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City of Compton CA Introduces Two-Year Universal Basic Income Pilot
submitted by /u/davidwholt [link] [comments]
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Can Chanting OM Reduce Stress and Anxiety?
OM, the word spoken in meditation and yoga practices, has existed for nearly 5,000 years. Can chanting this small word really provide a multitude of health benefits?
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Biden to Elevate Science Adviser to His Cabinet
The president-elect will nominate Eric S. Lander to head the Office of Science and Technology Policy, a post left vacant by President Trump for 18 months.
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The COVID-19 pandemic in brazil has overwhelmed its health systems
An analysis of the first 250,000 patients admitted to hospital with coronavirus reveals a high mortality and inequities in the quality of healthcare across regions
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Technique Talk: Troubleshooting Quantitative PCR (qPCR)
In this workshop, you will learn about the critical factors that ensure qPCR accuracy and success.
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Biden proposes a science-led New Deal to end pandemic suffering
President-elect outlines massive investment in public health workers and more to speed COVID-19 vaccinations and therapies
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What you need to know about Biden's 5-point COVID-19 relief plan
President-elect Biden has a long, challenging road ahead of him. (US Dept of Defense /) President-elect Joe Biden announced the key parts of his COVID-19 relief plan this week, bringing some much-needed reassurance and guidance to America in the midst of a bungled vaccine rollout. The goal is bold: 100 million shots given out in his administration's first 100 days in office. Biden acknowledged in
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Small Study Links Biomarkers in Sperm to Child's Autism Status With 90% Accuracy
It's preliminary research, but there are some interesting associations here.
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Can Animals Be Right- or Left-Pawed?
Many creatures favor one side of the body over another, just as humans do. Scientists are interested in learning what makes animals right or left-pawed, so to speak, because it offer fascinating insights into evolution and brain development.
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Rapid blood test identifies COVID-19 patients at high risk of severe disease
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that a relatively simple and rapid blood test can predict which patients with COVID-19 are at highest risk of severe complications or death. The blood test measures levels of mitochondrial DNA, which normally resides inside the energy factories of cells. Mitochondrial DNA spilling out of cells and into the bloodstream i
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New study connects religiosity in US South Asians to cardiovascular disease
The Study on Stress, Spirituality and Health (SSSH), a cutting-edge proteomics analysis, suggests that religious beliefs modulate protein expression associated with cardiovascular disease in South Asians in the United States.
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New coronavirus variants could cause more reinfections, require updated vaccines
Scientists worry mutations found in Brazil and South Africa could help SARS-CoV-2 evade human antibodies
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Hong Kong diary: locked down in luxury
The city's quarantine restrictions, among the strictest in the world, come at a high price
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Scientists offer road map to improve environmental observations in the Indian Ocean
A group of more than 60 scientists have provided recommendations to improve the Indian Ocean Observing System (IndOOS), a basin-wide monitoring system to better understand the impacts of human-caused climate change in a region that has been warming faster than any other ocean.
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Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
A conservationist has discovered that the glass frog Sachatamia orejuela can be added to the list of species that make use of visual cues in response to their acoustic environments. This is the first time a member of the glass frog family (Centrolenidae) has been observed using visual communication in this manner.
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Hard to crack research reveals how crop roots penetrate hard soils
Scientists have discovered a signal that causes roots to stop growing in hard soils which can be 'switched off' to allow them to punch through compacted soil — a discovery that could help plants to grow in even the most damaged soils.
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Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mut
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Not as simple as thought: How bacteria form membrane vesicles
Researchers have identified a novel mechanism by which bacteria form membrane vesicles, which bacteria employ to communicate with each other or to defend themselves against antibiotics. By studying mycolic acid-containing bacteria (MCB), which also includes tuberculosis-causing bacteria, the researchers demonstrated that environmental stimuli dictate the route by which the MCB form membrane vesicl
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Overactive food quality control system triggers food allergies, scientists say
In a new paper, immunobiologists propose an expanded explanation for the rise of food allergies — the exaggerated activation of our food quality control system, a complex and highly evolved program designed to protect us against eating harmful foods.
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Russia Complains That Assassins Are Getting Paid in Cryptocurrencies
Crypto Hitties According to Russian state-owned news agency TASS , hired assassins are taking cryptocurrencies as payment for their crimes. "We are investigating cases of professional perpetrators who are specialists in the IT sphere and feel confident in the cyber environment, who meticulously plan crimes and use the whole possible range of means to maintain their anonymity and be left unpunishe
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USask study finds COVID isolation worsens student diets, inactivity, and alcohol intake
A University of Saskatchewan study has found that the COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant worsening of already poor dietary habits, low activity levels, sedentary behaviour, and high alcohol consumption among university students.
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Scientists offer road map to improve environmental observations in the Indian Ocean
A group of more than 60 scientists have provided recommendations to improve the Indian Ocean Observing System (IndOOS), a basin-wide monitoring system to better understand the impacts of human-caused climate change in a region that has been warming faster than any other ocean.
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Coronavirus live news: global death toll passes milestone as Emirates cancels Australian flights
Global coronavirus death toll reaches 2 million people ; UK shuts travel corridors and requires negative Covid tests to enter ; German vaccine officials forced to guess who is eligible from names Brazil rushes to save premature babies as Covid swamps hospitals Vaccine passports: what are they and do they pose a danger to privacy? US suffers bleak January as Covid rages and vaccination campaign fa
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Spreading the sound
Scientists are studying the motion of sound waves in glassy materials using a new theoretical model and find that they can diffuse like fluids, which may lead to the design of more resilient touchscreens.
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Could altering mealtimes prevent development of Type 2 diabetes?
An innovative new study is set to examine if changing our mealtimes to earlier or later in the day could reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.
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An unexpected, and novel, target for prostate cancer: Our biological clock
Researchers find that CRY-1, a regulator of circadian rhythms, promotes tumor progression by altering DNA repair.
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Even skin shielded from the sun accumulates genomic DNA changes from UV light
For the first time, scientists have measured the different types of genomic DNA changes that occur in skin cells, finding that mutations from ultraviolet (UV) light is especially common, but Black individuals have lower levels of UV damage compared to white people.
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Apple's upcoming MacBook Pros could bring back MagSafe, ditch the Touch Bar
The next MacBook Pros could bring back some sorely missed features. (John Tekeridis via Pexels/) The 2021 Consumer Electronics Show just finished up, which means there are plenty of new gadgets to gawk at. But, true technology dorks are never satisfied with what we know now, so we're always looking toward the next bit of shiny gear coming down the line. That's part of what makes rumors so intrigu
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Report: Trump Admin's Promised COVID Vaccine Reserve Doesn't Exist
A reserve of coronavirus vaccines that the Trump administration promised to release doesn't actually exist, The Washington Post reports . Earlier this week, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar promised that the federal government would start distributing a stockpile of vaccines reserved for a second dose. But according to state and federal officials, there's no evidence they had a
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Scientists offer road map to improve environmental observations in the Indian Ocean
A group of more than 60 scientists have provided recommendations to improve the Indian Ocean Observing System (IndOOS), a basin-wide monitoring system to better understand the impacts of human.
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Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times
In groundbreaking materials research, a team led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows—transparency and conductivity.
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School risk calculations scrambled by fast-spreading virus strains
The Netherlands saw rapid spread through a school and into the community
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Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times
In groundbreaking materials research, a team has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows — transparency and conductivity.
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SARS-CoV-2 antibody test helps select donor blood samples for therapeutic use
Researchers have developed and applied a robust, versatile antibody test to assist health authorities in managing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, according to a new study.
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Q&A: Global Insect Declines Due to "Death by a Thousand Cuts"
University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner speaks with The Scientist about his biggest concerns for global insect populations and recommendations for actions to help save these tiny but important creatures.
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Biden appoints geneticist Eric Lander as science adviser
Post will also be elevated to Cabinet level
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Distant Neutron Stars May Offer Clue About the Truth of Dark Matter
According to a new study by a team of theoretical physicists, high-energy X-ray emissions emanating from a group of neutron stars may be caused by axions, a hypothetical elementary particle that's currently one of the top candidates for dark matter. The team, led by Berkeley Lab Physics Division theoretical physicist Benjamin Safdi, found that a number of neutron stars known as the "Magnificent S
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Pramila Jayapal Is 'Next-Level' Angry
I t still hurts to swallow or drink. Water tastes off. She can't sleep. She buried herself under blankets all weekend, but she couldn't stay warm. Then came the pounding headache, the blocked sinuses. So far, she's spent more than a week in self-isolation, toggling between British TV dramas and news reports about the rioters who wanted to assassinate her colleagues in Congress. Her husband's symp
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Conductive nature in crystal structures revealed at magnification of 10 million times
In groundbreaking materials research, a team led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows–transparency and conductivity.
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T cells linked to myelin implicated in MS-like disease in monkeys
Scientists have uncovered new clues implicating a type of herpes virus as the cause of a central nervous system disease in monkeys that's similar to multiple sclerosis in people. By linking two specific T cells to the loss of myelin, scientists say the new study opens the possibility of developing an antiviral therapy that could be especially useful for newly diagnosed cases of multiple sclerosis.
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Put on a happy face? "Deep acting" associated with improved work life
Deep acting is the work strategy of regulating your emotions to match a desired state. New research suggests that deep acting reduces fatigue, improves trust, and advances goal progress over other regulation strategies. Further research suggests learning to attune our emotions for deep acting is a beneficial work-life strategy. In the film adaptation of " Bye Bye Birdie" (1963), Dick Van Dyke sin
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CDC warns Covid-19 variant could dominate US by March
Health officials urge more precautions to curb spread as Biden lays out plans for vaccine push
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COVID-19 deaths really are different. But best practices for ICU care should still apply
COVID-19 deaths are indeed different from other lung failure deaths, according to two recent studies, with 56% of COVID-19 patients dying primarily from the lung damage caused by the virus, compared with 22% of those whose lungs fail due to other causes. But, the researchers conclude, the kind of care needed to help sustain people through the worst cases of all forms of lung failure is highly simi
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45% of adults over 65 lack online medical accounts, which could affect COVID vaccination
As the vaccination of older adults against COVID-19 begins across the country, new poll data suggests that many of them don't yet have access to the 'patient portal' online systems that could make it much easier for them to schedule a vaccination appointment. The poll finds that 45% of adults aged 65 to 80, and 42% of adults aged 50 to 80, said they hadn't set up an account with their health provi
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The Atlantic Hires Candace Montgomery as SVP and General Manager of AtlanticLIVE
The Atlantic has hired Candace Montgomery to help lead events as senior vice president and general manager of AtlanticLIVE . Montgomery joins The Atlantic from Essence, where she oversaw all events, including the strategic standup of the Essence Festival of Culture. The Atlantic is also releasing a first look at its early 2021 events lineup, including a new spring tentpole event focused on the pu
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Don't Despair: Research Shows Small Changes Really Can Lead to Big Climate Shifts
We've already hit several positive tipping points.
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Tool to distribute limited vaccines equitably
Researchers have developed a tool that incorporates a person's age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs.
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Researchers rewind the clock to calculate age and site of supernova blast
Astronomers are winding back the clock on the expanding remains of a nearby, exploded star. By using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, they retraced the speedy shrapnel from the blast to calculate a more accurate estimate of the location and time of the stellar detonation.
