has trained dogs and ferrets to detect avian flu in birds, explains why certain animals are well suited to sniff out sickness.
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New research in JNCCN highlights dangerous disparities for life-saving cancer screening
New research in the January 2021 issue of JNCCN–Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network finds more than a third of eligible people miss timely screening tests for colorectal cancer and at least a quarter appear to miss timely screening tests for breast and cervical cancers.
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Evolution: Speciation in the presence of gene flow
Spatial isolation is known to promote speciation — but researchers at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have now shown that, at least in yeast, the opposite is also true. New ecological variants can also evolve within thoroughly mixed populations.
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Researchers at Brazil's space institute discover why lightning branches and flickers
Analysis of the first super slow motion recordings of upward flashes suggests a possible explanation for the formation of luminous structures after electrical discharges split in the atmosphere.
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Inferring human genomes at a fraction of the cost promises to boost biomedical research
A new method, developed by Olivier Delaneau's group at the SIB Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics and the University of Lausanne, offers game-changing possibilities for genetic association studies and biomedical research. For less than $1 in computational cost, GLIMPSE is able to statistically infer a complete human genome from a very small amount of data. It offers a first realistic alternative to
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Why Aren't We Wearing Better Masks?
If you're like most Americans, there's a good chance you're going to wear a cloth mask today. Doing so makes sense. It remains the official recommendation in the United States, and it is something we've both advocated since the beginning of the pandemic. Both of us wrote articles as far back as March urging people to wear homemade cloth masks. We're also the authors (along with 17 other experts)
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The scent of sickness: 5 questions answered about using dogs – and mice and ferrets – to detect disease
Editor's note: As COVID-19 continues to spread worldwide, scientists are analyzing new ways to track it. One promising approach is training dogs to detect people who are infected by smelling samples of human urine or sweat. Research scientist Glen Golden, who has trained dogs and ferrets to detect avian flu in birds, explains why certain animals are well suited to sniff out sickness.
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Evolution in a test tube: These bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The t
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Scientists measure local vibrational modes at individual crystalline faults
Employing newly developed electron microscopy techniques, researchers have, for the first time, measured the spectra of phonons – quantum mechanical vibrations in a lattice – at individual crystalline faults, and they discovered the propagation of phonons near the flaws.
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Researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
Researchers describe how they developed a deep-learning framework to observe gene regulation at the cellular level.
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Framework sheds light on nitrogen loss of producing common food items
Differences in nitrogen loss intensity between livestock and crops confirm the need for change.
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Critics point to dangers of rapid Covid tests
UK ministers accused of throwing money at a flawed technology with high rate of false negatives
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Partisan politics prolong pandemic
Partisanship has eroded public trust in health agencies and exacerbated the spread of COVID-19, according to Christopher Kulesza, research analyst for the Child Health Policy program, and Quianta Moore, fellow in child health policy at the at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.
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Copper-indium oxide: A faster and cooler way to reduce our carbon footprint
With ever-worsening climate change, there is a growing need for technologies that can capture and use up the atmospheric CO2 (carbon dioxide) and reduce our carbon footprint. Within the realm of renewable energy, CO2-based e-fuels have emerged as a promising technology that attempts to convert atmospheric CO2 into clean fuels. The process involves production of synthetic gas or syngas (a mixture o
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Evolution in a test tube: These bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The t
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Could we harness energy from black holes?
A remarkable prediction of Einstein's theory of general relativity—the theory that connects space, time, and gravity—is that rotating black holes have enormous amounts of energy available to be tapped.
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Blue light means big progress for perovskite-based LEDs
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed efficient blue light-emitting diodes based on halide perovskites. "We are very excited about this breakthrough," says Feng Gao, professor at Linköping University. The new LEDs may open the way to cheap and energy-efficient illumination.
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CVIA publishes selected abstracts from the 31st GW-ICC Conference
Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications , publishes selected abstracts from the 31st Great Wall International Cardiology (GW-ICC) Conference, October 19 – 25, 2020Beijing, January 13, 2021: Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications (CVIA), in its role as the official journal of the Great Wall International Cardiology Conference (GW-ICC), has published selected abstracts from the 31st GW-ICC
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These snakes wiggle up smooth poles by turning their bodies into "lassoes"
Biologists discovered a previously unknown form of movement that the brown tree snakes use to climb wide objects, like poles. (Bruce Jayne/) When the brown tree snake is determined to climb something, it's pretty hard to stop it. For decades, the invasive reptiles have slithered up trees to feast upon the forest birds of Guam. They did so with such ease that it intrigued biologists. Now, in a new
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Scientists measure local vibrational modes at individual crystalline faults
Employing newly developed electron microscopy techniques, researchers have, for the first time, measured the spectra of phonons – quantum mechanical vibrations in a lattice – at individual crystalline faults, and they discovered the propagation of phonons near the flaws.
2h
Could we harness energy from black holes?
Physicists have found a new way to extract energy from black holes by breaking and rejoining magnetic field lines near the event horizon.
3h
Catalysts: worth taking a closer look
Metal surfaces play a role as catalysts for many important applications – from fuel cells to the purification of car exhaust gases. However, their behaviour is decisively affected by oxygen atoms incorporated into the surface. This phenomenon has been known for a long time, but until now it has been impossible to precisely investigate the role of oxygen in complex surfaces point by point in order
3h
High-sensitivity nanophotonic sensors with passive trapping of analyte molecules in hot-spots
Optical sensing which captures fingerprint information of chemical or biological substances with light, plays a crucial role in many areas including environmental sensing, medical diagnostics and homeland security. Scientists from University at Buffalo demonstrated an optical sensor design which utilizes nano-scale trenches to passively concentrate and trap trace analytes in a solution, leading to
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Workaholism leads to mental and physical health problems
Workaholism or work addiction risk is a growing public health concern that can lead to many negative mental and physical health outcomes such as depression, anxiety or sleep disorder. Perception of work (job demands and job control) may become a major cause of employees' work addiction. The international group of researchers including the HSE University scientist explored the link between work add
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New studies support blood test for early detection of Alzheimer's disease
In three recent publications in Molecular Psychiatry, Brain and JAMA Neurology researchers from the University of Gothenburg provide convincing evidence that an in-house developed blood test for Alzheimer's disease can detect the disease early and track its course, which has major implications for a potential use in clinical practice and treatment trials.
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Lipid biomarkers in urine can determine the type of asthma
In a new study, researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have used a urine test to identify and verify a patient's type of asthma. The study, which has been published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine , lays the foundation for a more personalized diagnosis and may result in improved treatment of severe asthma in the future.
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Ny klinisk professor i anæstesi på OUH og SDU
1. januar 2021 tiltrådte Hanne Berg Ravn stillingen som klinisk professor i Anæstesi ved Anæstesiologisk Afdeling, OUH og Klinisk Institut, SDU.
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Expansion of parental benefits saved marriages
An expansion of parental benefits in Quebec 15 years ago revolutionized the province's labour force—the intended outcome—but it also saved some marriages, a Western study has found.
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Copper-indium oxide: A faster and cooler way to reduce our carbon footprint
Emergent e-fuel technologies often employ the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction to convert atmospheric CO2 to CO. While efficient, this reaction requires high temperatures and complex gas separation for high performance. However, for the first time in the world, scientists from Japan have now demonstrated record-high CO2 conversion rates at relatively low temperatures in a modified chemical-
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TalTech's neuroscientists investigate the causes of a widespread eye disease
Fuchs' corneal dystrophy is one of the most common eye diseases diagnosed in almost 5% of the population of Europe aged 40 years or over. It is a hereditary eye disease that causes vision impairment and typically manifests in middle age. The first symptoms of the disease – blisters on the surface of your cornea – resemble cataract at first glance.
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How will we achieve carbon-neutral flight in future?
Carbon-neutral aviation is possible, but in future, aircraft are likely to continue to be powered by fossil fuels. The CO2 they emit must be systematically stored underground. This is the most economical of various approaches that ETH researchers have compared in detail.
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Evolution in a test tube: these bacteria survive on deadly copper surfaces
The descendants of regular wild-type bacteria can evolve to survive for a long time on metallic copper surfaces that would usually kill them within a few minutes. An international research team led by Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Bundeswehr Institute of Microbiology was able to produce these tiny survivalists in the lab and has been able to study them more closely. The t
3h
New molecular structures associated with ALS
Researchers from the University of Seville and the University of Pavia have identified a link between Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and the accumulation of DNA-RNA hybrids in the genome. The accumulation of these hybrids causes increased genomic damage and boosts genetic instability. This finding will make it possible to better understand the molecular basis of the disease, as well as to pro
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Seawater as an electrical cable !? Wireless power transfers in the ocean
Toyohashi University of Technology research team has successfully transferred power and data wirelessly through seawater by using a power transmitter/receiver with four layers of ultra-thin, flat electrodes. Until now, it had been thought that wireless power transfers could only be achieved through magnetic coupling. This time, with a focus on the high-frequency properties of seawater, a third met
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A new study identifies possible biomarkers of severe malaria in African children
The analysis identified a series of small molecules called microRNAs that are released as a result of organ damage and are associated with disease severity
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Blue-light stride in perovskite-based LEDs
Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, have developed efficient blue light-emitting diodes based on halide perovskites. "We are very excited about this breakthrough", says Feng Gao, professor at Linköping University. The new LEDs may open the way to cheap and energy-efficient illumination.
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Blått ljus på nytt sätt
Den nya lysdioden bygger på perovskit, ett samlingsnamn för halvledare med en speciell kubisk, kristallin form. På senare år har materialet slagit igenom inom solcellsforskningen tack vare att det är enkelt och billigt att tillverka samtidigt som det har god förmåga att omvandla solenergi till elektricitet. Men perovskit kan även emittera ljus och användas för att göra lysdioder. Hittills har det
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Wanted: UK bison rangers, no previous experience expected
Project using large beasts to help restore woodland offers unprecedented job opportunity Can you handle a beast as heavy as a small car, that can hurdle high fences from a standing start, and is a peaceful bulldozer for biodiversity? If you're not intimidated by the weightiest wild land mammal in Europe, you could become Britain's first ever bison ranger. Continue reading…
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Bound-charge engineering: A new strategy to develop nanowire transistors
In recent years, physicists and electronic engineers have been trying to identify materials that could be used to fabricate new types of electronic devices. One-dimensional (1-D) and two-dimensional (2-D) materials have been found to have particularly advantageous characteristics, particularly for the development of new generations of nanoelectronics (electronic components at the nano scale).
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Social media manipulation by political actors an industrial scale problem, report finds
Social media manipulation of public opinion is a growing threat to democracies around the world, according to the 2020 media manipulation survey from the Oxford Internet Institute, which found evidence in every one of the 80+ countries surveyed.
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Eight-year periodicity of train millipede confirmed
A trio of researchers with the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute and Shizuoka University, both in Japan, has confirmed the eight-year periodicity of the train millipede. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Keiko Niijima, Momoka Nii and Jin Yoshimura describe their multi-year study of the myriapod invertebrate Parafontaria laminata armigera Verhoeff, wh
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Mistaken identity: A presumed supernova is actually something much rarer
In a case of comic mistaken identity, an international team of astronomers revealed that what they once thought was a supernova is actually periodic flaring from a galaxy where a supermassive black hole gives off bursts of energy every 114 days as it tears off chunks of an orbiting star.
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Could the ocean hold the key to reducing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere?
Most experts agree that halting climate change—and the global warming, extreme heat events and stronger storms that come with it—will require the removal of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses from the atmosphere. But with humans pumping out an estimated 37 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide annually, current strategies for capturing it seem likely to fall short.
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Expert prognosis for the planet – we're on track for a ghastly future
An international group of 17 leading scientists have produced a comprehensive yet concise assessment of the state of civilization, warning that the outlook is more dire and dangerous than is generally understood.
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Do as the Romans: Power plant concrete strengthens with time
Scientists find a rare mineral in nuclear power plant walls, significantly improving their strength following years of full operation.
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Eight-year periodicity of train millipede confirmed
A trio of researchers with the Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute and Shizuoka University, both in Japan, has confirmed the eight-year periodicity of the train millipede. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, Keiko Niijima, Momoka Nii and Jin Yoshimura describe their multi-year study of the myriapod invertebrate Parafontaria laminata armigera Verhoeff, wh
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Link between climate scepticism and support for right-wing populists – study
Clear evidence of a link between people supporting right-wing political parties and climate-change scepticism has been identified in a new study from the University of Oxford and the Leibniz Institute for the Social Sciences.
3h
Storm in a cosmic teacup: A new paradigm for understanding plasma turbulence
On the path to writing his Ph.D. dissertation, Lucio Milanese made a discovery—one that refocused his research, and will now likely dominate his thesis.
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Liars found to coordinate body movements with the person they are lying to
A team of researchers from Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam, Lancaster University and the Open University has found that when people lie to someone, they tend to mimic that person's body movements. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes experiments they conducted with college students encouraged to lie.
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Physicists discover unifying pattern in two-dimensional ferroelectrics
University of Arkansas physicists have discovered a unifying framework in the dipolar patterns of two-dimensional ferroelectrics, a finding which could help advance the development of high-density information coding systems in computers and other electronics.
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COVID-19 Killed Eight Times More Americans Than Guns in 2020
In 2020, the coronavirus pandemic killed 345,737 people in the United States — and tens of thousands more in just the first week of January. But focusing just on 2020, that means that the coronavirus killed considerably more people in the U.S. than several other leading causes of death including guns, the flu, and car crashes combined . According to the Gun Violence Archive, 43,441 people died fr
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Enjoy them while you can? The ecotourism challenge facing Australia's favorite islands
I fell for Kangaroo Island from my first visit. I recall standing on a headland on the island's southern coast, near Remarkable Rocks (a popular tourist site), and being awestruck by the Southern Ocean.
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Limits of atomic nuclei predicted
Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. In an article published in Physical Review Letters , scientists from TU Darmstadt, the University of Washington, the Canadian laboratory TRIUMF, and the University of Mainz report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a larg
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A 'ghastly future' unless extraordinary action is taken soon on sustainability
Without immediate, drastic intervention, humans face a "ghastly future" — including declining health, climate devastation, tens of millions of environmental migrants and more pandemics — in the next several decades, according to an international team of 17 prominent scientists. The researchers cite more than 150 scientific studies and conclude, "That we are already on the path of a sixth major e
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Bacteria carried by mosquitos may protect them against pesticides
Mosquitoes are transmitters of several diseases and pesticides are used to control their numbers in many countries. New study finds Wolbachia – a bacteria commonly found in insects – appears to protect them against these pesticides.
