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nyheder2021januar14

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2h
Covid infection shown to provide as much immunity as vaccines
Researchers 'strongly encouraged' by findings of reinfection study among UK health workers
18h
Researchers link cellular transport pathway to aggressive brain cancer
Researchers at McGill University have identified a new cellular pathway that limits the growth and spread of brain tumors by controlling the recycling of cell surface receptor proteins. The study, which will be published January 14 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), suggests that the pathway, which involves a protein called Rab35, is defective in many patients with glioblastoma and that restori
2h
 

 

More evidence points to long-lasting COVID-19 immunity
We won't achieve herd immunity without vaccines. (Navy Medicine/) Immunity is a wildly complicated area, but for the past nine months or so it's been all anyone wants to hear about. Everyone has been hanging their hope on small bits of evidence that immunity to COVID-19 will be robust and long-lasting. Recent evidence has been promising: A study in Science from early January suggests immunity mig
4min
Tetris is no longer just a game, but an algorithm, which ensures maximum room occupancy
The software was developed by the University of Trento. It is a new and revolutionary method to manage the accommodation of guests in hotel. RoomTetris finds the best solution, the ideal combination between demand and supply, optimizing room occupancy. A tile-matching game that no human mind, no matter how experienced and skilled, could do better, with the seriousness and scientific rigor of a mat
14min
Presidential inaugurations boost tourism, but not this year
While new research from West Virginia University economists finds that presidential inaugurations have gained popularity as must-see tourist events in recent years, major security threats will keep visitors away for the inauguration of President-Elect Joe Biden.
14min
CCNY's David Lohman finds Asian butterfly mimics different species as defense mechanism
Many animal and insect species use Batesian mimicry – mimicking a poisonous species – as a defense against predators. The common palmfly, Elymnias hypermnestra (a species of satyrine butterfly), which is found throughout wide areas of tropical and subtropical Asia, adds a twist to this evolutionary strategy: the females evolved two distinct forms, either orange or dark brown, imitating two separat
14min
Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) as part of the Neurofibromatosis Clinical Trials Consortium have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). The results of the Phase 2 clinical trial, co-chaire
14min
Mathematicians Resurrect Hilbert's 13th Problem
Success is rare in math. Just ask Benson Farb . "The hard part about math is that you're failing 90% of the time, and you have to be the kind of person who can fail 90% of the time," Farb once said at a dinner party. When another guest, also a mathematician, expressed amazement that he succeeded 10% of the time, he quickly admitted, "No, no, no, I was exaggerating my success rate. Greatly." Farb,
14min
A Black Hole Bites a Chunk Out of This Star Every 114 Days
An international team of astronomers have detected a violent eruption of light emanating from a galaxy some 570 million light years away that repeats itself like clockwork every 114 Earth days. The explanation? They believe the repeating flares are caused by a supermassive black hole, about 20 times the mass of the one at the center of our own Milky Way, ripping a chunk out of an orbiting star wh
19min
Outdated carbon credits from old wind and solar farms are threatening climate change efforts
French global energy giant Total recently announced it had delivered its first shipment of "carbon neutral liquid natural gas". Natural gas is, of course, a fossil fuel and so can't itself be carbon neutral. Instead, emissions from transporting the cargo were partly "offset" by investing in a wind farm in China.
21min
COVID-19 is changing the way we work—and for disabled people, too
Remote working was the most requested but refused accommodation for disabled people in the workplace before the pandemic. Since COVID-19, however, employers have been forced to adapt. A lot of workplaces went online, leading to a rise in home working and an increase in online recruitment. These new ways of working provide valuable lessons for employers who want to improve their disability inclusio
21min
Deep learning outperforms standard machine learning in biomedical research applications
Compared to standard machine learning models, deep learning models are largely superior at discerning patterns and discriminative features in brain imaging, despite being more complex in their architecture.
28min
New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Gaining control of the flow of electrical current through atomically thin materials is important to potential future applications in photovoltaics or computing. Physicists in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered one way to locally add electrical charge to a graphene device.
28min
The scent of sickness: 5 questions answered about using dogs – and mice and ferrets – to detect disease
As COVID-19 continues to spread worldwide, scientists are analyzing new ways to track it. One promising approach is training dogs to detect people who are infected by smelling samples of human urine or sweat. Research scientist Glen Golden, who has trained dogs and ferrets to detect avian flu in birds, explains why certain animals are well suited to sniff out sickness. 1. Which species have a nos
32min
Keeping nurseries open helps in the fight against inequality but ignores a low-paid and anxious workforce
The current lockdown in England has seen schools closed, but—in a notable shift from the first lockdown in March 2020—nurseries and other venues looking after young children have been told by the government to keep their doors open. To understand this decision, we need to look at the role and status of the sector.
33min
Feces and algorithms: Artificial Intelligence to map our intestinal bacteria
Both past and present-day scientists have suspected the intestines of playing a role in various diseases. Present-day studies focus on the intestinal flora's role in physical diseases such as diabetes and overweight, while others seek to establish a connection between the intestinal flora and e.g. autism, schizophrenia and depression. But even modern-day scientists have difficulties studying the a
36min
New classification marks paradigm shift in how conservationists tackle climate change
A new study co-authored by researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society's (WCS) Global Conservation Program and the University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Forestry introduces a classification called Resistance-Resilience-Transformation (RRT) that enables the assessment of whether and to what extent a management shift toward transformative action is occurring in conservation. The tea
36min
How insects activate muscles to adapt to limbs removed
Adaptability explains why insects spread so widely and why they are the most abundant animal group on earth. Insects exhibit resilient and flexible locomotion, even with drastic changes in their body structure such as losing a limb.
36min
New way to control electrical charge in 2-D materials: Put a flake on it
Physicists at Washington University in St. Louis have discovered how to locally add electrical charge to an atomically thin graphene device by layering flakes of another thin material, alpha-RuCl3, on top of it.
39min
Feces and algorithms: Artificial Intelligence to map our intestinal bacteria
Both past and present-day scientists have suspected the intestines of playing a role in various diseases. Present-day studies focus on the intestinal flora's role in physical diseases such as diabetes and overweight, while others seek to establish a connection between the intestinal flora and e.g. autism, schizophrenia and depression. But even modern-day scientists have difficulties studying the a
39min
Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments. In his role as physical virologist, Wouter Roos, a physicist at the University of Groningen, together with two lo
39min
Greenland melting likely increased by bacteria in sediment
Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island's contribution to sea-level rise, according to Rutgers scientists.
39min
Teeth pendants speak of the elk's prominent status in the Stone Age
Roughly 8,200 years ago, the island of Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov in Lake Onega in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, housed a large burial ground where men, women and children of varying ages were buried. Many of the graves contain an abundance of objects and red ochre, signifying the wish to ensure the comfort of the buried also after death. Pendants made of elk incisors were apparently attached to clo
39min
New classification marks paradigm shift in how conservationists tackle climate change
A new study co-authored by researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society's (WCS) Global Conservation Program and the University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Forestry introduces a classification called Resistance-Resilience-Transformation (RRT) that enables the assessment of whether and to what extent a management shift toward transformative action is occurring in conservation. The tea
39min
How insects activate muscles to adapt to limbs removed
Adaptability explains why insects spread so widely and why they are the most abundant animal group on earth. Insects exhibit resilient and flexible locomotion, even with drastic changes in their body structure such as losing a limb.
39min
Galaxies hit single, doubles, and triple (growing black holes)
When three galaxies collide, what happens to the huge black holes at the centers of each? A new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and several other telescopes reveals new information about how many black holes are furiously growing after these galactic smash ups.
45min
NASA's Mars Mole Is Giving Up
The "mole" attached to NASA's InSight Mars lander, which has been attempting to dig itself into the rocky surface of the Red Planet since February 2019, is officially giving up, according to a NASA statement . The probe, called the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package (HP3), had been desperately trying to get itself into the surface in order to take the planet's internal temperature. Its goa
48min
Traveling (or Returning) to the U.S.? Prepare to Take a Coronavirus Test
Beginning Jan. 26, international travelers bound for the United States must show negative coronavirus test results before boarding their flights. Here's what you need to know.
48min
The richer you are, the more likely you'll social distance, study finds
The higher a person's income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the Covid-19 pandemic in the United States, Johns Hopkins University economists find.When it comes to adopting behaviors including social distancing and mask wearing, the team detected a striking link to their financial well-being. People who made around $230,000 a year were as much as 54% more lik
49min
Behaviors surrounding oral sex may increase HPV-Related cancer risk
A wide breadth of behaviors surrounding oral sex may affect the risk of oral HPV infection and of a virus-associated head and neck cancer that can be spread through this route, a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center suggests.
49min
New classification marks paradigm shift in how conservationists tackle climate change
A new study co-authored by researchers from the Wildlife Conservation Society's (WCS) Global Conservation Program and the University of British Columbia (UBC) Faculty of Forestry introduces a classification called Resistance-Resilience-Transformation (RRT) that enables the assessment of whether and to what extent a management shift toward transformative action is occurring in conservation.
49min
Mapping our sun's backyard
Astronomers have curated the most complete list of nearby brown dwarfs to date thanks to discoveries made by thousands of volunteers participating in the Backyard Worlds citizen science project. The list and 3D map of 525 brown dwarfs — including 38 reported for the first time — incorporate observations from a host of astronomical instruments including several NOIRLab facilities. The results con
49min
Physical frailty syndrome: a cacophony of multisystem dysfunction
Aging experts synthesize converging evidence that the aging-related pathophysiology underpinning the clinical presentation of phenotypic frailty is a state of lower functioning due to severe dysregulation of the complex dynamics in our bodies that maintains health and resilience. When severity passes a threshold, the clinical syndrome and its phenotype are diagnosable. This paper summarizes eviden
49min
Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments.
49min
Galaxies hit single, doubles, and triple (growing black holes)
When three galaxies collide, what happens to the huge black holes at the centers of each? A new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and several other telescopes reveals new information about how many black holes are furiously growing after these galactic smash ups.
49min
Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species, many long extinct, and even use those insights to figure out how modern-day communities might change in the future. There's just one problem: only some species left enough of a trace for scientists to find eons later, leaving large gaps in the fossil record — and researchers' ability to piece together the food webs
49min
Johnson and Johnson, SinoVac and More
We have some more data on the vaccine front that's worth looking at. J&J has published a bit more on their trials of their adenovirus-vector candidate, with data on the immunogenicity of the vaccine in patients. They have several cohorts evaluated: a single shot of low dose, single shot of high dose, two shots of low dose and two shots of high dose. This article at STAT sums it up: it's clear tha
50min
Conspiracy theorists destroy a rational society: resist them
We need to rebut propagandist falsehoods before they infect the real world
51min
Hørlykke ramte muren efter håndboldkarrieren: I dag hjælper hun andre til et aktivt liv
Da Rikke Hørlykke fik et kontorjob, manglede hun suset fra håndboldbanen.
52min
How New York's largest hospital system is predicting COVID-19 spikes
The machine-learning algorithm works by analyzing the online behavior of visitors to the Northwell Health website and comparing that data to future COVID-19 hospitalizations. The tool, which uses anonymized data, has so far predicted hospitalizations with an accuracy rate of 80 percent. Machine-learning tools are helping health-care professionals worldwide better constrain and treat COVID-19. One
54min
Dire wolves were a distant relative of wolves today
Before Dire wolves became extinct about 13,000 years ago, they genetically split off from other canids, making them the last of an ancient lineage, researchers report. The species, made famous by the show Game of Thrones , were different from other canine species such as coyotes and grey wolves—so much so that they were not able to breed with each other, according to the new research in Nature .
56min
Government defends Cumbria coal mine green light
Climate change: Cumbria coal mine "risks making Britain a laughing stock"
57min
Overraskende fund: Verdens ældste dyremaleri dukker op i grotte
Maleriet er 45.500 år gammelt og forestiller et vortesvin.
59min
Sprogmodel finder farlige virusmutationer
En model, der gør det muligt for computere at forstå sprog, kan også pege på de virusmutationer, der kan være modstandsdygtige over for vaccine.
1h
Shocking Study Finds Electric Eels Hunt Together
The study challenges what researchers know about eels' supposed loner behavior
1h
High Risk of Bias in Early COVID-19 Studies: Meta-Analysis
Few peer-reviewed clinical papers on the pandemic contained original data, and many of those that did had poor experimental design.
1h
Electric eels have a shocking tactic: hunting in packs
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00056-5 High-voltage fish in the Amazon swarm the buffet together.
1h
Accounting for the gaps in ancient food webs
If you want to understand an ecosystem, look at what the species within it eat. In studying food webs—how animals and plants in a community are connected through their dietary preferences—ecologists can piece together how energy flows through an ecosystem and how stable it is to climate change and other disturbances. Studying ancient food webs can help scientists reconstruct communities of species
1h
600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans.
1h
Spectacular fossil discovery: 150 million-year-old shark was one of the largest of its time
A team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes an well-preserved skeleton of the ancient shark Asteracanthus. This rare fossil find comes from the famous Solnhofen limestones in Bavaria, which was formed in a tropical-subtropical lagoon landscape during the Late Jurassic, about 150 million years ago. The almost complete skeleton shows that Asteracanthus was two-and-a-half m
1h
USTC makes security analysis and improvement of quantum random number generation
Recently, the research team led by academician GUO Guangcan from the USTC of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has made security analysis and improvement of source independent quantum random number generators with imperfect devices.
1h
MicroRNA may serve as therapeutic targets for traumatic brain injury
WRAIR scientists have shown that traumatic brain injury causes coordinated microRNA dysregulation followed by increased amounts of the beta-site amyloid cleaving enzyme, or BACE1, and loss of amyloid precursor protein. BACE-1 cleaves APP to generate amyloid beta peptides, a hallmark of neurodegenerative disease pathology and brain cells loss, which are the focus of several clinical trials for Alzh
1h
Moffitt researchers discover biochemical pathway that protects cells from ferroptosis
In an article published in Cell Metabolism , Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis.
1h
Bladder cancer — When to use chemotherapy
In patients with bladder cancer, chemotherapy effectiveness is partially determined by the body's immune system response to the malignancy. This is the conclusion of research conducted by a team of scientists from Charité — Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health. The findings, which have been published in Science Translational Medicine*, can be used to predict treatment suc
1h
Greenland melting likely increased by bacteria in sediment
Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island's contribution to sea-level rise, according to Rutgers scientists. That's because the microbes cause sunlight-absorbing sediment to clump together and accumulate in the meltwater streams, according to a Rutgers-led study – the first of its kind – in the journal Geophysical Research Letters . T
1h
How the famed Arecibo telescope fell—and how it might rise again
Engineering failures and a harsh climate conspired in telescope's sudden collapse
1h
Perth has distinct dolphin communities and they each need different protections
Research out of Murdoch University has identified distinct ecological communities of dolphins living in Perth waters requiring separate protection measures from anthropogenic threats.
1h
Teeth pendants speak of the elk's prominent status in the Stone Age
The elk was the most important animal to the people inhabiting the northern coniferous belt, with its incisors being perhaps the most coveted part of the body. Incisors were turned into pendants, which were attached using strings made of fibre or sinew. The manufacturing techniques of the thousands of elk tooth pendants discovered in the graves of hunter-gatherers who lived approximately 8,200 yea
1h
Faeces and algorithms: Artificial Intelligence to map our intestinal bacteria
The intestines and their bacteria are sometimes called our 'second brain', but studying these bacteria in their natural environment is difficult. Now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have developed a method that uses artificial intelligence to map intestinal bacteria using faeces. The researchers thus hope to gain more knowledge of the role played by these bacteria in various diseases
1h
Posidonia marine seagrass can catch and remove plastics from the sea
Posidonia oceanica seagrass -an endemic marine phanerogam with an important ecological role in the marine environment- can take and remove plastic materials that have been left at the sea, according to a study published in the journal Scientific Reports. The article's first author is the tenure-track 2 lecturer Anna Sànchez-Vidal, from the Research Group on Marine Geosciences of the Faculty of Ear
1h
Temperature scanners of limited value in detecting Covid-19
Making people stand in front of a scanner to have their body temperature read can result in a large number of false negatives, allowing people with Covid-19 to pass through airports and hospitals undetected.
1h
How insects activate muscles to adapt to limbs removed
Adaptability explains why insects spread so widely and why they are the most abundant animal group on earth. Insects exhibit resilient and flexible locomotion, even with drastic changes in their body structure such as losing a limb.
1h
New insights into pancreatitis
Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is one of the most common diseases around the world. Associated with a considerable risk of morbidity and even death in patients who suffer a severe form of the disease, to date there is no specific treatment for it.Now international AP experts have published a roadmap in the journal Gut (BMJ) pinpointing the two most significant thresholds in the disease that could serve a
1h
Perth has distinct dolphin communities and they each need different protections
Research out of Murdoch University has identified distinct ecological communities of dolphins living in Perth waters requiring separate protection measures from anthropogenic threats.
1h
600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans.