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Coronavirus News Roundup: January 9-January 15
Here are pandemic highlights for the week — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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OCT4 induces embryonic pluripotency via STAT3 signaling and metabolic mechanisms [Developmental Biology]
OCT4 is a fundamental component of the molecular circuitry governing pluripotency in vivo and in vitro. To determine how OCT4 establishes and protects the pluripotent lineage in the embryo, we used comparative single-cell transcriptomics and quantitative immunofluorescence on control and OCT4 null blastocyst inner cell masses at two developmental stages….
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The harsh microenvironment in early breast cancer selects for a Warburg phenotype [Evolution]
The harsh microenvironment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) exerts strong evolutionary selection pressures on cancer cells. We hypothesize that the poor metabolic conditions near the ductal center foment the emergence of a Warburg Effect (WE) phenotype, wherein cells rapidly ferment glucose to lactic acid, even in normoxia. To test…
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Systematic analysis of differential rhythmic liver gene expression mediated by the circadian clock and feeding rhythms [Systems Biology]
The circadian clock and feeding rhythms are both important regulators of rhythmic gene expression in the liver. To further dissect the respective contributions of feeding and the clock, we analyzed differential rhythmicity of liver tissue samples across several conditions. We developed a statistical method tailored to compare rhythmic liver messenger…
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Astrocytic cAMP modulates memory via synaptic plasticity [Neuroscience]
Astrocytes play a key role in brain homeostasis and functions such as memory. Specifically, astrocytes express multiple receptors that transduce signals via the second messenger cAMP. However, the involvement of astrocytic cAMP in animal behavior and the underlying glial–neuronal interactions remains largely unknown. Here, we show that an increase in…
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Thermodynamics of interfaces extended to nanoscales by introducing integral and differential surface tensions [Chemistry]
As a system shrinks down in size, more and more molecules are found in its surface region, so surface contribution becomes a large or even a dominant part of its thermodynamic potentials. Surface tension is a venerable scientific concept; Gibbs defined it as the excess of grand potential of an…
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The natural axis of transmitter receptor distribution in the human cerebral cortex [Neuroscience]
Transmitter receptors constitute a key component of the molecular machinery for intercellular communication in the brain. Recent efforts have mapped the density of diverse transmitter receptors across the human cerebral cortex with an unprecedented level of detail. Here, we distill these observations into key organizational principles. We demonstrate that receptor…
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Identification of existing pharmaceuticals and herbal medicines as inhibitors of SARS-CoV-2 infection [Medical Sciences]
The outbreak of COVID-19 caused by SARS-CoV-2 has resulted in more than 50 million confirmed cases and over 1 million deaths worldwide as of November 2020. Currently, there are no effective antivirals approved by the Food and Drug Administration to contain this pandemic except the antiviral agent remdesivir. In addition,…
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How Many Galaxies Are in the Universe? A New Answer From the Darkest Sky Ever Observed
Ordinarily, we point telescopes at some object we want to see in greater detail. In the 1990s astronomers did the opposite. They pointed the most powerful telescope in history, the Hubble Space Telescope, at a dark patch of sky devoid of known stars, gas, or galaxies. But in that sliver of nothingness, Hubble revealed a breathtaking sight: The void was brimming with galaxies. Astronomers have lon
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Hypersonic Superweapons Are a Mirage, New Analysis Says
Two scientists find revolutionary claims about the evasion of detection and defenses to be "nonsense."
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Parasite Spread to Humans by Pet Cats Linked to Brain Cancer
About 40 million people in the United States are estimated to have a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii living in their brains, according to CDC data . The parasite, which is infamously spread to people from their pet cats, was not previously known to cause notable medical issues for humans — but now, ominously, new research links the parasite to an increased risk of brain cancer. Toxoplasmosis, o
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Six-wavelength spectroscopy can offer new details of surface of Venus
A trio of papers provide new insight into the composition and evolution of the surface of Venus, hidden beneath its caustic, high temperature atmosphere. Utilizing imaging from orbit using multiple wavelengths—six-band spectroscopy proposed as part of the VERITAS and EnVision missions—scientists can map the iron content of the Venusian surface and construct the first-ever geologic map.
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Sexual harassment claims from "non-stereotypical women" seen as less credible
Sexual harassment is behavior characterized by the making of unwelcome and inappropriate sexual remarks or physical advances. Results of a 2018 survey showed that 81% of women (and 43% of men) had experienced some form of sexual harassment in their lifetime. According to a new study published by the American Psychological Association, women who do not fit female stereotypes for beauty are less li
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UK to close all travel corridors from Monday to halt virus variants
Restrictions backed up with substantial fines amid concerns over 'as yet unidentified new strains'
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COVID-19 cases are soaring in Indonesia. Can a new health minister turn things around?
Researchers are hopeful Budi Gunadi Sadikin will take a more science-based approach to the pandemic
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Examination of Theia 456 finds its nearly 500 stars were born at same time
The Milky Way houses 8,292 recently discovered stellar streams—all named Theia. But Theia 456 is special.
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Scientists identify nutrient that helps prevent bacterial infection
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient — taurine — that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics.
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Designer cytokine makes paralyzed mice walk again
Using gene therapy, a research team has succeeded in getting mice to walk again after a complete cross-sectional injury. The nerve cells produced the curative protein themselves.
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Tiny hard drives that are alive — and multiplying
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00092-1 A common bacterium can be engineered to carry coded messages in its genome.
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Publisher Correction: Unveiling the strong interaction among hadrons at the LHC
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03142-2
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The chemical flare that warns plants of rough going ahead
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00091-2 Elevated levels of a plant hormone tip off roots about compacted soil.
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Faster Vaccinations, New Mutations, and More Coronavirus News
Catch up on the most important updates from this week.
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Watch Highlights From WIRED's CES Conversations
Check out the replays of our talks with former US defense secretary Ash Carter, Nobel laureate Jennifer A. Doudna, Slack CEO Scott Butterfield, and more.
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Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
A University of California, Berkeley, conservationist has discovered that the glass frog Sachatamia orejuela can be added to the list of species that make use of visual cues in response to their acoustic environments. This is the first time a member of the glass frog family (Centrolenidae) has been observed using visual communication in this manner.
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Nanodiamonds feel the heat
Scientists from Osaka University, The University of Queensland, and the Faculty of Engineering at the National University of Singapore have created polymer-coated nanodiamonds that can be absorbed into cells. Based on changes in their fluorescence properties, the internal thermal conductivity of the cell can be measured, which may lead to new heat treatments that attack cancer cells.
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Wildfire smoke's effects are getting worse
The far-reaching effects of wildfires and wildfire smoke are no longer aberrations, researchers write in a new paper. Record-setting wildfires torched huge swaths of western states in 2020. They blotted out the sun, produced hazardous air pollution in cities far from the blazes, and sent toxic smoke wafting clear across the country and beyond. The number of homes at direct risk from wildfires—and
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US banks signal post-Covid optimism
JPMorgan, Citi and Wells Fargo cite vaccine rollout and better economic outlook
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Why antihistamines don't always ease chronic eczema itch
Allergens in the environment are often to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, a new study shows. In addition to a skin rash, many eczema sufferers also experience chronic itching, but sometimes that itching can become torturous. Worse, antihistamines—the standard treatment for itching and allergy—often don't help. The new research shows that the itching often doesn't respond to a
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B7-H3x4-1BB bispecific antibody augments antitumor immunity by enhancing terminally differentiated CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes
Cancer immunotherapy with 4-1BB agonists has limited further clinical development because of dose-limiting toxicity. Here, we developed a bispecific antibody (bsAb; B7-H3 x 4-1BB), targeting human B7-H3 (hB7-H3) and mouse or human 4-1BB, to restrict the 4-1BB stimulation in tumors. B7-H3 x m4-1BB elicited a 4-1BB–dependent antitumor response in hB7-H3–overexpressing tumor models without systemic
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TBC1D3 promotes neural progenitor proliferation by suppressing the histone methyltransferase G9a
Genomic changes during human linage evolution contribute to the expansion of the cerebral cortex to allow more advanced thought processes. The hominoid-specific gene TBC1D3 displays robust capacity of promoting the generation and proliferation of neural progenitors (NPs), which are thought to contribute to cortical expansion. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we found that
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Deriving iron contents from past and future Venus surface spectra with new high-temperature laboratory emissivity data
In situ information on the surface composition of Venus is based on measurements of a small number of landing sites. In the laboratory, we measured the emissivity of a range of igneous rocks at temperatures up to 480°C. We show that high-temperature laboratory spectra of basalts are consistent with the only existing multispectral data from the surface of Venus obtained by the photometers on the V
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The Rab32/BLOC-3-dependent pathway mediates host defense against different pathogens in human macrophages
Macrophages provide a first line of defense against microorganisms, and while some mechanisms to kill pathogens such as the oxidative burst are well described, others are still undefined or unknown. Here, we report that the Rab32 guanosine triphosphatase and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 (biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex–3) are central components of a trafficking
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Ancient protein analysis in archaeology
The analysis of ancient proteins from paleontological, archeological, and historic materials is revealing insights into past subsistence practices, patterns of health and disease, evolution and phylogeny, and past environments. This review tracks the development of this field, discusses some of the major methodological strategies used, and synthesizes recent developments in archeological applicat
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Multiple screening approaches reveal HDAC6 as a novel regulator of glycolytic metabolism in triple-negative breast cancer
Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a subtype of breast cancer without a targeted form of therapy. Unfortunately, up to 70% of patients with TNBC develop resistance to treatment. A known contributor to chemoresistance is dysfunctional mitochondrial apoptosis signaling. We set up a phenotypic small-molecule screen to reveal vulnerabilities in TNBC cells that were independent of mitochondrial a
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The translocon-associated protein (TRAP) complex regulates quality control of N-linked glycosylation during ER stress
Asparagine (N)–linked glycosylation is required for endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, but how this co- and posttranslational modification is maintained during ER stress is unknown. Here, we introduce a fluorescence-based strategy to detect aberrant N-glycosylation in individual cells and identify a regulatory role for the heterotetrameric translocon-associated protein (TRAP) complex. Unexpe
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Overlap of NatA and IAP substrates implicates N-terminal acetylation in protein stabilization
SMAC/DIABLO and HTRA2 are mitochondrial proteins whose amino-terminal sequences, known as inhibitor of apoptosis binding motifs (IBMs), bind and activate ubiquitin ligases known as inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs), unleashing a cell's apoptotic potential. IBMs comprise a four-residue, loose consensus sequence, and binding to IAPs requires an unmodified amino terminus. Closely related, IBM-l
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Integrated quantitative PIXE analysis and EDX spectroscopy using a laser-driven particle source
Among the existing elemental characterization techniques, particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) and energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy are two of the most widely used in different scientific and technological fields. Here, we present the first quantitative laser-driven PIXE and laser-driven EDX experimental investigation performed at the Centro de Láseres Pulsados in Salamanca. Thanks to
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Leaf-derived ABA regulates rice seed development via a transporter-mediated and temperature-sensitive mechanism
Long-distance transport of the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) has been studied for ~50 years, yet its mechanistic basis and biological significance remain very poorly understood. Here, we show that leaf-derived ABA controls rice seed development in a temperature-dependent manner and is regulated by defective grain-filling 1 (DG1), a multidrug and toxic compound extrusion transporter that efflux
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Translational and rotational critical-like behaviors in the glass transition of colloidal ellipsoid monolayers
Critical-like behaviors have been found in translational degrees of freedom near the glass transition of spherical particle systems mainly with local polycrystalline structures, but it is not clear if criticality exists in more general glassy systems composed of nonspherical particles without crystalline structures. Here, through experiments and simulations, we show critical-like behaviors in bot
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Metallic line defect in wide-bandgap transparent perovskite BaSnO3
A line defect with metallic characteristics has been found in optically transparent BaSnO 3 perovskite thin films. The distinct atomic structure of the defect core, composed of Sn and O atoms, was visualized by atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). When doped with La, dopants that replace Ba atoms preferentially segregate to specific crystallographic sites adjacent t