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CU Anschutz scientists reverse deadly impacts of asthma in mice
Excess mucus in the lungs can be fatal for asthma patients, but scientists at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus have broken up those secretions at the molecular level and reversed their often deadly impacts.
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Changes in political administration come with increased danger of international conflict
A new paper including faculty at Binghamton University suggests that when democratic publics vote out an administration, this change comes with an increase in the danger of undesirable conflict.
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Discovery of 'adolescent' skeletal stem cells might someday help prevent osteoporosis
A new study reported in STEM CELLS reveals a unique population of skeletal stem cells (SSCs) that function during the transitional period between rapid bone growth and bone maintenance.
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USTC obtains Pd-Pt tesseracts for oxygen reduction reaction
A team led by Prof. ZENG Jie from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Prof. BAO Jun from National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory of University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences made breakthrough in the controlled synthesis of Pd-Pt tesseracts for ORR and the mechanism investigation of their etching process.
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Scientists discover key enzyme responsible for skin blistering in the elderly
The Granzyme B (GzmB) enzyme, which accumulates in certain tissues as we age, has been identified as a driver of itchy and sometimes life-threatening autoimmune conditions known as pemphigoid diseases (PDs), which cause blistering and skin erosion below the skin's surface. New research led by University of British Columbia (UBC) and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute (VCHRI) scientists ha
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Perceptions of police using PPE during the pandemic – SFU study
A Simon Fraser University study on public perceptions of police officers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during the current pandemic finds that most PPE renders positive perceptions of police, while some equipment, including full-face respirator masks, may be viewed more negatively.
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Impact of COVID lockdown on aeromedical retrievals in remote parts of Australia
New data released this week by Australian researchers reveals the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown period on aeromedical retrievals in rural and remote regions.
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Enjoy them while you can? The ecotourism challenge facing Australia's favorite islands
I fell for Kangaroo Island from my first visit. I recall standing on a headland on the island's southern coast, near Remarkable Rocks (a popular tourist site), and being awestruck by the Southern Ocean.
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Exploring the reasons some women use force
In the context of family relationships, women who use force generally do so because they want power rather than because they have power, according to new research.
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Thailand looks for answers as Covid cases surge
The vanishingly low infection rate is rising after a lapse in vigilance let the virus resurface
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Worried about Earth's future? Well, the outlook is worse than even scientists can grasp
Anyone with even a passing interest in the global environment knows all is not well. But just how bad is the situation? Our new paper shows the outlook for life on Earth is more dire than is generally understood.
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A robot made of ice could adapt and repair itself on other worlds
Some of the most tantalizing targets in space exploration are frozen ice worlds. Take Jupiter's moon Europa, for instance. Its warm, salty subsurface ocean is buried under a moon-wide sheet of ice. What's the best way to explore it?
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Birdsong finds rhythm between science and art
Native Western Australian birds are the composers and stars of an engaging new music project at Edith Cowan University.
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New cathode material for high-performing sodium ion batteries could benefit large scale energy storage
ANSTO contributed to a large international collaboration on advanced sodium ion batteries led by French researchers, which provides a direction for the design of high-performing sodium ion electrodes. Advanced sodium ion batteries could be used for large scale energy storage.
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Birdsong finds rhythm between science and art
Native Western Australian birds are the composers and stars of an engaging new music project at Edith Cowan University.
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Second shots of Covid vaccine could be delayed further in England
Some evidence suggests spacing vaccination doses improves effectiveness Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Second shots of coronavirus vaccine could be delayed even further amid growing evidence that spacing out the doses improves their effectiveness. The NHS vaccination programme aims to immunise about 14 million people at greatest risk of Covid by mid-February, with s
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Neighborhood farms could be the answer to Tucson's food deserts
Even in arid climates where water is scarce, urban farms could be a solution to so called "food deserts"—sections of a city where residents don't have access to healthy and affordable food.
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Study investigates emission from a distant red quasar
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, an international team of astronomers has performed observations of HSC J120505.09−000027.9—the most distant red quasar so far detected and found that it showcases an extended emission of ionized carbon. The finding is reported in a paper published January 4 on arXiv.org.
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UCI researchers use deep learning to identify gene regulation at single-cell level
In a Science Advances study, UCI researchers describe how they developed a deep-learning framework to observe gene regulation at the cellular level.
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Springer Nature journal retracts BMI, honesty paper
More than five months after outraged readers demanded that a Springer Nature journal retract a paper linking body mass index to honesty, the publication has been pulled. The journal now says that a post-publication review of the article found that the data don't support the authors' conclusions — which is another way of saying that … Continue reading
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Dålig kondition kopplat till ökad risk för psoriasis
Sämre fysisk kondition hos unga vuxna är kopplat till en ökad risk för den autoimmuna sjukdomen psoriasis. De män som tillhörde gruppen med sämst kondition vid mönstringen hade 35 procents högre risk att utveckla psoriasis senare i livet, än de som hade bäst kondition. Forskare vid Göteborgs universitet har gjort en stor registerbaserad studie, baserad på data om drygt 1,2 miljoner svenska män so
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How a Decade-Old Game Helped Me Cope with Seasonal Depression
During a bleary fall and winter, the open world of Skyrim gave me the motivation and joy I couldn't find in the real world.
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Mountain Water Supply to Two Billion People Could Change
Data about Earth's 78 most important mountaintops foretell changes in the amount and timing of snowmelt — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Algorithm and poop ID our many intestinal bacteria
A new method uses artificial intelligence and poop to map intestinal bacteria. The intestines and their bacteria are sometimes called our "second brain," but studying these bacteria in their natural environment is difficult. Researchers hope to gain more knowledge of the role played by these bacteria in various diseases. "In recent years we have discovered that bacteria have a great impact on the
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UCI scientists measure local vibrational modes at individual crystalline faults
Employing newly developed electron microscopy techniques, researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have, for the first time, measured the spectra of phonons – quantum mechanical vibrations in a lattice – at individual crystalline faults, and they discovered the propagation of phonons near the flaws. The team's findings are the subject of a study published recently
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The odd structure of ORF8: Mapping the coronavirus protein linked to disease severity
A team of biologists who banded together to support COVID-19 science determined the atomic structure of a coronavirus protein thought to help the pathogen evade and dampen response from human immune cells. The structural map has laid the groundwork for new antiviral treatments and enabled further investigations into how the newly emerged virus ravages the human body.
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UV-lys, ventilation og digitale masker: Sådan forsøger tech-industrien at bremse corona
Teknologivirksomheder lancerer en lang række nye produkter og løsninger, der skal inddæmme spredningen af corona-virus. De fleste bygger på velkendt vide. Men der er alligevel grund til sund skepsis, når så mange nye produkter kommer på markedet på kort tid.
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Förstadium till Higgsmekanismen observerat
Genom att studera kalla atomer har forskare på ett unikt sätt kunnat observera ett förstadium till en kvantfasövergång, och därigenom studera fysikaliska processer som kan liknas vid den så kallade Higgsmekanismen. Många har kanske hört talas om Higgspartikeln, särskilt efter att Peter Higgs fick Nobelpriset i fysik 2013. Efter årtionden av försök kunde partikeln tillslut observeras vid partikela
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Rough nights for moms of multiple kids, but not dads
Mothers of multiple children report more fragmented sleep than do moms of one child, but the number of kids doesn't seem to affect sleep quality for dads, research finds. A total of 111 parents (54 couples and 3 mothers in single-parent families) participated in the study that appears in the Journal of Sleep . Researchers Samantha Kenny, a doctoral student at McGill University, and Marie-Hélène P
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One More Time – Masks Work
The evidence supports that conclusion that mask-wearing policies are effective and justified. The post One More Time – Masks Work first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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The dream cartel
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00061-8 A date to remember.
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Nanoparticle immunization technology could protect against many strains of coronaviruses
Researchers are studying a new type of immunization that may be able to protect against many variants of viruses.
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High doses of saccharin don't lead to diabetes in healthy adults, study finds
A new study has found that the sugar substitute saccharin doesn't lead to the development of diabetes in healthy adults.
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Hope for children with rare heart condition: novel stem cell therapy to save the day
Researchers put forward a safe and efficient new stem cell therapy for regenerating cardiac function in pediatric patients.
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The three days pregnancy sickness is most likely to start pinpointed
Researchers have narrowed the time frame that nausea and vomiting during pregnancy will potentially start to just three days for most women, opening up the possibility for scientists to identify a biological cause for the condition.
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Study finds risk factors linked to COVID-19 mental health impacts for college students
A study of students at seven public universities across the United States has identified risk factors that may place students at higher risk for negative psychological impacts related to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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The odd structure of ORF8: Mapping the coronavirus protein linked to disease severity
A team of biologists who banded together to support COVID-19 science determined the atomic structure of a coronavirus protein thought to help the pathogen evade and dampen response from human immune cells. The structural map has laid the groundwork for new antiviral treatments and enabled further investigations into how the newly emerged virus ravages the human body.
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Make-up of gut microbiome may influence COVID-19 severity and immune response
The variety and volume of bacteria in the gut, known as the microbiome, may influence the severity of COVID-19 as well as the magnitude of the immune system response to the infection, suggests research.
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After aborted attempt, sensitive WHO mission to study pandemic origins is on its way to China
International team hopes to meet Chinese scientists and visit sites in Wuhan after two weeks in quarantine
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Inre omställning krävs för yttre hållbarhet
Det är inte bara yttre förändringar inom områden som jordbruk, transporter och byggande som krävs för ett samhälle i ekologisk balans. Allt fler svenska forskare menar att den inre omställningen av våra tankesätt, känslor och värderingar är minst lika viktig. Trots decennier av debatt och politiska mål kring hållbarhet, har den förändring som krävs i samhället inte skett. Enligt Christine Wamsler
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How Amazon Sidewalk Works—and Why You May Want to Turn It Off
The premise is convenient. But the e-commerce giant's privacy track record isn't exactly inspiring.
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The Case for Cannibalism, or: How to Survive the Donner Party
Don't be a young, healthy, single man. That's our first piece of advice.
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A pair of whirlpools delicately move an embryo — contact-free
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00059-2 Vortex 'tweezers' can pick up and transport particles just 1 millimetre wide.
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Daily briefing: The era of RNA vaccines has arrived
Nature, Published online: 12 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00068-1 How the pandemic unlocked the power of RNA vaccines. Plus, scientists are divided over COVID vaccine dosing strategies, and why the platypus is the paragon of mammals.
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Lucasfilm Games' New Partnerships Mean the Galaxy's the Limit
The Disney-owned company just announced a new Star Wars title coming from Ubisoft and an Indiana Jones game from Bethesda. And that's just the beginning.
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What is chronic kidney disease and how does dialysis work?
Read the full, 5-part series in partnership with Undark: Profit and Loss: America on Dialysis: https://undark.org/profit-and-loss-america-on-dialysis/ The kidneys are two bean-shaped organs, each about the size of a fist. They are located just below the rib cage, one on each side of your spine. Healthy kidneys filter your blood, maintaining a healthy balance of water, salts, and minerals while ex
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COVID Is on Track to Become the U.S.'s Leading Cause of Death–Yet Again
This winter the novel coronavirus may kill more people than heart disease, cancer, stroke, Alzheimer's or diabetes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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For andet år i træk: Andelen af lægepraksisser med lukket patienttilgang falder
I 2018 ønskede to ud af tre af landets praktiserende læger ikke at tage imod nye patienter. I dag er tallet faldet til cirka halvdelen, fremgår det af en ny analyse fra PLO.
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Using neural networks for faster X-ray imaging
A team of scientists from Argonne is using artificial intelligence to decode X-ray images faster, which could aid innovations in medicine, materials and energy.
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Climate warming increases cryospheric hazards
The cryosphere is an important component of the global climate system. In a narrow sense, it mainly refers the glaciers, permafrost, snow cover, and sea ice because these components are continuously distributed below the freezing point with a certain thickness. Cryospheric components are sensitive to climate warming, and changes in the cryosphere can lead to serious hazards to human society.
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Research improves ion evaporation theories and performance of electrospray applications
Electrospray of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), which are solvent-free electrolytes with easily tailored ions, is emerging as a powerful tool in diverse fields. In particular, electrosprays of RTILs operating in the pure-ion mode have attracted significant attention recently. However, despite intensive technological development, these electrosprays have yet to achieve the robustness and ef
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Image: Underwater astronaut training
Prepping for a spacewalk typically means diving underwater to rehearse and fine-tune operations.
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Mere end 100 praktiserende læger er klar til at vaccinere i Nordjylland
Mere end hver tredje praktiserende læge i Region Nordjylland har meldt sig på banen til at vaccinere borgere i vaccineplanens næste fase, der officielt begynder i dag. I Jammerbugt Kommune skal 148 borgere efter planen vaccineres.
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COVID Is on Track to Become the U.S.'s Leading Cause of Death–Yet Again
This winter the novel coronavirus may kill more people than heart disease, cancer, stroke, Alzheimer's or diabetes — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Upper ocean temperatures hit record high in 2020
Even with the small COVID-19-related dip in global carbon emissions due to limited travel and other activities, the ocean temperatures continued a trend of breaking records in 2020. A new study, authored by 20 scientists from 13 institutes around the world, reported the highest ocean temperatures since 1955 from surface level to a depth of 2,000 meters.
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'Corals are being cooked': A third of Taiwan's reefs are dying
Nearly a third of Taiwan's corals are dying from bleaching caused by warming oceans in an alarming phenomenon that poses a severe threat to the island's delicate underwater ecosystem, conservationists warned Wednesday.
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MAGA-land's Favorite Newspaper
Photo-illustrations by Kibele Yarman* The rural hamlet of Cuddebackville, New York, is home to a guru named Li Hongzhi, who calls his 427-acre compound Dragon Springs. At the center of the compound —a kind of timber frame Shangri-la—stands a massive replica of a Tang Dynasty temple. On March 19, 2020, Li wrote a message to his disciples titled "Rationality." The message was about COVID-19, which
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'Corals are being cooked': A third of Taiwan's reefs are dying
Nearly a third of Taiwan's corals are dying from bleaching caused by warming oceans in an alarming phenomenon that poses a severe threat to the island's delicate underwater ecosystem, conservationists warned Wednesday.
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Forest loss 'hotspots' bigger than Germany: WWF
More than 43 million hectares of forest—an area bigger than Germany—have been lost in a little over a decade in just a handful of deforestation hotspots, conservation organisation WWF said Wednesday.
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The Parler Bans Open a New Front in the 'Free Speech' Wars
Apple, Google, and Amazon booted the site from their own platforms. But who moderates the moderators?