1h
Scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon storage calculations
Investors who bet on tropical forest conservation and reforestation to solve global warming by storing carbon in wood face huge uncertainties because the science behind predicting carbon stocks is still shaky. Even the best Earth Systems Models fail to predict how carbon stored by tropical forests varies from place to place. The New Phytologist invites scientists doing the "most-exciting, ground-b
1h
Giant map of the sky sets stage for ambitious DESI survey
Astronomers using images from Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory have created the largest ever map of the sky, comprising over a billion galaxies. The ninth and final data release from the ambitious DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys sets the stage for a ground-breaking 5-year survey with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), which aims to provide new in
1h
Doubling the number of known gravitational lenses
Data from the DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) Legacy Imaging Surveys have revealed over 1200 new gravitational lenses, approximately doubling the number of known lenses. Discovered using machine learning trained on real data, these warped and stretched images of distant galaxies provide astronomers with a flood of new targets with which to measure fundamental properties of the Universe
1h
Warming May Push Ecosystems to Release Carbon, Instead of Absorbing It
Nearly half of terrestrial ecosystems could reach this tipping point in just a few decades — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Yes, the Pandemic Is Ruining Your Body
The first time my hips locked up, the reason was at least a little bit glamorous. It was 2018, and I was returning from vacation in Sicily, which was the fanciest thing I'd ever done by several orders of magnitude. As I went through the motions—and, perhaps more important, the lack of motion—of international flight, my gait began to stiffen, and my stride contracted to a fraction of its former se
1h
Cancer research reveals how mutations in a specific gene cause different types of disease
Leading cancer expert solve long-standing question of how various types of mutations in just one gene cause different types of diseases
1h
How aerosols are formed
ETH Zurich researchers conducted an experiment to investigate the initial steps in the formation of aerosols. Their findings are now aiding efforts to better understand and model that process – for example, the formation of clouds in the atmosphere.
1h
Research reveals new insight into why breastfed babies have improved immune systems
Research has revealed new insight into the biological mechanisms of the long-term positive health effects of breastfeeding.
1h
The regulatory network of sugar and organic acid in watermelon fruit is revealed
The innovation project watermelon and melon cultivation and physiology team of Zhengzhou Fruit Research Institute has made new progress in the metabolism regulation of sugar and organic acid in watermelon fruit.
1h
Wits University scientists artificially infect mosquitoes with human malaria to advance treatment
Scientists at the Wits Research Institute for Malaria (WRIM) in partnership with the University of Pretoria and colleagues in the US, Spain and Switzerland have identified novel antiplasmodial lead compounds for mass drug administration and vector control to eliminate malaria.
1h
Triggering tumor antiviral immune response in triple negative breast cancer
Researchers at Baylor College of Medicine have discovered how therapeutics targeting RNA splicing can activate antiviral immune pathways in triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) to trigger tumor cell death and signal the body's immune response.
1h
Study shows sharp decline in cancer screenings, diagnoses during the first COVID-19 surge
In one of the first studies to examine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cancer diagnoses, researchers at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center document a substantial decline in cancer and precancer diagnoses at the Northeast's largest health care system during the first peak of the pandemic because of a drop in the number of cancer screening tests performed.
1h
Overactive food quality control system triggers food allergies, Yale scientists say
In a paper published Jan. 14 in the journal Cell , four Yale immunobiologists propose an expanded explanation for the rise of food allergies — the exaggerated activation of our food quality control system, a complex and highly evolved program designed to protect us against eating harmful foods.
1h
Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which th
1h
Comparing reactions of flu vaccines in older adults
Researchers in this randomized clinical trial compared injection-site pain and other reactions among adults age 65 and older who received flu vaccines.
1h
Flip the script: cardiac rehabilitation is underused, but a simple change could fix that
Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent
1h
Progression of myopia in children after COVID-19 home confinement
Researchers investigated the association of home confinement during the COVID-19 outbreak with myopia (nearsightedness) development in school-age children in China.
1h
Socioeconomic disparities in patient use of telehealth during COVID-19 surge
Which demographic and socioeconomic factors were associated with patient participation in telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic surge was examined in this observational study.
1h
Cancer screening tests, cancer diagnoses during COVID-19 pandemic
The number of patients undergoing cancer screening tests and of subsequent cancer diagnoses during the COVID-19 pandemic in the largest health care system in the northeastern United States was assessed in this study.
1h
Experts reduce search times for novel high-entropy alloys 13,000-fold using Cuckoo Search
A major roadblock to computational design of high-entropy alloys has been removed, according to scientists at Iowa State University and Lehigh University. Engineers from the Ames Lab and Lehigh University's Department of Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics have developed a process that reduces search time used for predictive design 13,000-fold.
1h
Scientists take important step toward using retinal cell transplants to treat blindness
Latest discovery is promising step in use of cell therapy to treat retinal diseases
1h
Retinal cell transplant clears experimental hurdle toward treating blindness
Retinal cells derived from adult human eye stem cells survived when transplanted into the eyes of monkeys, an important early step in the validation of this approach for treating blindness, according to a study by Liu, et al recently published in Stem Cell Reports. The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a layer of pigmented cells in the retina, is essential for sustaining normal vision. Blindness d
1h
New method makes better predictions of material properties using low quality data
By combining large amounts of low-fidelity data with smaller quantities of high-fidelity data, nanoengineers from the Materials Virtual Lab at UC San Diego have developed a new machine learning method to predict the properties of materials with more accuracy than existing models. Crucially, their approach is also the first to predict the properties of disordered materials–those with atomic sites
1h
Environment: Seagrass meadows may facilitate marine plastic removal from the sea
Underwater seagrass meadows may trap, extract and carry marine plastic debris to shore, thereby helping to remove plastic litter from the sea, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
1h
Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group
Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels. Researchers witnessed the electric eels working together to herd small fish into tightly packed balls. Groups of up to 10 eels periodically split off to form cooperative hunting parties. Those smaller groups then surrounded the prey and launched simultaneous electr
1h
600-year-old marine sponge holds centuries-old climate records
Scientists used a 600-year-old marine sponge to reconstruct a record of ocean temperature in the North Atlantic revealing past volcanic activity as well as the current global warming trend from the release of carbon dioxide and other heat trapping gasses into Earth's atmosphere and absorbed by the oceans.
1h
Smithsonian scientists reduce uncertainty in forest carbon storage calculations
Helene Muller-Landau, staff scientist was invited to write an authoritative review about carbon storage in forests. Her team combed through existing studies and came up with some novel conclusions of their own.
1h
Study gauges psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic on university students
More than half of all university students in the United States have experienced high levels of psychological impact from the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Matthew Browning of Clemson University, US, and colleagues.
1h
Anti-ageing effects of protein restriction unpacked
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03662-x Two animal studies show that restricting the dietary intake of branched-chain amino acids can extend lifespan by modulating the mTOR signalling pathway. But more research is needed before this diet should be recommended in people.
1h
Accurate machine learning in materials science facilitated by using diverse data sources
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03259-4 A strategy for machine learning has been developed that exploits the fact that data are often collected in different ways with varying levels of accuracy. The approach was used to build a model that predicts a key property of materials.
1h
Andrew Yang Proposes Basic Income For New York City
Yang For NYC Former presidential candidate Andrew Yang is officially running for mayor of New York City, The Washington Post reports . At the front of his campaign's platform is a promise to bring universal basic income to the country's most populous city. "We need to realize Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream of a guaranteed minimum income and get cash into the hands of people who need it most," Yan
1h
Global temperatures in 2020 tied record highs
Defying cooling from La Niña, roasting heat levels set Siberia and Australia on fire
2h
Shocking discovery: Electric eels hunt in packs in Amazon rivers
Social predation spotted for the first time among these animals
2h
Climate change: 'Exceptionally hot' 2020 concludes warmest decade
The years between 2011 and 2020 were the hottest on record, and 2020 was among the warmest of all.
2h
Electric eels work together to zap prey
The electric predators work in groups to herd and "zap" their prey in unison, scientists shocked to discover.
2h
How your brain responds to stories — and why they're crucial for leaders | Karen Eber
How do the world's best leaders and visionaries earn trust? They don't just present data — they also tell great stories. Leadership consultant Karen Eber demystifies what makes for effective storytelling and explains how anyone can harness it to create empathy and inspire action.
2h
Best vacuum cleaner: How to tidy up fast
No matter the mess, these vacuum cleaners have you covered. (The Creative Exchange via Unsplash/) Vacuuming has come a long way since 1908 when an Ohio store janitor, James Murray Spangler, sold his patent for an Electric Suction Sweeper to one William Hoover. The two men would undoubtedly be astonished to discover that, these days, vacuum cleaners don't need to be plugged in with a cord, don't a
2h
Tørke i Tyrkiet: Istanbul kan være uden vand om 45 dage
Den værste tørkeperiode i Tyrkiet gennem 10 år betyder, at landets storbyer snart løber tør for vand. På samme tid vokser risikoen for en fejlslagen høst.
2h
Electric Eels Hunt in Packs, Shocking Prey and Scientists
The behavior, used by wolves and orcas to run down fast prey, is rarely seen in fish.
2h
Seagrass meadows may facilitate marine plastic removal from the sea
Underwater seagrass meadows may trap, extract and carry marine plastic debris to shore, thereby helping to remove plastic litter from the sea, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.
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Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group
Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists led by the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History fish research associate C. David de Santana discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels, many of which were upwards of 4 feet long. On its own, this was an intriguing discovery, electric eels—a type of knifefish rather than true eels—were thought to
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Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which th
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Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group
Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists led by the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History fish research associate C. David de Santana discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels, many of which were upwards of 4 feet long. On its own, this was an intriguing discovery, electric eels—a type of knifefish rather than true eels—were thought to
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Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which th
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Bees respond to wildfire aftermath by producing more female offspring
Researchers at Oregon State University have found that the blue orchard bee, an important native pollinator, produces female offspring at higher rates in the aftermath of wildfire in forests.
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Viruses hitch lifts on some bacteria, the better to kill others
A hitchhiker's guide to the microverse
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Scientists Reprogram Fat Cells to Repair Injuries
Scientists have developed a first-of-its-kind human stem cell that seems to be capable of repairing and healing damage anywhere in the body. These so-called "smart" stem cells start off as human fat cells. But after being reprogrammed with cancer drugs that stripped the cells of their identity, they turned back into multipotent stem cells that were able to adapt to their surroundings in a mouse m
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How Science Explains Trump's Grip on White Males
Research on risk perception can help us understand the Trump supporters who stormed the Capitol — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A highly sensitive technique for measuring the state of a cytoskeleton
Researchers have developed a highly sensitive technique to quantitatively evaluate the extent of cytoskeleton bundling from microscopic images. Until now, analysis of cytoskeleton organization was typically made by manually checking microscopic images. The new method uses microscopic image analysis techniques to automatically measure the cytoskeleton organization. The researchers expect it to dram
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Micro-climate moulds and reshapes northern insect communities, herbivory and predation
Climate and changes in it have direct impacts on species of plant and animals – but climate may also shape more complex biological systems like food webs. Now a research group from the University of Helsinki has investigated how micro-climate shapes each level of the ecosystem, from species' abundances in predator communities to parasitism rates in key herbivores, and ultimately to damage suffered
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Spectacular fossil discovery:
A team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes an well-preserved skeleton of the ancient shark Asteracanthus. This rare fossil find comes from the famous Solnhofen limestones in Bavaria, which was formed in a tropical-subtropical lagoon landscape during the Late Jurassic, about 150 million years ago. The almost complete skeleton shows that Asteracanthus was two-and-a-half m
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Catalyticity of molybdenum-dinitrogen complexes in organic reactions
Molybdenum dinitrogen complexes supported by monodentate arylsilylamido ligand, [Ar(Me3Si)N]3MoN2Mg(THF)2[N(SiMe3)Ar] and [Ar(Me3Si)N]3MoN2SiMe3 (Ar = 3,5-Me2C6H3) were synthesized and structurally characterized, which were proved to be effective catalysts for the disproportionation of cyclohexadienes and isomerization of terminal alkenes. 1H NMR spectrum suggested that the bridging nitrogen ligan
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Temperature scanners of limited value in detecting Covid-19
Making people stand in front of a scanner to have their body temperature read can result in a large number of false negatives, allowing people with Covid-19 to pass through airports and hospitals undetected.
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KAL's cartoon
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Politics this week
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Business this week
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A close look at forest fire smoke yields new clues about air pollution
With samples taken from an airplane and given an unprecedented level of offline analysis, Yale researchers have produced a highly detailed look at the chemical make-up and transformations of an evolving plume of forest fire smoke—findings that could contribute to a better understanding of air pollution in many parts of the world.
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Bees respond to wildfire aftermath by producing more female offspring
Researchers at Oregon State University have found that the blue orchard bee, an important native pollinator, produces female offspring at higher rates in the aftermath of wildfire in forests.
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Illinois residents value strategies to improve water quality
Illinois residents value efforts to reduce watershed pollution, and they are willing to pay for environmental improvements, according to a new study from agricultural economists at the University of Illinois.
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A fully functional and animated Cortana hologram.
submitted by /u/West_Succotash9404 [link] [comments]
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Introducing the VR Teleoperation application on Reachy
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Rechargable Zinc-Air batteries could replace Li-Ion batteries!
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'Magic mushrooms' grow in man's blood after injection with shroom tea
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Bugs Are Safe for Humans to Eat, Says EU
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Artificial intelligence could train your dog how to sit
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Facial recognition reveals political party in troubling new research
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These robo-fish autonomously form schools and work as search parties
submitted by /u/wyndwatcher [link] [comments]
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The 'megascale' structures that humans could one day build
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Could we harness energy from black holes?
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Tesla Balks at Touch Screen Recall, US Agency Takes Action
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Insect Market To Explode: EU Gives Green Light To Eating Mealworm
submitted by /u/chemistrynerd1994 [link] [comments]
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Author Correction: Probing nanomechanical responses of cell membranes
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80518-4
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A highly sensitive technique for measuring the state of a cytoskeleton
A research group from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed a highly sensitive technique to quantitatively evaluate the extent of cytoskeleton bundling from microscopic images. Until now, analysis of cytoskeleton organization was generally made by manually checking microscopic images. The new method uses microscopic image analysis techniques to automatically measure cytoskeleton organization. T
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Svår oro för smitta på jobbet bland sjukvårdsanställda
Risken att smittas på jobbet är betydande, menar anställda inom vården i region Skåne. Var fjärde hälso- och sjukvårdsanställd anser att de åtgärder som vidtagits för att förhindra smitta bland personalen under Covid-19 inte varit tillräckligt effektiva. Skyddsrutiner som fastställts har inte följts fullt ut menar 36 procent av den vårdpersonal som svarat på en enkät till 7 781 hälso- och sjukvår
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Expanding the biosynthetic pathway via retrobiosynthesis
KAIST metabolic engineers present the bio-based production of multiple short-chain primary amines that have a wide range of applications in chemical industries for the first time. The research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering designed the novel biosynthetic pathways for short-chain primary amines by combining retrobiosynt
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A scanning transmission X-ray microscope for analysis of chemical states of lithium
Lithium-ion batteries (LIB) are widely used for daily products in our life, such as hybrid cars, cell phone, etc. but their charge/discharge process is not fully understood yet. To understand the process, behaviors of lithium ion, distribution and chemical composition and state, should be revealed. A research group in the Institute for Molecular Science observed that scanning transmission X-ray mi
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Expanding the biosynthetic pathway via retrobiosynthesis
KAIST metabolic engineers present the bio-based production of multiple short-chain primary amines that have a wide range of applications in chemical industries for the first time. The research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee from the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering designed the novel biosynthetic pathways for short-chain primary amines by combining retrobiosynt
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A highly sensitive technique for measuring the state of a cytoskeleton
A research group from Kumamoto University, Japan has developed a highly sensitive technique to quantitatively evaluate the extent of cytoskeleton bundling from microscopic images. Until now, analysis of cytoskeleton organization was generally made by manually checking microscopic images. The new method uses microscopic image analysis techniques to automatically measure cytoskeleton organization. T
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SpaceX Secures NASA Contract to Launch Lunar Lander
Falcon to the Moon SpaceX just won a contract to launch a commercial lunar lander backed by NASA, SpaceNews reports . The lander is being built by autonomous drone systems company Intuitive Machines as part of its IM-2 lunar lander mission. If all goes according to schedule, SpaceX will launch the lander on a Falcon 9 rocket within the next two years. "Signing with SpaceX for our IM-2 Polar Missi
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Most distant quasar's black hole has the mass of 1.6B suns
Astronomers have observed a luminous quasar 13.03 billion light-years from Earth—the most distant quasar discovered to date. Dating back to 670 million years after the Big Bang, when the universe was only 5% its current age, the quasar hosts a supermassive black hole equivalent to the combined mass of 1.6 billion suns. In addition to being the most distant—and by extension, earliest— quasar known
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Study the boundary between bulk, nano and molecule scale of gold plasmonic physics
The collective behavior of electrons in metal plasmons reflects the important difference between condensed matter and molecule-like ones. With the help of gold clusters with precise atom numbers(N), the evolution of plasmonic response is clarified and three regimes are observed, each with distinct physics. An atomically-precise evolution picture of plasmon physics is shown with 3 regimes: classica
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Penned release of green geckos has potential to help preserve threatened native species
Researchers outlined how they translocated 19 barking geckos to Mana Island, using the method of penned release – enclosing them in a 100m² pen for three months so they get used to the site and hopefully establish a breeding population.
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A rift in the retina may help repair the optic nerve
In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the success rate for regrowing nerve cells damaged by blinding diseases.