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Structure and noncanonical Cdk8 activation mechanism within an Argonaute-containing Mediator kinase module
The Cdk8 kinase module (CKM) in Mediator, comprising Med13, Med12, CycC, and Cdk8, regulates RNA polymerase II transcription through kinase-dependent and -independent functions. Numerous pathogenic mutations causative for neurodevelopmental disorders and cancer congregate in CKM subunits. However, the structure of the intact CKM and the mechanism by which Cdk8 is non-canonically activated and fun
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Direct coherent multi-ink printing of fabric supercapacitors
Coaxial fiber-shaped supercapacitors with short charge carrier diffusion paths are highly desirable as high-performance energy storage devices for wearable electronics. However, the traditional approaches based on the multistep fabrication processes for constructing the fiber-shaped energy device still encounter persistent restrictions in fabrication procedure, scalability, and mechanical durabil
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In situ measurements of intracellular thermal conductivity using heater-thermometer hybrid diamond nanosensors
Understanding heat dissipation processes at nanoscale during cellular thermogenesis is essential to clarify the relationships between the heat and biological processes in cells and organisms. A key parameter determining the heat flux inside a cell is the local thermal conductivity, a factor poorly investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Here, using a nanoheater/nanothermometer hybrid
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Genetic analysis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies contributing pathways and cell types
Despite the considerable progress in unraveling the genetic causes of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), we do not fully understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. We analyzed genome-wide data involving 78,500 individuals using a polygenic risk score approach to identify the biological pathways and cell types involved in ALS. This data-driven approach identified multiple aspect
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Single-cell cytometry via multiplexed fluorescence prediction by label-free reflectance microscopy
Traditional imaging cytometry uses fluorescence markers to identify specific structures but is limited in throughput by the labeling process. We develop a label-free technique that alleviates the physical staining and provides multiplexed readouts via a deep learning–augmented digital labeling method. We leverage the rich structural information and superior sensitivity in reflectance microscopy a
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Strontium ions protect hearts against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury
Timely restoration of blood supply following myocardial infarction is critical to save the infarcted myocardium, while reperfusion would cause additional damage. Strontium ions have been shown to promote angiogenesis, but it is unknown whether they can save the damaged myocardium. We report that myocardial ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)–induced functional deterioration and scar formation were notably
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Systemic inequalities for LGBTQ professionals in STEM
Researchers have documented race and gender inequality in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) for decades. Do lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) professionals face parallel experiences of disadvantage in STEM? Using representative survey data from 21 STEM professional societies ( N sample = 25,324; N LGBTQ = 1006), this paper presents multidimensional and methodo
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Ultrahigh-yield on-surface synthesis and assembly of circumcoronene into a chiral electronic Kagome-honeycomb lattice
On-surface synthesis has revealed remarkable potential in the fabrication of atomically precise nanographenes. However, surface-assisted synthesis often involves multiple-step cascade reactions with competing pathways, leading to a limited yield of target nanographene products. Here, we devise a strategy for the ultrahigh-yield synthesis of circumcoronene molecules on Cu(111) via surface-assisted
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Corner-, edge-, and facet-controlled growth of nanocrystals
The ability to precisely control nanocrystal (NC) shape and composition is useful in many fields, including catalysis and plasmonics. Seed-mediated strategies have proven effective for preparing a wide variety of structures, but a poor understanding of how to selectively grow corners, edges, and facets has limited the development of a general strategy to control structure evolution. Here, we repo
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Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light
Using state-of-the-art fabrication and imaging, researchers watched the consequences of adding sculpted light to a catalyst during a chemical transformation. This work could inform more efficient — and potentially new — forms of catalysis.
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Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: Ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.
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Researchers discover new inhibitor drug combination for rare form of cancer
Researchers took the novel approach of targeting specific cell proteins that control DNA information using inhibitors, or drugs, that were effective in reducing the growth of the Waldenström macroglobulinemia cancer cells and when combined with a third drug were even more successful in killing the WM cancer cells which could lead to more treatment options.
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Nanodiamond sensors can act as both heat sources and thermometers
A team of scientists from Osaka University, the University of Queensland and the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering used tiny nanodiamonds coated with a heat-releasing polymer to probe the thermal properties of cells. When irradiated with light from a laser, the sensors acted both as heaters and thermometers, allowing the thermal conductivity of the interior of a cell to be
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Anti-nutrients might sound scary, but you need them in your diet
These compounds occur naturally in a number of healthy foods, including legumes and whole grains. (foodism360/Unsplash/) Jill Joyce is an assistant professor of Public Health Nutrition at Oklahoma State University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Maybe you're trying to eat healthier these days, aiming to get enough of the good stuff and limit the less-good stuff. You're payin
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Best running shoes for men: Break a sweat, not your arches
Serious upgrades to replace your worn-down running shoes. (Jenny Hill via Unsplash/) Running is truly an exercise of convenience. You don't have to learn how to do it, and it doesn't require any equipment other than your own two feet. Of course, those need to be outfitted correctly. Running around with bare feet might be fun for toddlers, but a guy who wants to go the distance without falling apa
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Russia Might Issue Fines for Using SpaceX Starlink Internet Service
SpaceX is busy ferrying astronauts to and from the International Space Station these days, but that's not all Elon Musk's aerospace firm is doing. It's also gearing up for a Mars colonization effort and deploying a satellite internet constellation called Starlink. You can get Starlink internet in a few places, but Russia doesn't want any of its citizens going through the SpaceX system as it expan
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Mysterious Heat Spikes inside Cells Are Probed with Tiny Diamonds
A new type of sensor may help solve a puzzling cellular phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mysterious Heat Spikes inside Cells Are Probed with Tiny Diamonds
A new type of sensor may help solve a puzzling cellular phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Mysterious Heat Spikes inside Cells Are Probed with Tiny Diamonds
A new type of sensor may help solve a puzzling cellular phenomenon — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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COVID curbed carbon emissions in 2020 — but not by much
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00090-3 Despite sharp drops early in the pandemic, global emissions of carbon dioxide picked up in the second half of the year, new data show.
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US fishing and seafood industries saw broad declines last summer due to COVID-19
While losses vary by sector, by region and by industry, data and information from this report may help businesses and communities assess losses and inform long-term recovery and resilience strategies.
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Scientists identify nutrient that helps prevent bacterial infection
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient—taurine—that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding, published in the journal Cell by scientists from five institutes of the National Institutes of Health, could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics.
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Using metals for fuel
Did you know that in microgravity we are preparing one of the most promising fuels for the future?
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US fishing and seafood industries saw broad declines last summer due to COVID-19
While losses vary by sector, by region and by industry, data and information from this report may help businesses and communities assess losses and inform long-term recovery and resilience strategies.
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Scientists identify nutrient that helps prevent bacterial infection
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient—taurine—that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding, published in the journal Cell by scientists from five institutes of the National Institutes of Health, could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics.
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Towards applications: ultra-low-loss on-chip zero-index materials
A refractive index of zero induces a wave vector with zero amplitude and undefined direction. Therefore, light propagating inside a zero-index medium does not accumulate any spatial phase advance, resulting in perfect spatial coherence. Such coherence brings several potential applications, including arbitrarily shaped waveguides, phase-mismatch-free nonlinear propagation, large-area single-mode la
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New study compiles four years of corn loss data from 26 states and Ontario, Canada
Plant pathologists working at universities across 26 corn-producing states in the United States and in Ontario, Canada, compiled data about annual corn reductions caused by diseases. Estimated loss from each disease varied greatly by region.
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Stereotypes may stifle some harassment claims
People are more likely to believe the sexual harassment accusations of young, "conventionally attractive" women who appear and act feminine, research finds. That leaves people who don't fit the prototype potentially facing greater hurdles when trying to convince a workplace or court that they have been harassed. The study, involving more than 4,000 participants, reveals perceptions that primarily
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New study compiles four years of corn loss data from 26 states and Ontario, Canada
Plant pathologists working at universities across 26 corn-producing states in the United States and in Ontario, Canada, compiled data about annual corn reductions caused by diseases. Estimated loss from each disease varied greatly by region.
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Engineers find a way to control chemical catalysts with sculpted light
Like a person breaking up a cat fight, the role of catalysts in a chemical reaction is to hurry up the process—and come out of it intact. And, just as not every house in a neighborhood has someone willing to intervene in such a battle, not every part of a catalyst participates in the reaction. But what if one could convince the unengaged parts of a catalyst to get involved? Chemical reactions coul
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Ex-CISA Head Chris Krebs: 'Impeachment Is the Right Mechanism'
In an interview with WIRED, the famously fired DHS official shared insights on election security, disinformation, SolarWinds—and what to do about Trump.
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Publisher Correction: Enhancer remodeling promotes tumor-initiating activity in NRF2-activated non-small cell lung cancers
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20927-9
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Daily briefing: Underwhelming trial results for leading Chinese COVID vaccine
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00114-y The CoronaVac vaccine, developed by Sinovac in China, reports mixed results in Brazil. Plus, what we know about COVID's toll on smell and taste, and the mysterious extinction of the dire wolf.
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How high did our ancestors get? We might soon be able to tell.
Archaeologists can now tell what drugs our ancestors used thanks to tooth tartar. For this study, they tested 10 cadavers and discovered 44 drugs and metabolites. This new method will offer us insights into the types of drugs our ancestors used. Archaeologists rejoiced last year when a team discovered that an Israeli shrine contained remnants of cannabis and frankincense . Improved laboratory tec
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Listen: Coronavirus Mutations
After a new variant of the coronavirus spread throughout the United Kingdom, daily cases hit record levels and the prime minister ordered a national lockdown. Now more mutations from South Africa and Brazil have made headlines. The prospect of a more transmissible virus has many worried, but exactly how bad are these new mutations? And should you change anything you're doing already? Vineet Menac
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Coronavirus diaries: making plans in a changing world
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00106-y John Tregoning grapples with a shifting schedule and a new UK lockdown.
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One termite lineage took over by switching diets
Tracing their evolution shows termites do much more than eat wood and destroy homes, other buildings, and trees, researchers report. "The fact is termites are mostly misunderstood and remain important ecological engineers," says Thomas Chouvenc, an assistant professor of entomology at the University of Florida/Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Cent
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C.D.C. Warns the New Virus Variant Could Fuel Huge Spikes in Covid-19 Cases
The more contagious version, first identified in Britain, is expected to spread widely and lead to further strains on an already overburdened health care system.
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Already had COVID-19? You still need a vaccine.
Even if you've had COVID-19, the vaccine will boost your immunity and reduce your chances of becoming reinfected and sick again in the future. (Pixabay/) The United States has now reached more than 23 million documented cases of COVID-19 (and likely even more that went uncounted), representing roughly 7 percent of the nation's total population. Given the disease's wildfire spread throughout the c
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The Coronavirus Is Evolving Before Our Eyes
In the final, darkest days of the deadliest year in U.S. history, the world received ominous news of a mutation in the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus. Scientists in the U.K. had identified a form of the virus that was spreading rapidly throughout the nation. Then, on January 4, Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a lockdown that began almost immediately and will last until at least the middle of Febru
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Special interests can be assets for youth with autism
COLUMBIA, Mo. – When he was in middle school, teachers would give Sam Curran a list of words to type in a computer to practice his vocabulary.