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The Best of CES 2021
These are the products, prototypes, and ideas that did the best job of signaling the future at this year's consumer tech showcase.
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Bugsnax Is Keeping Me Going (and It Might Just Help You Too)
The island quest-style game is perfect for this "casual gaming" moment.
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The Covid-19 Vaccine Rollout Faces a Two-Shot Problem
Millions of follow-up doses have been languishing in freezers, causing a massive logjam—and not everyone likes the ideas for a fix.
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The Quantum Computer Revolution Must Include Women
Physics is still dominated by men, which means we're largely missing out on the talents of half the population — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Tiny robots and sensors need tiny batteries — here's how to do it
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00021-2 Improve materials and architectures to shrink microscopic devices.
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China Places Over 22 Million on Lockdown Amid New Covid Wave
The country is experiencing its worst coronavirus flare-up since last summer, testing the government's success in subduing the disease.
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Tysk investeringsfond bag fire støttefri solcelleparker på tilsammen 415 MW
Lokalplanerne er på plads. Så en af fire parker forventes at kunne producere grøn strøm allerede i år. Tilsammen vil de kunne levere strøm til 120.000 husstande.
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'Nanolites' Can Trigger Dangerous Volcanic Explosions
Tiny crystals play a big role in unexpectedly violent eruptions — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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4 Ways to Prevent a Future Insurrection
As violent and tumultuous as the postelection period has been, imagining how much worse things could be is unfortunately all too easy. What if Mike Pence had gone along with Donald Trump's gambit to thwart Congress's counting of electors? What if both chambers of Congress were held by the president's own party, and willing to overthrow the vote? No statute exists to prevent this, because pre-Trum
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I'm a pregnant doctor and I feel confident receiving the Covid vaccine. Here's why | Tsion Firew
I understand why some pregnant women are nervous about the vaccine. But I looked at the research and feel confident in my decision I am a pregnant doctor who received the Covid-19 vaccine. Within hours of making my decision public on social media, scathing attacks from anti-maskers and anti-vaxxers ensued . I have been working in the heart of the pandemic as an emergency doctor since Covid hit Ne
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Nya små antikroppar effektiva mot covid-19-infektion
Forskare vid Karolinska institutet har i samarbete med forskare i USA och Tyskland byggt små antikroppar, nanoantikroppar, som hindrar coronaviruset sars-cov-2 från att ta sig in i mänskliga celler. En kombinerad nano-antikropp har visat sig ge särskilt bra effekt – även om viruset muterade. På ytan av coronaviruset sars-cov-2 finns så kallade spikproteiner som hjälper viruset att infektera värdc
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Don't Overreact to the Capitol Riots
Attempts by President Donald Trump and his insurrectionist supporters to overturn the results of the 2020 election are infuriating, tantamount to an attack on the heart of American democracy. Death threats against Vice President Mike Pence, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and others illustrate how much worse things could have been amid the chaos. To safeguard the rule of law and to deter future viole
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Eric Jerome Dickey Made Black Women Feel Seen
Since learning of the death of the best-selling author Eric Jerome Dickey, I've thought a great deal about the nature of Black storytelling. Black American novelists, in particular, tread a dichotomous path: Part of the landscape festers with the trauma wounds passed down from enslaved ancestors, wounds opened daily by driving , jogging , sleeping , birding , playing with toy gun s, selling loosi
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Forskere får millioner til udvikling af vaccine mod blærebetændelse
Danske forskere har fået en bevilling fra EU på ca. en mio. euro til at udvikle en vaccine mod blærebetændelse. Målet er at nedbringe mængden af blærebetændelser for de mest udsatte.
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"Confrontation is an important element of physics progress:" Paper on black holes retracted
A Springer Nature journal has retracted a 2019 article by a Slovenian physicist who claims that both Creationism and Big Bang theory are wrong, and that black holes are the engines driving the universe. The paper, in Scientific Reports, was titled "Mass-energy equivalence extension onto a superfluid quantum vacuum," and was written by Amrit Srečko … Continue reading
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The universe is 13.8 billion years old—here's how we know
Measuring the distance to various galaxies and the speed at which they are moving away from each other as the universe expands is one way to estimate the age of the cosmos. (NASA, ESA, F. Summers, Z. Levay, L. Frattare, B. Mobasher, A. Koekemoer and the HUDF Team (STScI)/) In milliseconds, Google can serve up a fact that long eluded many of humanity's deepest thinkers: The universe is nearly 14 b
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More infectious coronavirus variants will emerge, disease expert predicts
Highly contagious strains already detected in several countries including UK and South Africa
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What the Blood Supply Shows About Covid-19's Spread
Since March, researchers have mined the nation's blood supply for signs of Covid-19 infections. Their data, drawn from millions of donations and samples, offers a distinctive glimpse of Covid-19's spread through the U.S. — one that could prove useful in the months ahead as vaccines become widely available.
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The secret forces that squeeze and pull life into shape
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00018-x Scientists are getting to grips with the role of mechanical forces in the body, from embryo to adult.
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Coronavirus in the UK: when will the worst of this be over?
What data from the first wave suggests about how much longer cases and deaths will continue to rise Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The UK is on course for record hospital admissions and deaths in the coming weeks, as coronavirus cases hit an all-time high following the loosening of restrictions in December and the rapid spread of the new variant. On Monday, the chie
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A DNA origami-based aptamer nanoarray for potent and reversible anticoagulation in hemodialysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20638-7 Safe haemodialysis is essential for patients with acute kidney injury and renal failure. Here the authors present a DNA origami-based approach with high affinity and specificity to thrombin, inhibiting coagulation.
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Regulatory protein HilD stimulates Salmonella Typhimurium invasiveness by promoting smooth swimming via the methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein McpC
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20558-6 Protein HilD of Salmonella Typhimurium coordinates motility and host cell invasion by upregulating flagellar genes and a secretion system. Here, Cooper et al. show that HilD also modulates swimming behaviour by upregulating a subunit of the chemotactic receptor array, and this is important for invasion of epi
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Dual RNA 3'-end processing of H2A.X messenger RNA maintains DNA damage repair throughout the cell cycle
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20520-6 H2A.X histone variant gene encodes poly(A)+ and poly(A)- mRNA isoforms which are differentially expressed depending on cell lines. Here the authors show that upon DNA damage, cells expressing more poly(A)+ isoform require this isoform for de novo H2A.X synthesis while cells with more poly(A)- isoform have suf
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Graphical analysis for phenome-wide causal discovery in genotyped population-scale biobanks
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20516-2 Mendelian randomization is a popular method to detect causal relationships between traits, but can be confounded by instances of horizontal pleiotropy. Here, the authors present a Mendelian randomization workflow which includes causal discovery analysis and filtering of genetic instruments based on their cond
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Very low mutation burden is a feature of inflamed recurrent glioblastomas responsive to cancer immunotherapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20469-6 Recurrent glioblastomas (rGBM) have dismal outcomes, but long-term survival has been observed in subsets of patients after immunotherapy. Here the authors report a positive association between low tumor mutation burden, inflammatory gene signatures, and survival after immunotherapy in rGBM patients.
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Engineered dual selection for directed evolution of SpCas9 PAM specificity
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20650-x The PAM specificity of SpCas9 can be altered with positive selection during directed evolution. Here the authors use simultaneous positive and negative selection to improve activity on NAG PAMs while reducing activity on NGG PAMs.
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Deep learning encodes robust discriminative neuroimaging representations to outperform standard machine learning
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20655-6 Recent critical commentaries unfavorably compare deep learning (DL) with standard machine learning (SML) for brain imaging data analysis. Here, the authors show that if trained following prevalent DL practices, DL methods substantially improve compared to SML methods by encoding robust discriminative brain re
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Mixed halide perovskites for spectrally stable and high-efficiency blue light-emitting diodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20582-6 Achieving bright and efficient blue emission in metal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes has proven to be challenging. Here, the authors demonstrate high EQE and spectrally stable blue light-emitting diodes based on mixed halide perovskites, with emission from 490 to 451 nm by using a vapour-assisted cry
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Author Correction: A detailed characterization of complex networks using Information Theory
Scientific Reports, Published online: 12 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81323-3
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Recurrent GBM brain tumors with few mutations respond best to immunotherapy
New insights from a team led by Duke's Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center provide potential answers about why immunotherapies have limited success against brain tumors. The team found that recurring glioblastoma tumors with very few mutations are far more vulnerable to immunotherapies than similar tumors with an abundance of mutations.
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Research reveals how teeth functioned and evolved in giant mega-sharks
A pioneering study by University of Bristol researchers finds that the evolution of teeth in the giant prehistoric shark Megalodon and its relatives was a by-product of becoming huge, rather than an adaptation to new feeding habits.
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A justification of the invariance of the speed of light by quantum theoretical considerations
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80922-w
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Development of a machine learning model for predicting pediatric mortality in the early stages of intensive care unit admission
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80474-z
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Geographical influences on thyroid abnormalities in adult population from iodine-replete regions: a cross-sectional study
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80248-7
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Feasibility and initial experience of left radial approach for diagnostic neuroangiography
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80064-z
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Experimental and thermodynamic modeling decitabine anti cancer drug solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80399-7
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A pilot study for intraocular pressure measurements based on vibroacoustic parameters
Scientific Reports, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80321-1
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Johnson & Johnson Expects Covid Vaccine Results Soon but Lags in Production
The U.S. needs J.&J.'s one-shot vaccine more than ever. But the company is behind on manufacturing promises made in its Operation Warp Speed contract.
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Det bliver bare ved: Nyuddannede kvindelige ingeniører starter arbejdslivet med løngab
PLUS. Seniorforsker hos VIVE giver sit bud på, hvorfor indkomsten hos nyuddannede mænd i ingeniørfaget stadigvæk er væsentligt højere end kvindernes
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Research reveals how teeth functioned and evolved in giant mega-sharks
A pioneering study by University of Bristol researchers finds that the evolution of teeth in the giant prehistoric shark Megalodon and its relatives was a by-product of becoming huge, rather than an adaptation to new feeding habits.
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Stor dansk undersøgelse: Piger kommer tidligere i puberteten, når mor og far flytter fra hinanden
Det kan dog skyldes flere ting som stress, genetik og ernæring.
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Ørsted advarer mod energiø: »Vi frygter, det her bliver havvindens IC4-sag«
Ørsted advarer politikerne mod en inddæmmet energiø og foreslår i stedet en løsning med stålplatforme. COWI har tidligere vurderet, at en kunstig ø er den billigste løsning af de to muligheder.
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Clean air: Coal burning ban and wet wood restrictions planned
A new clean air law could see burning house coal banned in Wales, and stricter rules on using wood fires.
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We may have only weeks to act before a variant coronavirus dominates the US
The US may face a rapidly closing window to bring a suspected extra-contagious variant of covid-19 under control. If the variant strain, first spotted in the United Kingdom , is as infectious as some suspect, it could dominate US case numbers by March, send covid-19 deaths to unprecedented levels, and collide with the rollout of vaccines, research suggests. British scientists fear that the new st
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Amid Nile dam tensions, Egypt recalls Aswan 50 years on
Half a century since Egypt's ground-breaking Aswan dam was inaugurated with much fanfare, harnessing the Nile for hydropower and irrigation, the giant barrier is still criticised for its human and environmental toll.
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Traitorous COVID antibodies and fast-spreading variant
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00017-y The latest science news, in brief.
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Why a pioneering plan to distribute COVID vaccines equitably must succeed
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00044-9 COVAX is key to both immunizing the world's poorest people and ending the pandemic.
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Jordemoder giver stafet til håndboldstjerne efter dramatisk fødsel: 'Det var bare en stærk krop og en stærk person'
Bevægelses-stafetten går denne gang til Rikke Hørlykke på grund af hendes viljestyrke under akut kejsersnit.
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Belgian high schoolers demand to get back in-person learning
A late-stage side effect of the coronavirus pandemic has turned up in Belgium, where a group of teenagers is begging to go back to school.
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50 krockar som avslöjar döda stjärnor
Vad blir det av stjärnor när de dör? Vissa av dem exploderar och lämnar efter sig en rest i form av en kompakt neutronstjärna. Men efter de största stjärnornas explosioner faller den återstående massan samman till ett svart hål. Svarta hål är svåra att se mot en bakgrund av rymdens mörker. I teleskop som fångar upp ljus syns bara de svarta hål som avslöjar sig genom att vara insvepta i materia som
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Pandemic's toll shows up on students' college applications
In a college application season like no other, students who have seen every aspect of their lives disrupted by the coronavirus are grappling with how to show their potential.
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Climate crisis: record ocean heat in 2020 supercharged extreme weather
Scientists say temperatures likely to be increasing faster than at any time in past 2,000 years Analysis: why are ocean warming records being broken year after year? The world's oceans reached their hottest level in recorded history in 2020, supercharging the extreme weather impacts of the climate emergency, scientists have reported. More than 90% of the heat trapped by carbon emissions is absorb
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The Act of Living by Frank Tallis review – what the analysts can teach us
We need a strong sense of self, to feel safe, to be loved. Reading Freud and others in the psychotherapeutic tradition can help, this genial study argues An old man with a shaggy white beard and matching hair stands in front of an audience of seekers and flower children. They are looking for ways of amplifying their human potential, of becoming more aware of their sense perceptions. It's the tail
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High cost to wildlife from shark nets protecting S.Africa beaches
"They're basically curtains of death," said shark diver Walter Bernardis as he reached over the side of his zodiac inflatable boat to pull up a net bobbing in eastern South Africa's subtropical waters.
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High cost to wildlife from shark nets protecting S.Africa beaches
"They're basically curtains of death," said shark diver Walter Bernardis as he reached over the side of his zodiac inflatable boat to pull up a net bobbing in eastern South Africa's subtropical waters.
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Environmentalists fight move to reduce beetle's protections
An environmental group said Tuesday that it plans to sue the U.S. government over a decision to reclassify a large scavenging beetle as threatened instead of endangered.
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Environmentalists fight move to reduce beetle's protections
An environmental group said Tuesday that it plans to sue the U.S. government over a decision to reclassify a large scavenging beetle as threatened instead of endangered.
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Expert prognosis for the planet—we're on track for a ghastly future
A loss of biodiversity and accelerating climate change in the coming decades coupled with ignorance and inaction is threatening the survival of all species, including our very own, according to the experts from institutions including Stanford University, UCLA, and Flinders University.
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Expert prognosis for the planet—we're on track for a ghastly future
A loss of biodiversity and accelerating climate change in the coming decades coupled with ignorance and inaction is threatening the survival of all species, including our very own, according to the experts from institutions including Stanford University, UCLA, and Flinders University.