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Climate change is hurting children's diets, global study finds
An international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education. The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions examined–in Asia, Afr
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Acting quickly after heart attack symptoms start can be a heart saver
The degree of heart muscle damage from a heart attack is associated with how long it takes from when heart attack symptoms start to when patients receive an artery-clearing procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI. The longer the time period before PCI, called symptom-to-balloon time, the more significant and damaging the heart attack.
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Pillarene hybrid material shows enhanced tunable multicolor luminescence and sensing ability
Tunable luminescent materials are highly desirable owing to their broad application potential in various fields. Recently, a pillar[5]arene-based hybrid material with stimuli-responsive luminescent properties and ion sensing abilities has been elegantly constructed from a pyridine-modified conjugated pillar[5]arene and a planar chromophore oligo(phenylenevinylene) upon coordination of Cd (II) meta
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Giant 2D atlas of the universe helps dark energy spectroscopic survey
Researchers from the National Astronomical Observatories of Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) and their collaborators released a giant 2D map of the universe, which paves the way for the upcoming new-generation dark energy spectroscopic survey.
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Giving the hydrogen economy an acid test
Tsukuba University scientists show that the effectiveness of hydrogen-producing metal catalysts protected by graphene depends on the ability of protons to penetrate into the inner metallic surface. This work may lead to widely available hydrogen-powered cars.
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New suspicious lesions on breast MRI in neoadjuvant therapy
According to ARRS' American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR), new suspicious findings occurred in 5.5% of breast MRI examinations performed to monitor response to neoadjuvant therapy; none of these new lesions were malignant.
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New algorithm mimics electrosensing in fish
Weakly electric fish are specially adapted to traverse murky waters without relying on vision; instead, they sense their environment via electric fields. Researchers developed an innovative algorithm for observing objects via electrosensing that is based on the real behavior of weakly electric fish.
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SolarEV City concept: Building the next urban power and mobility systems
Cities are responsible for 60-70% of energy-related CO2 emissions. As the world is increasingly urbanized, it is crucial to identify cost-effective pathways to decarbonize. Here, we propose a "SolarEV City" concept, in which integrated systems of cities' roof-top PVs with EVs as batteries can supply affordable and dispatchable CO2-free electricity for citie's dwerllers, which can reduce CO2 emis
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A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, new research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove carbon dioxide directly from the ambient air and sequester it s
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Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
A new study revealed that the record-warm sea surface temperature over the northwestern Pacific in August 2020 could not be expected to occur without human-induced climate changes. Such extremely warm condition is likely to become a new normal climate in August by the mid-21st century, needing the prompt implementation of adaptation measures for anthropogenic global warming.
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How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
Researchers have discovered a group of neurons in the mouse brainstem that suppress unwanted movement during rapid eye movement sleep.
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Cell's publisher invites statements in papers about studies' diversity and inclusion efforts
Researchers see the voluntary statements as a vehicle for progress
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The power of a budget plan in grant writing
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00096-x Ethan Wilk, who begins an undergraduate programme this autumn, explains how a detailed outline of his proposed expenses and timeline helped him to win a competitive award to study endangered trout.
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Watch Samsung announce its new Galaxy S21 smartphones and Galaxy Buds Pro headphones
Samsung has already shown off quite a bit of cool kit at this year's CES, but the company has saved one of its biggest announcements for near the end. Today, we'll get to hear about Samsung's new Galaxy S21 smartphones and some other new products, including the possibility of some Galaxy Buds Pro high-end wireless headphones. We're expecting three different versions of the Galaxy S21, the standar
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Commercializing Low Earth Orbit
For the SGU podcast this week we interviewed Phil McAlister, who is the Director of Commercial Spaceflight Development at NASA Headquarters (this will be available starting 1/16). It's an excellent interview I recommend listening to – the overall theme of the discussion is that NASA is pulling back from low Earth orbit (LEO) so that they can focus on deep space exploration, including cis-Lunar sp
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Trailer-transporten over Storebælt stoppet efter løs lastbiltrailer
Ifølge transportministeren minder hændelsen om den ulykke, der i 2019 kostede otte mennesker livet.
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Pandemic Causes Historic — But Fleeting— Drop In U.S. Climate Emissions
As Americans stayed home during the pandemic, cars and planes produced less heat-trapping emissions. But the effect is only temporary. (Image credit: Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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Samsung Has New Galaxy Phones (and New Earbuds Too)
A trio of new Android phones—the S21, S21+, and S21 Ultra—are joined by new Bluetooth earbuds and a Tile-like tracker.
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These five AI developments will shape 2021 and beyond
The year 2020 was profoundly challenging for citizens, companies, and governments around the world. As covid-19 spread, requiring far-reaching health and safety restrictions, artificial intelligence (AI) applications played a crucial role in saving lives and fostering economic resilience. Research and development (R&D) to enhance core AI capabilities, from autonomous driving and natural language
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Final data release from DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys issued
Astronomers using images from Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory have created the largest ever map of the sky, comprising over a billion galaxies. The ninth and final data release from the ambitious DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys sets the stage for a ground-breaking 5-year survey with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), which aims to provide new in
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A highly sensitive technique for measuring the state of a cytoskeleton
Researchers have developed a highly sensitive technique to quantitatively evaluate the extent of cytoskeleton bundling from microscopic images. Until now, analysis of cytoskeleton organization was typically made by manually checking microscopic images. The new method uses microscopic image analysis techniques to automatically measure the cytoskeleton organization. The researchers expect it to dram
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Esophageal cancer patients show abundance of oral pathogens
DNA from various oral bacterial pathogens has been found in tumors from esophageal cancer patients. Researchers led by Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) examined bacterial pathogens in plaque and saliva from esophageal cancer patients, determining that a prevalence of three species in particular, along with alcohol consumption, is associated with a high risk of esophageal cancer. Screenin
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Millioner til forskning i diabetesbetinget knoglesygdomme
To forskningsprojekter i diabetesbetinget knoglesygdomme modtager 8,2 mio. kr. i støtte. Formålet er at blive klogere på, hvorfor personer med diabetes oftere end andre bliver ramt af knoglebrud.
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Digital kompetens – en bristvara inom offentlig sektor
Ett allt mer digitaliserat samhälle ställer nya krav på anställda och inom offentlig sektor fördubblades efterfrågan av digital kompetens under perioden 2006−2019. Bristen på kompetens gör att de offentliga organisationerna riskerar att halka efter i sitt digitaliseringsarbete. Kravet på digital kompetens finns idag inom alla yrkesområden och berör i stort sett alla som arbetar. Anledningen är at
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The best laptop desks for working at home in comfort
Great spaces to work on. (Content Pixie via Unsplash/) Being able to work outside the traditional office is really a marker of how our lives have evolved. No longer are we only sitting at our desks in offices, this new freedom comes with many advantages – like, say, the ability to work full time from your couch. Small, lightweight tech like laptops, tablets, and smartphones allow us the flexibili
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Rolls-Royce vil halvere rejsetiden til Mars med atomteknologi
Det britiske rumagentur vil forkorte rejsetiden til den røde planet ved trække på Rolls Royces ekspertise inden for atomkraft. Nasa gør allerede fremskridt inden for teknologien.
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Many summer camps don't require immunizations
While most children need to show immunization records to attend school, the same may not be true for summer camps, according to a new study. Nearly half of summer camps researchers surveyed did not have official policies requiring vaccinations for campers, according to the findings in JAMA Pediatrics . Of 378 camps represented, just 174 reportedly had immunization policies for campers and 133 (39
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Mars 2020 Perseverance rover to capture sounds from the red planet
When the Mars Perseverance rover lands on the red planet on Feb. 18, 2021, it will not only collect stunning images and rock samples; the data it returns may also include some recorded sounds from Mars.
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Scientists discover the secret of Galápagos' rich ecosystem
New research has unlocked the mystery of how the Galápagos Islands, a rocky, volcanic outcrop, with only modest rainfall and vegetation, is able to sustain its unique wildlife habitats.
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Short term low carbohydrate diet linked to remission of type 2 diabetes
Patients with type 2 diabetes who follow a strict low carbohydrate diet for six months may experience greater rates of remission compared with other recommended diets without adverse effects, a new study suggests.
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Early warning sign for heart disease
The build-up of calcium in a major artery outside of the heart could predict future heart attack or stroke, a new study has demonstrated.
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Sustainable transportation: Clearing the air on nitrogen doping
Researchers have identified the active nitrogen atoms in the carbon catalyst of a technology that will help optimize a proposed renewable energy storage technology.
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A scanning transmission X-ray microscope for analysis of chemical states of lithium
A new method to analyze chemical status of lithium was developed by using a synchrotron-based scanning transmission soft X-ray microscope (STXM). A key of the method is installation of a newly designed X-ray lens, a low-pass filtering zone plate, to the STXM to improve quality of a monochromatic X-ray. 2-dimensional chemical state of a test electrode of Li-ion battery was successfully analyzed wit
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New combination drug therapy offers hope against methamphetamine addiction
A new treatment that combines two existing medications may provide long-sought relief for many battling debilitating methamphetamine use disorder, according to a study to be published tomorrow in The New England Journal of Medicine.
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Expanding the biosynthetic pathway via retrobiosynthesis
KAIST metabolic engineers presented the bio-based production of multiple short-chain primary amines that have a wide range of applications in chemical industries for the first time. The research team designed the novel biosynthetic pathways for short-chain primary amines by combining retrobiosynthesis and a precursor selection step.
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Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Farhaan Vahidy of Houston Methodist Research Institute, US, and colleagues.
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Scientists are a step closer to developing 'smart' stem cells – made from human fat
These new, adaptive stem cells can lie dormant until needed, a new animal study using human cells shows.
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Eastern and central China become brighter due to clean air action
A new study finds that the air pollution control actions can lead to not only considerable environmental and health improvements, but also increases in solar photovoltaic energy production.
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Bedside lights that do more than shine
Upgrade your bedside lighting. (Amazon/) Our bodies' circadian rhythms function best with established routines, predictable light, and lower noise levels. When circadian rhythms are functioning well, our sleep is deeper and we wake feeling more rested. However, with so many hours spent indoors and under artificial lighting it's easy to fall out of rhythm and into the cycle of insomnia. Interestin
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Rubber tree plant leaves found to grow slippery to ward off insects as plant ages
A team of researchers at the University of Freiburg, has found that at least one kind of plant has leaves that grow slippery as it ages in an apparent attempt to ward off leaf-eating insects. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of rubber tree plant leaves and their impact on Colorado potato beetles.
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Poorest face dilemma in Africa's cities
A recent study in South Africa and Ghana shows people support government steps to combat COVID-19 but lack the infrastructure and financial security required to maintain social distancing.
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Rubber tree plant leaves found to grow slippery to ward off insects as plant ages
A team of researchers at the University of Freiburg, has found that at least one kind of plant has leaves that grow slippery as it ages in an apparent attempt to ward off leaf-eating insects. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes their study of rubber tree plant leaves and their impact on Colorado potato beetles.
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Doubling the number of known gravitational lenses
Data from the DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) Legacy Imaging Surveys have revealed over 1200 new gravitational lenses, approximately doubling the number of known lenses. Discovered using machine learning trained on real data, these warped and stretched images of distant galaxies provide astronomers with a flood of new targets with which to measure fundamental properties of the Universe
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NASA's SDO spots first lunar transit of 2021
On Jan. 13, 2021, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, experienced its first lunar transit of the year when the moon crossed its view of the sun. The transit lasted about 30 minutes, between 12:56 and 1:25 a.m. ET. During this time, the moon happened to cover two of the spacecraft's fine-guidance sensors, causing its view of the sun to jitter slightly. SDO recovered a steady view shortly aft
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NASA's Juno mission expands into the future
NASA has authorized a mission extension for its Juno spacecraft exploring Jupiter. The agency's most distant planetary orbiter will now continue its investigation of the solar system's largest planet through September 2025, or until the spacecraft's end of life. This expansion tasks Juno with becoming an explorer of the full Jovian system—Jupiter and its rings and moons—with multiple rendezvous pl
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Citizen scientists contribute to 3-D map of cosmic neighborhood
Scientists tapped into the worldwide network of volunteers using Backyard Worlds: Planet 9 to map dozens of new brown dwarfs, or balls gas not heavy enough to be stars.
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After COVID we may never think about hotels in the same way again
In Australia, New Zealand and around the world, COVID has turned luxury and semi-luxury hotels into quarantine facilities.
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Penned release of green geckos has potential to help preserve threatened native species
University of Otago researchers have added another piece to the puzzle about how best to translocate New Zealand lizards for conservation purposes—confine them.
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Smart site selection can make hydropower greener
Even though new hydropower dam developments are intended to provide green energy, they can drown areas that are rich in plant and animal species. But this kind of collateral damage can be limited by strategic site selection, a new study shows.
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Penned release of green geckos has potential to help preserve threatened native species
University of Otago researchers have added another piece to the puzzle about how best to translocate New Zealand lizards for conservation purposes—confine them.
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Bio-based replacements to fossil fuel plastics
BPA is an organic compound made from fossil fuel sources. The industrial chemical has been used to make plastics and resins since the 1950s, and products made with it are cheap to make, clear, flexible and strong. BPA can be found in a variety of products, including water bottles, storage containers and sports equipment. It's also widely used in the linings of food and beverage cans and in sales r
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How aerosols are formed
ETH Zurich researchers conducted an experiment to investigate the initial steps in the formation of aerosols. Their findings are now aiding efforts to better understand and model that process—for example, the formation of clouds in the atmosphere.
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Giving the hydrogen economy an acid test
A team of researchers led by the Institute of Applied Physics at the University of Tsukuba has demonstrated a method for producing acid-resistant catalysts by covering them with layers of graphene. They show that using few layers allows for greater proton penetration during a hydrogen evolution reaction, which is crucial for maximizing the efficiency when producing H2 as fuel. This work may lead t
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150-million-year-old shark was one of the largest of its time
In a new study, an international research team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes an exceptionally well-preserved skeleton of the ancient shark Asteracanthus. This extremely rare fossil find comes from the famous Solnhofen limestones in Bavaria, which was formed in a tropical-subtropical lagoon landscape during the Late Jurassic, about 150 million years ago. The almost
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What makes an explanation good enough?
"If you look at the biggest and most divisive arguments we're having right now," says Simon DeDeo, SFI External Professor and Carnegie Mellon University Professor, "we often agree on the facts. We disagree on the explanations."
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Team links gait change after ACL injury and knee osteoarthritis
Using a new, noninvasive rodent model of ACL injury very similar to human's, researchers have found the first known direct link between altered gait and knee osteoarthritis. Almost half of patients who undergo surgery to repair a torn anterior cruciate ligament will develop knee osteoarthritis. Rehabilitation specialists and researchers have long hypothesized that ACL injury results in gait chang
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Pandemic could mark 'turning point' for Chinese science
Despite missteps and government control, early findings guided other countries' fight against the coronavirus
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150-million-year-old shark was one of the largest of its time
In a new study, an international research team led by Sebastian Stumpf from the University of Vienna describes an exceptionally well-preserved skeleton of the ancient shark Asteracanthus. This extremely rare fossil find comes from the famous Solnhofen limestones in Bavaria, which was formed in a tropical-subtropical lagoon landscape during the Late Jurassic, about 150 million years ago. The almost
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First lockdown's effect on air pollution was overstated, our study reveals
The pandemic caused governments around the world to introduce lockdowns in early 2020, temporarily closing workplaces and emptying roads and public spaces. As economic activity slowed, so did emissions of air pollutants. Almost a year later, the effect that all this had on the air we breathe is becoming clear.
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Flight or fright: What is the future of the emus of east coast Australia?
Scientists at Western Sydney University and University of Tasmania have mapped the historic shifts in the distribution of Australia's iconic emus (Dromaius novehollandiae), to project how regional emu populations are likely to change in the next 50 years.
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Sea lion diagnosed with tuberculosis triggers public health concerns
Australian sea lions are an endangered species. New research suggests endemic tuberculosis might be another health threat facing the pinnipeds. Dr. Rachael Gray is working to help save our sea lions.
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Lactating grizzly bears use cooling baths to avoid heat stress, study finds
Taking a bath to relieve stress isn't unique to humans.
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A rift in the retina may help repair the optic nerve
In experiments in mouse tissues and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say they have found that removing a membrane that lines the back of the eye may improve the success rate for regrowing nerve cells damaged by blinding diseases.
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Sexual harassment claims by less feminine women perceived as less credible
Women who do not fit female stereotypes are less likely to be seen as victims of sexual harassment, and if they claim they were harassed, they are less likely to be believed, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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Sexual harassment claims considered more credible if made by 'prototypical' women
A new UW-led study reveals people's perceptions that sexual harassment primarily affects young, feminine and conventionally attractive women. Women who fall outside that prototype not only are perceived as unharmed by harassment, but also have a harder time convincing others that they have been harassed.
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Researchers identify promising model for studying human aging
The research team plans to study how the changes observed in animal models mimic the deterioration of muscle function in aging humans.
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Penned release of green geckos has potential to help preserve threatened native species
In a paper just published in the New Zealand Journal of Ecology , the Department of Zoology researchers outlined how they translocated 19 barking geckos to Mana Island, using the method of penned release – enclosing them in a 100m² pen for three months so they get used to the site and hopefully establish a breeding population.