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Controlling chemical catalysts with sculpted light
Using state-of-the-art fabrication and imaging, researchers watched the consequences of adding sculpted light to a catalyst during a chemical transformation. This work could inform more efficient — and potentially new — forms of catalysis.
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RNA's mysterious folding process
Using data from RNA-folding experiments, the researchers generated the first-ever data-driven movies of how RNA folds as it is made by cellular machinery. By watching their videos of this folding occur, the researchers discovered that RNA often folds in surprising, perhaps unintuitive ways, such as tying itself into knots.
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Target discovered that halts osteoarthritis-type knee cartilage degeneration
In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain.
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Blodprov som avslöjar Alzheimers inom räckhåll
Enkla blodprov som upptäcker Alzheimers sjukdom i tidigt skede skulle revolutionera vården. Det menar forskare vid Göteborgs universitet, som i tre studier visar att ett egenutvecklat blodprovsbaserat test kan avslöja sjukdomen innan symptom, och dessutom förutsäga dess förlopp. – Det här är ett extremt dynamiskt forskningsfält just nu, tack vare de senaste årens teknikutveckling och några betyda
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Los Angeles Is Literally Running Out of Space to Store Dead Bodies
Los Angeles is in extraordinarily bad shape right now — the coronavirus is hitting the county so hard that literally running out of places to store dead bodies. Local hospitals have already run out of room to store deceased COVID-19 patients, CNN reports , and the Los Angeles Medical Examiner Coroner's Office is at nearly twice its normal capacity of 500 bodies. The county has relied on refrigera
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79 Percent of Americans Say US Is Falling Apart
The Fall One week after the pro-Trump insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, a majority of Americans seemed to agree that the country is "falling apart." That's according to a new Axios-Ipsol poll that gauged Americans' stance on the President, the state of the nation at large, and their feelings about impeaching and removing Donald Trump from office. As The Hill notes , about 79 percent of the 1,019
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Covid infection trends in England put scientists at odds
Studies reveal a mixed picture across country in terms of R number and contradictory national snapshots from experts
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Researchers trace geologic origins of Gulf of Mexico 'super basin' success
The Gulf of Mexico holds huge untapped offshore oil deposits that could help power the U.S. for decades.
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Author Correction: Suppression of a SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in the Italian municipality of Vo'
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2956-7
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Bangladesh zoo seeks mate for lonely Kanchi the Rhino
A lonely rhinoceros at a Bangladesh zoo is looking for new love after losing her partner seven years ago, but pandemic travel restrictions are hampering her keeper's attempts to play matchmaker.
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Vampire finches: how little birds in the Galápagos got a taste for big bird blood
For most people, the word "vampire" brings to mind Dracula or perhaps slayers such as Blade or Buffy; or maybe even the vampire bats of South America. Few will think of a small and rather lovely bird—the finch.
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US fishing and seafood industries saw broad declines last summer due to COVID-19
The US fishing and seafood sector years generated more than $200 billion in annual sales and supported 1.7 million jobs in recent years. It experienced broad declines in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 public health crisis, according to a new NOAA Fisheries analysis released today.
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New study compiles four years of corn loss data from 26 states and Ontario, Canada
Plant pathologists working at universities across 26 corn-producing states in the United States and in Ontario, Canada, compiled data about annual corn reductions caused by diseases. Estimated loss from each disease varied greatly by region.
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Bangladesh zoo seeks mate for lonely Kanchi the Rhino
A lonely rhinoceros at a Bangladesh zoo is looking for new love after losing her partner seven years ago, but pandemic travel restrictions are hampering her keeper's attempts to play matchmaker.
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Vampire finches: how little birds in the Galápagos got a taste for big bird blood
For most people, the word "vampire" brings to mind Dracula or perhaps slayers such as Blade or Buffy; or maybe even the vampire bats of South America. Few will think of a small and rather lovely bird—the finch.
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Mike Pence Has Nowhere to Go
Updated on January 15, 2021 at 1:52 p.m. ET Mike Pence publicly defied the president once in four years, and for that solitary show of independence, his own political future could be all but finished. The vice president's swift journey from acolyte to outcast was head-spinning. This is someone who would pause after mentioning Donald Trump's name during an address so that the audience had time to
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Researchers trace geologic origins of Gulf of Mexico 'super basin' success
The Gulf of Mexico holds huge untapped offshore oil deposits that could help power the U.S. for decades. According to researchers, the basin's vast oil and gas reserves are the result of a remarkable geologic past. Only a fraction of the oil has been extracted and much remains buried beneath ancient salt layers, just recently illuminated by modern seismic imaging.
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Breathing easier with a better tracheal stent
New research is poised to drastically improve the use of tracheal stents for children with airway obstruction. Researchers demonstrate for the first time the successful use of a completely biodegradable magnesium-alloy tracheal stent that safely degrades and does not require removal.
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New delivery method promises relief from antipsychotic medication's adverse side effects
A team of neuroscientists and engineers has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body.
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X-Rays surrounding 'Magnificent 7' may be traces of sought-after particle
Theoretical physicists suggest that never-before-observed particles called axions may be the source of unexplained, high-energy X-ray emissions surrounding a group of neutron stars.
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Scientists identify contents of ancient Maya drug containers
Scientists have identified the presence of a non-tobacco plant in ancient Maya drug containers for the first time. The researchers detected Mexican marigold (Tagetes lucida) in residues taken from 14 miniature Maya ceramic vessels. The vessels also contain chemical traces present in two types of dried and cured tobacco.
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Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered
Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of hea
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Stuck in a rut: Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Researchers have found that ocean acidification limits algal communities to a state of low diversity and complexity. Communities grown in waters rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) were dominated by turf algae, and had low biodiversity, ecological complexity and biomass. Communities grown under acidic conditions and then transferred to waters that weren't CO2-enriched increased their biodiversity and com
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Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study suggests.
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Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success
Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows.
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Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane.
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Cities can help migrating birds on their way by planting more trees and turning lights off at night
Millions of birds travel between their breeding and wintering grounds during spring and autumn migration, creating one of the greatest spectacles of the natural world. These journeys often span incredible distances. For example, the Blackpoll Warbler, which weighs less than half an ounce, may travel up to 1,500 miles between its nesting grounds in Canada and its wintering grounds in the Caribbean
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How hitchhiking worms choose their vehicles
Tiny worms that live inside fig trees use the fig wasp as a 'vehicle' to hitch rides from one tree to another by crawling into the wasp's gut without harming it. This relationship has existed for millions of years. But how do these worms‒called nematodes‒choose their wasp vehicles? What cues do they use to check for co-passengers? A new study from the Centre for Ecological Sciences (CES) at the In
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Large mammals make soil more fertile in tropical forests
The White-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) is a boar-like hoofed mammal found throughout Central and South America. These animals roam the forest in bands of 50 to 100 individuals, eating a wide variety of foods. In Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest, they prefer the fruit of the jussara palm Euterpe edulis.
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Cities can help migrating birds on their way by planting more trees and turning lights off at night
Millions of birds travel between their breeding and wintering grounds during spring and autumn migration, creating one of the greatest spectacles of the natural world. These journeys often span incredible distances. For example, the Blackpoll Warbler, which weighs less than half an ounce, may travel up to 1,500 miles between its nesting grounds in Canada and its wintering grounds in the Caribbean
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A textual analysis of Trump's language shows shifts in the weeks leading up to the Capitol riot
On Jan. 6, the world witnessed how language can incite violence.
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How hitchhiking worms choose their vehicles
Tiny worms that live inside fig trees use the fig wasp as a 'vehicle' to hitch rides from one tree to another by crawling into the wasp's gut without harming it. This relationship has existed for millions of years. But how do these worms‒called nematodes‒choose their wasp vehicles? What cues do they use to check for co-passengers? A new study from the Centre for Ecological Sciences (CES) at the In
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Want a hot stock tip? Avoid this type of investment fund
"Buy low and sell high" says the old adage about investing in the stock market.
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Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation
Liquids are ubiquitous in Nature: from the water that we consume daily to superfluid helium which is a quantum liquid appearing at temperatures as low as only a few degrees above the absolute zero. A common feature of these vastly different liquids is being self-bound in free space in the form of droplets. Understanding from a microscopic perspective how a liquid is formed by adding particles one
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Large mammals make soil more fertile in tropical forests
The White-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) is a boar-like hoofed mammal found throughout Central and South America. These animals roam the forest in bands of 50 to 100 individuals, eating a wide variety of foods. In Brazil's Atlantic Rainforest, they prefer the fruit of the jussara palm Euterpe edulis.
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Genes highlight differences in wild and tame rabbits
Researchers have found changes in gene expression patterns across the brain between wild and domestic rabbits, which likely contributed to the evolution of tameness during domestication. By demonstrating that domestic animals acquired tolerance toward humans through regulatory changes of certain genes, researchers are able to better understand the link between genetic changes and the mechanisms o
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With Discovery, Star Trek Is Finally Moving Forward
The show's third season jumps forward 1,000 years into the future. It helped the show not stay mired in old ideas.
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NIH scientists identify nutrient that helps prevent bacterial infection
Scientists studying the body's natural defenses against bacterial infection have identified a nutrient–taurine–that helps the gut recall prior infections and kill invading bacteria, such as Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kpn). The finding, published in the journal Cell by scientists from five institutes of the National Institutes of Health, could aid efforts seeking alternatives to antibiotics.
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UW researchers develop tool to equitably distribute limited vaccines
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health and UW Health have developed a tool that incorporates a person's age and socioeconomic status to prioritize vaccine distribution among people who otherwise share similar risks due to their jobs.
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Researchers trace geologic origins of Gulf of Mexico 'super basin' success
The Gulf of Mexico holds huge untapped offshore oil deposits that could help power the U.S. for decades. According to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin, the basin's vast oil and gas reserves are the result of a remarkable geologic past. Only a fraction of the oil has been extracted and much remains buried beneath ancient salt layers, just recently illuminated by modern seismic imagi
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Target discovered that halts osteoarthritis-type knee cartilage degeneration
In a mouse study, researchers used nanotechnology and previous knowledge of a protein pathway to significantly reduce knee cartilage degeneration and pain
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Joe Biden's Looming War on White Supremacy
For four years, Donald Trump downplayed the risk of white-supremacist violence and denied that racial bias is pervasive in law enforcement. In a single, searing day, the assault on the U.S. Capitol exposed the price of both of those choices—and may have provided Joe Biden new political momentum for reversing direction on each front. At once, the rioters demonstrated how much the threat of white e
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Footprints of crocodile-like prehistoric reptile found in Italian Alps
Fossilised track dates back to period immediately following mass extinction 252m years ago Footprints believed to have belonged to a crocodile-like prehistoric reptile have been found in the Italian Alps in an extraordinary discovery that scientists say proves there were survivors of a mass extinction 252m years ago. The well-preserved fossilised track, made up of about 10 footprints, was found a
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Swarms of robotic fish can synchronize their swimming, for the first time
Two cameras and light-emitting diode lights enable communication
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Limits of atomic nuclei predicted
Novel calculations have enabled the study of nearly 700 isotopes between helium and iron, showing which nuclei can exist and which cannot. Scientists report how they simulated for the first time using innovative theoretical methods a large region of the chart of nuclides based on the theory of the strong interaction.