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What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
Researchers from University of Hawaii and University of Florida published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that argues that a biological account of human behavior, especially undesirable behavior, will benefit human welfare. This biological perspective can complement traditional psychological, anthropological, and economic perspectives on consumption, particularly with respect to the vital
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No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways. While soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, agricultural activities such as conventional tilling exacerbate it. Farmers implementing no-till practices can significantly reduce soil erosion rates, a new University of Illinois study shows.
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Framework sheds light on nitrogen loss of producing common food items
The element nitrogen is a double-edged sword. It is essential for growing plants and feeding people, but it is also a leading cause of pollution across the world. Only by using nitrogen more sustainably can the positive and harmful effects of nitrogen be balanced.
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Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Researchers at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) have developed a technique to more quickly analyze extensive data from Arctic ice sheets in order to gain insight and useful knowledge on patterns and trends. Over the years, vast amounts of data have been collected about the Arctic and Antarctic ice. These data are essential for scientists and policymakers seeking to understand cl
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Framework sheds light on nitrogen loss of producing common food items
The element nitrogen is a double-edged sword. It is essential for growing plants and feeding people, but it is also a leading cause of pollution across the world. Only by using nitrogen more sustainably can the positive and harmful effects of nitrogen be balanced.
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Families' remote learning experience during lockdown more positive than widely believed
The remote learning experience of parents who had their children at home in Spring 2020, as schools across the US closed during the United States' COVID-19 lockdown, was more positive than widely believed.
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Ukraine genome survey adds missing pieces to human diversity puzzle
The largest study of genetic diversity in Ukraine was published in the open science journal GigaScience . Led by researchers at Uzhhorod National University and Oakland University in the US, the work provides genetic understanding of the historic and pre-historic migration settlements in one of the key intersections of human trade and migration between the Eurasian peoples and identifies genetic v
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EU godkendte COVID-19-vaccine ti dage senere end USA: Venstre vil have EMA gransket
Morten Løkkegaard, medlem af Europa-Parlamentet for Venstre, vil have Det Europæiske Lægemiddelagenturs godkendelsesproces af COVID-19-vacciner undersøgt til bunds i EU og på nationalt plan i Danmark.
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Amerikansk industrigigant opkøber dansk batteri-pioner
Den danske batteriteknologi-virksomhed Lithium Balance får efter opkøb adgang til de helt store bilproducenter. »Det kan man slet ikke overvurdere værdien af,« siger udviklingschef Claus Friis Pedersen.
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Pharma lobby warns against extending Covid jab intervals
Statement comes even as AstraZeneca executive tells UK lawmakers longer lag could yield greater efficacy
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Will Someone Take Charge?
I can recall the moment I realized I was one of those strange people who wanted to be locked down. It was day two in the neonatal ward, back in October. My daughter, my second child, had arrived a couple of weeks early at just five pounds, four ounces—a tiny dot of perfection. But tests had found that her blood sugar was low, and then she was jaundiced, so the hospital said she (as well as my wif
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New study suggests that college campuses are COVID-19 superspreaders
College campuses are at risk of becoming COVID-19 superspreaders for their entire county, according to a new vast study which shows the striking danger of the first two weeks of school in particular.
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Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
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You Can Now Easily Download All CIA UFO Documents to Date
submitted by /u/drunkles [link] [comments]
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Google trained a trillion-parameter AI language model
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GM surprises with Cadillac eVTOL air taxi at CES 2021
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Seeing on the far side of the moon – Works in Progress
submitted by /u/Sudden_Pop2 [link] [comments]
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Brain in a jar
How close are we to being able to keep a person alive indefinitely by keeping their brain in a jar? if we preserved her brain now do you think we could bring back Ruth bader Ginsberg? submitted by /u/das_cthulu [link] [comments]
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cyborg flesh and bone
i asked a question some time ago about whether it would be possible to place a machine part in a cell that was capable of replicating with the cell. now my question is if that was possible how would that change the flesh and bone that we are made out of? would our flesh and bone themselves be cyborg? would that change the way they feel and operate? submitted by /u/das_cthulu [link] [comments]
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New glue sticks easily, holds well, and is a gas to pull apart
submitted by /u/kernals12 [link] [comments]
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Cisco Pulls Back From Its "Smart City" Plans
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Meet Assembloids, Mini Human Brains With Muscles Attached
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Future too warm for baby sharks
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The Ballad of Claudio Hetz
"Patients affected with ALS now need to know that we are working for them […] We feel completely motivated and convinced to dedicate our careers to fight ALS." Claudio Hetz, Photoshop artist.
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Study: Colleges can prevent 96% of COVID-19 infections with common measures
The combined effectiveness of three COVID-prevention strategies on college campuses–mask-wearing, social distancing, and routine testing–are as effective in preventing coronavirus infections as the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines approved by US FDA, according to a new study from Case Western Reserve University.
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What does marketing have to do with ill-advised consumer behavior?
A biological account of human behavior can benefit human welfare and marketing can play a critical role in facilitating public understanding and acceptance of biological causation.
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Do as the Romans: Power plant concrete strengthens with time
Nagoya University scientists find a rare mineral in nuclear power plant walls, significantly improving their strength following years of full operation.
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Energy harvesting made possible with skin temperature
The Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) announced that a collaborative research team led by Dr. Seungjun Chung from the Soft Hybrid Materials Research Center and Professor Yongtaek Hong from the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Seoul National University (SNU) developed flexible thermoelectric devices with high power generation performance by maximizing flexibility
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Framework sheds light on nitrogen loss of producing common food items
Differences in nitrogen loss intensity between livestock and crops confirm the need for change.
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Weaker skin barrier leads to faster uptake of chemicals
The ability of our skin to protect us from chemicals is something we inherit. Some people are less well-protected which could imply an increased risk of being afflicted by skin disease or cancer. A new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden that has been published in Environmental Health Perspectives shows how the rate of uptake of common chemicals is faster in people with a genetically weaken
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Can menopause be blamed for increased forgetfulness and lack of attention?
If you're a bit more forgetful or having more difficulty processing complex concepts than in the past, the problem may be your menopause stage. A new study claims that menopause stage is a key determinant of cognition and, contrary to previous studies, shows that certain cognitive declines may continue into the postmenopause period. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journa
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Need to reduce work-related stress? It's a walk in the park
Research from the University of Tsukuba examined the relationship between "sense of coherence" (a quality indicative of stress-coping ability) and frequency of walking in forests or greenspaces. The aim was to find easy coping devices for workplace stress. Forest/greenspace walking at least once a week was found to correlate with those with a stronger sense of coherence. The findings suggest the b
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Expert prognosis for the planet – we're on track for a ghastly future
An international group of 17 leading scientists have produced a comprehensive yet concise assessment of the state of civilization, warning that the outlook is more dire and dangerous than is generally understood.
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Disagreeing takes up a lot of brain real estate
In a new study Yale scientists looked into the brains of individuals engaged in conversation. What they observed varied significantly depending on whether or not the participants were in agreement.
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Families' remote learning experience during lockdown more positive than widely believed
The remote learning experience of parents who had their children at home in Spring 2020, as schools across the US closed during the United States' COVID-19 lockdown, was more positive than widely believed.
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Ovarian cancer cells adapt to their surroundings to aid tumor growth
A description of how ovarian cancer cells adapt to survive and proliferate in the peritoneal cavity has been detailed by a new study. It shows structures inside the cells change as the disease progresses, to help the cells grow in an otherwise hostile environment of low oxygen and nutrients. Understanding how these cellular adaptations are regulated could herald new targeted treatment options agai
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Australian scientists cast doubt on Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine
Some experts want to pause rollout but Canberra insists jab is effective and safe
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Her er nyhederne i Java 16: Vektor-beregninger på cpu'en
Vektor-beregninger på cpu'en og store flyttedag til Github er blandt nyhederne i næste omgang Java.
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Chef for kraftvarmeværk ryster på hovedet over lukning: »Vi kan sagtens afbrænde halm«
PLUS. Det giver mening at anvende halmen til kraftvarme, indtil de højteknologiske løsninger er klar, lyder det fra forsker, der samtidig sår tvivl om regeringens klimaregnskab
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New Zealand stands by 'travel bubble' plan despite Covid outbreaks in Australia
Quarantine-free movement by April could still be on the cards, even amid extra caution over new variant Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The New Zealand government is standing by its plan to establish a trans-Tasman travel "bubble" by April, despite community transmission of coronavirus in several Australian states. In mid-December the prime minister, Jacinda Ardern,
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The Atlantic Daily: On the Capitol Rioters
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . GETTY / THE ATLANTIC They wore Viking horns and animal pelts and conspiracy-theory paraphernalia; they carried Confederate flags —photographs searing their angry faces into history. Law enforceme
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Every 8 Years, Swarms of Millipedes Stop Trains in Japan. Scientists Finally Know Why
There's something incredibly unique about their life cycle.
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Bordeaux-ver the moon: French wine to return from space station after 12 months
Experts looking forward to tasting some of the 12 bottles of Bordeaux that will splashdown in the Gulf of Mexico via a SpaceX Dragon capsule The International Space Station bid adieu on Tuesday to 12 bottles of Bordeaux wine and hundreds of snippets of grapevines that spent a year orbiting the world in the name of science. The wine and vines – and thousands of pounds of other gear and research, i
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No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways. While soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, agricultural activities such as conventional tilling exacerbate it. Farmers implementing no-till practices can significantly reduce soil erosion rates, a new study shows.
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Wildfire smoke is more cooling on climate than computer models assume
Many of the most advanced climate models simulate smoke that is darker, or more light absorbing, than what researchers see in observations.
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DNA in water used to uncover genes of invasive fish
In a proof-of-principle study, researchers describe a new technique in which they analyzed environmental DNA – or eDNA – from water samples in Cayuga Lake to gather nuanced information about the presence of these invasive fish.
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Mothers, but not fathers, with multiple children report more fragmented sleep
Mothers with multiple children report more fragmented sleep than mothers of a single child, but the number of children in a family doesn't seem to affect the quality of sleep for fathers, according to a new study.
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Understanding how to improve antibodies targeting OX40 for the treatment of cancer
Scientists have gained new insight into how the immune system can be better used to find and kill cancer cells.
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Killing cancer by unleashing the body's own immune system
The body's immune system is the first line of defense against infections like bacteria, viruses or cancers. Some cancers, however, have developed the art of molecular deception to avoid destruction by the body's immune system. Now, a researcher might have found a new way to help the body's immune system get past that deception and destroy the cancer.
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Metabolism may play role in recurrent major depression
Researchers have found that certain metabolites — small molecules produced by the process of metabolism — may be predictive indicators for persons at risk for recurrent major depressive disorder.
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New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in Western US
Wildlife biologists combined GPS location data of tagged mule deer and pronghorn antelope with satellite imagery of Wyoming fences to find out just how often these animals encounter fences, and what happens when they do. The results help pinpoint which fences pose the biggest barrier to ungulates trying to access their ideal habitat.
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Nerves that sense touch may play role in autism
Autism refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviors, speech, and nonverbal communication. According to the CDC , autism impacts an estimated 1 in 54 children in the United States. An October 2020 study suggests that the peripheral nervous system may play a role in autism. The parameters of the study may not show the entire picture —mor
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Why Are Republicans Being So Divisive?
This is a moment for healing and unity. The nation has been through a lot over the past few weeks and days, and it can scarcely afford more fractiousness. This is not a moment for partisan posturing, trying to gain a political advantage, or exploiting divisions. Just ask most GOP members of the House of Representatives. "America is intensely divided at this moment, and people across the nation ar
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School testing plans risk spreading covid-19 more widely, warn experts
As schools prepare to re-open to all pupils in February, experts warn that UK government plans for mass testing risks spreading covid-19 more widely.
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New study shows mental health of ICU staff should be immediate priority
New research from King's College London shows nearly half of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) staff are likely to meet the threshold for PTSD, severe anxiety or problem drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic.
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CDC Requires COVID-19 Test From Air Passengers Entering The U.S.
Starting Jan. 26, airlines will only allow people to board if they provide documentation that they tested negative in the preceding three days or have recovered from the disease. (Image credit: Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images)
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Millipede Swarms Once Stopped Japanese Trains in Their Tracks
A team of scientists say they have figured out the cicada-like life cycles of the many-legged arthropods.
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Grey camouflage 'better than zebra stripes'
Dull, featureless camouflage provides better protection from predators than zebra stripes, according to a new study.
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Grey camouflage 'better than zebra stripes'
Dull, featureless camouflage provides better protection from predators than zebra stripes, according to a new study.
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Beating the 'billion-dollar bug' is a shared burden
A new study linking land use patterns and pest outbreaks in Bt maize suggests that slowing the resurgence of western corn rootworm may require a larger-scale strategy than previously thought.
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Razer's concept gaming chair wraps players in a huge, curved screen
It's not as elaborate as other all-in-one workstations from companies like Acer. (Razer /) Elaborate gaming chairs are a CES staple. Every year, there's at least one—usually more—elaborate multi-monitor workstation that looks like something you'd find in a NASA training facility or in the bedroom of that one guy at work who really loves Battlestar Galactica. At the all-virtual CES 2021, however,
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First Confirmed Case of COVID-19 Transmission to Great Apes
Two gorillas at San Diego Zoo have tested positive.
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US to require negative Covid-19 test for international air travellers
Health officials try to clamp down as new variants raise alarms about the virus's spread
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U.S. to Require Negative Virus Tests From International Air Passengers
Before they board planes to the U.S., passengers will have to produce proof that they are not infected or have recently recovered.
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Third time's the charm? Brazil scales back efficacy claims for COVID-19 vaccine from China
Lower efficacy for Sinovac's vaccine still meets recognized threshold for emergency use, but barely
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Wives bore the brunt of child care during the shutdown
Traditional gendered patterns of child care persisted during the COVID-19 shutdown, with more than a third of couples relying on women to provide most or all of it, according to a new study.
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New process evaluates patients for elective surgeries following COVID-19
Acknowledging that COVID-19 may be here to stay, experts have laid out a series of steps to prepare patients for elective surgery following their illness.
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Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics.
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New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION device).
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Trapping light without back reflections
Researchers demonstrate a new technique for suppressing back reflections of light, leading to better signal quality for sensing and information technology.
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Third time's the charm? Brazil scales back efficacy claims for COVID-10 vaccine from China
Lower efficacy for Sinovac still meets recognized threshold for emergency use, but barely
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In Minecraft, All the Server's a Stage
A pixelated political drama has played out in the sandbox game since May—drawing millions of viewers in the process.
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What Is Chronic Kidney Disease, and How Might It Affect You?