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Giant map of the sky sets stage for ambitious DESI survey
Astronomers using images from Kitt Peak National Observatory and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory have created the largest ever map of the sky, comprising over a billion galaxies. The ninth and final data release from the ambitious DESI Legacy Imaging Surveys sets the stage for a ground-breaking 5-year survey with the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI), which aims to provide new in
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Flight or fright: What is the future of the emus of east coast Australia?
Scientists at Western Sydney University and University of Tasmania have mapped the historic shifts in the distribution of Australia's iconic emus (Dromaius novehollandiae), to project how regional emu populations are likely to change in the next 50 years.
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Sea lion diagnosed with tuberculosis triggers public health concerns
Australian sea lions are an endangered species. New research suggests endemic tuberculosis might be another health threat facing the pinnipeds. Dr. Rachael Gray is working to help save our sea lions.
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Lactating grizzly bears use cooling baths to avoid heat stress, study finds
Taking a bath to relieve stress isn't unique to humans.
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Fast decisions of flying insects
Scientists are homing in on the amazing flying skills of insects. How flying insects are able to respond rapidly and appropriately in a fast-changing surroundings is a serious ambition of new Australian Research Council study.
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Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
"The lotus roots may break, but the fiber remains joined"—an old Chinese saying that reflects the unique structure and mechanical properties of the lotus fiber. The outstanding mechanical properties of lotus fibers can be attributed to their unique spiral structure, which provides an attractive model for biomimetic design of artificial fibers.
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Biodegradable inorganic upconversion nanocrystals developed for in vivo applications
Lanthanide-doped inorganic upconversion nanocrystals (UCNCs) are attracting more attention, as they are potential fluorescent diagnostic and therapeutic agents for in vivo applications including biological imaging and disease theragnostics.
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Acoustofluidic centrifuge for nanoparticle enrichment and assortment
Liquid droplets have recently gained renewed attention as a simplified model for a variety of fascinating physical phenomena at the scale of the cell nucleus to stellar black holes. In a new report now published in Science Advances, Yuyang Gu and a team of scientists in the U.S. presented an acoustofluidic centrifugation technique that used the entanglement of acoustic wave actuation and the spin
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Scientists develop Z-scheme catalyst for contaminants in water
In recent years, rapid industrialization has caused increasingly severe environmental pollution. Antibiotics and microbiological contamination in water have become major threats to human health and critical risks to ecosystem security worldwide. Therefore, an effective treatment approach has become an urgent task for elimination of bacterial and antibiotic contamination from the watery environment
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Stainless steel cups for any beverage
Maintain your beverage's temperature. (Colton Strickland via Unsplash/) It happens all the time. Your herbal tea goes lukewarm before it soothes your throat. The ice in your cocktail melts when you savor every sip. A drink is undoubtedly more enjoyable when it holds temperature, but few vessels can make that happen. A stainless steel cup is an awesome tool for keeping hot drinks hot and cold drin
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Fast decisions of flying insects
Scientists are homing in on the amazing flying skills of insects. How flying insects are able to respond rapidly and appropriately in a fast-changing surroundings is a serious ambition of new Australian Research Council study.
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New partnership could put University of Minnesota at center of biomanufacturing industry
The University of Minnesota aims to become a hub of bioindustrial manufacturing through a new multimillion dollar partnership partially funded by the U.S. Department of Defense.
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Shining a new light on dark energy
The Dark Energy Survey has released a massive, public collection of astronomical data and calibrated images from six years of work. Containing data on nearly 700 million astronomical objects, this second data release in the Survey's seven-year history is the topic of sessions today and tomorrow at the 237th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society.
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SolarEV City concept: Building future urban power and mobility systems
Cities have become the focus of global climate mitigation efforts because as they are responsible for 60 to 70% of energy-related CO2 emissions. As the world is increasingly urbanized, it is crucial to identify cost-effective pathways to decarbonize and enhance the resilience of cities, which ensure the well-being of their dwellers. In this study, we propose a SolarEV City concept, in which integr
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Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
August 2020 set new record high sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the northwestern Pacific Ocean and around the Japan coasts. A new study led by National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) researchers revealed that this warming record could not happen without human-induced climate changes.
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New partnership could put University of Minnesota at center of biomanufacturing industry
The University of Minnesota aims to become a hub of bioindustrial manufacturing through a new multimillion dollar partnership partially funded by the U.S. Department of Defense.
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Interior strips protections for owl species on decline
The Interior Department said it will eliminate from federal protection more than 3 million acres in California, Oregon and Washington vital to the northern spotted owl, a species considered endangered under federal law.
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Interior strips protections for owl species on decline
The Interior Department said it will eliminate from federal protection more than 3 million acres in California, Oregon and Washington vital to the northern spotted owl, a species considered endangered under federal law.
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Bees respond to wildfire aftermath by producing more female offspring
Researchers have found that the blue orchard bee, an important native pollinator, produces female offspring at higher rates in the aftermath of wildfire in forests.
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Expert decodes Trump talk, Q codes, and road to insurrection
The violent breach of the Capitol was a culmination of communication between President Trump and his most fanatical supporters, says linguistic anthropologist Janet McIntosh. "The register of cryptic-yet-knowing talk among Trump supporters and Q aficionados helped inspire the insurrection." Before the crowd of thousands marched to the Capitol that day, they listened to a speech from President Don
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A step-by-step guide to giving yourself a massage
If your neck is feeling a little stiff, take a minute and rub it. Your muscles will thank you. (DecaStock / Deposit Photos/) Massages can be a relaxing, pleasurable way to deal with things like stress, postural problems, and even physical injuries. But professional massages can be expensive—not to mention difficult to enjoy safely during a pandemic—so it's useful to know you can get a similar eff
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Film can grab your sweat to power your watch
Researchers have created a novel film that is very effective in evaporating sweat from our skin to keep us cool and comfortable when we exercise. The moisture from sweat can also power wearable electronic devices such as watches, fitness trackers, and more, the researchers report. " Sweat is mostly composed of water. When water is evaporated from the skin surface, it lowers the skin temperature a
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Bees respond to wildfire aftermath by producing more female offspring
Researchers have found that the blue orchard bee, an important native pollinator, produces female offspring at higher rates in the aftermath of wildfire in forests.
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Diffractive networks light the way for optical image classification
There is renewed interest in optical computing due to its potential advantages, including parallelization, power-efficiency, and computation speed. Diffractive networks utilize deep learning-based design of successive diffractive layers to all-optically process information as the light is transmitted from the input to the output plane. UCLA researchers significantly improved the statistical infere
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Illinois residents value strategies to improve water quality
Illinois residents value efforts to reduce watershed pollution, and they are willing to pay for environmental improvements, according to a new study from agricultural economists at the University of Illinois.
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Doubling the number of known gravitational lenses
Data from the DESI (Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument) Legacy Imaging Surveys have revealed over 1200 new gravitational lenses, approximately doubling the number of known lenses. Discovered using machine learning trained on real data, these warped and stretched images of distant galaxies provide astronomers with a flood of new targets with which to measure fundamental properties of the Universe
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The DC Riot Is the Sandy Hook of the Disinformation Crisis
After the 2012 mass shooting, many asked: If this doesn't lead to change, can we ever expect change? We should be asking the same of the insurrection.
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How Old-School Text Adventures Inspired Our Virtual Spaces
MMORPGs and even social media can trace their roots to games that used simple text commands to construct vivid, fantastical worlds.
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The Remaining COVID-19 Journey
With a vaccine in limited availability, many still need medicines to keep the virus at bay — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Astronomers Find Oldest Supermassive Black Hole in the Universe
Astronomers have discovered about 750,000 quasars, which are among the brightest and most energetic objects in the universe. Despite its uninspiring designation, J0313-1806 is distinct from other quasars. This recently spotted object is the oldest known quasar in the universe , with a supermassive black hole more than 13 billion years old. In fact, it's so old and huge that scientists don't know
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Students discover bright lensed galaxy in the early universe
The night sky is a natural time machine, used by cosmologists to explore the origins and evolution of the universe. Reaching into the depths of the past, a class of undergraduate students at the University of Chicago sought to do the same—and uncovered an extraordinarily distant galaxy in the early cosmos.
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Study highlights the role of forest fuels amid a warming climate
California's drought of 2012-2016 killed millions of trees in the Sierra Nevada—mostly by way of a bark beetle epidemic—leaving a forest canopy full of dry needles. A study published from the University of California, Davis, and the U.S. Forest Service helps answer concerns about what effect de
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Scientists are a step closer to developing 'smart' stem cells – and they're made from human fat
A new type of stem cell—that is, a cell with regenerative abilities—could be closer on the horizon, a new study led by UNSW Sydney shows.
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Why Are Lightning 'Superbolts' More Common Over the Ocean?
Salt seems to be the reason why bolts are brighter over seas than over land
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Study highlights the role of forest fuels amid a warming climate
California's drought of 2012-2016 killed millions of trees in the Sierra Nevada—mostly by way of a bark beetle epidemic—leaving a forest canopy full of dry needles. A study published from the University of California, Davis, and the U.S. Forest Service helps answer concerns about what effect de
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Scientists are a step closer to developing 'smart' stem cells – and they're made from human fat
A new type of stem cell—that is, a cell with regenerative abilities—could be closer on the horizon, a new study led by UNSW Sydney shows.
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Daily briefing: Pulsars hint at sea of gravitational waves
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00084-1 Signs of ripples from supermassive black hole mergers in galaxies across the universe. Plus, the secret forces that squeeze and pull life into shape, and the questions around COVID vaccines and transmission.
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Once you know what happens to food you leave outdoors, you'll stop doing it
This apple does not belong here. (Sabina Music Rich/Unsplash/) You're out on a hike, or maybe cruising down a country road, snacking on an apple, a banana, or a handful of nuts. When you're finished, all that's left is a core, a peel, perhaps a shell or a raisin you didn't want to eat. "It's natural," you tell yourself, tossing it into the woods or onto the side of the road. After all, food waste
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An Algorithm Is Helping a Community Detect Lead Pipes
The model had shown promise in Flint before officials rebelled. Now Toledo is using it, while incorporating more public input.
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Crime Rates Dropped in 2020—Just as They Did in 1918
An economist looks at public safety during the Covid lockdowns and also at the time of Spanish Flu.
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The World's Oldest Animal Paintings Are on This Cave Wall
Depictions of pigs found in Indonesia date back at least 45,500 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The World's Oldest Animal Paintings Are on This Cave Wall
Depictions of pigs found in Indonesia date back at least 45,500 years — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Honey detective work raises fears for bees
Pollinators risk running short of food as wildflowers disappear in a "green desert", experts warn.
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Hawaii managed COVID-19 better than any other state, but its residents are still at risk
Hawaiians largely fended off COVID-19, even before the arrival of the vaccine. But some populations remain vulnerable. (Sergeant John Schoebel/U.S. Army National Guard/) Surrounded by Pacific waters, 2,500 miles away from the continental US, Hawaii is in a unique position to weather COVID-19 . On the one hand, the state's economy has nosedived with the tourism industry, leaving many residents une
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Earth's Biodiversity Bursts Do Not Follow Expected Pattern
Life's great radiations do not always line up with mass extinctions, a new study shows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Earth's Biodiversity Bursts Do Not Follow Expected Pattern
Life's great radiations do not always line up with mass extinctions, a new study shows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Earth's Biodiversity Bursts Do Not Follow Expected Pattern
Life's great radiations do not always line up with mass extinctions, a new study shows — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Next Gen Console Games You Should Actually Care About
The Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5 have some great games coming this year—assuming schedules hold. Here's a quick rundown of some great ones.
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The 15 Best Devices From CES That You Can Buy Now
Much of the trade show's flashy tech will never hit store shelves, but here are a few gadgets that are already available.
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The Local Politics of Airbnb's Ban on DC Rentals
Residents and city officials traumatized by last week's unrest fear a repeat for Biden's inauguration.
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Ærgerlig justitsminister i samråd om ulovlig logning: Jeg ville allerhelst blive ved
Revisionen af de ulovlige, danske logningsregler udskydes for femte gang i folketinget. Justitsminister Nick Hækkerup synes det er en skam og vil gøre alt han kan for at opretholde så meget logning som overhovedet muligt.
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Det danske kvælstofdrama: »Det er jo liv og død for de her landmænd«
PLUS. Landbrug & Fødevarer mener, at Aarhus Universitets arbejde bag et nyt, lavere kvælstofmål, er fuld af fejl og usikkerheder. Men hvad er op og ned i forskningen? Ingeniøren pakker kvælstofdramaet ud.
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Health and tech groups aim to create digital Covid 'vaccination passport'
Coalition including Microsoft and Oracle says system can help people return to travel, work and education
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Scientific Collaboration in a Divided World
An initiative in Arctic bird conservation shows the value of cooperation across geographical and political boundaries — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Should We Change COVID Vaccine Doses to Reach More People? What the Data Say
Scientists are debating whether to delay, skip or halve doses. But untested tweaks could shake public confidence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Should We Change COVID Vaccine Doses to Reach More People? What the Data Say
Scientists are debating whether to delay, skip or halve doses. But untested tweaks could shake public confidence — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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For true herd immunity, we must vaccinate immigrants as a priority | Laura Spinney
The US hasn't learned from past pandemics. The health of naturalized Americans is intertwined with that of immigrants The Trump administration's colossal mismanagement of the Covid-19 pandemic isn't over, and won't be for a long time after the current president's departure. There's a sting in that administration's tail, whose poison is already spreading through the US population. It has been invi
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The Lawyers and Doctors Making America's Crisis Worse
The United States is facing both a deadly pandemic and a political crisis, and in each case, some highly trained professionals have been actively undermining the public interest. A handful of physicians, academics, and other trained experts have helped enable President Donald Trump's deadly mishandling of the COVID-19 pandemic and stoked needless fears about vaccines. Attorneys with impressive cr
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In uncertain times, certainty is over-rated and over-rewarded
We should all aim to be more like foxes and less like hedgehogs about what we don't know
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How the Low Minimum Wage Helps Rich Companies
The country's very low minimum wage comes at a high cost. And for taxpayers, it adds up to more than $100 billion a year. That number comes from a new analysis of safety-net usage by Ken Jacobs, Ian Eve Perry, and Jenifer MacGillvary of UC Berkeley's Labor Center. It identifies working families with at least one member who would get a raise if the federal minimum wage were lifted to $15 an hour,
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Find the Place You Love. Then Move There.
" How to Build a Life " is a biweekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. Several years ago, I was sitting on a flight to San Francisco, when my seatmate, a man a little older than me, struck up a conversation. Perhaps you hate it when that happens; I love it. In addition to being an extrovert, I'm a social scientist, so I'm always fascinated by what I can learn
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Don't Be Scared of Prosecuting Trump
On December 29, 1992, a grand jury delivered a 13-count felony indictment of Alabama Governor Guy Hunt. Four months later, the governor was convicted of money laundering—of looting his inaugural fund to cover a variety of personal expenses, including a marble shower —and removed from office. At the time of Hunt's conviction, former West Virginia Governor Arch Moore Jr. was rounding out a prison s
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Urinprov visar svårighetsgrad av astma
Genom att mäta biomarkörer i urinprov har forskare identifierat och verifierat vilken typ av astma en patient har. På sikt kan det leda till en mer individuell diagnos där behandlingen blir skräddarsydd och bättre anpassad till svårighetsgraden av astma. Det finns flera typer av astma och besvären kan variera mellan patienter, från lindriga till mer allvarliga. Vid misstanke om astma görs i dag e
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Past Covid-19 infection may provide 'months of immunity'
But researchers warn there is still a risk of catching and passing the virus on to others again.
7h
Australia: Spectacular 'tree of life' found in lake
An amateur photographer's aerial photos are gaining attention for this little known "natural wonder".
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Forskere måler i højden: Luftforurening fra krydstogtskibe koster leveår
PLUS. Forurening fra krydstogtskibene i København og Aarhus giver en lokal luftforurening værre end de mest trafikerede byveje.
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Serine synthesis pathway inhibition cooperates with dietary serine and glycine limitation for cancer therapy
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20223-y Dietary serine and glycine starvation has emerged as a potential therapy for cancer. Here, the authors show that inhibition of PHGDH, which mediates the first step in the serine synthesis pathway, improves the therapeutic efficacy of serine depletion diet in mouse xenograft models.
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Diabatic heating governs the seasonality of the Atlantic Niño
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20452-1 The relative roles of the ocean and atmosphere for the Atlantic Niño is poorly understood. Here, we show that its seasonality is governed by atmospheric diabatic heating that is associated with the seasonal migration of the inter-tropical convergence zone.
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Effects of plasma turbulence on the nonlinear evolution of magnetic island in tokamak
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20652-9 Magnetic reconnection and plasma turbulence occur in atmospheric and magnetized laboratory plasmas. Here the authors report evolution of magnetic islands and plasma turbulence in tokamak plasmas using high resolution 2D electron cyclotron emission diagnostics.