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Here's the view from humanity's furthest spacecraft
Jimmy Carter was U.S. president and Elvis Presley was still alive in 1977, the year Voyager 1 was launched. Back in 1990, Voyager 1's last picture showed Earth as nothing more than a 'Pale Blue Dot'. Voyager 1 is now traversing interstellar space – here's what our solar system looks like from there. Speeding towards the Serpent-bearer What's the farthest place that humanity has gone? For a practi
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U.S. Covid-19 Deaths Reach Numbing New Heights
No country has recorded as many Covid-19 deaths as the United States. On Tuesday alone, an estimated 4,327 people died in the U.S. from complications related to the now-leading cause of death — a new record for the pandemic. Around 130,000 more people lay in U.S. hospitals, battling the virus.
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Intertropical Convergence Zone limits climate predictions in the tropical Atlantic
The strongest climate fluctuation on time scales of a few years is the so-called El Niño phenomenon, which originates in the Pacific. A similar circulation pattern exists in the Atlantic, which scientists under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have studied in more detail. Their results, now published in the international journal Nature Communications, contribute to
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Man Invents Backpack-Mounted "Jetpack" for Speedy Ice Skating
Weed Whacker Skating Canadian tinkerer Brydon Gibson, a 24-year-old Ottawa native, has built himself a "jetpack" that can allow him to ice skate at up to 25 mph, the CBC reports . To be clear, the term "jetpack" is a bit of a misnomer — it pushes him along using an old-fashioned propeller, not a jet engine. But it still looks like a fun time. "I got my hands on some weed whacker motors and I figu
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Increased risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with schizophrenia
A new study shows that patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder have an increased risk of Parkinson's disease later in life. The increased risk may be due to alterations in the brain's dopamine system caused by dopamine receptor antagonists or neurobiological effects of schizophrenia.
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Intertropical Convergence Zone limits climate predictions in the tropical Atlantic
The strongest climate fluctuation on time scales of a few years is the so-called El Niño phenomenon, which originates in the Pacific. A similar circulation pattern exists in the Atlantic, which scientists have now studied in more detail. Their results contribute to a better understanding of this climate fluctuation and pose a challenge for prediction models.
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Researchers Find NTRK fusions more common than expected in pediatric tumors
Researchers have found that NTRK fusions are more common in pediatric tumors and also involve a wider range of tumors than adult cancers, information that could help prioritize screening for NTRK fusions in pediatric cancer patients who might benefit from treatment with TRK inhibitors.
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2020 tied for warmest year on record, NASA analysis shows
Earth's global average surface temperature in 2020 tied with 2016 as the warmest year on record, according to an analysis by NASA.
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Breathing easier with a better tracheal stent
New research led by the University of Pittsburgh is poised to drastically improve the use of tracheal stents for children with airway obstruction. Researchers demonstrate for the first time the successful use of a completely biodegradable magnesium-alloy tracheal stent that safely degrades and does not require removal.
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New delivery method promises relief from antipsychotic medication's adverse side effects
A team of neuroscientists and engineers at McMaster University has created a nasal spray to deliver antipsychotic medication directly to the brain instead of having it pass through the body.
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Biodistribution of AAV gene transfer vectors in nonhuman primate
The biodistribution of adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene transfer vectors can be measured in nonhuman primates using a new method. The method quantifies whole-body and organ-specific AAV capsids from 1 to 72 hours after administration
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Galaktiska kollisioner kan få galaxer att dö
Utan gas bildas inga nya stjärnor och galaxer dör. Med hjälp av teleskopet ALMA har forskare för första gången lyckats observera en galax som är på väg att dö. Forskarna kunde se stjärnbildande gas kastas ut i form av en "tidvattensvans" och orsaken till fenomenet tros vara en kollision mellan två galaxer som smält samman till en. Med hjälp av Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA),
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Climate impacts on health and urban areas: Heatwaves and death rate
Over the last half-century, the probability of heat extreme events has changed by orders of magnitude in almost every region of the world, with occurrences that are now up to a hundred times more in respect to a century ago. Of all-natural disasters, extreme high temperature events are the main cause of weather-related mortality and they are also expected to be the main factor responsible for addi
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Understanding how sound waves travel through disordered materials
A team of researchers lead by the University of Tsukuba have created a new theoretical model to understand the spread of vibrations through disordered materials, such as glass. They found that as the degree of disorder increased, sound waves traveled less and less like ballistic particles, and instead began diffusing incoherently. This work may lead to new heat- and shatter-resistant glass for sma
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Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers
Scientists at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu have found a way to develop optical quantum computers of a new type. Central to the discovery are rare earth ions that have certain characteristics and can act as quantum bits. These would give quantum computers ultrafast computation speed and better reliability compared to earlier solutions. The University of Tartu researchers Vlad
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X-rays surrounding 'Magnificent 7' may be traces of sought-after particle
A new study, led by a theoretical physicist at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), suggests that never-before-observed particles called axions may be the source of unexplained, high-energy X-ray emissions surrounding a group of neutron stars.
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Divergences between scientific and indigenous and local knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and indigenous and local knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests.
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The end of domestic wine in 17th century Japan
Researchers from Kumamoto University (Japan) have found an Edo period document that clearly indicates the Hosokawa clan, rulers of the Kokura Domain (modern-day Fukuoka Prefecture), completely stopped producing wine in 1632, the year before the shogunate ordered them to move to the Higo Domain (now Kumamoto Prefecture). The researchers believe that the discontinuation of wine production was direct
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The basis for mitochondria, essential cellular powerhouses
Mitochondria are vital for the human body as cellular powerhouses: They possess more than 1000 different proteins, required for many central metabolic pathways. Dysfunction of these lead to severe diseases, especially of the nervous system and the heart. In order to transport proteins and metabolites, mitochondria contain a special group of so-called beta-barrel membrane proteins, which form trans
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Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success
Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows.
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Scientists identify contents of ancient Maya drug containers
Scientists have identified the presence of a non-tobacco plant in ancient Maya drug containers for the first time.
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Precise measurements of cluster formation in outer neutron 'skin' of a range of tin isotopes
A large international team of researchers has developed a way to measure cluster formations in the outer neutron 'skin' of a range of tin isotopes rich in neutrons. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes using knockout reactions to obtain evidence of the formation of α clusters at the surface of tin isotopes rich in neutrons. Or Hen, with MIT, has published a Perspect
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Artificial intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
In the last decades, artificial intelligence has shown to be very good at achieving exceptional goals in several fields. Chess is one of them: in 1996, for the first time, the computer Deep Blue beat a human player, chess champion Garry Kasparov. A new piece of research shows now that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memor
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Divergences between scientific and indigenous and local knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and indigenous and local knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests.
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The basis for mitochondria, essential cellular powerhouses
Mitochondria are vital for the human body as cellular powerhouses: They possess more than 1000 different proteins, required for many central metabolic pathways. Dysfunction of these lead to severe diseases, especially of the nervous system and the heart. In order to transport proteins and metabolites, mitochondria contain a special group of so-called beta-barrel membrane proteins, which form trans
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Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success
Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows.
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Young people's mental health must be a priority this lockdown
For some children the pandemic will build resilience, but many others will bear scars
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The Emotional Miseducation of Tiger Woods
David Strick / Redux "I might be sorta like a Michael Jordan in basketball," a teenage Tiger Woods says during a 1990 interview featured in a new documentary on the legendary American golfer. Moments before, Woods suggested he could one day overshadow the veteran player Jack Nicklaus: "I might be even bigger than him—to the Blacks." Such brazen statements pepper most sports documentaries, and HBO
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A case of 'stomach flu' arms the microbiome against invaders
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00078-z Gut-wrenching infection encourages production of an amino acid consumed by helpful bacteria.
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Want a hot stock tip? Avoid this type of investment fund
'Buy low and sell high' says the old adage about investing in the stock market. But a relatively new type of investment fund is luring unsophisticated investors into buying when values are at their highest, resulting in losses almost immediately, a new study has found. The lure? Buying into trendy investment areas like cannabis, cybersecurity and work-from-home businesses.
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Is your skin thirsty? Optoacoustic sensor measures water content in living tissue
Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (US) have shown how optoacoustics can be used for monitoring skin water content, a technique which is promising for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and in cosmetology.
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Physicists propose a new theory to explain one dimensional quantum liquids formation
Researchers from the Institute of Cosmos Sciences of the University of Barcelona present a microscopic theory of lattice quantum droplets which explains the formation of a new type of quantum droplets that has been experimentally observed in ultracold atomic systems.
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Principles of care established for young adults with substance use disorders
A national group of pediatric addiction medicine experts have released newly-established principles of care for young adults with substance use disorder. Led by the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center, the collection of peer-reviewed papers was developed to guide providers on how to treat young adults with substance use disorder given their age-specific needs, as well as elevate
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Large mammals make soil more fertile in tropical forests
A study conducted by scientists at São Paulo State University demonstrates that animals like peccaries and tapirs boost soil levels of nitrogen, an essential element to plant growth.
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USC study measures brain volume differences in people with HIV
With access to treatment, HIV has become a lifelong chronic condition for the majority of 38 million people living with it. Understanding how it affects the brain over time is increasingly important for improving both treatment and quality of life. A new study of brain scans of 1,203 HIV-infected adults across 5 continents found that with people with lower white blood cell counts also had less bra
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New videos show RNA as it's never been seen
Using data from RNA-folding experiments, the researchers generated the first-ever data-driven movies of how RNA folds as it is made by cellular machinery. By watching their videos of this folding occur, the researchers discovered that RNA often folds in surprising, perhaps unintuitive ways, such as tying itself into knots.
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New Trick Turns Air Into Synthetic Gasoline Without Using Any Fossil Fuels
Natural Gas A team of scientists seems to have developed a cleaner way of generating fuel for gas-burning cars — using nothing but renewable energy. The new process takes carbon dioxide and water and then combines them into the fuel methanol using electricity generated from nothing more than the daily rise and fall of temperatures. And while methanol can be used as fuel in some cases, The Drive n
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Snakes evolve a magnetic way to be resistant to venom
Certain snakes have evolved a unique genetic trick to avoid being eaten by venomous snakes, according to new research. The technique works in a manner similar to the way two sides of a magnet repel each other.
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Our moral imperative to act on climate change — and 3 steps we can take (English) | His Holiness Pope Francis
The global climate crisis will require us to transform the way we act, says His Holiness Pope Francis. Delivering a visionary TED Talk from Vatican City, the spiritual leader proposes three courses of action to address the world's growing environmental problems and economic inequalities, illustrating how all of us can work together, across faiths and societies, to protect the Earth and promote the
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Can you experience dementia without having dementia?
I don't know if this is the right place to discuss this. I'm not asking for advice, just interested in a discussion. Anyway: A few times in my drinking career I've blacked out. So we're talking difficulty/an inability to retain short term memories along with other memory and processing problems. I was just watching a video on the front page featuring a lady with Alzheimer's. It made me wonder how
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Training Perceptual Processing – Finding hidden objects
I'm in the process for the military as a pilot and it involves a lot of cognitive testing, it's extremely demanding and has a pass rate of 20%. I've failed it once by a hair due to a stupid mistake. There are a few domains I would like to improve on. Specifically, one of them is finding objects within a cluttered mess. For example I'll be given a screen with a huge mess of shapes and symbols and
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These new flying taxis offer a glimpse at our future commutes
This aircraft from Joby will seat four passengers; Joby announced earlier this year that it is buying Uber Elevate. (Joby /) The annual Consumer Electronics Show is ground zero for showing off fancy new products and concepts that may or may not become a reality in your life in the near future. And nothing quite says "future" like an autonomous and electric flying pod that could whisk you through
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The best humidifier: Fight dry air (and a dry nose) all winter long
Here are some of the most important things to consider when looking for a new humidifier. (Jon'Nathon Stebbe via Unsplash/) The Environmental Protection Agency recommends that indoor air humidity levels are kept between 30 and 50 percent for optimal health. Dry air, whether indoor or outdoor, is a recipe for a host of potential inconveniences including dry skin, irritated eyes, and overall dehydr
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New videos show RNA as it's never been seen
A new Northwestern University-led study is unfolding the mystery of how RNA molecules fold themselves to fit inside cells and perform specific functions. The findings could potentially break down a barrier to understanding and developing treatments for RNA-related diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy and perhaps even the novel coronavirus.