In the U.S., a third of Americans are at risk of chronic kidney disease, and age is a major factor. More than half of Americans older than 75 are thought to have some sort of kidney damage…. — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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COVID-19 measures also suppress flu—for now
In downside, trend could weaken immunity and complicate vaccine formulation
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Colorful brain mapping tool lights up neural connections
A new tool called NeuroPal allows scientists to map the brain in more detail than ever before. By using the same color highlight for similar neurons, it allows researchers to more fully understand what areas of the brain do what. It has already been made available to other researchers who are publishing new brain studies. The human brain is one of the most complicated things in the known universe
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Even If You Don't Drink Daily, Alcohol Can Mess With Your Brain
You don't have to drink every day to have an Alcohol Use Disorder. Even moderate amounts of alcohol consumption impact brain wiring, dopamine and other neurotransmitters.
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The Weekly Planet: What 2020's Bizarre Economy Taught Us About Climate Change
Every Tuesday, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . Hello! Many things have happened since we last spoke. The most significant of them, for our purposes, was probably that Democrats won the Georgia runo
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Saudi Arabia Is Building a Zero-Carbon City in a 100-Mile Straight Line
Saudi Arabia has unveiled its newest zero-carbon city project, called "The Line." As its eyebrow-raising name suggests, the unusual metropolis will be built in a straight line more than a hundred miles in length. The unconventional city will feature "zero cars, zero streets, and zero carbon emissions," according to a statement by Saudi crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, and will be able to house o
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Bryan Sykes, Ancestral Genetics Expert, Dies at 73
Sykes sequenced famous ancient remains, such as Ötzi and Cheddar Man, and was one of the first researchers to use mitochondrial DNA to trace genetic lineages.
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Advanced light reveals how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. Researchers are determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and are getting closer to that goal.
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Immune response biomarkers, novel pathways in four marine mollusk species
A new study assessed immune responses in four economically important marine mollusk species — the blue mussel, soft-shell clam, Eastern oyster, and Atlantic jackknife clam — and identified new biomarkers relating to changes in protein function involved in novel regulatory mechanisms of important metabolic and immunological pathways.
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How many mice and rats are used in U.S. labs? Controversial study says more than 100 million
Total figure is more than seven times some estimates, but critics say analysis is flawed
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Researchers speed up analysis of Arctic ice and snow data through AI
Professors at University of Maryland, Baltimore County have developed an artificial intelligence technique to quickly analyze newly collected data based on Arctic ice and snow thickness. Researchers previously analyzed these data manually; this AI will assist them by automating how they detect and analyze patterns in the thickness of the ice. Climate change necessitates a rapid understanding of ne
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New study examines medical practice patterns over time
Variations in medical practice can have serious consequences for the quality, equity and cost of one's health care; however, it's unclear whether these disparities can be attributed to individual differences, from one doctor to another or to changes in your doctor's individual practice over time, perhaps in response to shifts in clinical guidelines or advancements in diagnostic technologists.
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No-till practices in vulnerable areas significantly reduce soil erosion
Soil erosion is a major challenge in agricultural production. It affects soil quality and carries nutrient sediments that pollute waterways. While soil erosion is a naturally occurring process, agricultural activities such as conventional tilling exacerbate it. Farmers implementing no-till practices can significantly reduce soil erosion rates, a new University of Illinois study shows.
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Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes. Informed consent and trust are critical components in a patient's decision to participate in research. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial to compare the effects on patient experiences of three electronic consent (e-consent) designs that asked them t
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Fewer patient encounters drive decline in total primary care office visits
Despite seeing gains in insurance coverage for preventive health services under the Affordable Care Act, the US has seen a declining rate of primary care visits over the past fifteen years. Are fewer individuals seeing primary care physicians?
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Treatment for chronic pain must address both physical and social pain
Physical pain and social pain may be more closely related than previously thought. Social pain, which typically results from interpersonal rejection or abuse, has been viewed as a non-medical response to external factors. However, recent research suggests that some physical and social stress responses may arise because of shared processing in the brain.
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Primary care plays key role in managing COVID-19 in three Asian cities
Despite having some of the densest living spaces and the highest number of international visitors, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Beijing have utilized their respective primary health care systems to keep their COVID-19 cases and deaths relatively low.
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Reviewing the evidence for cloth mask use among health care workers
A rapid, evidence-based review summarizes the effectiveness of cloth masks in protecting health care clinicians from respiratory viral infections, such as COVID-19. Nine studies were included in the review, and all but one were conducted prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.
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North Carolina simplifies medicaid enrollment, improves coverage for pregnant women
North Carolina did not expand Medicaid eligibility under the ACA, which continued to put many low-income women at risk for losing health care coverage post partum. The state did comply with ACA standards for simplifying Medicaid enrollment. By automating the process and removing a stringent and often cumbersome financial assessment process, more low-income women qualified for full Medicaid and red
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Advanced light reveals how different biofuels behave
Vehicles have evolved to become more efficient and sophisticated, but their fuel hasn't necessarily evolved along with them. Researchers are determined to identify cleaner burning and renewable alternatives to gasoline, and are getting closer to that goal.
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Method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts.
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Researchers find wildfire smoke is more cooling on climate than computer models assume
A study of biomass burning aerosols led by University of Wyoming researchers revealed that smoke from wildfires has more of a cooling effect on the atmosphere than computer models assume.
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Activists Plan to Hand Out Free Weed at DC Vaccination Sites
The cannabis activist group DC Marijuana Justice (DCMJ) says it's going to hand out free bags of weed to people who get their coronavirus vaccine at some locations in Washington, D.C. Both the medical and recreational use of marijuana is perfectly legal in D.C., so DCMJ doesn't expect any legal trouble while it gives out its post-vaccine goody bags, Motherboard reports . The ultimate goal is two-
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Q&A: Brown Fat Linked to Better Cardio and Metabolic Health
Paul Cohen of the Rockefeller University describes his study of thousands of people, finding that the energy-burning tissue is tied to a lower risk of for several diseases, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease.
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Laser-based process to 3D print detailed glass objects
Researchers have developed a new laser-based process for 3D printing intricate parts made of glass. With further development, the new method could be useful for making complex optics for vision, imaging, illumination or laser-based applications.
20h
Soil degradation costs U.S. corn farmers a half-billion dollars every year
One-third of the fertilizer applied to grow corn in the U.S. each year simply compensates for the ongoing loss of soil fertility, leading to more than a half-billion dollars in extra costs to U.S. farmers every year, finds new research.
20h
Physicists get closer to examining the symmetries underlying our universe
Every field has its underlying principles. For economics it's the rational actor; biology has the theory of evolution; modern geology rests on the bedrock of plate tectonics.
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Method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts.
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New treatment allows some people with spinal cord injury to regain hand and arm function
Researchers helped six Seattle-area people with spinal cord injuries regain some hand and arm mobility.
20h
Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains.
20h
Unsure how to help reverse insect declines? Scientists suggest simple ways
Entomologists' message is straightforward: We can't live without insects. They're in trouble. And there's something all of us can do to help.
20h
Nanosheet-based electronics could be one drop away
A surprisingly simple method improves 'drop casting' fabrication of tiled nanosheets that could be used in next-generation electronic devices. All you need is a pipette and a hotplate.
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Making hydrogen energy with the common nickel
To resolve the energy crisis and environmental issues, research to move away from fossil fuels and convert to eco-friendly and sustainable hydrogen energy is well underway around the world. Recently, a team of researchers has proposed a way to efficiently produce hydrogen fuel via water-electrolysis using inexpensive and readily available nickel as an electrocatalyst, greenlighting the era of hydr
20h
Low fitness linked to higher psoriasis risk later in life
Scientists have now demonstrated a connection between inferior physical fitness in young adults and elevated risk of the autoimmune disease psoriasis. For the male recruits to compulsory military training who were rated as the least fit, the risk of developing psoriasis later was 35 percent higher than for the fittest.
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Wives bore the brunt of child care during the shutdown
Traditional gendered patterns of child care persisted during the COVID-19 shutdown, with more than a third of couples relying on women to provide most or all of it.
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Black and Hispanic Californians face health discrimination; less trusting of clinicians
A recent statewide survey of Californians uncovered that 30% of Black adults and 13% of Hispanic adults felt that they have been judged or treated differently by a health care provider because of their race/ethnicity or language.
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Higher vaccine rates associated with indicative language by provider, more efficient
New research from Boston Medical Center finds that using clear, unambiguous language when recommending HPV vaccination both increases vaccine acceptance and increases conversation efficiency while preserving patient satisfaction.
20h
Researchers find wildfire smoke is more cooling on climate than computer models assume
Many of the most advanced climate models simulate smoke that is darker, or more light absorbing, than what researchers see in observations.
20h
Twitter croudsourcing found effective for dermatologic diagnoses
New study from researchers at the University of Paris provides support for social media as a potentially useful tool in the doctor's diagnostic toolkit and a way for general practitioners with questions to connect to specialists who may have the answers.
20h
Mothers, but not fathers, with multiple children report more fragmented sleep
Mothers with multiple children report more fragmented sleep than mothers of a single child, but the number of children in a family doesn't seem to affect the quality of sleep for fathers, according to a study from McGill University.
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Has anyone watched Surviving Death on Netflix?
I just got into a very heated family argument about this show, because from my perspective it was all pseudo-scientific nonsense that I found insulting to the neuroscience work I do. The show offers anecdote after anecdote without any empirical or even skeptical perspectives addressed as counterpoints. I understand that these people believe their experiences are real, but I think the cognitive sc
20h
Can I do a Cognitive Sciences MA after Education BA?
I'm currently studying English Language Teaching, our programme has little bits of Psychology, Philosophy, Computer Sciences and Linguistics. My question is, a I do a Cognitive Sciences MA? I feel like what I'm studying is close to what Cognitive Sciences studies, at least some part of it. I can't find a clear answer so if anyone here knows, I would really like it if you tell me. If I can do it w
20h
Tapping the brain to boost stroke rehabilitation
Stroke survivors who had ceased to benefit from conventional rehabilitation gained clinically significant arm movement and control by using an external robotic device powered by the patients' own brains.
20h
US Confirms World's First SARS-CoV-2 Cases in Gorillas
Zoo officials say the captive primates are recovering, but scientists worry the virus could spread quickly through dwindling wild populations.
20h
Ginger may guard against the progression of some autoimmune diseases
A new Michigan Medicine study on mice suggests that the primary bioactive compound of ginger root, 6-gingerol, could help counter the autoimmune disorders lupus and antiphospholipid syndrome. The researchers found that the mice had lower levels of NETs (which play a role in the pathogenesis of lupus and antiphospholipid syndrome by stimulating autoantibody formation) after being giving 6-gingerol
20h
Hacker Seizes Control of Internet-Enabled Chastity Cages
All Your Base In perhaps the most wince-inducing example of why your household items probably don't need to be connected to the internet , we bring you the news that a hacker took control of internet-connected chastity cages and demanded a Bitcoin ransom before releasing their hostages. But first, let's take a few steps back. A chastity cage is, put simply, a cage for penises that's a popular acc
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January/February 2021 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheet
Annals of Family Medicine is a peer-reviewed, indexed research journal that provides a cross-disciplinary forum for new, evidence-based information affecting the primary care disciplines.
20h
Chinese vaccine efficacy lower than originally thought in Brazil trials
New data is a blow to attempts to contain the Covid-19 pandemic in Latin America's largest country
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Beating the 'billion-dollar bug' is a shared burden
A lurking threat that has stymied US corn growers for decades is now returning to the forefront: western corn rootworm. Sometimes referred to as the "billion-dollar bug," the species' tiny larvae chew through the roots of corn plants, causing devastating yield losses. In 2003, farmers began planting a genetically engineered variety of corn known as "Bt," which produces a protein toxic to the pest
21h
Beating the 'billion-dollar bug' is a shared burden
A lurking threat that has stymied US corn growers for decades is now returning to the forefront: western corn rootworm. Sometimes referred to as the "billion-dollar bug," the species' tiny larvae chew through the roots of corn plants, causing devastating yield losses. In 2003, farmers began planting a genetically engineered variety of corn known as "Bt," which produces a protein toxic to the pest
21h
New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in the West
Each year, thousands of migratory mule deer and pronghorn antelope journey northwest from their winter homes in the Green River Basin, a grassland valley in western Wyoming, to their summer homes in the mountainous landscape near Grand Teton National Park.
21h
New promising antibodies against SARS-CoV-2
Researchers have identified and further developed novel antibody fragments against the SARS coronavirus-2. These 'nanobodies' are smaller than classic antibodies penetrating the tissue better and can be produced in larger quantities. The researchers also combined the nanobodies into potentially particularly effective molecules attacking different parts of the virus simultaneously. The approach cou
21h
Museum scientists: Prepare for next pandemic now by preserving animal specimens in natural history
Authors of a new article urge researchers who conduct host-pathogen studies to adopt vouchering practices and to collaborate with natural history museums to permanently archive host specimens, along with their tissue and microbiological samples.
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Four tips for bake-off worthy cakes
You'll need real skill and training to do something like this, but you can always improve with a little practice. (American Heritage Chocolate/Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Saveur . For no-fail, sky-high layer cakes, like the fluffy Southern cakes from Ben Mims' story Southern Dreams , there are a few simple rules to follow. These four tips will help you produce perfect cakes e
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New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in the West
Each year, thousands of migratory mule deer and pronghorn antelope journey northwest from their winter homes in the Green River Basin, a grassland valley in western Wyoming, to their summer homes in the mountainous landscape near Grand Teton National Park.
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High Tech N95 Mask Amplifies Your Voice With Built-In Sound System
Project Hazel PC gaming company Razer, known for making gaudy light-up accessories and peripherals, has decided to make its first foray into "smart" face masks. The company showed off a concept reusable N95 respirator called Project Hazel that it claims is the "world's smartest mask," as The Verge reports . It's like a Razer for, well, your face. And yes, of course it has RGB lighting. RGB or Bus
21h
Hunters and busybodies: Researchers use Wikipedia to measure different types of curiosity
Curiosity has been found to play a role in our learning and emotional well-being, but due to the open-ended nature of how curiosity is actually practiced, measuring it is challenging. Psychological studies have attempted to gauge participants' curiosity through their engagement in specific activities, such as asking questions, playing trivia games, and gossiping. However, such methods focus on qua
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New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer, potentially enabling scientists working outside the lab to study and track microorganisms like the SARS-CoV-2 virus more efficiently.
21h
DNA in water used to uncover genes of invasive fish
Invasive round goby fish have impacted fisheries in the Great Lakes and the Finger Lakes by competing with native species and eating the eggs of some species of game fish.