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A structural polymer for highly efficient all-day passive radiative cooling
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20646-7 There still remains a big challenge in fabricating highly efficient and low-cost radiative coolers for all-day and all-climates. Here, the authors report a hierarchically structured polymethyl methacrylate film with a micropore array combined with random nanopores for highly efficient day- and nighttime passi
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Two distinct catalytic pathways for GH43 xylanolytic enzymes unveiled by X-ray and QM/MM simulations
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20620-3 Family 43 glycoside hydrolases (GH43) are involved in the breakdown of hemicellulose. Functional, structural and computational characterization of a GH43 enzyme, including a snapshot of an active Michaelis complex, reveal the hydrolysis mechanism and suggest two possible reaction pathways.
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SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein vaccine candidate NVX-CoV2373 immunogenicity in baboons and protection in mice
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20653-8 Here, the authors characterize a SARS-CoV-2 subunit vaccine candidate that contains full-length spike protein stabilized in its prefusion conformation, and show immunogenicity in baboons and protection in mice with Matrix-M adjuvanted vaccine.
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Emergency deployment of direct air capture as a response to the climate crisis
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20437-0 Governments may struggle to impose costly polices on vital industries, resulting in a greater need for negative emissions. Here, the authors model a direct air capture crash deployment program, finding it can remove 2.3 GtCO2 yr–1 in 2050, 13–20 GtCO2 yr–1 in 2075, and 570–840 GtCO2 cumulative over 2025–2100.
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Identification of fidelity-governing factors in human recombinases DMC1 and RAD51 from cryo-EM structures
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20258-1 RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases catalyse high-fidelity and mismatch tolerant recombination, processes that are indispensable for the maintenance of genomic integrity. Here, the authors via cryo-EM, molecular dynamics simulation and functional analysis elucidate the structural difference between RAD51 and DMC1 wit
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Swimming With the Sharks in Facebook's World
Our columnist is searching for his own niche in a universe dominated by giants.
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Journal expresses concern over study of potential treatment for autism
A journal has issued an expression of concern for a 2014 paper on a study of a potential treatment for autism. The article, by a group in Slovakia, purported to show for the first time that the drug ubiquinol — a form of the compound coenzyme Q₁₀ — could improve the ability of children with … Continue reading
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A Big Science Publisher Is Going Open Access. But at What Cost?
At first glance, Springer Nature's new policy allowing authors to make their work freely accessible to the public might seem like a positive development. But the steep fees imposed on authors, several times what other publishers charge, will likely deepen inequality in academia and cause irreparable harm.
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Diagnosing Hirschsprung disease by detecting intestinal ganglion cells using label-free hyperspectral microscopy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-80981-7
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Tunable broadband polarization converters based on coded graphene metasurfaces
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80493-w
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The calming effect of roasted coffee aroma in patients undergoing dental procedures
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80910-0
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Reduced renal function may explain the higher prevalence of hyperuricemia in older people
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80250-z
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Action potentials induce biomagnetic fields in carnivorous Venus flytrap plants
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81114-w
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Highly sensitive determination of heavy metals in water prior to and after remediation using Citrofortunella Microcarpa
Scientific Reports, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80672-9
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Seks konsortier vil bygge Danmark næste kæmpestore havmøllepark
Energistyrelsen har prækvalificeret seks stærke konsortier og selskaber til at deltage i udbuddet af Danmarks hidtil største havmøllepark, Thor Havvindmøllepark, på minimum 800-1000 MW ud for den jyske vestkyst.
7h
Scientists discover the secret of Galápagos' rich ecosystem
New research has unlocked the mystery of how the Galápagos Islands, a rocky, volcanic outcrop, with only modest rainfall and vegetation, is able to sustain its unique wildlife habitats.
7h
Honeybees reveal how our floral landscape has changed over the last 65 years
Honeybees have been helping researchers from the National Botanic Garden of Wales track how the UK's fields, hedgerows, wild spaces and gardens have changed since the 1950s.
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A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, new research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from t
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Low cost chlorine dispensing device improves tap water safety in low-resource regions
Engineers have developed an inexpensive chlorine dispensing device that improves the safety of drinking water in remote and low resource regions at the point of collection. It requires no electricity and very little maintenance, and provides a quick and easy way to eliminate water borne pathogens.
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Smoking directly linked to a higher risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage
The relationship between smoking and risk of a serious type of bleeding stroke called subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) appeared to be linear, with risk of SAH increasing significantly among people considered heavy smokers.People with genetic variants that predisposed them to smoking behaviors have an increased risk of SAH by more than 60%.
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Acting quickly after heart attack symptoms start can be a heart saver
The degree of heart muscle damage from a heart attack is associated with how long it takes from when heart attack symptoms start to when patients receive an artery-clearing procedure called percutaneous coronary intervention, or PCI.The longer the time period before PCI, called symptom-to-balloon time, the more significant and damaging the heart attack.
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Climate change is hurting children's diets, global study finds
A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education.The 19-nation study is the largest investigation to date of the relationship between our changing climate and children's diet diversity. Of the six regions exami
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Neutrinomysterium består efter forgæves søgen efter sjældne radioaktive henfald
PLUS. Efter flere års målinger har man stort eksperiment ikke fundet den særlige form for radioaktivt henfald, der kan opstå, hvis neutrinoen er sin egen antipartikel. Men fysikerne har ikke givet op. Ny og større detektor skal fortsætte eftersøgningen.
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Scientists discover the secret of Galapagos' rich ecosystem
New research has unlocked the mystery of how the Galápagos Islands, a rocky, volcanic outcrop, with only modest rainfall and vegetation, is able to sustain its unique wildlife habitats.
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Climate change is hurting children's diets, global study finds
A first-of-its-kind, international study of 107,000 children finds that higher temperatures are an equal or even greater contributor to child malnutrition and low quality diets than the traditional culprits of poverty, inadequate sanitation, and poor education.
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A climate in crisis calls for investment in direct air capture, news research finds
There is a growing consensus among scientists as well as national and local governments representing hundreds of millions of people, that humanity faces a climate crisis that demands a crisis response. New research from the University of California San Diego explores one possible mode of response: a massively funded program to deploy direct air capture (DAC) systems that remove CO2 directly from t
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Low cost chlorine dispensing device improves tap water safety in low-resource regions
A team of researchers led by engineers at Tufts University's School of Engineering and Stanford University's Program on Water, Health and Development have developed a novel and inexpensive chlorine dispensing device that can improve the safety of drinking water in regions of the world that lack financial resources and adequate infrastructure. With no moving parts, no need for electricity, and litt
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Honeybees reveal how our floral landscape has changed over the last 65 years
Honeybee historians might seem like a flight of fancy but these tiny pollinators have been helping researchers from the National Botanic Garden of Wales track how the UK's fields, hedgerows, wild spaces and gardens have changed since the 1950s.Using cutting-edge DNA barcoding techniques, scientists at the Botanic Garden identified which plants modern-day honeybees visited most often by looking at
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UK Covid: travel bans expected amid concerns over Brazil coronavirus strain
Ministers concerned about new variant reaching UK But government delays implementation of testing at borders 9.50am GMT Good morning. The cabinet office minister, Michael Gove, will chair a meeting to discuss Covid O today, which is expected to agree a ban on direct flights between Brazil and the UK , amid concerns over the new highly transmissible coronavirus strain in the south American country
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Scientists discover the secret of Galapagos' rich ecosystem
New research has unlocked the mystery of how the Galápagos Islands, a rocky, volcanic outcrop, with only modest rainfall and vegetation, is able to sustain its unique wildlife habitats.
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Honeybees reveal how our floral landscape has changed over the last 65 years
Honeybee historians might seem like a flight of fancy but these tiny pollinators have been helping researchers from the National Botanic Garden of Wales track how the UK's fields, hedgerows, wild spaces and gardens have changed since the 1950s.Using cutting-edge DNA barcoding techniques, scientists at the Botanic Garden identified which plants modern-day honeybees visited most often by looking at
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Covid testing for people arriving in England delayed until Monday
Move comes after government decision on which tests it would accept only published on Wednesday
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Recovering from Covid gives similar level of protection to vaccine
PHE found immunity from earlier infection provided 83% protection against reinfection for at least 20 weeks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage People who recover from coronavirus have a similar level of protection against future infection as those who receive a Covid vaccine – at least for the first five months, research suggests. A Public Health England (PHE) study of
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Rekordvarma hav 2020
Ett forskarteam med 20 deltagare från 13 institutioner världen över har sammanställt data över de temperaturer som rådde i världshavens översta 2000 meter år 2020. Den här sortens mätningar har utförts sedan 1950-talet och trenden är tydlig, temperaturerna ökar. Inte alltid från år till i år men varje nytt decennium har varit varmare än det föregående. År 2019 blev ett rekordår men 2020 blev ännu
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WHO team arrives in Wuhan to probe origins of coronavirus
Virologists land in China a week later than planned after Beijing delayed approving visas
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Growing food: Call to give vegetable growers public cash
An alliance of food experts want more public funds to go towards Wales-grown produce.
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UK Covid live: almost 4.5m people waiting for operations in England after virus backlog
Latest updates: government's chief scientific adviser says UK's daily death figures likely to stay at high levels 'for some weeks' UK Covid travel testing delay 'to help out business' Recovering from Covid gives similar level of protection to vaccine Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage 10.33am GMT High street pharmacies are to begin rolling out Covid vaccines, as the vir
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Water and gender equality
New Stanford research finds installing piped water in rural Zambian homes frees up time in the daily lives of women and girls, while also promoting economic growth and food security – making an argument for piped water infrastructure investments across rural, low-income areas.
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Historic snowfall chills Madrid slum to the bones
"We're not animals but dogs live better than us," sighs Lidia Arribas, who lives without electricity in a vast slum near Madrid where temperatures hit historic lows this week.
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French court to hear landmark case on climate inaction
A Paris court will begin hearing Thursday a complaint brought by NGOs backed by two million citizens accusing the French state of failing to act to halt climate change.
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Australia to kill pigeon that crossed Pacific from Oregon
A racing pigeon has survived an extraordinary 13,000-kilometer (8,000-mile) Pacific Ocean crossing from the United States to find a new home in Australia. Now authorities consider the bird a quarantine risk and plan to kill it.
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Australia to kill pigeon that crossed Pacific from Oregon
A racing pigeon has survived an extraordinary 13,000-kilometer (8,000-mile) Pacific Ocean crossing from the United States to find a new home in Australia. Now authorities consider the bird a quarantine risk and plan to kill it.
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Covid: UK travel testing delay 'to help out business'
Rule requiring travellers to show negative test to come into force on Monday, not Friday as planned Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has suggested it is delaying the requirement for travellers to England to have a negative coronavirus test to soften the impact of the move on businesses. Late on Wednesday night, the transport secretary, Grant Shapps, sai
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Pulsed ultraviolet light technology to improve egg safety, help poultry industry
Pulsed ultraviolet light can be an effective alternative to some of the antimicrobial technologies now used by the poultry industry to kill pathogens on eggshells, according to Penn State researchers, who simulated production conditions to test the technology.
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Pulsed ultraviolet light technology to improve egg safety, help poultry industry
Pulsed ultraviolet light can be an effective alternative to some of the antimicrobial technologies now used by the poultry industry to kill pathogens on eggshells, according to Penn State researchers, who simulated production conditions to test the technology.
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Building a giant 2-D map of the universe to prepare for the largest 3-D map
Before DESI, the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, can begin its 5-year mission from an Arizona mountaintop to produce the largest 3-D sky map yet, researchers first needed an even bigger 2-D map of the universe.
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The Atlantic Daily: America's Bungled Coronavirus Response
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Impeachment STEFANI REYNOLDS / GETTY Today, Donald Trump became the first president in United States history to be impeached twice. Perhaps this time , it'll stick, our staff writer David A. Grah
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Generna spelar roll vid främre korsbandsskada
Det är sedan tidigare känt att val av skor, underlag och typ av idrott är faktorer som kan bidra när man drabbas av korsbandsskada. Nu har forskare vid Lunds universitet i en epidemiologisk studie sett att även generna spelar en betydande roll.
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Archive review – anyone for a posthuman wife? She comes with an off switch
A lonely computer scientist in the year 2038 secretly works on an android version of his wife who died in a car crash – is it romantic, or something more sinister? British illustrator and visual-effects director Gavin Rothery makes his feature debut with this artificial intelligence thriller: a tale of love, death and robotics that has some nicely creepy moments. Set in 2038, it centres on lonely
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I'm considering minoring in cogsci
I'm on the pre-health track and I'm interested in cogsci and was wondering if this subject can be beneficial to people wanting to work in healthcare field and if so how/ why? submitted by /u/alexfromsdca [link] [comments]
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Great site for learning all about glial cells, the key to human cognition.
submitted by /u/Neuronologist [link] [comments]
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European Space Agency to build module for Gateway space station
Esprit module will supply communications and refuelling to international lunar station The European Space Agency (Esa) has signed a contract to begin building the module to supply communications and refuelling for the international lunar Gateway space station. The European System Providing Refuelling, Infrastructure and Telecommunications (Esprit) will consist of two separate units. The communica
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Seks englehop og en stafet: Lars Krogh Jeppesen overraskes efter morgentræning med Hørlykke
En beæret Lars Krogh Jeppesen får nu til opgave at bringe stafetten videre.
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Bastyr University's MPH and MPH/ND programs should not be accredited
Bastyr University's application for accreditation of MPH and MPH/ND programs should be denied. Bastyr's curriculum is filled with pseudoscience and incompatible with the science of public health. Naturopathy is a poor fit for an MPH program, especially considering its opposition to immunization. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Extremely Rare Phenomenon Sees Babies Inhale Cancer Cells During Vaginal Birth
Transmitting cancer from mother to child is rare, but it does happen.
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China records first Covid death since May as WHO team arrives in Wuhan
Delegation arrives as China suffers growing outbreak of coronavirus in Hebei province Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Mainland China has reported its first Covid-19 death in eight months, as most of a team of experts from the World Health Organization landed in Wuhan to investigate the origins of the pandemic. Two members were stopped in Singapore after tests detecte
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How the brain paralyzes you while you sleep
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have discovered a group of neurons in the mouse brainstem that control muscle tone. Inhibiting these neuronal cells caused mice to move during REM sleep, reminiscent of REM sleep behavior disorders. These neurons were also responsible for episodes of cataplexy in a mouse model of narcolepsy; inhibiting them reduced the number of cataplexic bouts. These ci
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Concept for a hybrid-electric plane may reduce aviation's air pollution problem
A proposed hybrid-electric plane could "eliminate aviation's air pollution problem," say MIT engineers. Their design could reduce global nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions by 95 percent, they report in a study.
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Human-induced climate change caused the northwestern Pacific warming record in August 2020
A new study led by National Institute for Environmental Studies researchers, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters , revealed that the record-warm sea surface temperature over the northwestern Pacific in August 2020 could not be expected to occur without human-induced climate changes. Such extremely warm condition is likely to become a new normal climate in August by the mid-21st c
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SolarEV City concept: Building the next urban power and mobility systems
Cities are responsible for 60-70% of energy-related CO2 emissions. As the world is increasingly urbanized, it is crucial to identify cost-effective pathways to decarbonize. Here, we propose a "SolarEV City" concept, in which integrated systems of cities' roof-top PVs with EVs as batteries can supply affordable and dispatchable CO2-free electricity for citie's dwerllers, which can reduce CO2 emissi
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Effects of head trauma from intimate partner violence largely unrecognized
Carrie Esopenko, assistant professor at the Rutgers School of Health Professions, speaks on new international effort to understand ramifications of concussions and head and neck injuries sustained due to intimate partner violence.
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Chemotherapy with light; only one injection required
Researchers in South Korea have developed a phototherapy technology that can significantly increase efficiency while reducing the pain of chemotherapy and minimizing side effects after treatment. The research team has developed a cancer-targeted phototherapeutic agent that promises complete elimination of cancer cells without side effects. It involves only one injection and repeated phototherapy.
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Fast food restaurant proximity likely doesn't affect children's weight
A new paper in Q Open , published by Oxford University Press, finds that the availability of fast food restaurants on the route between children's houses and their schools does not affect children's weight.
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Covid-19: how and why is the virus mutating?
The new Covid variant, B117, is rapidly spreading around the UK and has been detected in many other countries. Although it is about 50% more infectious than previous variants, B117 does not seem to cause more severe disease or be immune to current vaccines. Yet it has raised concerns over how the virus may adapt to our antibodies and vaccines in the future. To explore these issues, the health edi
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Covid-19: how and why is the virus mutating?
The new Covid variant, B117, is rapidly spreading around the UK and has been detected in many other countries. Although it is about 50% more infectious than previous variants, B117 does not seem to cause more severe disease or be immune to current vaccines. Yet it has raised concerns over how the virus may adapt to our antibodies and vaccines in the future. To explore these issues, the health edit
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W.H.O. Team in Wuhan to Trace Coronavirus
Beijing has repeatedly impeded the global inquiry into the emergence of the coronavirus. Two scientists on the team remained in Singapore after testing positive for antibodies.
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Indonesia: Archaeologists find world's oldest animal cave painting
The life-sized picture of a wild pig found in a remote cave is thought to be 45,000 years old.