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White Christian Nationalists Want More Than Just Political Power
"Leave all snacks on the bus!" our guide shouted over the intercom as we readied ourselves to go through security at the U.S. Capitol a few years ago. "What about my gun?" a man in the back called out, prompting laughter from us all. That he had brought his gun wasn't surprising. I was with a busload of white conservative Christians who had come to D.C. from all over the country to learn a Christ
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New videos show RNA as it's never been seen
A new Northwestern University-led study is unfolding the mystery of how RNA molecules fold themselves to fit inside cells and perform specific functions. The findings could potentially break down a barrier to understanding and developing treatments for RNA-related diseases, including spinal muscular atrophy and perhaps even the novel coronavirus.
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Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered
Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an experiment the existence of preformed helium nuclei at the surface of several tin isotopes could be identified in a reaction. The results confirm a theory, which predicts the formation of helium clusters in low-density nuclear matter and at the surface of hea
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CHOP researchers Find NTRK fusions more common than expected in pediatric tumors
Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have found that NTRK fusions are more common in pediatric tumors and also involve a wider range of tumors than adult cancers, information that could help prioritize screening for NTRK fusions in pediatric cancer patients who might benefit from treatment with TRK inhibitors.
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Intertropical Convergence Zone limits climate predictions in the tropical Atlantic
The strongest climate fluctuation on time scales of a few years is the so-called El Niño phenomenon, which originates in the Pacific. A similar circulation pattern exists in the Atlantic, which scientists under the leadership of GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have studied in more detail. Their results, now published in the international journal Nature Communications , contribute t
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Designer cytokine makes paralyzed mice walk again
To date, paralysis resulting from spinal cord damage has been irreparable. With a new therapeutic approach, scientists from the Department for Cell Physiology at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) headed by Professor Dietmar Fischer have succeeded for the first time in getting paralyzed mice to walk again. The keys to this are the protein hyper-interleukin-6, which stimulates nerve cells to regenerate,
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Hubble pinpoints supernova blast
The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has observed the supernova remnant named 1E 0102.2-7219. Researchers are using Hubble's imagery of the remnant object to wind back the clock on the expanding remains of this exploded star in the hope of understanding the supernova event that caused it 1700 years ago.
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Climate impacts on health and urban areas: Heatwaves and death rate
Heat does not kill in the same way everywhere. Urban planning, social cohesion, traffic, crime: the urban and social context can worsen the vulnerability of individuals to heatwaves, with differences even within the same city. An analysis of the scientific literature conducted by CMCC@Ca'Foscari.
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IOF and IFCC review calls for harmonization of assays for reference bone turnover markers
The newly published review 'Analytical considerations and plans to standardize or harmonize assays for the reference bone turnover markers PINP and β-CTX in blood' describes the current status of assays for PINP and β-CTX in blood, as well as the plans for and ongoing progress towards the achievement of harmonization or standardization of commercial assays for these reference markers.
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How bad data keeps us from good AI | Mainak Mazumdar
The future economy won't be built by people and factories, but by algorithms and artificial intelligence, says data scientist Mainak Mazumdar. But what happens when these algorithms get trained on biased data? Drawing on examples from Shanghai to New York City, Mazumdar shows how less-than-quality data leads to AI that makes wrong decisions and predictions — and reveals three infrastructural rese
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ADA lowers target HbA1C levels for children with type-1 diabetes
In early 2020, upon recommendation by leading endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association lowered the target hemoglobin A1C guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes. Their goal in recommending stricter glucose control was to ensure children with type 1 diabetes have better immediate and long-term health outcomes with fewer health complications and reduced mortality rates. Researchers now d
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Changing resilience of oceans to climate change
Oxygen levels in the ancient oceans were surprisingly resilient to climate change, new research suggests.
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Managing large-scale construction projects to avoid cost overruns
Supplier selection and pricing format decisions that reflect key characteristics of the project, such as the size of the project, duration, and type of customer, are best at reducing a significant part of cost overruns.
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Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows.
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New fossil provides clarity to the history of Alligatoridae
Families are complicated. For members of the Alligatoridae family, which includes living caimans and alligators – this is especially true. They are closely related, but because of their similarity, their identification can even stump paleontologists.
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DNA test can quickly identify pneumonia in patients with severe COVID-19, aiding faster treatment
Researchers have developed a DNA test to quickly identify secondary infections in COVID-19 patients, who have double the risk of developing pneumonia while on ventilation than non-COVID-19 patients.
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Newly developed GaN based MEMS resonator operates stably even at high temperature
JST PRESTO researcher developed a MEMS resonator that stably operates even under high temperatures by regulating the strain caused by the heat from gallium nitride (GaN). This device is small, highly sensitive and can be integrated with CMOS technology promising for the application to 5G communication, IoT timing device, on-vehicle applications, and advanced driver assistance system.
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Astronomers document the rise and fall of a rarely observed stellar dance
Astronomers have catalogued 126 years of changes to HS Hydra, a rare evolving eclipsing binary star system. Analyzing observations from astro-photographic plates in the late 1800s to TESS observations in 2019, they show that the two stars in HS Hydra began to eclipse each other around a century ago, peaking in the 1960s. The degree of eclipsing then plummeted over the course of just a half century
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Scientists synthetize new material for high-performance supercapacitors
Scientists of Tomsk Polytechnic University jointly with colleagues from the University of Lille (Lille, France) synthetized a new material based on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) for supercapacitors, energy storage devices. The rGO modification method with the use of organic molecules, derivatives of hypervalent iodine, allowed obtaining a material that stores 1.7 times more electrical energy. The r
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Spreading the sound
Tsukuba University scientists describe the diffusion of sound in disordered materials, such as glass, using a new mathematical model. This work may lead to stronger and cheaper displays for touchscreen devices.
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Increased risk of Parkinson's disease in patients with schizophrenia
A new study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that patients with a schizophrenia spectrum disorder have an increased risk of Parkinson's disease later in life. The increased risk may be due to alterations in the brain's dopamine system caused by dopamine receptor antagonists or neurobiological effects of schizophrenia.
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Revisiting the Global Workspace orchestrating the hierarchical organisation of the human brain
A paper published on 4 January in the open access journal Nature Human Behavior by Gustavo Deco, director of the Brain and Cognition Center, and Morten L. Kringelbach, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Oxford University (UK) and the Center for Music in the Brain, University of Aarhus (Denmark).
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Stuck in a rut: Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba have found that ocean acidification limits algal communities to a state of low diversity and complexity. Communities grown in waters rich in carbon dioxide (CO2) were dominated by turf algae, and had low biodiversity, ecological complexity and biomass. Communities grown under acidic conditions and then transferred to waters that weren't CO2-enriched incre
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Scientists' discovery is paving the way for novel ultrafast quantum computers
Scientists at the Institute of Physics of the University of Tartu have found a way to develop optical quantum computers of a new type. Central to the discovery are rare earth ions that have certain characteristics and can act as quantum bits. These would give quantum computers ultrafast computation speed and better reliability compared to earlier solutions. The University of Tartu researchers Vlad
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Simulating evolution to understand a hidden switch
Some organisms evolve an internal switch that can remain hidden for generations until stress flicks it on.
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Leaked Parler Data Contains Stunning Details About Capitol Attack
Y'all Qaeda A developer who goes by the pseudonym Patr10tic has taken the extensive amount of data that was uploaded to the right-wing extremist social network Parler during the deadly Capitol riots on January 6 and turned it into an interactive map , as Motherboard first reported . The project, dubbed "Y'all Qaeda," maps extensive quantities of photos and videos thanks to their included GPS coor
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Why Your To-Do List Never Ends
A common 21st-century complaint is that life didn't used to be as busy as it is today, but some people are more likely to think so than others. According to Liana Sayer, the director of the University of Maryland's Time Use Laboratory, many Americans who are employed, married, a parent, or a college graduate feel shorter on time today than people in those situations did several decades ago. Worki
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The Books Briefing: Humor, Mined From the Absurd
The world sometimes seems dark. Humor, mined from the absurd, can help us see another side of the pain. That sensibility animates the author Paul Auster's memoir Hand to Mouth , which follows his early failures as a writer. It also powered work by Auster's inspiration Samuel Beckett, who wrote the hilarious Watt while on the run from the Gestapo. The memoirist Sean Wilsey even remarked in a colum
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2,000-year-old remains of infant and pet dog uncovered in France
Child was buried at beginning of first century surrounded by vases and animal offerings French archaeologists have hailed the "exceptional" discovery of the 2,000-year-old remains of a child buried with animal offerings and what appears to have been a pet dog. The child, believed to have been around a year old, was interred at the beginning of the first century, during Roman rule, in a wooden cof
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'A bloody mess': Confusion reigns over naming of new COVID variants
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00097-w As more lineages emerge, researchers are struggling with a patchwork of nomenclature.
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Study: X-Rays surrounding 'Magnificent 7' may be traces of sought-after particle
A new study, led by a theoretical physicist at Berkeley Lab, suggests that never-before-observed particles called axions may be the source of unexplained, high-energy X-ray emissions surrounding a group of neutron stars.
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Managing large-scale construction projects to avoid cost overruns
Supplier selection and pricing format decisions that reflect key characteristics of the project, such as the size of the project, duration, and type of customer, are best at reducing a significant part of cost overruns.
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Newly developed GaN based MEMS resonator operates stably even at high temperature
JST PRESTO researcher developed a MEMS resonator that stably operates even under high temperatures by regulating the strain caused by the heat from gallium nitride (GaN). This device is small, highly sensitive and can be integrated with CMOS technology promising for the application to 5G communication, IoT timing device, on-vehicle applications, and advanced driver assistance system.
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World's oldest work of art found in a hidden Indonesian valley
Archaeologists find a cave painting of a wild pig that is at least 45,500 years old. The painting is the earliest known work of representational art. The discovery was made in a remote valley on the Indonesian island of Sulawesi. A recently-found picture of a wild pig that was made over 45,500 years ago is the world's oldest known cave painting, according to archaeologists. The painting, which ma
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Rigshospitalets nordfløj går mindst 300 millioner over budget
Flere års forsinkelse giver en stor ekstraregning på en ny tilbygning til Rigshospitalet, der har døjet med vandskader og hullede vandrør undervejs i byggeriet.
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Are partially protected areas the 'red herrings' of marine conservation?
Partially protected marine areas create confusion and don't meet their broad conservation objectives, researchers have found.
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Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
New research indicates that allergens in the environment often are to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, and that the itching often doesn't respond to antihistamines because the itch signals are being carried to the brain along a previously unrecognized pathway that current drugs don't target.
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Scientists uncover new path toward treating a rare but deadly neurologic condition
Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is a compound that is little known but is essential for life. Children born without the ability to synthesize Moco die young. It has not been possible to create Moco supplements because the compound is so unstable. Studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that by combining, Moco with certain proteins, it becomes stable and can repair deficiency.