21h
Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics.
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Why You Should Still Wear A Mask And Avoid Crowds After Getting The COVID-19 Vaccine
It takes time after vaccination for immunity to the virus to build up, and no vaccine is 100% effective. Plus, scientists don't yet know if the vaccine stops viral spread. Here's what's known so far. (Image credit: Mario Tama/Getty Images)
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Beating the 'billion-dollar bug' is a shared burden
A new study linking land use patterns and pest outbreaks in Bt maize suggests that slowing the resurgence of western corn rootworm may require a larger-scale strategy than previously thought.
21h
New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer, potentially enabling scientists working outside the lab to study and track microorganisms like the SARS-CoV-2 virus more efficiently.
21h
DNA in water used to uncover genes of invasive fish
Invasive round goby fish have impacted fisheries in the Great Lakes and the Finger Lakes by competing with native species and eating the eggs of some species of game fish.
21h
Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics.
21h
"Boomerang" performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
Organizations seeking to fill internal roles traditionally have two options: promote from within or hire externally. Internal promotions benefit from being vetted talent who possess firm-specific skills while outside hires harbor external knowledge that can infuse an organization with new energy. Though this dichotomy is often accepted as unavoidable, there is a third option: boomerang employees.
21h
Non-classical photosynthesis by earth's inorganic semiconducting minerals
Photosynthesis, the process by which plants and other organisms convert sunlight into chemical energy, has been a major player during the evolution of life and our planet's atmosphere. Although most of the ins and outs of photosynthesis are understood, how the necessary mechanisms evolved is still a topic of debate. The answer to this question, however, may actually lie buried in the mineral world
21h
New Horizons spacecraft answers the question: How dark is space?
How dark is the sky, and what does that tell us about the number of galaxies in the visible universe? Astronomers can estimate the total number of galaxies by counting everything visible in a Hubble deep field and then multiplying them by the total area of the sky. But other galaxies are too faint and distant to directly detect. Yet while we can't count them, their light suffuses space with a feeb
21h
Curiosity rover reaches its 3,000th day on Mars
As the rover has continued to ascend Mount Sharp, it's found distinctive benchlike rock formations.
21h
Scientists Question Discovery of New Human Salivary Gland
A widely publicized paper has drawn scrutiny from physicians and anatomists about the authors' claims regarding so-called tubarial glands.
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Humanity's planet-shaping powers — and what they mean for the future | Achim Steiner
Humanity now has incredible power to shape nature and the Earth: the power to destroy and the power to repair, says sustainability champion and UNDP Administrator Achim Steiner. In this action-oriented talk, Steiner shows how this power is putting our own survival at risk — and takes us on a global tour of individuals and societies that are choosing to write a new, sustainable and equitable chapt
21h
An iPhone 12 Can Temporarily Shut Down Implantable Defibrillators
According to a new study published last week in the journal Heart Rhythm , placing an iPhone 12 over an implantable cardioverter defibrillator can shut the lifesaving unit down. That's due to the magnetic field put out by the Apple device's MagSafe charging technology, a magnetic array on the back of the device designed to make wireless charging easier. The researchers from the Henry Ford Heart a
21h
Hunters and busybodies: Researchers use Wikipedia to measure different types of curiosity
In the past, research on curiosity has mostly tried to quantify it, rather than to understand the different ways it can be expressed. Now, a new study led by researchers at Penn and American University uses Wikipedia browsing as a method for describing curiosity styles. Using a branch of mathematics known as graph theory, their analysis of curiosity opens doors for using it as a tool to improve le
21h
New study reveals how fences hinder migratory wildlife in the West
Wildlife biologists at the University of California, Berkeley, combined GPS location data of tagged mule deer and pronghorn antelope with satellite imagery of Wyoming fences to find out just how often these animals encounter fences, and what happens when they do. The results, published on Jan. 7, 2021 in the Journal of Applied Ecology, help pinpoint which fences pose the biggest barrier to ungulat
21h
Nanoparticle immunization technology could protect against many strains of coronaviruses
Caltech researchers are studying a new type of immunization that may be able to protect against many variants of viruses.
21h
Can you step in the same river twice? Wittgenstein vs. Heraclitus
'I am not a religious man,' the philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein once said to a friend, 'but I cannot help seeing every problem from a religious point of view.' These problems that he claims to see from a religious point of view tend to be technical matters of logic and language. Wittgenstein trained as an engineer before he turned to philosophy, and he draws on mundane metaphors of gears, levers
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No limit to cardiovascular benefits of exercise, study finds
Physical activity is not only associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease, but there is no threshold for that association, with the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease seen for those who are most active, according to a new study.
21h
More than half of COVID-19 health care workers at risk for mental health problems
A new study suggests more than half of doctors, nurses, and emergency responders involved in COVID-19 care could be at risk for one or more mental health problems, including acute traumatic stress, depression, anxiety, problematic alcohol use, and insomnia. The researchers found that the risk of these mental health conditions was comparable to rates observed during natural disasters, such as 9/11
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Simplified COVID-19 diagnostic method to ramp up widespread testing
A simplified COVID-19 testing protocol can detect minimal quantities of the SARS-CoV-2 using samples from the nose and throat as well as saliva and may be useful in testing patients with low viral titers such as asymptomatic patients or testing individuals prior to quarantine release. The high sensitivity method can be used in laboratories with minimal molecular biology equipment and expertise, an
21h
The Unsettling Truth About the 'Mostly Harmless' Hiker
His emaciated body was discovered in a tent, just a few miles from a major Florida highway. His identity—and troubled past—were discovered by the internet.
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22 Orphans Gave Up Everything to Distribute the World's First Vaccine
When the United States green-lit two coronavirus vaccines in December, it was a rare bright spot during this pandemic: Scientists had developed a vaccine for COVID-19 far faster than any other vaccine in history. The end finally seemed at hand. Since then, many, many things have gone wrong. In mid-December, Pfizer reported that it had millions of doses sitting around in a warehouse , and no instr
21h
What Antarctic Meteorites Tell Us About Earth's Origins
Each year, Smithsonian scientists collect hundreds of meteorites from Antarctica that reveal details about the origins of Earth and our solar system
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The earliest supermassive black hole and quasar in the universe
The most distant quasar known has been discovered. Observed just 670 million years after the Big Bang, it is 1000 times more luminous than the Milky Way. It is powered by the earliest known supermassive black hole, which weighs in at more than 1.6 billion times the mass of the Sun. Seen more than 13 billion years ago, this fully formed distant quasar is also the earliest yet discovered, providing
21h
CDC report: removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception use by people with certain characteristics or medical conditions. The CDC is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the release of its U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (MEC),
21h
Metabolism may play role in recurrent major depression
Researchers at UC San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with Dutch scientists, have found that certain metabolites — small molecules produced by the process of metabolism — may be predictive indicators for persons at risk for recurrent major depressive disorder.
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Prevalence of patients receiving dialysis in China may exceed 800,000 by 2025
Study projects that prevalence of patients receiving dialysis in China will increase from 384.4 patients per million (PPM) in 2017 to 629.7 PMP in 2025 with a predicted 874,373 patients receiving dialysis in 2025.
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Scientists: It'd Be Impossible to Control Superintelligent AI
Runaway AI Scientists at the Max Planck Society, a storied European research institution, say humanity will never be able to control a super-intelligent artificial intelligence that could save or destroy humanity. That's according to research published last week in the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research . The problem, the Max Planck scientists say, is that there's no way to contain such
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Scientists identify 'immune cop' that detects SARS-CoV-2
Scientists have identified the sensor in human lungs that detects SARS-CoV-2 and signals that it's time to mount an antiviral response.
22h
There's No Excuse to Ignore Warnings of Domestic Terrorism
The insurrection at the Capitol was planned on social media—and more plans are still being made in broad daylight across the internet.
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Fetal-maternal discordance in APOL1 genotype contributes to preeclampsia risk
Fetal APOL1 kidney risk alleles are associated with increased risk for preeclampsia in African Americans and maternal fetal genotype discordance is also associated with this risk.
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New process evaluates patients for elective surgeries following COVID-19
Acknowledging that COVID-19 may be here to stay, Oregon Health & Science University has laid out a series of steps to prepare patients for elective surgery following their illness. The evaluation, outlined in a commentary published in the journal Perioperative Medicine, is believed to be the first published protocol laying out a COVID-era path forward in American medicine.
22h
Killing cancer by unleashing the body's own immune system
The body's immune system is the first line of defense against infections like bacteria, viruses or cancers. Some cancers, however, have developed the art of molecular deception to avoid destruction by the body's immune system. Now, a University of Missouri researcher might have found a new way to help the body's immune system get past that deception and destroy the cancer.
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Is the COVID-19 vaccine safe for nursing mothers?
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) does not recommend cessation of breastfeeding for individuals who are vaccinated against COVID-19.
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These Euphoric Beverages Are Non Alcoholic Drinks Designed for Social Drinkers
It's 2021, and as with every new year, everyone is making various new year's resolutions to try and improve their lives. One relatively commonplace way of doing that is to quit drinking alcohol , but that can be easier said than done, especially for social drinkers. But luckily, thanks to non alcoholic Kin brand euphoric beverages , you can maintain the treasured rituals and social benefits of al
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A single genetic switch can lead to rapid evolution in sea anemones
Powerful evolutionary mechanism may have helped them colonize the seas
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Science panel Republicans more likely to oppose Biden victory
Electoral college vote is reminder of House of Representatives committee's partisan divide
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Record Drop in U.S. Emissions Is No Cause for Celebration
The pandemic drove a 10.3 percent decline in greenhouse gases last year but experts expect levels to rebound in 2021 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New technology reveals fast and slow twitch muscle fibers respond differently to exercise
Scientists have performed the most in-depth analysis of fast and slow twitch muscle fibers and the different ways they respond to exercise. Their novel approach uses large scale protein analysis of freeze-dried muscle samples, which opens the door for new analyses of muscle samples that are located in freezers around the world.
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First-degree relative with kidney disease increases disease risk by three-fold
In a large population-based family study, family history of kidney disease was strongly associated with increased risk of chronic kidney disease.
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DNA in water used to uncover genes of invasive fish
In a proof-of-principle study, Cornell researchers describe a new technique in which they analyzed environmental DNA – or eDNA – from water samples in Cayuga Lake to gather nuanced information about the presence of these invasive fish.
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Gene-editing produces tenfold increase in superbug slaying antibiotics
Scientists have used gene-editing advances to achieve a tenfold increase in the production of super-bug targeting formicamycin antibiotics.
22h
New method helps pocket-sized DNA sequencer achieve near-perfect accuracy
Researchers have found a simple way to eliminate almost all sequencing errors produced by a widely used portable DNA sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies' MinION device).