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'Deeply unfair': First author of newly retracted paper on weight and honesty speaks out
The first author of a highly controversial — and now retracted — paper linking body weight to integrity calls the journal's decision to pull the article "a bitter surprise" and its handling of the article after publication "deeply unfair." The article, "Dishonesty is more affected by BMI status than by short-term changes in glucose," was … Continue reading
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Why Horror Films Are More Popular Than Ever – Issue 95: Escape
2020 was a bad year for just about everything—except horror. Horror films were wildly popular on streaming platforms over the past year, and 2020 saw the horror genre take home its largest share of the box office in modern history.1 In a year where the world was stricken by real horrors, why were many people escaping to worlds full of fictional horrors? As odd as it may sound, the fact that peopl
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Dreaming Is Like Taking LSD – Issue 95: Escape
Without a doubt, the biggest questions about dreaming are all variants on this question: Why do we dream? We began studying dreaming in the early 1990s and, between the two of us, have published over 200 scientific papers on sleep and dreams. Pulling together a variety of compelling neuroscientific ideas and state-of-the-art findings in the fields of sleep and dream research, we propose a new and
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Why a Universal Society Is Unattainable – Issue 95: Escape
On Jan. 1, 2021, five long years after the vote for what's become known as Brexit, and numerous marches before and after that national decision, some of which attracted more than 100,000 impassioned participants, Great Britain formally severed its nearly half century-long ties with the European Union. The decision, as columnist Owen Jones described it in The Guardian , was to foment "an all-out c
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Early COVID-19 lockdown in Delhi had less impact on urban air quality than first believed
The first COVID-19 lockdowns led to significant changes in urban air pollution levels around the world, but the changes were smaller than expected, a new study reveals.
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COVID-19 vaccine creates incentive to improve our health
While we wait for our turn to get vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, we could — and probably should — use the time to make sure we bring our healthiest emotional and physical selves to the treatment, a new review of previous research suggests.
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College campuses are COVID-19 superspreaders, new study suggests
College campuses are at risk of becoming COVID-19 superspreaders for their entire county, according to a new vast study which shows the striking danger of the first two weeks of school in particular.
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Mothers of children with autism found to have significantly different metabolite levels
Blood sample analysis showed that, two to five years after they gave birth, mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) had several significantly different metabolite levels compared to mothers of typically developing children.
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Bali's thieving monkeys can spot high-value items to ransom
Study finds macaques go for tourists' electronics and wallets over empty bags and then maximise their profit At the Uluwatu temple in Bali, monkeys mean business. The long-tailed macaques who roam the ancient site are infamous for brazenly robbing unsuspecting tourists and clinging on to their possessions until food is offered as ransom payment. Researchers have found they are also skilled at jud
17h
Combination treatment for methamphetamine use disorder shows promise
A combination of two medications, injectable naltrexone and oral bupropion, was safe and effective in treating adults with moderate or severe methamphetamine use disorder in a double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III clinical trial. The findings suggest this combination therapy may be a promising addition to current approaches to treatment, such as cognitive behavioral therapy and contingency ma
17h
Pulsed ultraviolet light technology to improve egg safety, help poultry industry
Pulsed ultraviolet light can be an effective alternative to some of the antimicrobial technologies now used by the poultry industry to kill pathogens on eggshells, according to researchers, who simulated production conditions to test the technology.
17h
Memory may be preserved in condition with brain changes similar to Alzheimer's disease
Primary progressive aphasia is a rare neurodegenerative condition characterized by prominent language problems that worsen over time. About 40% of people with the condition have underlying Alzheimer's disease. But a new study has found that people with the condition may not develop the memory problems associated with Alzheimer's disease.
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Shedding light on the secret reproductive lives of honey bees
Research shows that there are trade-offs between sperm viability and the expression of a protein involved in the insect's immune response.
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Inferring human genomes at a fraction of the cost promises to boost biomedical research
A new method, developed offers game-changing possibilities for genetic association studies and biomedical research. For less than $1 in computational cost, GLIMPSE is able to statistically infer a complete human genome from a very small amount of data. It offers a first realistic alternative to current approaches, and so allows a wider inclusion of underrepresented populations.
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MIND and Mediterranean diets associated with later onset of Parkinson's disease
A new study suggests a strong correlation between following the MIND and Mediterranean diets and later onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). While researchers have long known of neuroprotective effects of the MIND diet for diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia, this study is the first to suggest a link between this diet and brain health for Parkinson's disease (PD).
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Tiny molecules in blood with a big impact
Scientists have discovered hundreds of previously unknown variations in genes that have a sometimes drastic impact on the concentration of small molecules in the blood.
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Resilience to climate change? octopuses adapting to higher ocean acid levels
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response.
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Taking the lab into the ocean: A fleet of robots tracks and monitors microbial communities
Researchers enabled a trio of self-driving robots to locate, follow, and sample a layer of oceanic microbes as they drifted in an open-ocean eddy north of the Hawaiian islands.
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Taking the lab into the ocean: A fleet of robots tracks and monitors microbial communities
Researchers enabled a trio of self-driving robots to locate, follow, and sample a layer of oceanic microbes as they drifted in an open-ocean eddy north of the Hawaiian islands.
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COVID reinfections are unusual — but could still help the virus to spread
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00071-6 Large study of UK health-care workers suggests that most people are immune for months after catching COVID-19 for the first time.
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Imaging technique proves effective in measuring mitochondrial dysfunction in motor neuron disease (MND)
Non-invasive imaging technique called 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy used to measure mitochondrial function in patients with motor neuron disease (MND)
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Coronavirus live news: New York pleads for more Covid vaccine as global daily deaths pass 17,000 for first time
New York Mayor warns city will fall short of its inoculation goals unless it gets more vaccine ; Portugal announces lockdown ; UK passes 100,000 deaths Coronavirus variant from UK 'must not get out of hand' warns EU US coronavirus death toll reaches new one-day high UK coronavirus deaths pass 100,000 after 1,564 reported in one day Tokyo outbreak adds to doubts over hosting Olympic Games See all
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New insights into the control of inflammation
Scientists discovered that EGR1inhibits expression of pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. The discovery expands the understanding of how macrophages are set off and deactivated in the inflammatory process, which is critical in many normal and pathological conditions.
18h
Physical weathering of rock breakdown more important than previously recognized
Anisovolumetric weathering is much more common than previously thought, and variations in this process can be explained by climate and erosion.
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Compound protects myelin, nerve fibers
A compound appears to protect nerve fibers and the fatty sheath, called myelin, that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The new research in a mouse model advances earlier work to develop the compound – known as sobetirome – that has already showed promise in stimulating the repair of myelin.
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Pivotal discovery in quantum and classical information processing
Researchers have achieved, for the first time, electronically adjustable interactions between microwaves and a phenomenon in certain magnetic materials called spin waves. This could have application in quantum and classical information processing.
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Compound from medicinal herb kills brain-eating amoebae in lab studies
Primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a deadly disease caused by the 'brain-eating amoeba' Naegleria fowleri, is becoming more common in some areas of the world, and it has no effective treatment. Now, researchers have found that a compound isolated from the leaves of a traditional medicinal plant, Inula viscosa or 'false yellowhead,' kills the amoebae by causing them to commit cell suicide i
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A niche for the eye
What if the degenerative eye conditions that lead to glaucoma, corneal dystrophy, and cataracts could be detected and treated before vision is impaired? Recent findings point to the ciliary body as a key to unlocking this possibility.
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Moderna believes it could update its coronavirus vaccine without a big new trial
Covid vaccines reprogrammed to aim at emerging new strains of the virus could reach the market quickly, without going through large clinical trials, according to officials at Moderna Therapeutics and the US government. As researchers identify mutated versions of the coronavirus that causes covid-19, there's concern that the germ could evade approved vaccines and new shots could be necessary. But
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Will delaying second doses of COVID-19 vaccines spur viral resistance?
Virologists, evolutionary biologists clash over risks
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Pivotal discovery in quantum and classical information processing
Researchers have achieved, for the first time, electronically adjustable interactions between microwaves and a phenomenon in certain magnetic materials called spin waves. This could have application in quantum and classical information processing.
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Short term low carbohydrate diet linked to remission of type 2 diabetes
Patients with type 2 diabetes who follow a strict low carbohydrate diet for six months may experience greater rates of remission compared with other recommended diets without adverse effects, suggests a study published by The BMJ today.
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Evolution: Speciation in the presence of gene flow
Spatial isolation is known to promote speciation — but researchers have now shown that, at least in yeast, the opposite is also true. New ecological variants can also evolve within thoroughly mixed populations.
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How to keep drones flying when a motor fails
Robotics researchers show how onboard cameras can be used to keep damaged quadcopters in the air and flying stably — even without GPS.
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Scientists study salmonella swimming behavior as clues to infection
Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium bacteria (S. Typhimurium) commonly cause human gastroenteritis, inflammation of the lining of the intestines. The bacteria live inside the gut and can infect the epithelial cells that line its surface. Many studies have shown that Salmonella use a 'run-and-tumble' method of short swimming periods (runs) punctuated by tumbles when they randomly change directi
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Flashing plastic ash completes recycling
A new flash graphene process, adapted to convert worthless pyrolyzed plastic ash, could be used to strengthen concrete and toughen plastics used in medicine, energy and packaging applications.
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Wetland methane cycling increased during ancient global warming event
Wetland methane cycling increased during a rapid global warming event 56 million years ago and could foreshadow changes the methane cycle will experience in the future, according to new research.
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The cancer microbiome reveals which bacteria live in tumors
Biomedical engineers have devised an algorithm to remove contaminated microbial genetic information from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). With a clearer picture of the microbiota living in various organs in both healthy and cancerous states, researchers will now be able to find new biomarkers of disease and better understand how numerous cancers affect the human body.
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Flashing plastic ash completes recycling
A new flash graphene process, adapted to convert worthless pyrolyzed plastic ash, could be used to strengthen concrete and toughen plastics used in medicine, energy and packaging applications.
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From NASA to your table: A history of food from thin air
The idea of growing food from CO 2 dates back to NASA 50 years ago. Two companies are bringing high-quality, CO 2 -derived protein to market. CO 2 -based foods provide an environmentally benign way of producing the protein we need to live. The idea of making food from little more than thin air— carbon dioxide, actually—is not a new one. NASA was tinkering with the idea in the 1960s as a means of
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Saliva could hold clues to how sick you will get from COVID-19
Compared with nasal swabs, saliva tests may better reflect infection deep in the lungs
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Trafikforsker: Efter corona kan 10-20 procent have forladt kollektiv transport for altid
PLUS. Det er ikke nyt, at passagererne vælger især bussen fra. Men epidemien kan gøre kollektiv transport til et nicheprodukt, lyder det fra DTU's Otto Anker Nielsen.
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Most House Republicans Did What the Rioters Wanted
January 6, 2021, will surely live in infamy—the day the United States Capitol was stormed by a mob, forcing legislators to evacuate in a rush and leaving five dead, including a police officer. The most dangerous part of that day for the country as a whole, however, was not what happened when the insurrectionists fought their way into the Capitol in the afternoon, but what happened just a few hour
19h
How Medieval Europe Finally Ditched Roman Numerals
The Hindu-Arabic number system we use in everyday life was truly revolutionary. Why did it take so long for the West to embrace it?
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Record Drop in US Cancer Death Rate
From 2017 to 2018, cancer deaths dropped by 2.4 percent, the largest single-year improvement recorded in 70 years of American Cancer Society annual cancer reports.
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Astrophysicist Says It's Likely We Can Travel Through Wormholes
Warp Zone Wormholes, or theoretical bridges connecting distant points in spacetime, are quickly being plucked from the realm of science fiction and brought into scientific reality . In recent years, scientists have made significant progress toward making sense of these hypothetical warp tunnels. Pointing to all that research, Liverpool John Moores University astrophysicist Andreea Font argues in
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The Big Story: America After Trump
At a live virtual event, The Atlantic 's senior editor Ronald Brownstein will talk with staff writers Clint Smith and Anne Applebaum and executive editor Adrienne LaFrance about the factors that led to last week's attack on the U.S. Capitol. They'll explore what the future holds for the outgoing president and the Republican Party, and the challenges that incoming President Joe Biden will face in
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Pulsed ultraviolet light technology to improve egg safety, help poultry industry
Pulsed ultraviolet light can be an effective alternative to some of the antimicrobial technologies now used by the poultry industry to kill pathogens on eggshells, according to Penn State researchers, who simulated production conditions to test the technology.
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Depression and stress could dampen efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines
Health behaviors and emotional stressors can alter the body's ability to develop an immune response to vaccines, including–potentially–the new COVID-19 vaccines. Simple interventions, including exercising and getting a good night's sleep in the 24 hours before vaccination, may maximize the vaccine's initial effectiveness.
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This Impeachment Is Different
Maybe the second time's the charm. This afternoon, Donald Trump, the third president in American history to be impeached, became the first to be impeached twice. The House of Representatives voted 232–197 to impeach Trump for inciting the attempted coup on January 6 and for trying to overturn Joe Biden's election as president. The matter now goes to the Senate, where a trial is unlikely before Bi
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Northern lakes at risk of losing ice cover permanently, impacting drinking water
Close to 5,700 lakes in the Northern Hemisphere may permanently lose ice cover this century, 179 of them in the next decade, at current greenhouse gas emissions, despite a possible polar vortex this year, researchers have found. Those lakes include large bays in some of the deepest of the Great Lakes, such as Lake Superior and Lake Michigan, which could permanently become ice free by 2055.
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Pollinators not getting the 'buzz' they need in news coverage
A dramatic decline in pollinating insects threatens the global food supply, yet it's getting 'vanishingly low levels of attention' in mainstream news, even compared to coverage of climate change. Researchers analyzed nearly 25 million news items from six prominent U.S. and global news sources using the university's massive Global News Index.
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Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity
People worldwide want their coffee to be both satisfying and reasonably priced. To meet these standards, roasters typically use a blend of two types of beans, arabica and robusta. But, some use more of the cheaper robusta than they acknowledge, as the bean composition is difficult to determine after roasting. Now, researchers have developed a new way to assess exactly what's in that cup of joe.
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Superheroes, foods and apps bring a modern twist to the periodic table
Many students, especially non-science majors, dread chemistry. The first lesson in an introductory chemistry course typically deals with how to interpret the periodic table of elements, but its complexity can be overwhelming to students with little or no previous exposure. Now, researchers introduce an innovative way to make learning about the elements much more approachable — by using 'pseudo' p
20h
Spilling the beans on coffee's true identity
People worldwide want their coffee to be both satisfying and reasonably priced. To meet these standards, roasters typically use a blend of two types of beans, arabica and robusta. But, some use more of the cheaper robusta than they acknowledge, as the bean composition is difficult to determine after roasting. Now, researchers have developed a new way to assess exactly what's in that cup of joe.
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Two New Coronavirus Strains Emerge in the United States
Scientists in Ohio have found two new strains of the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. The new strains, which were first identified by a team at The Ohio State University, show new mutations that appear to make them more infectious, Gizmodo reports . That means that they may spread among people more readily, raising the alarming potential for even higher numbers of new infections in the U.S. when healthcar
20h
New research reveals early warning sign for heart disease
The build-up of calcium in a major artery outside of the heart could predict future heart attack or stroke, a new Edith Cowan University led study has demonstrated.
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My 11 part-time jobs made me a better PhD student
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00089-w Waitressing, bartending and tutoring stole time from my academic studies, but I picked up transferable skills that still serve me well, says Cassie Sims.
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Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
Scientists have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa. The species, which the researchers expect is likely critically endangered, underscores the importance of sub-Saharan 'sky islands' to bat diversity.
21h
Melting icebergs key to sequence of an ice age
Scientists claim to have found the 'missing link' in the process that leads to an ice age on Earth.
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Scientists reverse deadly impacts of asthma in mice
Excess mucus in the lungs can be fatal for asthma patients, but scientists have broken up those secretions at the molecular level and reversed their often deadly impacts.
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Copper-indium oxide: A faster and cooler way to reduce our carbon footprint
Emergent e-fuel technologies often employ the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction to convert atmospheric CO2 to CO. While efficient, this reaction requires high temperatures and complex gas separation for high performance. However scientists have now demonstrated record-high CO2 conversion rates at relatively low temperatures in a modified chemical-looping version of RWGS using a novel copper-
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Bacteria carried by mosquitoes may protect them against pesticides
Mosquitoes are transmitters of several diseases and pesticides are used to control their numbers in many countries. New study finds Wolbachia – a bacteria commonly found in insects – appears to protect them against these pesticides.
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How teeth functioned and evolved in giant mega-sharks
Researchers find that the evolution of teeth in the giant prehistoric shark Megalodon and its relatives was a by-product of becoming huge, rather than an adaptation to new feeding habits.
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Stats on HIV among men who have sex with men could help resolve China's epidemic
China has been dealing with an HIV epidemic and seeing rising infections among male college students who practice sex with men. But what is driving this increase and how to put a halt to it? To find out, scientists from China have conducted a study across seven cities, focusing on recent HIV incidence and resistance to therapy among this population.
21h
Trump Opens Habitat of a Threatened Owl to Timber Harvesting
Going far beyond expectations, the Trump administration eliminated protection from more than three million acres of northern spotted owl habitat in the Pacific Northwest.