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Climate change doesn't spare the insects
Entomologists have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They are sharing new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and they are coming up with a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower them to conserve it. It's a model they hope catches on and spreads around the g
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Scholars link diet, dentition, and linguistics
Anthropologists used a novel data analysis of thousands of languages, in addition to studying a unique subset of celebrities, to reveal how a soft food diet — contrasted with the diet of hunter-gatherers — is restructuring dentition and changing how people speak.
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Extreme fire weather
When the Thomas Fire raged through Ventura and Santa Barbara counties in December 2017, an earth science researcher was stunned by its severity. Burning for more than a month and scorching 440 square miles, the fire was then considered the worst in California's history.
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Rare lichen unique to Florida discovered in museum collections, may be extinct
Scientists have found a new species of fleshy verdigris lichen, thanks to DNA analysis of museum specimens. Misidentified by its original collectors, the lichen is only known from 32 specimens collected in North and Central Florida scrubland between 1885 and 1985. Now the hunt is on to find it in the wild — if it still exists.
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Skeptics in the Pub – Online:Teaching Critical Thinking in an Era of Disinformation
Nästa VoF Skeptics in the Pub är den 26 januari! Läs allt om eventet här. The post Skeptics in the Pub – Online: Teaching Critical Thinking in an Era of Disinformation appeared first on Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Banks need to strike the right balance for digital transformation
Every financial institution is looking to digital transformation to meet rising customer expectations for speed and convenience, lower its operating cost, and fend off competition, including from tech companies moving into financial services. Some are spending over 10% of yearly revenue on technology investments, according to Bloomberg . "This is a huge investment and most financial institutions
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Trump Administration Will Let More Doctors Prescribe Drug To Fight Opioid Addiction
The change means that doctors will no longer need a special federal waiver in order to prescribe buprenorphine, a medication to treat opioid use disorder. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Multiverses and the Inverse Gambler's Fallacy
I was intrigued by an article in Scientific American by philosopher, Philip Goff, mainly because I disagree with his ultimate conclusion. He makes a very cogent logical argument, but I am having trouble with one piece of it. Here's the quick summary: The core enigma is the fine-tuning problem with the universe. There are a number of physical constants, such as gravity, the charge of an electron,
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BIO Integration journal, Volume 1, Issue number 4, publishes
BIO Integration Journal, Volume 1, Issue Number 4, PublishesGuangzhou, January 15, 2021: New journal BIO Integration (BIOI) publishes its fourth issue, volume 1, issue 4.
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Basis for the essential cellular powerhouses
Researchers have solved the operating mode of the barrel pore protein assembly in the mitochondrial outer membrane
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Genital shape key to male flies' sexual success
Having genitals of a certain shape and size gives male flies a major reproductive advantage, new research shows.
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Brazilian authorities airlift oxygen to coronavirus-stricken Manaus
Health experts say a new strain is hitting Amazonian city harder than during first wave
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Research breaks new ground in understanding how a molecular motor generates force
A team of biophysicists set out to tackle the long-standing question about the nature of force generation by myosin, the molecular motor responsible for muscle contraction. The key question they addressed – one of the most controversial topics in the field – was: how does myosin convert chemical energy, in the form of ATP, into mechanical work? The answer revealed new details into how myosin, the
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DB Cargo kommenterer Storbælt-hændelse: Vi overholder alle sikkerhedsregler
PLUS. Fragtfirmaet håber at havarikommisionen vil undersøge, hvilke forhold på Storbælt der bliver ved med at forårsage ulykker med firmaets vogne.
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Most of us are sticking to the lockdown rules, so why do we blame one another? | Stephen Reicher
Fixating on the actions of a handful of 'covidiots' will only undermine compliance among the population as a whole There is a paradox at the heart of this pandemic. Since before England's first lockdown, politicians, media pundits and government advisers have voiced concerns that the public would be the weak link in controlling infections. Judging by polling and social media posts decrying lockdo
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Why you should turn off your camera during Zoom meetings
Leaving your camera off during a virtual meeting can do a lot to reduce your carbon footprint, a new study shows. The study says that despite a record drop in global carbon emissions in 2020, a pandemic-driven shift to remote work and more at-home entertainment still has significant environmental impact due to how internet data is stored and transferred around the world. Just one hour of videocon
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The new Covid variants are a peril to us all
Mutations crop up every now and then and dramatically change the threat we face
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Caro Verbeek: What Can The Scents Of The Past Tell Us About Our History?
Each day, we breathe about 22,000 times–and all that time we smell. Scent historian Caro Verbeek recreates scents of the past. She says, just like music and art, smell is a part of our heritage. (Image credit: TED)
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The role of T cells in fighting cancer
Why do some hosts' immune systems reject tumors easily, while others have a harder time doing so? It depends on the types of the immune cells known as CD8 T cells and how a host's specific T cells match up with the neoantigens present in the tumor.
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Research breaks new ground in understanding how a molecular motor generates force
A team of biophysicists set out to tackle the long-standing question about the nature of force generation by myosin, the molecular motor responsible for muscle contraction. The key question they addressed – one of the most controversial topics in the field – was: how does myosin convert chemical energy, in the form of ATP, into mechanical work? The answer revealed new details into how myosin, the
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Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding Arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation.
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Altering mealtimes could prevent development of Type 2 diabetes
An innovative new study is set to examine if changing our mealtimes to earlier or later in the day could reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes.
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Artificial Intelligence beats us in chess, but not in memory
A new piece of research shows that the brain strategy for storing memories may lead to imperfect memories, but in turn, allows it to store more memories, and with less hassle than AI. The new study, carried out by SISSA scientists in collaboration with Kavli Institute for Systems Neuroscience & Centre for Neural Computation, Trondheim, Norway, has just been published in Physical Review Letters .
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A new tool to facilitate quicker, error-free software design
The tool permits the early detection of errors at any point during the modelling process, not just on completion, as is the case now
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Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: ion beam breeding to the rescue
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan successfully created a larger strain of zooplankton by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam, which contributes to improving the survival rate and growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.
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Science journals to offer select authors open-access publishing for free
"Green" open-access route complies with the Coalition S funders' mandate
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Brexit trade problems: What's gone wrong and can it be fixed?
Queues of lorries at borders and empty supermarket shelves confirm what most already knew: the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) has increased trade barriers between the EU and the UK.
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Remediation gets the lead out of soil, but not kids
A relatively affordable remediation process can almost entirely remove lead left behind by unregulated battery recycling, report researchers. The finding raises troubling questions about how to effectively eliminate the poison from children's bodies. The battery recycling industry is responsible for much of the lead soil contamination in poor and middle-income countries. Decades after the industr
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Data-driven rating system makes it easier to select sports teams
Picking the right sports team for a particular event or to play in certain conditions is many a selector's nightmare.
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Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
Most frogs emit a characteristic croak to attract the attention of a potential mate. But a few frog species that call near loud streams—where the noise may obscure those crucial love songs—add to their calls by visually showing off with the flap of a hand, a wave of a foot or a bob of the head. Frogs who "dance" near rushing streams have been documented in the rainforests of India, Borneo, Brazil
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In lab study, nanoparticle shows promising results for treating severe allergies
For about one in 13 children in the U.S., normally harmless foodstuffs such as milk, eggs and peanuts can send the body's natural defenses into overdrive.
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Changes in nutrient storage and metabolism help fruit flies reach maturity
RIKEN developmental biologists have analyzed the transitions that precede metamorphosis in fruit fly larvae using experiments and mathematical modeling1. They have also identified the survival strategies underlying these transitions. While conducted on fruit flies, their study may have relevance for other species, including humans.
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Glass frogs living near roaring waterfalls wave hello to attract mates
Most frogs emit a characteristic croak to attract the attention of a potential mate. But a few frog species that call near loud streams—where the noise may obscure those crucial love songs—add to their calls by visually showing off with the flap of a hand, a wave of a foot or a bob of the head. Frogs who "dance" near rushing streams have been documented in the rainforests of India, Borneo, Brazil
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Changes in nutrient storage and metabolism help fruit flies reach maturity
RIKEN developmental biologists have analyzed the transitions that precede metamorphosis in fruit fly larvae using experiments and mathematical modeling1. They have also identified the survival strategies underlying these transitions. While conducted on fruit flies, their study may have relevance for other species, including humans.
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Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: Ion beam breeding to the rescue
A research team led by scientists at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (RNC) has successfully created larger-than-usual strains of zooplankton—which are used in fish nurseries—by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam. The new strains of zooplankton could contribute to improving the survival rate and optimizing the growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.
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Birds that play with others have the biggest brains—and the same may go for humans
Have you ever seen magpies play-fighting with one another, or rolling around in high spirits? Or an apostlebird running at full speed with a stick in its beak, chased by a troop of other apostlebirds? Well, such play behavior may be associated with a larger brain and a longer life.
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Snakes evolve a magnetic way to be resistant to venom
Certain snakes have evolved a unique genetic trick to avoid being eaten by venomous snakes, according to University of Queensland research.
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Protecting the genome from transposon activation
Transposons are foreign DNA elements capable of random insertion into the genome, an event that can be very dangerous for a cell. Their activity must be silenced to maintain genomic integrity, which is primarily achieved by H3K9me3-mediated repression. Researchers from the Gasser group identified two parallel pathways that are essential for H3K9me3- mediated transcriptional repression and thus for
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Optical computing at sub-picosecond speeds
Vanderbilt researchers have developed the next generation of ultrafast data transmission that may make it possible to make already high-performance computing "on demand." The technology unjams bottlenecks in data streams using a hybrid silicon-vanadium dioxide waveguide that can turn light on and off in less than one trillionth of a second.
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Ozone generators may help remediate contamination caused by thirdhand smoke
In 10 years of studying thirdhand smoke, which is the toxic cigarette residue that clings to virtually all indoor surfaces for months or years, Berkeley Lab scientist Hugo Destaillats said the most frequent question he hears from the public is how to remediate property where a smoker once lived.
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Primer on carbon dioxide removal provides vital resource at critical time
Scientists say that any serious plan to address climate change should include carbon dioxide removal (CDR) technologies and policies, which makes the newly launched CDR Primer an especially vital resource, says Berkeley Lab scientist Margaret Torn, one of about three dozen scientists who contributed to this document.
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Science family of journals announces change to open-access policy
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00103-1 Subscription journals will let some Plan S funded researchers share accepted manuscripts under open licences.
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Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can be helpful
Divergences between scientific and Indigenous and Local Knowledge can provide a better understanding of why local pastoralists may be willing, or not, to participate in conservation initiatives for carnivores, a study from University of Helsinki suggests.
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The end of domestic wine in 17th century Japan
An historical document clearly indicates that the Hosokawa clan of Japan's Kokura Domain stopped producing wine in 1632, the year before the shogunate ordered them to move to the Higo Domain. Researchers believe the reason for halting wine production was directly related to the move and because wine was considered a drink of Christianity, which was harshly suppressed at that time in Japan.
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Are partially protected areas the 'red herrings' of marine conservation?
Partially protected marine areas create confusion and don't meet their broad conservation objectives, UNSW researchers have found.
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WSU scientists identify contents of ancient Maya drug containers
Scientists have identified the presence of a non-tobacco plant in ancient Maya drug containers for the first time. The researchers detected Mexican marigold (Tagetes lucida) in residues taken from 14 miniature Maya ceramic vessels. The vessels also contain chemical traces present in two types of dried and cured tobacco.