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In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
NEUROSCIENCE Exogenous R-spondin promotes taste cell generation in the absence of innervation. Signaling protein regenerates taste cells, maintains taste tissue homeostasis in mice Like all cells, the 50 to 100 taste cells in the human taste bud age and lose their integrity over time. First shown more than a century…
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Time-reversal symmetry breaking in the Fe-chalcogenide superconductors [Applied Physical Sciences]
Topological superconductivity has been sought in a variety of heterostructure systems, the interest being that a material displaying such a phenomenon could prove to be the ideal platform to support Majorana fermions, which in turn could be the basis for advanced qubit technologies. Recently, the high-Tc family of superconductors, FeTe1−xSex,…
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Oncogenic HPV promotes the expression of the long noncoding RNA lnc-FANCI-2 through E7 and YY1 [Microbiology]
Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play diverse roles in biological processes, but their expression profiles and functions in cervical carcinogenesis remain unknown. By RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of 18 clinical specimens and selective validation by RT-qPCR analyses of 72 clinical samples, we provide evidence that, relative to normal cervical tissues, 194 lncRNAs…
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Ferric heme as a CO/NO sensor in the nuclear receptor Rev-Erbss by coupling gas binding to electron transfer [Chemistry]
Rev-Erbβ is a nuclear receptor that couples circadian rhythm, metabolism, and inflammation. Heme binding to the protein modulates its function as a repressor, its stability, its ability to bind other proteins, and its activity in gas sensing. Rev-Erbβ binds Fe3+-heme more tightly than Fe2+-heme, suggesting its activities may be regulated…
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X-ray linear dichroic ptychography [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Biominerals such as seashells, coral skeletons, bone, and tooth enamel are optically anisotropic crystalline materials with unique nanoscale and microscale organization that translates into exceptional macroscopic mechanical properties, providing inspiration for engineering new and superior biomimetic structures. Using Seriatopora aculeata coral skeleton as a model, here, we experimentally demonst
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Imaging conical intersection dynamics during azobenzene photoisomerization by ultrafast X-ray diffraction [Chemistry]
X-ray diffraction is routinely used for structure determination of stationary molecular samples. Modern X-ray photon sources, e.g., from free-electron lasers, enable us to add temporal resolution to these scattering events, thereby providing a movie of atomic motions. We simulate and decipher the various contributions to the X-ray diffraction pattern for…
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An ancient neuropeptide defends the brain against infection [Commentaries]
The mechanisms that operate to control infection in the vertebrate brain remain poorly understood (1). The microglia are the mobile phagocytic cells that scavenge microbes. Cytokines expressed by various cells within the brain inform the microglia of the threat and call them to arms. The infectious agents must be eliminated…
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Insects and recent climate change [Biological Sciences]
Insects have diversified through more than 450 million y of Earth's changeable climate, yet rapidly shifting patterns of temperature and precipitation now pose novel challenges as they combine with decades of other anthropogenic stressors including the conversion and degradation of land. Here, we consider how insects are responding to recent…
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Deep learning and computer vision will transform entomology [Biological Sciences]
Most animal species on Earth are insects, and recent reports suggest that their abundance is in drastic decline. Although these reports come from a wide range of insect taxa and regions, the evidence to assess the extent of the phenomenon is sparse. Insect populations are challenging to study, and most…
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To us insectometers, it is clear that insect decline in our Costa Rican tropics is real, so let's be kind to the survivors [Biological Sciences]
We have been field observers of tropical insects on four continents and, since 1978, intense observers of caterpillars, their parasites, and their associates in the 1,260 km2 of dry, cloud, and rain forests of Área de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG) in northwestern Costa Rica. ACG's natural ecosystem restoration began with its…
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Agricultural intensification and climate change are rapidly decreasing insect biodiversity [Biological Sciences]
Major declines in insect biomass and diversity, reviewed here, have become obvious and well documented since the end of World War II. Here, we conclude that the spread and intensification of agriculture during the past half century is directly related to these losses. In addition, many areas, including tropical mountains,…
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A window to the world of global insect declines: Moth biodiversity trends are complex and heterogeneous [Biological Sciences]
Moths are the most taxonomically and ecologically diverse insect taxon for which there exist considerable time-series abundance data. There is an alarming record of decreases in moth abundance and diversity from across Europe, with rates varying markedly among and within regions. Recent reports from Costa Rica reveal steep cross-lineage declines…
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The decline of butterflies in Europe: Problems, significance, and possible solutions [Biological Sciences]
We review changes in the status of butterflies in Europe, focusing on long-running population data available for the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Belgium, based on standardized monitoring transects. In the United Kingdom, 8% of resident species have become extinct, and since 1976 overall numbers declined by around 50%. In…
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No buzz for bees: Media coverage of pollinator decline [Biological Sciences]
Although widespread declines in insect biomass and diversity are increasing concerns within the scientific community, it remains unclear whether attention to pollinator declines has also increased within information sources serving the general public. Examining patterns of journalistic attention to the pollinator population crisis can also inform efforts to raise awareness…
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The changing risk and burden of wildfire in the United States [Sustainability Science]
Recent dramatic and deadly increases in global wildfire activity have increased attention on the causes of wildfires, their consequences, and how risk from wildfire might be mitigated. Here we bring together data on the changing risk and societal burden of wildfire in the United States. We estimate that nearly 50…
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Insect biomass decline scaled to species diversity: General patterns derived from a hoverfly community [Biological Sciences]
Reports of declines in biomass of flying insects have alarmed the world in recent years. However, how biomass declines reflect biodiversity loss is still an open question. Here, we analyze the abundance (19,604 individuals) of 162 hoverfly species (Diptera: Syrphidae), at six locations in German nature reserves in 1989 and…
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Nonlinear trends in abundance and diversity and complex responses to climate change in Arctic arthropods [Biological Sciences]
Time series data on arthropod populations are critical for understanding the magnitude, direction, and drivers of change. However, most arthropod monitoring programs are short-lived and restricted in taxonomic resolution. Monitoring data from the Arctic are especially underrepresented, yet critical to uncovering and understanding some of the earliest biological responses to…
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Insect decline in the Anthropocene: Death by a thousand cuts [Biological Sciences]
Nature is under siege. In the last 10,000 y the human population has grown from 1 million to 7.8 billion. Much of Earth's arable lands are already in agriculture (1), millions of acres of tropical forest are cleared each year (2, 3), atmospheric CO2 levels are at their highest concentrations…
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Opinion: Eight simple actions that individuals can take to save insects from global declines [Environmental Sciences]
Insects constitute the vast majority of known animal species and are ubiquitous across terrestrial ecosystems, playing key ecological roles. As prey, they are critical to the survival of countless other species, including the majority of bats, birds, and freshwater fishes (1). As herbivores, predators, and parasites, they are major determinants…
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Arthropods are not declining but are responsive to disturbance in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico [Biological Sciences]
A number of recent studies have documented long-term declines in abundances of important arthropod groups, primarily in Europe and North America. These declines are generally attributed to habitat loss, but a recent study [B.C. Lister, A. Garcia, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 115, E10397–E10406 (2018)] from the Luquillo Experimental Forest…
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Global mapping of urban-rural catchment areas reveals unequal access to services [Environmental Sciences]
Using travel time to cities of different sizes, we map populations across an urban–rural continuum to improve on the standard dichotomous representations of urban–rural interactions. We extend existing approaches by 1) building on central place theory to capture the urban hierarchy in access to services and employment opportunities provided by…
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Multiple signaling pathways are essential for synapse formation induced by synaptic adhesion molecules [Neuroscience]
Little is known about the cellular signals that organize synapse formation. To explore what signaling pathways may be involved, we employed heterologous synapse formation assays in which a synaptic adhesion molecule expressed in a nonneuronal cell induces pre- or postsynaptic specializations in cocultured neurons. We found that interfering pharmacologically with…
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High-speed compressed-sensing fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of live cells [Engineering]
We present high-resolution, high-speed fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) of live cells based on a compressed sensing scheme. By leveraging the compressibility of biological scenes in a specific domain, we simultaneously record the time-lapse fluorescence decay upon pulsed laser excitation within a large field of view. The resultant system, referred…
22h
Shell mineralogy of a foundational marine species, Mytilus californianus, over half a century in a changing ocean [Ecology]
Anthropogenic warming and ocean acidification are predicted to negatively affect marine calcifiers. While negative effects of these stressors on physiology and shell calcification have been documented in many species, their effects on shell mineralogical composition remains poorly known, especially over longer time periods. Here, we quantify changes in the shell…
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The secretome mouse provides a genetic platform to delineate tissue-specific in vivo secretion [Medical Sciences]
At present, it remains difficult to deconvolute serum in order to identify the cell or tissue origin of a given circulating protein. Here, by exploiting the properties of proximity biotinylation, we describe a mouse model that enables the elucidation of the in vivo tissue-specific secretome. As an example, we demonstrate…
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Foraging trade-offs, flagellar arrangements, and flow architecture of planktonic protists [Applied Physical Sciences]
Unicellular flagellated protists are a key element in aquatic microbial food webs. They all use flagella to swim and to generate feeding currents to encounter prey and enhance nutrient uptake. At the same time, the beating flagella create flow disturbances that attract flow-sensing predators. Protists have highly diverse flagellar arrangements…
22h
Citramalate synthase yields a biosynthetic pathway for isoleucine and straight- and branched-chain ester formation in ripening apple fruit [Biochemistry]
A plant pathway that initiates with the formation of citramalate from pyruvate and acetyl-CoA by citramalate synthase (CMS) is shown to contribute to the synthesis of α-ketoacids and important odor-active esters in apple (Malus × domestica) fruit. Microarray screening led to the discovery of a gene with high amino acid…
22h
ATRX and RECQ5 define distinct homologous recombination subpathways [Cell Biology]
Homologous recombination (HR) is an important DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that copies sequence information lost at the break site from an undamaged homologous template. This involves the formation of a recombination structure that is processed to restore the original sequence but also harbors the potential for crossover (CO)…
22h
Modulation of immune cell reactivity with cis-binding Siglec agonists [Chemistry]
Inflammatory pathologies caused by phagocytes lead to numerous debilitating conditions, including chronic pain and blindness due to age-related macular degeneration. Many members of the sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectin (Siglec) family are immunoinhibitory receptors whose agonism is an attractive approach for antiinflammatory therapy. Here, we show that synthetic lipid-conjugated glyc
22h
Emergence of homochirality in large molecular systems [Physics]
The selection of a single molecular handedness, or homochirality across all living matter, is a mystery in the origin of life. Frank's seminal model showed in the '50s how chiral symmetry breaking can occur in nonequilibrium chemical networks. However, an important shortcoming in this classic model is that it considers…
22h
A modern scleractinian coral with a two-component calcite-aragonite skeleton [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
One of the most conserved traits in the evolution of biomineralizing organisms is the taxon-specific selection of skeletal minerals. All modern scleractinian corals are thought to produce skeletons exclusively of the calcium-carbonate polymorph aragonite. Despite strong fluctuations in ocean chemistry (notably the Mg/Ca ratio), this feature is believed to be…
22h
Spatial and evolutionary predictability of phytochemical diversity [Ecology]
To cope with environmental challenges, plants produce a wide diversity of phytochemicals, which are also the source of numerous medicines. Despite decades of research in chemical ecology, we still lack an understanding of the organization of plant chemical diversity across species and ecosystems. To address this challenge, we hypothesized that…
22h
A link between synaptic plasticity and reorganization of brain activity in Parkinson's disease [Neuroscience]
The link between synaptic plasticity and reorganization of brain activity in health and disease remains a scientific challenge. We examined this question in Parkinson's disease (PD) where functional up-regulation of postsynaptic D2 receptors has been documented while its significance at the neural activity level has never been identified. We investigated…
22h
Unsupervised neural network models of the ventral visual stream [Computer Sciences]
Deep neural networks currently provide the best quantitative models of the response patterns of neurons throughout the primate ventral visual stream. However, such networks have remained implausible as a model of the development of the ventral stream, in part because they are trained with supervised methods requiring many more labels…
22h
Interplay between desmoglein2 and hypoxia controls metastasis in breast cancer [Cell Biology]
Metastasis is the major cause of cancer death. An increased level of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), metastatic cancer cells that have intravasated into the circulatory system, is particularly associated with colonization of distant organs and poor prognosis. However, the key factors required for tumor cell dissemination and colonization remain elusive….
22h
The amphibian antimicrobial peptide uperin 3.5 is a cross-{alpha}/cross-{beta} chameleon functional amyloid [Biochemistry]
Antimicrobial activity is being increasingly linked to amyloid fibril formation, suggesting physiological roles for some human amyloids, which have historically been viewed as strictly pathological agents. This work reports on formation of functional cross-α amyloid fibrils of the amphibian antimicrobial peptide uperin 3.5 at atomic resolution, an architecture initially discovered…
22h
Natural resistance to worms exacerbates bovine tuberculosis severity independently of worm coinfection [Ecology]
Pathogen interactions arising during coinfection can exacerbate disease severity, for example when the immune response mounted against one pathogen negatively affects defense of another. It is also possible that host immune responses to a pathogen, shaped by historical evolutionary interactions between host and pathogen, may modify host immune defenses in…
22h
Design of a native-like secreted form of the hepatitis C virus E1E2 heterodimer [Microbiology]
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major worldwide health burden, and a preventive vaccine is needed for global control or eradication of this virus. A substantial hurdle to an effective HCV vaccine is the high variability of the virus, leading to immune escape. The E1E2 glycoprotein complex contains conserved epitopes…
22h
An unconventional role of an ASB family protein in NF-{kappa}B activation and inflammatory response during microbial infection and colitis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)–mediated signaling pathway plays a crucial role in the regulation of inflammatory process, innate and adaptive immune responses. The hyperactivation of inflammatory response causes host cell death, tissue damage, and autoinflammatory disorders, such as sepsis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, how these processes are precisely controlled is…
22h
Satellites can reveal global extent of forced labor in the world's fishing fleet [Environmental Sciences]
While forced labor in the world's fishing fleet has been widely documented, its extent remains unknown. No methods previously existed for remotely identifying individual fishing vessels potentially engaged in these abuses on a global scale. By combining expertise from human rights practitioners and satellite vessel monitoring data, we show that…
22h
Photosynthesis-assisted remodeling of three-dimensional printed structures [Engineering]
The mechanical properties of engineering structures continuously weaken during service life because of material fatigue or degradation. By contrast, living organisms are able to strengthen their mechanical properties by regenerating parts of their structures. For example, plants strengthen their cell structures by transforming photosynthesis-produced glucose into stiff polysaccharides. In this…
22h
Stone-Wales defects preserve hyperuniformity in amorphous two-dimensional networks [Chemistry]
Disordered hyperuniformity (DHU) is a recently discovered novel state of many-body systems that possesses vanishing normalized infinite-wavelength density fluctuations similar to a perfect crystal and an amorphous structure like a liquid or glass. Here, we discover a hyperuniformity-preserving topological transformation in two-dimensional (2D) network structures that involves continuous introducti
22h
Garnet sand reveals rock recycling processes in the youngest exhumed high- and ultrahigh-pressure terrane on Earth [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Rock recycling within the forearcs of subduction zones involves subduction of sediments and hydrated lithosphere into the upper mantle, exhumation of rocks to the surface, and erosion to form new sediment. The compositions of, and inclusions within detrital minerals revealed by electron microprobe analysis and Raman spectroscopy preserve petrogenetic clues…
22h
Sculpting crystals one Burgers vector at a time: Toward colloidal lattice robot swarms [Applied Physical Sciences]
Plastic deformation of crystalline materials with isotropic particle attractions proceeds by the creation and migration of dislocations under the influence of external forces. If dislocations are produced and migrated under the action of local forces, then material shape change can occur without the application of surface forces. We investigate how…
22h
The high-affinity immunoglobulin receptor Fc{gamma}RI potentiates HIV-1 neutralization via antibodies against the gp41 N-heptad repeat [Medical Sciences]
The HIV-1 gp41 N-heptad repeat (NHR) region of the prehairpin intermediate, which is transiently exposed during HIV-1 viral membrane fusion, is a validated clinical target in humans and is inhibited by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drug enfuvirtide. However, vaccine candidates targeting the NHR have yielded only modest neutralization…
22h
Avian mud nest architecture by self-secreted saliva [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Mud nests built by swallows (Hirundinidae) and phoebes (Sayornis) are stable granular piles attached to cliffs, walls, or ceilings. Although these birds have been observed to mix saliva with incohesive mud granules, how such biopolymer solutions provide the nest with sufficient strength to support the weight of the residents as…
22h
Topological metals and finite-momentum superconductors [Applied Physical Sciences]
We show that the Zeeman field can induce a topological transition in two-dimensional spin–orbit-coupled metals and, concomitantly, a first-order phase transition in the superconducting state involving a discontinuous change of Cooper pair momentum. Depending on the spin–orbit coupling strength, we find different phase diagrams of two-dimensional (2D) superconductors under in-plane…
22h
Goblet cell LRRC26 regulates BK channel activation and protects against colitis in mice [Physiology]
Goblet cells (GCs) are specialized cells of the intestinal epithelium contributing critically to mucosal homeostasis. One of the functions of GCs is to produce and secrete MUC2, the mucin that forms the scaffold of the intestinal mucus layer coating the epithelium and separates the luminal pathogens and commensal microbiota from…
22h
Structure and activation mechanism of the yeast RNA Pol II CTD kinase CTDK-1 complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The C-terminal domain (CTD) kinase I (CTDK-1) complex is the primary RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) CTD Ser2 kinase in budding yeast. CTDK-1 consists of a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) Ctk1, a cyclin Ctk2, and a unique subunit Ctk3 required for CTDK-1 activity. Here, we present a crystal structure of CTDK-1…
22h
Bioavailable soil Pb minimized by in situ transformation to plumbojarosite [Environmental Sciences]
Exposure to lead (Pb) during early life has persistent adverse health effects. During childhood, ingestion of bioavailable Pb in contaminated soils can be a major route of Pb absorption. Remediation to alter physiochemical properties of soil-borne Pb can reduce Pb bioavailability. Our laboratory-based approach for soil Pb remediation uses addition…
22h
Vaccinology in the post-COVID-19 era [Perspectives]
The COVID-19 pandemic is a shocking reminder of how our world would look in the absence of vaccination. Fortunately, new technologies, the pace of understanding new and existing pathogens, and the increased knowledge of the immune system allow us today to develop vaccines at an unprecedented speed. Some of the…
22h
Crucial role for CA2 inputs in the sequential organization of CA1 time cells supporting memory [Neuroscience]
There is considerable evidence for hippocampal time cells that briefly activate in succession to represent the temporal structure of memories. Previous studies have shown that time cells can be disrupted while leaving place cells intact, indicating that spatial and temporal information can be coded in parallel. However, the circuits in…
22h
Droplet-based mRNA sequencing of fixed and permeabilized cells by CLInt-seq allows for antigen-specific TCR cloning [Immunology and Inflammation]
T cell receptors (TCRs) are generated by somatic recombination of V/D/J segments to produce up to 1015 unique sequences. Highly sensitive and specific techniques are required to isolate and identify the rare TCR sequences that respond to antigens of interest. Here, we describe the use of mRNA sequencing via cross-linker…
22h
A subset of spinal dorsal horn interneurons crucial for gating touch-evoked pain-like behavior [Neuroscience]
A cardinal, intractable symptom of neuropathic pain is mechanical allodynia, pain caused by innocuous stimuli via low-threshold mechanoreceptors such as Aβ fibers. However, the mechanism by which Aβ fiber-derived signals are converted to pain remains incompletely understood. Here we identify a subset of inhibitory interneurons in the spinal dorsal horn…
22h
Altered ratio of dendritic cell subsets in skin-draining lymph nodes promotes Th2-driven contact hypersensitivity [Immunology and Inflammation]
Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) specialize in the production of type I IFN (IFN-I). pDCs can be depleted in vivo by injecting diphtheria toxin (DT) in a mouse in which pDCs express a diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) transgene driven by the human CLEC4C promoter. This promoter is enriched for binding sites…
22h
Invariant timescale hierarchy across the cortical somatosensory network [Neuroscience]
The ability of cortical networks to integrate information from different sources is essential for cognitive processes. On one hand, sensory areas exhibit fast dynamics often phase-locked to stimulation; on the other hand, frontal lobe areas with slow response latencies to stimuli must integrate and maintain information for longer periods. Thus,…
22h
Regulation of a subset of release-ready vesicles by the presynaptic protein Mover [Neuroscience]
Neurotransmitter release occurs by regulated exocytosis from synaptic vesicles (SVs). Evolutionarily conserved proteins mediate the essential aspects of this process, including the membrane fusion step and priming steps that make SVs release-competent. Unlike the proteins constituting the core fusion machinery, the SV protein Mover does not occur in all species…
22h
Natural cystatin C fragments inhibit GPR15-mediated HIV and SIV infection without interfering with GPR15L signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]
GPR15 is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) proposed to play a role in mucosal immunity that also serves as a major entry cofactor for HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). To discover novel endogenous GPR15 ligands, we screened a hemofiltrate (HF)-derived peptide library for inhibitors of GPR15-mediated SIV infection. Our…
22h
Correction for Silva et al., Repurposing a peptide toxin from wasp venom into antiinfectives with dual antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties [Corrections]
MICROBIOLOGY Correction for "Repurposing a peptide toxin from wasp venom into antiinfectives with dual antimicrobial and immunomodulatory properties," by Osmar N. Silva, Marcelo D. T. Torres, Jicong Cao, Elaine S. F. Alves, Leticia V. Rodrigues, Jarbas M. Resende, Luciano M. Lião, William F. Porto, Isabel C. M. Fensterseifer, Timothy K….