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Random People Are Lining Up to Get Vaccinated in D.C. Grocery Stores
It was anarchy at the deli counter. On Sunday afternoon in Washington, D.C.'s Shaw neighborhood, a couple dozen masked people had crowded into a corner of a Giant supermarket, where they swiveled their heads warily. As I approached them, a slightly haggard man in an orange down jacket stopped me. "Here for the extra vaccine doses?" asked the man, who was part of the group, not a Giant employee. H
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World's oldest known cave painting found in Indonesia
Picture of wild pig made at least 45,500 years ago provides earliest evidence of human settlement Archaeologists have discovered the world's oldest known cave painting: a life-sized picture of a wild pig that was made at least 45,500 years ago in Indonesia . The finding, described in the journal Science Advances on Wednesday, provides the earliest evidence of human settlement of the region. Conti
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Twitter shuts down account of Sci-Hub, the pirated-papers website
Move comes as publishers sue in India to block public access
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Virgin Orbit's First Launch of 2021 Is Imminent
The company is targeting Sunday, January 17 for sending its LauncherOne rocket to space from the belly of a 747 jet — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Age matters in identifying maltreatment in infants and young children with fractures
Among children who were not in an independently verified incident, evaluation for child abuse should be done by specialty consultation in children aged less than three-years old presenting with rib fractures and children aged less than 18-months presenting with humeral or femoral fractures.
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Inpatient mammograms can reduce disparities in breast cancer screening rates
Inpatient mammograms are a feasible approach to deliver preventive care to hospitalized women who may face significant barriers to completing the test in the outpatient setting.
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Shedding light on the secret reproductive lives of honey bees
Honey bee health has been on the decline for two decades, with U.S. and Canadian beekeepers now losing about 25 to 40% of their colonies annually. And queen bees are failing faster than they have in the past in their ability to reproduce. The reason has been a mystery, but researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of British Columbia are finding answers.
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Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
A group of scientists led by the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa. The species, which the researchers expect is likely critically endangered, underscores the importance of sub-Saharan "sky islands" to bat diversity. The species is described today in the journal A
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Pivotal discovery in quantum and classical information processing
Working with theorists in the University of Chicago's Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering, researchers in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have achieved a scientific control that is a first of its kind. They demonstrated a novel approach that allows real-time control of the interactions between microwave photons and magnons, potentially leading to advances in
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Studying chaos with one of the world's fastest cameras
There are things in life that can be predicted reasonably well. The tides rise and fall. The moon waxes and wanes. A billiard ball bounces around a table according to orderly geometry.
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Shedding light on the secret reproductive lives of honey bees
Honey bee health has been on the decline for two decades, with U.S. and Canadian beekeepers now losing about 25 to 40% of their colonies annually. And queen bees are failing faster than they have in the past in their ability to reproduce. The reason has been a mystery, but researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of British Columbia are finding answers.
21h
Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
A group of scientists led by the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa. The species, which the researchers expect is likely critically endangered, underscores the importance of sub-Saharan "sky islands" to bat diversity. The species is described today in the journal A
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Studying chaos with one of the world's fastest cameras
Ultrafast camera technology might aid in the study of unpredictable systems.
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Burst of light April 15, 2020 likely magnetar eruption in nearby galaxy
On April 15, 2020, a brief burst of high-energy light swept through the solar system, triggering instruments on many NASA spacecraft. Scientists think the blast came from a supermagnetized stellar remnant located in a neighboring galaxy.
21h
China Unveils Maglev Train that Travels at Nearly 400 MPH
Taking Off Chinese researchers have unveiled a new prototype maglev train that they say can reach speeds of nearly 400 miles per hour. The train, which was revealed on a short stretch of test track Wednesday, is meant to provide a rapid means of transit between cities that could be nearly as fast as a jet, the South China Morning Post reports . It will require a good deal of fine-tuning before it
21h
Resilience to climate change? New study finds octopuses adapting to higher ocean acid levels
With the impact of climate change increasing by the day, scientists are studying the ways in which human behavior contributes to the damage. A recent study at Walla Walla University, by a collaboration of researchers from Walla Walla University and La Sierra University, examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world
21h
A new 'e-nose' and computer vision help researchers cook the perfect chicken
Skoltech researchers have found a way to use chemical sensors and computer vision to determine when grilled chicken is cooked just right. These tools can help restaurants monitor and automate cooking processes in their kitchens, and perhaps one day even end up in your 'smart' oven. The paper detailing this research results, supported by a Russian Science Foundation grant, was published in the jour
21h
Study find physical weathering of rock breakdown more important than previously recognized
Research led by the University of Wyoming shows that physical weathering is far more important than previously recognized in the breakdown of rock in mountain landscapes. Because it is difficult to measure, physical weathering has commonly been assumed to be negligible in previous studies.
21h
Resilience to climate change? New study finds octopuses adapting to higher ocean acid levels
With the impact of climate change increasing by the day, scientists are studying the ways in which human behavior contributes to the damage. A recent study at Walla Walla University, by a collaboration of researchers from Walla Walla University and La Sierra University, examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world
21h
Shedding light on the secret reproductive lives of honey bees
Research at NC State and the University of British Columbia shows that there are trade-offs between sperm viability and the expression of a protein involved in the insect's immune response.
21h
Researchers say Europe's ban on throwing unwanted fish overboard is backfiring
Study finds increased quotas and exemptions are contributing to overfishing
21h
The Black Hole in America's COVID-19 Data
For months, public-health experts have been calling for a new line of defense against COVID-19. Antigen testing, also known as rapid testing, is cheaper and faster than standard testing, and it can happen at points of care—long-term-care facilities, prisons, schools, and doctors' offices. The technology has been around since the spring, but the real investment came in August, when the federal gov
21h
Indigenous peoples wary of UN biodiversity rescue plan
As crunch UN talks to reverse the accelerating destruction of nature loom, indigenous peoples are sounding an alarm over proposed conservation plans they say could clash with their rights.
22h
Earth to reach temperature tipping point in next 20 to 30 years, new study finds
An international team looked at 20 years of data from throughout the world and found that record-breaking temperatures are contributing to a significant decrease in plants' ability to absorb human-caused carbon emissions.
22h
Robotic swarm swims like a school of fish
Researchers have developed fish-inspired robots that can synchronize their movements like a real school of fish, without any external control. It is the first time researchers have demonstrated complex 3D collective behaviors with implicit coordination in underwater robots.
22h
Indigenous peoples wary of UN biodiversity rescue plan
As crunch UN talks to reverse the accelerating destruction of nature loom, indigenous peoples are sounding an alarm over proposed conservation plans they say could clash with their rights.
22h
China Is Using Robots to Administer COVID Tests
Residents in Shenyang, China are being tested for COVID-19 by a plastic-wrapped robotic arm, Euronews reports . The goal of the arm, which is being controlled by a health worker from the next room, is to minimize contact and reduce the risk of cross contamination between people. The disembodied arm is capable of taking a throat swab — a routine yet delicate medical procedure. The person being tes
22h
45,000-Year-Old Pig Painting in Indonesia May Be Oldest Known Animal Art
Ice Age cave painters flourished in Southeast Asia, where their work adorned rock walls
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Rising Costs of U.S. Flood Damage Linked to Climate Change
As warming temperatures intensified precipitation over the last 30 years, floods costs have risen by $2.5 billion — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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A Japanese forestry firm wants to put wooden satellites into orbit
In space, wood has advantages over artificial materials
22h
World's oldest known cave painting found in Indonesia
Archaeologists have discovered the world's oldest known cave painting: a life-sized picture of a wild pig that was made at least 45,500 years ago in Indonesia.
22h
Cafe, croissant, worms? EU agency says worms safe to eat
The vaunted Mediterranean diet and the French "bon gout" are getting some competition: The European Union's food safety agency says worms are safe to eat.
22h
Bayesian estimation of SARS-CoV-2 prevalence in Indiana by random testing [Statistics]
From 25 to 29 April 2020, the state of Indiana undertook testing of 3,658 randomly chosen state residents for the novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus, the agent causing COVID-19 disease. This was the first statewide randomized study of COVID-19 testing in the United States. Both PCR…
22h
Genomic evolution of antibiotic resistance is contingent on genetic background following a long-term experiment with Escherichia coli [Evolution]
Antibiotic resistance is a growing health concern. Efforts to control resistance would benefit from an improved ability to forecast when and how it will evolve. Epistatic interactions between mutations can promote divergent evolutionary trajectories, which complicates our ability to predict evolution. We recently showed that differences between genetic backgrounds can…
22h
Small-molecule endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis regulator acts as a broad-spectrum inhibitor of dengue and Zika virus infections [Biochemistry]
Flaviviruses, including dengue and Zika, are widespread human pathogens; however, no broadly active therapeutics exist to fight infection. Recently, remodeling of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis by pharmacologic regulators, such as compound 147, was shown to correct pathologic ER imbalances associated with protein misfolding diseases. Here, we establish an additional activity…
22h
The 3-O-sulfation of heparan sulfate modulates protein binding and lyase degradation [Chemistry]
Humans express seven heparan sulfate (HS) 3-O-sulfotransferases that differ in substrate specificity and tissue expression. Although genetic studies have indicated that 3-O-sulfated HS modulates many biological processes, ligand requirements for proteins engaging with HS modified by 3-O-sulfate (3-OS) have been difficult to determine. In particular, the context in which the…
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Physiological role of the 3'IgH CBEs super-anchor in antibody class switching [Immunology and Inflammation]
IgH class switch recombination (CSR) replaces Cμ constant region (CH) exons with one of six downstream CHs by joining transcription-targeted double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the Cμ switch (S) region to DSBs in a downstream S region. Chromatin loop extrusion underlies fundamental CSR mechanisms including 3′IgH regulatory region (3′IgHRR)-mediated S region…
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Science and Culture: At the nexus of music and medicine, some see treatments for disease [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
When physician Babar Khan started studying delirium seven years ago, he set out to find a drug that could sooth the agitation, inattention, and hallucinations that characterize the disorder. Delirium is common in the intensive care units (ICUs) where Khan works, most recently as an ICU physician at Indiana University…
22h
Cafe, croissant, worms? EU agency says worms safe to eat
The vaunted Mediterranean diet and the French "bon gout" are getting some competition: The European Union's food safety agency says worms are safe to eat.
22h
Experiments investigate time symmetry violations
Researchers report progress on synthesizing and detecting ions that are among the most sensitive measures for time symmetry violations. Every field has its underlying principles. For economics it's the rational actor; biology has the theory of evolution; modern geology rests on the bedrock of plate tectonics. Physics has conservation laws and symmetries. For instance, the law of conservation of e
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Studying chaos with one of the world's fastest cameras
Lihong Wang demonstrates how his ultrafast camera technology might aid in the study of unpredictable systems.
22h
MIND and Mediterranean diets associated with later onset of Parkinson's disease
A new study from UBC researchers suggests a strong correlation between following the MIND and Mediterranean diets and later onset of Parkinson's disease (PD). While researchers have long known of neuroprotective effects of the MIND diet for diseases like Alzheimer's and dementia, this study is the first to suggest a link between this diet and brain health for Parkinson's disease (PD).
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Tiny molecules with a big impact
In an international study, scientists from the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH) and Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin joined forces with colleagues from the United Kingdom, Australia and the United States and discovered hundreds of previously unknown variations in genes that have a sometimes drastic impact on the concentration of these small molecules in the blood. The researchers have now publ
22h
Resilience to climate change?
A recent study examined the effects of acidic water on octopuses, potentially bringing new insight into both how our activities impact the world around us, and the way that world is adapting in response.
22h
Jeffrey Luz Ishøy har droppet Facebook og Twitter til fordel for censurfri sociale medier
Udover opfordring til vold, mener Jeffrey Luz Ishøy ikke, sociale medier bør fjerne indhold, der krænker eller fornærmer andre mennesker.
22h
Chaperone-mediated autophagy sustains haematopoietic stem-cell function
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03129-z Haematopoietic stem cells show progressive functional decline with age that can be reversed by stimulation of chaperone-mediated autophagy in old mice and aged humans.
22h
Small patio sets that maximize your outdoor space
Space-conscious patio furniture. (Lindsey LaMont via Unsplash/) Outdoor spaces—we all love to have them, but they can be tough to design for, especially when they're small. Three-piece bistro sets are a great way to maximize even the smallest of balconies and porches—giving you the freedom to reclaim your outdoor space—while still looking stylish in larger settings. Enjoy a work setup with fresh
22h
Scientists discover new 'spectacular' bat from West Africa
A group of scientists led by the American Museum of Natural History and Bat Conservation International have discovered a new species of a striking orange and black bat in a mountain range in West Africa. The species, which the researchers expect is likely critically endangered, underscores the importance of sub-Saharan 'sky islands' to bat diversity. The species is described today in the journal A
22h
Nanotechnology prevents premature birth in mouse studies
In a study in mice and human cells, Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers say that they have developed a tiny, yet effective method for preventing premature birth.
22h
Pivotal discovery in quantum and classical information processing
Researchers have achieved, for the first time, electronically adjustable interactions between microwaves and a phenomenon in certain magnetic materials called spin waves. This could have application in quantum and classical information processing.
22h
In new Skoltech research, 'e-nose' and computer vision help cook the perfect chicken
Skoltech researchers have found a way to use chemical sensors and computer vision to determine when grilled chicken is cooked just right. These tools can help restaurants monitor and automate cooking processes in their kitchens, and perhaps one day even end up in your 'smart' oven.
22h
COVID-19 vaccine creates incentive to improve our health
While we wait for our turn to get vaccinated against SARS-CoV-2, we could – and probably should – use the time to make sure we bring our healthiest emotional and physical selves to the treatment, a new review of previous research suggests.
22h
New insights into the control of inflammation
Wistar scientists discovered that EGR1inhibits expression of pro-inflammatory genes in macrophages. The discovery expands the understanding of how macrophages are set off and deactivated in the inflammatory process, which is critical in many normal and pathological conditions.
22h
Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances , engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse feta
22h
Robotic swarm swims like a school of fish
A team of Harvard researchers have developed fish-inspired robots that can synchronize their movements like a real school of fish, without any external control. It is the first time researchers have demonstrated complex 3D collective behaviors with implicit coordination in underwater robots.
22h
'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominates ocean economy
Most of the revenues extracted from use of the world's oceans is concentrated among 100 transnational corporations. Dubbed the "Ocean 100" by researchers at Duke University and Stockholm University, these "blue economy" companies collectively generated $1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to research published Wednesday in the journal Science Advances. If the group were a country, it would
22h
Scientists modeled protein behavior of archaeal viruses to crack protein folding mystery
Scientists from the Pacific Quantum Center of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) figured out how the AFV3-109 protein with slipknot structure folds and unfolds depending on temperature. The protein is typical for the viruses of the oldest single-celled organisms that can survive in the extreme conditions of underwater volcanic sources – archaea. The research outcome appears in PLOS ONE.
22h
How does your computer smell?
A keen sense of smell is a powerful ability shared by many organisms. However, it has proven difficult to replicate by artificial means. Researchers combined biological and engineered elements to create what is known as a biohybrid component. Their volatile organic compound sensor can effectively detect odors in gaseous form. They hope to refine the concept for use in medical diagnosis and the det
22h
Earth's terrestrial ecosystems may transition from carbon sinks to carbon sources within decades
Rising temperatures could trigger Earth's terrestrial ecosystems to transition from carbon sinks to carbon sources in the next 20 to 30 years, according to data from the world's largest continuous carbon monitoring network. The researchers suggest that up to half of land ecosystems could reach this tipping point – when plants begin to release carbon into the atmosphere.
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Taking the lab into the ocean: A fleet of robots tracks and monitors microbial communities
A new paper describes how researchers at MBARI, the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa (UH Mānoa), and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, enabled a trio of self-driving robots to locate, follow, and sample a layer of oceanic microbes as they drifted in an open-ocean eddy north of the Hawaiian islands.
22h
Earth to reach temperature tipping point in next 20 to 30 years, new NAU study finds
Postdoc Katharyn Duffy led an international team that looked at 20 years of data from throughout the world and found that record-breaking temperatures are contributing to a significant decrease in plants' ability to absorb human-caused carbon emissions.
22h
Wielding a laser beam deep inside the body
Robotic engineers led by Wyss Associate Faculty member Robert Wood, Ph.D., and postdoctoral fellow Peter York, Ph.D., at Harvard University's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School for Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) have developed a laser-steering microrobot in a miniaturized 6×16 millimeter package that operates with high speed and precision, and c
22h
'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominate ocean economy
Dubbed the 'Ocean 100', the group of companies generated US$1.1 trillion in revenues in 2018, according to the research published in the journal Science Advances.
22h
Early COVID-19 lockdowns had less impact on urban air quality than first believed
The first COVID-19 lockdowns led to significant changes in urban air pollution levels around the world, but the changes were smaller than expected – a new study reveals.
22h
Stylish and sophisticated scarves that everyone will love
Total comfort gifts. (Karen Cantú Q via Unsplash/) When it comes to accessories, scarves are an extremely practical and versatile item. There are so many reasons to grab a scarf, from protection from the elements to a simple style accent. With endless sizes, colors, and fabrics available it's easy to find giftable options for any of your friends or family members. Scarves also don't take up much
22h
I Asked My Colleagues to Wear Masks. They Laughed.
As a pro-Trump mob stormed the Capitol on January 6, security guards hustled representatives into a secure location. Representative Lisa Blunt Rochester, Delaware's sole member of the House, tried to convince several of her Republican colleagues to put on masks. They refused, and laughed at her—behavior that was captured in a viral video . In the days since, House Democrats Pramila Jayapal, Brad
22h
How close are we to the temperature tipping point of the terrestrial biosphere?