22h
Profile of Dolph Schluter [Profiles]
Dolph Schluter explores the origin of species on Earth, an avenue of research he has pursued with persistence, creativity, and methodical precision for more than 40 years. Schluter has taken what for Darwin was mainly a thought experiment and applied modern experimental methods to provide scientific evidence of the process…
22h
Profile of David M. Kingsley [Profiles]
When talking about his career as a developmental and evolutionary biologist, Stanford University's David M. Kingsley likes to say that "genetics works." He means that genetics can solve biological problems that have long been mysterious. He has repeatedly put that theory to the test throughout his research career, initially using…
22h
An evidence review of face masks against COVID-19 [Medical Sciences]
The science around the use of masks by the public to impede COVID-19 transmission is advancing rapidly. In this narrative review, we develop an analytical framework to examine mask usage, synthesizing the relevant literature to inform multiple areas: population impact, transmission characteristics, source control, wearer protection, sociological considerations, and implementation…
22h
Hydrogen sulfide is neuroprotective in Alzheimer's disease by sulfhydrating GSK3{beta} and inhibiting Tau hyperphosphorylation [Neuroscience]
Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common cause of dementia and neurodegeneration in the elderly, is characterized by deterioration of memory and executive and motor functions. Neuropathologic hallmarks of AD include neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), paired helical filaments, and amyloid plaques. Mutations in the microtubule-associated protein Tau, a major component of the…
22h
Contribution of historical precipitation change to US flood damages [Sustainability Science]
Precipitation extremes have increased across many regions of the United States, with further increases anticipated in response to additional global warming. Quantifying the impact of these precipitation changes on flood damages is necessary to estimate the costs of climate change. However, there is little empirical evidence linking changes in precipitation…
22h
Equity for women and underrepresented minorities in STEM: Graduate experiences and career plans in chemistry [Chemistry]
Recent events prompted scientists in the United States and throughout the world to consider how systematic racism affects the scientific enterprise. This paper provides evidence of inequities related to race–ethnicity and gender in graduate school experiences and career plans of PhD students in the top 100 ranked departments in one…
22h
Molecular structure of a prevalent amyloid-{beta} fibril polymorph from Alzheimer's disease brain tissue [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Amyloid-β (Aβ) fibrils exhibit self-propagating, molecular-level polymorphisms that may contribute to variations in clinical and pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We report the molecular structure of a specific fibril polymorph, formed by 40-residue Aβ peptides (Aβ40), that is derived from cortical tissue of an AD patient by seeded fibril…
22h
High-speed atomic force microscopy tracks the dynamic parts of the ribosome [Biochemistry]
"In biology, use of the force microscope will probably become quite common because of its ability to deliver films of processes," predicted Gerd Binnig, co-inventor and Nobel prize winner for the scanning tunneling microscope, and coinventor of the atomic force microscope (AFM), in a 1992 review (ref. 1, p. 14)….
22h
QnAs with Robert Tycko [QnAs]
The complexity of diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), has hampered treatments despite decades of study. Recent technological advances and interdisciplinary investigations, however, are helping researchers better understand such diseases. Robert Tycko, a Senior Investigator in the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National…
22h
Ecological correlates of species' roles in highly invaded seed dispersal networks [Ecology]
Ecosystems with a mix of native and introduced species are increasing globally as extinction and introduction rates rise, resulting in novel species interactions. While species interactions are highly vulnerable to disturbance, little is known about the roles that introduced species play in novel interaction networks and what processes underlie such…
22h
Captive gorillas test positive for coronavirus
First case of COVID-19 in endangered apes detected at San Diego wildlife park
22h
Sunak vows to keep housing, construction and manufacturing open
But PM is under pressure from scientists to do more to stem rising Covid infections
22h
Scientists Successfully Store Data Inside DNA of Living Bacteria
Thanks to its tremendous density, DNA can store the equivalent of about 10 digital movies of data in the volume of a single grain of salt. Now, scientists at Columbia University have pushed the concept even further, by writing data into the DNA of living bacteria, as Science reports . To store data inside DNA, it has to be converted by a DNA synthesizer from its binary format of ones and zeros in
22h
'Old Faithful' cosmic eruption shows black hole ripping at star
You've heard of Old Faithful, the Yellowstone National Park geyser that erupts every hour or two, a geological phenomenon on a nearly predictable schedule. Now, an international group of scientists who study space have discovered an astronomical 'Old Faithful' – an eruption of light flashing about once every 114 days on a nearly predictable schedule.
22h
Mechanisms in the kidney that control magnesium and calcium levels discovered
The gene KCTD1 directs production of a protein that functions in the kidney to maintain a normal balance of magnesium and calcium in blood. Loss of KCTD1 impairs the ability of the kidney to properly absorb magnesium and calcium from urine in the kidney, leading to abnormally low magnesium and calcium blood levels, thereby triggering the parathyroid glands to secrete excess parathyroid hormone tha
22h
Quasar discovery sets new distance record
Astronomers have discovered the most distant quasar yet found. The bright quasar, powered by a supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy, is seen as it was only 670 million years after the Big Bang, and is providing valuable clues about how such huge black holes and their host galaxies formed in the early Universe.
23h
Study of flowers with two types of anthers solves mystery that baffled Darwin
Most flowering plants depend on pollinators such as bees to transfer pollen from the male anthers of one flower to the female stigma of another flower, enabling fertilization and the production of fruits and seeds. Bee pollination, however, involves an inherent conflict of interest, because bees are only interested in pollen as a food source. A new study describes a pollination strategy involving
23h
An 'old faithful' active galaxy: Black hole rips away at star
Yellowstone National Park's Old Faithful geyser regularly blasts a jet of boiling water high in the air. Now, an international team of astronomers has discovered a cosmic equivalent, a distant galaxy that erupts roughly every 114 days.
23h
Fossils' soft tissues helping to solve puzzle that vexed Darwin
Remarkably well-preserved fossils are helping scientists unravel a mystery about the origins of early animals that puzzled Charles Darwin.
23h
A bucket of water can reveal climate change impacts on marine life in the Arctic
We know very little about marine life in the Arctic. Now researchers are trying to change that. They have shown that a simple water sample makes it possible to monitor the presence, migration patterns and genetic diversity of bowhead whales in an otherwise hard-to-reach area. The method can be used to understand how climate changes and human activities impact life in the oceans.
23h
Rotten egg gas could guard against Alzheimer's disease
Typically characterized as poisonous, corrosive and smelling of rotten eggs, hydrogen sulfide's reputation may soon get a face-lift thanks to researchers. In experiments in mice, researchers have shown the foul-smelling gas may help protect aging brain cells against Alzheimer's disease.
23h
Scientists reveal how gut microbes can influence bone strength in mice
Gut microbes passed from female mice to their offspring, or shared between mice that live together, may influence the animals' bone mass.
23h
Scientists develop method to more efficiently isolate and identify rare T cells
Scientists have developed a technique that will enable researchers to more efficiently isolate and identify rare T cells that are capable of targeting viruses, cancer and other diseases.
23h
Researchers report quantum-limit-approaching chemical sensing chip
Researchers are reporting an advancement of a chemical sensing chip that could lead to handheld devices that detect trace chemicals — everything from illicit drugs to pollution — as quickly as a breathalyzer identifies alcohol.
23h
Boomerang performance is on par with internal employees who never left the firm, new paper finds
A new paper contrasts the outcomes for boomerang employees with those of internally promoted employees to help firms determine whether to invest in talent management strategies that include boomerang rehiring or to focus on internal strategies that develop current employees.
23h
US looks to expand access to Covid-19 vaccines as rollout lags
New York to begin administering jabs to over-65s in accordance with new CDC guidance
23h
The Mind-Expanding Power of Complementarity
Embracing divergent perspectives at the same time is a key to understanding reality — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
New Technique Uses Entire Milky Way as a Giant Observatory
Zooming Out A team of scientists is taking an unusual approach to finding a new kind of gravitational wave they think is constantly washing over the Earth: using a clever trick to turn the entire galaxy into a giant observatory. The team, from the University of Colorado at Boulder, is using the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) to hunt for gravitational waves
23h
Families report benefits of cats for kids with autism
Cats may help increase empathy and decrease separation anxiety for children with autism, research finds. The findings could be useful for families considering adopting a companion animal for their child. "Previous research has shown parents of kids with autism are more stressed than parents of kids with any other disability," says Gretchen Carlisle, a former school nurse and now a research scient
23h
Cancer cells hibernate to survive chemotherapy, finds study
Cancer cells go into a state similar to hibernation when attacked by chemotherapy. The low-energy state is similar to diapause – the embryonic survival strategy of over a 100 species of mammals. Researchers hope to use these findings to develop new cancer-fighting therapies. When attacked by chemotherapy, all cancer cells have the ability to start hibernating in order to wait out the threat, find
23h
Why independent cultures think alike when it comes to categories: It's not in the brain
Scientists conducted an experiment in which people were asked to categorize unfamiliar shapes. Individuals and small groups created many different unique categorization systems while large groups created systems nearly identical to one another.
23h
New humanized mouse model provides insight into immunotherapy resistance
Scientists have created an advanced humanized immune system mouse model that allows them to examine resistance to immune checkpoint blockade therapies in melanoma. It has revealed a central role for mast cells.
23h
Tweaking AI software to function like a human brain improves computer's learning ability
Computer-based artificial intelligence can function more like human intelligence when programmed to use a much faster technique for learning new objects, say two neuroscientists who designed such a model that was designed to mirror human visual learning.
23h
Climate change reduces the abundance and diversity of wild bees
Wild bees are more affected by climate change than by disturbances to their habitats, according to a team of researchers. The findings suggest that addressing land-use issues alone will not be sufficient to protecting these important pollinators.
23h
Removing space junk
Plans to clean up orbits around Earth are being hatched
23h
More Things to Do With mRNA
After yesterday's post on mRNA vaccines and RNA mechanisms, I wanted to highlight a completely non-coronavirus application that has recently appeared in the literature. It's from BioNTech, the German company who's been working with Pfizer on one of the two mRNA coronavirus vaccines, of course, but they have other therapeutic interests as well. This latest paper is on an interesting approach to au
23h
Meipu teeth shed light on the human settlement of Asia
María Martinón-Torres and José María Bermúdez de Castro, researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), have participated in a study published in the Journal of Human Evolution, on one of the few human fossils known from late Early Pleistocene China, the Meipu teeth, which provides new information on the early settlement of continental Asia.
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OXGENE introduces SLIM platform for discovery of antibodies against membrane proteins
Novel self-labelling mammalian display method for identifying antibodies against membrane proteins in their native configurationPaper published in Journal of Biological Chemistry demonstrates compatibility with downstream manufacturing technologies to help accelerate CAR-T or antibody therapeutics development
23h
Why won't antibiotics cure us anymore?
Current means of fighting bacteria are no longer as good as they used to be because of antibiotic resistance. These days, people are dying from bacterial infections that could have been cured fifty years ago.
23h
NASA missions help investigate an 'Old Faithful' active galaxy
During a typical year, over a million people visit Yellowstone National Park, where the Old Faithful geyser regularly blasts a jet of boiling water high in the air. Now, an international team of astronomers has discovered a cosmic equivalent, a distant galaxy that erupts roughly every 114 days.
23h
Scientist develops method to find toxic chemicals in drinking water
Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts.
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