The temperature dependence of global photosynthesis and respiration determine land carbon sink strength. While the land sink currently mitigates ~30% of anthropogenic carbon emissions, it is unclear whether this ecosystem service will persist and, more specifically, what hard temperature limits, if any, regulate carbon uptake. Here, we use the largest continuous carbon flux monitoring network to
23h
EGR1 is a gatekeeper of inflammatory enhancers in human macrophages
Monocytes and monocyte-derived macrophages originate through a multistep differentiation process. First, hematopoietic stem cells generate lineage-restricted progenitors that eventually develop into peripheral, postmitotic monocytes. Second, blood-circulating monocytes undergo differentiation into macrophages, which are specialized phagocytic cells capable of tissue infiltration. While monocytes
23h
Ionizable lipid nanoparticles for in utero mRNA delivery
Clinical advances enable the prenatal diagnosis of genetic diseases that are candidates for gene and enzyme therapies such as messenger RNA (mRNA)–mediated protein replacement. Prenatal mRNA therapies can treat disease before the onset of irreversible pathology with high therapeutic efficacy and safety due to the small fetal size, immature immune system, and abundance of progenitor cells. However
23h
Exceptions to bed-controlled ice sheet flow and retreat from glaciated continental margins worldwide
Projections of ice sheet behavior hinge on how ice flow velocity evolves and the extent to which marine-based grounding lines are stable. Ice flow and grounding line retreat are variably governed by the coupling between the ice and underlying terrain. We ask to what degree catchment-scale bed characteristics determine ice flow and retreat, drawing on paleo-ice sheet landform imprints from 99 site
23h
Substrate-specific recognition of IKKs mediated by USP16 facilitates autoimmune inflammation
The classic NF-B pathway plays crucial roles in various immune responses and inflammatory diseases. Its key kinase, IKKβ, participates in a variety of pathological and physiological processes by selectively recognizing its downstream substrates, including p105, p65, and IBα, but the specific mechanisms of these substrates are unclear. Hyperactivation of one of the substrates, p105, is closely rel
23h
Nonresonant powering of injectable nanoelectrodes enables wireless deep brain stimulation in freely moving mice
Devices that electrically modulate the deep brain have enabled important breakthroughs in the management of neurological and psychiatric disorders. Such devices are typically centimeter-scale, requiring surgical implantation and wired-in powering, which increases the risk of hemorrhage, infection, and damage during daily activity. Using smaller, remotely powered materials could lead to less invas
23h
The Ocean 100: Transnational corporations in the ocean economy
The ocean economy is growing as commercial use of the ocean accelerates, while progress toward achieving international goals for ocean conservation and sustainability is lagging. In this context, the private sector is increasingly recognized as having the capacity to hamper efforts to achieve aspirations of sustainable ocean-based development or alternatively to bend current trajectories of ocean
23h
Real-time observation and control of optical chaos
Optical chaotic system is a central research topic due to its scientific importance and practical relevance in key photonic applications such as laser optics and optical communication. Because of the ultrafast propagation of light, all previous studies on optical chaos are based on either static imaging or spectral measurement, which shows only time-averaged phenomena. The ability to reveal real-
23h
Induction of muscle-regenerative multipotent stem cells from human adipocytes by PDGF-AB and 5-azacytidine
Terminally differentiated murine osteocytes and adipocytes can be reprogrammed using platelet-derived growth factor–AB and 5-azacytidine into multipotent stem cells with stromal cell characteristics. We have now optimized culture conditions to reprogram human adipocytes into induced multipotent stem (iMS) cells and characterized their molecular and functional properties. Although the basal transc
23h
Highly sensitive VOC detectors using insect olfactory receptors reconstituted into lipid bilayers
This paper reports a volatile organic compound (VOC) sensor based on olfactory receptors that were reconstituted into a lipid bilayer and used in a specifically designed gas flow system for rapid parts per billion (ppb)–level detection. This VOC sensor achieves both rapid detection and high detection probability because of its gas flow system and array design. Specifically, the gas flow system in
23h
O-GlcNAcylation ameliorates the pathological manifestations of Alzheimers disease by inhibiting necroptosis
O -GlcNAcylation ( O -linked β- N -acetylglucosaminylation) is notably decreased in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Necroptosis is activated in AD brain and is positively correlated with neuroinflammation and tau pathology. However, the links among altered O -GlcNAcylation, β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation, and necroptosis are unclear. Here, we found that O -GlcNAcylation plays a protective role in AD
23h
TRAF6-IRF5 kinetics, TRIF, and biophysical factors drive synergistic innate responses to particle-mediated MPLA-CpG co-presentation
Innate immune responses to pathogens are driven by co-presentation of multiple pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Combinations of PAMPs can trigger synergistic immune responses, but the underlying molecular mechanisms of synergy are poorly understood. Here, we used synthetic particulate carriers co-loaded with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) and CpG as pathogen-like particles (PLPs) to
23h
Oldest cave art found in Sulawesi
Indonesia harbors some of the oldest known surviving cave art. Previously, the earliest dated rock art from this region was a figurative painting of a Sulawesi warty pig ( Sus celebensis ). This image from Leang Bulu' Sipong 4 in the limestone karsts of Maros-Pangkep, South Sulawesi, was created at least 43,900 years ago (43.9 ka) based on Uranium-series dating. Here, we report the Uranium-series
23h
The Arp1/11 minifilament of dynactin primes the endosomal Arp2/3 complex
Dendritic actin networks develop from a first actin filament through branching by the Arp2/3 complex. At the surface of endosomes, the WASH complex activates the Arp2/3 complex and interacts with the capping protein for unclear reasons. Here, we show that the WASH complex interacts with dynactin and uncaps it through its FAM21 subunit. In vitro, the uncapped Arp1/11 minifilament elongates an acti
23h
Abrupt but smaller than expected changes in surface air quality attributable to COVID-19 lockdowns
The COVID-19 lockdowns led to major reductions in air pollutant emissions. Here, we quantitatively evaluate changes in ambient NO 2 , O 3 , and PM 2.5 concentrations arising from these emission changes in 11 cities globally by applying a deweathering machine learning technique. Sudden decreases in deweathered NO 2 concentrations and increases in O 3 were observed in almost all cities. However, th
23h
CGG repeat RNA G-quadruplexes interact with FMRpolyG to cause neuronal dysfunction in fragile X-related tremor/ataxia syndrome
Fragile X-related tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by CGG triplet repeat expansions in FMR1 , which elicit repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation and produce the toxic protein FMRpolyG. We show that FMRpolyG interacts with pathogenic CGG repeat-derived RNA G-quadruplexes (CGG-G4RNA), propagates cell to cell, and induces neuronal dysfunction. The FMRpolyG p
23h
Optical selection and sorting of nanoparticles according to quantum mechanical properties
Optical trapping and manipulation have been widely applied to biological systems, and their cutting-edge techniques are creating current trends in nanomaterial sciences. The resonant absorption of materials induces not only the energy transfer from photons to quantum mechanical motion of electrons but also the momentum transfer between them, resulting in dissipative optical forces that drive the
23h
How volatile components catalyze vapor nucleation
Gas phase nucleation is a ubiquitous phenomenon in planetary atmospheres and technical processes, yet our understanding of it is far from complete. In particular, the enhancement of nucleation by the addition of a more volatile, weakly interacting gaseous species to a nucleating vapor has escaped molecular-level experimental investigation. Here, we use a specially designed experiment to directly
23h
Spin-orbit coupling suppression and singlet-state blocking of spin-triplet Cooper pairs
An inhomogeneous magnetic exchange field at a superconductor/ferromagnet interface converts spin-singlet Cooper pairs to a spin-polarized triplet state. Although the decay envelope of triplet pairs within ferromagnetic materials is well studied, little is known about their decay in nonmagnetic metals and superconductors and, in particular, in the presence of spin-orbit coupling (SOC). Here, we in
23h
CMOS-compatible ferroelectric NAND flash memory for high-density, low-power, and high-speed three-dimensional memory
Ferroelectric memory has been substantially researched for several decades as its potential to obtain higher speed, lower power consumption, and longer endurance compared to conventional flash memory. Despite great deal of effort to develop ferroelectric memory based on perovskite oxides on Si, formation of unwanted interfacial layer substantially compromises the performance of the ferroelectric
23h
Structures of Rhodopseudomonas palustris RC-LH1 complexes with open or closed quinone channels
The reaction-center light-harvesting complex 1 (RC-LH1) is the core photosynthetic component in purple phototrophic bacteria. We present two cryo–electron microscopy structures of RC-LH1 complexes from Rhodopseudomonas palustris . A 2.65-Å resolution structure of the RC-LH1 14 -W complex consists of an open 14-subunit LH1 ring surrounding the RC interrupted by protein-W, whereas the complex witho
23h
Multilayered electronic transfer tattoo that can enable the crease amplification effect
Electronic tattoos have great potential in health and movement sensing applications on the skin. However, existing electronic tattoos cannot be conformal, sticky, and multilayered at the same time. Here, we have achieved multilayered integration of the electronic tattoo that is highly stretchable (800%), conformal, and sticky. This electronic tattoo can enable the crease amplification effect, whi
23h
Cell cycle inertia underlies a bifurcation in cell fates after DNA damage
The G 1 -S checkpoint is thought to prevent cells with damaged DNA from entering S phase and replicating their DNA and efficiently arrests cells at the G 1 -S transition. Here, using time-lapse imaging and single-cell tracking, we instead find that DNA damage leads to highly variable and divergent fate outcomes. Contrary to the textbook model that cells arrest at the G 1 -S transition, cells trig
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Rare quadruple-helix DNA found in living human cells with glowing probes
New probes allow scientists to see four-stranded DNA interacting with molecules inside living human cells, unravelling its role in cellular processes.
23h
Scientists find antibody that blocks dengue virus
A research team confirm an effective antibody that prevents the dengue virus from infecting cells in mice, and may lead to treatments for this and similar diseases.
23h
A fly's eye view of evolution
The fascinating compound eyes of insects consist of hundreds of individual eyes known as 'facets'. In the course of evolution, an enormous variety of sizes and shapes has emerged, often adaptations to different environmental conditions. Scientists have now shown that these differences can be caused by very different changes in the genome of fruit flies.
23h
Limits of atomic nuclei predicted
Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. Scientists report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large region of the chart of nuclides based on the theory of the strong interaction.
23h
Pig Painting May Be World's Oldest Cave Art Yet, Archaeologists Say
The depiction of the animal on an Indonesian island is at least 45,500 years old, the researchers say.
23h
New Bat Species With Orangutan Hue Discovered in West Africa
Scientists hope the rare discovery could be a catalyst for conserving the region's biodiversity.
23h
These Adorable Fish Robots Form Schools Like the Real Thing
Meet Bluebot, a friendly swimming robot with big camera eyes. Put a few in a tank together and they'll collaborate to complete surprisingly complex tasks.
23h
The Future of Phone Design: Flexible Screens That Roll Up
At CES 2021, two companies showed off concepts for a rollable phone. This year, expect this new category of devices to greatly expand.
23h
Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal
23h
Scientists model protein behavior of archaeal viruses to crack protein folding mystery
Scientists from the Pacific Quantum Center of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) report that the slipknot-structure AFV3-109 protein folds and unfolds depending on temperature. The protein is typical for the archaea, viruses of the oldest single-celled organisms that can survive in the extreme conditions of underwater volcanic sources. The research appears in PLOS ONE.
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Earth to reach temperature tipping point in next 20 to 30 years, new study finds
Earth's ability to absorb nearly a third of human-caused carbon emissions through plants could be halved within the next two decades at the current rate of warming, according to a new study in Science Advances by researchers at Northern Arizona University, the Woodwell Climate Research Center and the University of Waikato, New Zealand. Using more than two decades of data from measurement towers in
23h
Early COVID-19 lockdowns had less impact on urban air quality than first believed
The first COVID-19 lockdowns led to significant changes in urban air pollution levels around the world, but the changes were smaller than expected—a new study reveals.
23h
'Ocean 100': Small group of companies dominates ocean economy
Most of the revenues extracted from use of the world's oceans is concentrated among 100 transnational corporations, which have been identified for the first time by researchers at Duke University and the Stockholm Resilience Centre at Stockholm University.
23h
This Innovative Sparkling Water Combines CBD With Real Fruit Flavor
Over the past few years, the health and lifestyle benefits of CBD have become more widely known. And during that same time, the options for taking CBD have also multiplied. So if you've been looking for a way to give CBD a try for yourself, the folks at Wyld have created a tasty, healthy line of sparkling waters infused with real fruit and broad spectrum hemp extract. Wyld CBD sparkling waters ar
23h
Scientists model protein behavior of archaeal viruses to crack protein folding mystery
Scientists from the Pacific Quantum Center of Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) report that the slipknot-structure AFV3-109 protein folds and unfolds depending on temperature. The protein is typical for the archaea, viruses of the oldest single-celled organisms that can survive in the extreme conditions of underwater volcanic sources. The research appears in PLOS ONE.
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US researchers say they have found new coronavirus variants
Early results from scientists in Ohio raise concerns about rapid mutations
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Scientists Warn of "Ghastly Future" for Global Environment
Doomsday Report A prominent team of scientists has a dire warning for the planet and everyone on it: Unless humanity takes urgent action against climate change, we can look forward to a "ghastly future" of mass extinction, unthinkable death tolls, and horrifying conflict. Of course, experts have been warning for years that climate change is driving species extinct , forcing people out of their ho
23h
The Guardian view on lockdown law: democracy must keep up | Editorial
The prime minister is getting too comfortable with a pandemic regime that allows him to escape scrutiny and accountability Even in the most extreme emergency, the prime minister does not have the power to make law by himself, live on television. The pandemic has sometimes created the impression that something along those lines is happening when Boris Johnson announces new lockdown rules, but his
23h
Welcome to 'Hail Alley,' a U.S. Region Prone to Pelting Ice
A few unfortunate factors make some western states more susceptible to strong, damaging storms. Researchers are collecting data to better predict when hail will fall.
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Don't blame the public for surge in Covid cases | Letters
Shannon Turner feels the stay at home message is unclear when so many shops remain open, while Eric Thomas says the government must not use the public as a scapegoat for soaring Covid cases. Plus letters from Dr Stephen Battersby and Dr Michael Quigley Perhaps if there were fewer shops open, the stay at home message might be more effective ( Police in England say they won't enforce masks in super
23h
Study suggests compound protects myelin, nerve fibers
A compound developed at Oregon Health & Science University appears to protect nerve fibers and the fatty sheath, called myelin, that covers nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. The new research in a mouse model advances earlier work to develop the compound – known as sobetirome – that has already showed promise in stimulating the repair of myelin.
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Study find physical weathering of rock breakdown more important than previously recognized
Anisovolumetric weathering is much more common than previously thought, and variations in this process can be explained by climate and erosion.
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Impeaching Trump Was an Act of Self-Defense
Updated at 4:35 p.m. ET on January 13, 2021 R epresentative Jan Schakowsky of Illinois, a 12-term veteran of Congress, was holed up in her office when the mob arrived. Thousands of MAGA diehards had followed President Donald Trump's call to march to the Capitol to protest the certification of the Electoral College vote. "It was like a declaration of war against the United States, issued by the pr
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Team links screen time and pandemic mental health risks at college
A new study of students at seven public universities in the United States pinpoints risk factors that may place students at higher risk for negative psychological effects related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Factors associated with greater risk of negative impacts include the amount of time students spend on screens each day, their gender, age, and other characteristics, the researchers report. "We
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It takes a lot of brain 'real estate' to disagree
Researchers have created a way to look into the brains of two people simultaneously while they're talking. What they found will not surprise anyone who has found themselves arguing about politics or social issues. When two people agree, their brains exhibit a calm synchronicity of activity focused on sensory areas of the brain. When they disagree, however, many other regions of the brain involved
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Publisher Correction: Impacts of speciation and extinction measured by an evolutionary decay clock
Nature, Published online: 13 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03178-4
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Mothers of children with Autism found to have significantly different metabolite levels
Blood sample analysis showed that, two to five years after they gave birth, mothers of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) had several significantly different metabolite levels compared to mothers of typically developing children. That's according to new research recently published in BMC Pediatrics by a multidisciplinary team from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Arizona State Universit
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Density of marijuana retailers linked to higher use among young adults
Researchers have begun to examine how the number of marijuana outlets influence use of the drug, but most of the work thus far has examined medical marijuana dispensaries prior to the opening of recreational retail outlets. The first study to look at both licensed and unlicensed recreational marijuana retailers finds that their density is associated with more use and a greater intensity of use amo
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OR Medicaid expansion helped more women access insurance coverage for abortion services
A recent study from Oregon State University found that after Oregon expanded Medicaid in 2014, more women were able to receive insurance coverage for abortion services, rather than paying out of pocket.
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Scientists confirm quantum response to magnetism in cells
Scientists suspect quantum effects are behind animals' ability to perform geomagnetic navigation. Geomagnetic navigation is believed to be light-based. Researchers watch as magnet-induced quantum changes affect cells' luminescence. We know at this point that there are species that can navigate using the Earth's magnetic field. Birds use this ability in their long-distance migrations, and the list
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