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Newly developed GaN based MEMS resonator operates stably even at high temperature
JST PRESTO researcher developed a MEMS resonator that stably operates even under high temperatures by regulating the strain caused by the heat from gallium nitride (GaN). This device is small, highly sensitive and can be integrated with CMOS technology promising for the application to 5G communication, IoT timing device, on-vehicle applications, and advanced driver assistance system.
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Bio-inspired spiral hydrogel fiber qualified to be surgical suture
A team led by Prof. YU Shuhong from the University of Science and Technology of China reported a bio-inspired lotus-fiber-mimetic spiral structure BC hydrogel fiber with high strength, high toughness, excellent biocompatibility, good stretchability, and high energy dissipation.
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Dual-shot dynamics and ultimate frequency of all-optical magnetic recording on GdFeCo
Achieving ultrafast and energy-efficient optical control of magnetism beyond light's 'diffraction limit' could revolutionize information-processing technology. Towards this goal, researchers led by Xiangping Li at Jinan University and Alexey V. Kimel at Radboud University have determined the fastest possible rate of the optical reversal of magnetization of up to 3?GHz, and proposed a method to ach
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Towards applications: ultra-low-loss on-chip zero-index materials
Dirac-cone materials behave like an isotropic and impedance-matched zero-index medium at Dirac-point wavelength, enabling light-matter interactions in a spatially uniform optical mode with arbitrary shapes. However, such interactions are limited to small areas because of the propagation loss. Scientists designed an ultra-low-loss and homogeneous zero-index material by introducing resonance-trapped
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ADA lowers target HbA1C levels for children with type-1 diabetes
In early 2020, upon recommendation by leading endocrinologists, American Diabetes Association lowered the target hemoglobin A1C guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes. Their goal in recommending stricter glucose control was to ensure children with type 1 diabetes have better immediate and long-term health outcomes with fewer health complications and reduced mortality rates. In this "Perspect
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Filling a crucial gap in aquafarming: Ion beam breeding to the rescue
A research team led by scientists at the RIKEN Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science (RNC) has successfully created larger-than-usual strains of zooplankton—which are used in fish nurseries—by creating mutations with a heavy ion beam. The new strains of zooplankton could contribute to improving the survival rate and optimizing the growth of juvenile fish in aquaculture.
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Birds that play with others have the biggest brains—and the same may go for humans
Have you ever seen magpies play-fighting with one another, or rolling around in high spirits? Or an apostlebird running at full speed with a stick in its beak, chased by a troop of other apostlebirds? Well, such play behavior may be associated with a larger brain and a longer life.
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Snakes evolve a magnetic way to be resistant to venom
Certain snakes have evolved a unique genetic trick to avoid being eaten by venomous snakes, according to University of Queensland research.
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Protecting the genome from transposon activation
Transposons are foreign DNA elements capable of random insertion into the genome, an event that can be very dangerous for a cell. Their activity must be silenced to maintain genomic integrity, which is primarily achieved by H3K9me3-mediated repression. Researchers from the Gasser group identified two parallel pathways that are essential for H3K9me3- mediated transcriptional repression and thus for
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A new way to look for gravitational waves
In a paper published today in Physical Review Letters, Valerie Domcke of CERN and Camilo Garcia-Cely of DESY report on a new technique to search for gravitational waves—the ripples in the fabric of spacetime that were first detected by the LIGO and Virgo collaborations in 2015 and earned Rainer Weiss, Barry Barish and Kip Thorne the Nobel Prize in Physics in 2017.
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Mutant roots reveal how we can grow crops in damaged soils
For years, conventional wisdom has held that roots don't grow as deep in hard soil because it's just too difficult for them to physically push through it. But our new research has unearthed another reason: their growth is controlled by a biological signal which can be "switched off," enabling them to punch through compacted earth. It's a discovery that could help crops to grow in even the most dam
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New data on the Quaternary ecosystems in the central Iberian Peninsula
Adrián Pablos and Nohemi Sala, researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), lead the team that has recently published two papers in the journals Quaternary Science Reviews and Radiocarbon on the Cueva de los Torrejones, a classic site in the locality of Tamajón (Guadalajara, Spain), that furnish new data on the Quaternary ecosystems of the peninsular inte
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Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Out with the old, in with the new, as the New Year's saying goes, but not where the marine environment is concerned. Researchers from Japan have discovered that ocean acidification keeps algal communities locked in a simplified state of low biodiversity.
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Simulating evolution to understand a hidden switch
Computer simulations of cells evolving over tens of thousands of generations reveal why some organisms retain a disused switch mechanism that turns on under severe stress, changing some of their characteristics. Maintaining this "hidden" switch is one means for organisms to maintain a high degree of gene expression stability under normal conditions.
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New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities
Mangroves are salt-tolerant plants found in intertidal areas throughout much of the world's tropical and subtropical coastlines. Mangrove ecosystems are highly variable, ranging from sparse, stunted shrubs to dense stands of thick-stemmed tall trees.
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What can Avicenna teach us about the mind-body problem?
Philosophers of the Islamic world enjoyed thought experiments. If the heavens vanished, they wondered, would time continue to pass? If existence were distinct from essence, would that mean that existence itself must exist? Can God turn your household servant into a horse, so that you come back home to find it has urinated all over your books? But the most famous is the so-called 'flying man' thou
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Øget brug af magneter iPhone 12 kan kortslutte pacemakere
PLUS. Flere magneter i nye mobiltelefoner øger risikoen for magnetiske forstyrrelser, som kan resultere i kortslutninger af pacemakere og implanterbare hjertestartere, viser nyt amerikansk studie. Hjerteforeningen er bekymret for udviklingen.
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Mutant roots reveal how we can grow crops in damaged soils
For years, conventional wisdom has held that roots don't grow as deep in hard soil because it's just too difficult for them to physically push through it. But our new research has unearthed another reason: their growth is controlled by a biological signal which can be "switched off," enabling them to punch through compacted earth. It's a discovery that could help crops to grow in even the most dam
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New data on the Quaternary ecosystems in the central Iberian Peninsula
Adrián Pablos and Nohemi Sala, researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), lead the team that has recently published two papers in the journals Quaternary Science Reviews and Radiocarbon on the Cueva de los Torrejones, a classic site in the locality of Tamajón (Guadalajara, Spain), that furnish new data on the Quaternary ecosystems of the peninsular inte
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Ocean acidification locks algal communities in a simplified state
Out with the old, in with the new, as the New Year's saying goes, but not where the marine environment is concerned. Researchers from Japan have discovered that ocean acidification keeps algal communities locked in a simplified state of low biodiversity.
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Simulating evolution to understand a hidden switch
Computer simulations of cells evolving over tens of thousands of generations reveal why some organisms retain a disused switch mechanism that turns on under severe stress, changing some of their characteristics. Maintaining this "hidden" switch is one means for organisms to maintain a high degree of gene expression stability under normal conditions.
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New mangrove forest mapping tool puts conservation in reach of coastal communities
Mangroves are salt-tolerant plants found in intertidal areas throughout much of the world's tropical and subtropical coastlines. Mangrove ecosystems are highly variable, ranging from sparse, stunted shrubs to dense stands of thick-stemmed tall trees.
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Four tips for learning language through film and TV
Films and TV shows can be great tools to help you become a more competent speaker of another language. By captivating your attention and arousing your curiosity, these formats can instill a positive attitude towards learning. They can also help you be a more active participant and keep you motivated to spend more time on language-related tasks.
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Ammonite: The remarkable real science of Mary Anning and her fossils
Palaeontologist Mary Anning is known for discovering a multitude of Jurassic fossils from Lyme Regis on England's Dorset Coast from the age of ten in 1809.
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75% of Australia's marine protected areas are given only 'partial' protection. Here's why that's a problem
A global coalition of more than 50 countries have this week pledged to protect over 30% of the planet's lands and seas by the end of this decade. Their reasoning is clear: we need greater protection for nature, to prevent further extinctions and protect the life-sustaining ecosystems crucial to human survival.
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Mars is still an active world—here's a landslide in Nili Fossae
Since the 1960s and '70s, scientists have come to view Mars as something of a "dead planet." As the first close-up images from orbit and the surface came in, previous speculation about canals, water and a Martian civilization were dispelled. Subsequent studies also revealed that the geological activity that created features like the Tharsis Mons region (especially Olympus Mons) and Valles Marineri
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Fluorescence microscopy at highest spatial and temporal resolution
LMU researchers simplify the MINFLUX microscope and have succeeded in differentiating molecules that are extremely close together and tracking their dynamics.
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Ammonite: The remarkable real science of Mary Anning and her fossils
Palaeontologist Mary Anning is known for discovering a multitude of Jurassic fossils from Lyme Regis on England's Dorset Coast from the age of ten in 1809.
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75% of Australia's marine protected areas are given only 'partial' protection. Here's why that's a problem
A global coalition of more than 50 countries have this week pledged to protect over 30% of the planet's lands and seas by the end of this decade. Their reasoning is clear: we need greater protection for nature, to prevent further extinctions and protect the life-sustaining ecosystems crucial to human survival.
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Facebook Can't Fix What It Won't Admit To
Plus: Zuckerberg's community manifesto, how to hold platforms accountable, and an accidental admission in Congress.
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Hackers Used Zero-Days to Infect Windows and Android Devices
Google researchers say the campaign, which booby-trapped sites to ensnare targets, was carried out by a "highly sophisticated actor."
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How to keep your anxiety from spiraling out of control
Anxiety can strike any time, especially when your underlying stress levels are high. (Diego Cervo/Deposit Photos/) If you're reading this, you're probably stressed. Never fear: We've dug through the evidence to reveal what science really says about finding zen—and holding onto it through tough times. Want to try meditation ? Take better baths ? Stop anxiety in its tracks ? Welcome to Calm Month .
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Mini Museum Brings Priceless Scientific and Historical Artifacts to the Masses
A lot has happened since the dawn of the known universe. Over billions of years, stars, planets, and galaxies formed out of gas and dust. Atoms collided to create molecules that came to life and evolved from single cell organisms into complex life. Entire species of spectacular giants came and went millions of years before we ever existed. And humans have gone from cave-dwelling hunter-gatherers
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Unrivaled View of Brilliant 'Planetary Nebula' NGC 2899
Its distinctive butterfly shape is caused by one star interfering with the gas expulsion pattern of another — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Snakes evolve a magnetic way to be resistant to venom
Certain snakes have evolved a unique genetic trick to avoid being eaten by venomous snakes, according to University of Queensland research.Associate Professor Bryan Fry from UQ's Toxin Evolution Lab said the technique worked in a manner similar to the way two sides of a magnet repel each other.
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New England Journal of Medicine publishes COVID-19 treatment trial results
In a multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health, a combination of two drugs, baricitinib and remdesivir, reduced time to recovery in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The results from sites including UT Health San Antonio and University Health were published Dec. 11 in the New England Journal of Medicine .
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Can You Treat Loneliness By Creating an Imaginary Friend? – Facts So Romantic
Tulpamancers imagine talking to the tulpa, sometimes for more than an hour a day, and eventually, perhaps after several months, the tulpa will start talking back. Photo Illustration by LeaDigszammal / Shutterstock Did you ever have an imaginary friend? If you didn't, chances are you know someone who did. Imaginary companions, as scholars call them, are quite common, and aren't strictly associated
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Now we have the coronavirus vaccine, how soon can we get back to normal life?
The government has ordered sufficient doses to inoculate the entire population of the UK against Covid-19 but we are in for a long haul Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage When will the Covid-19 vaccine begin to have an effect on the nation? The government has pledged to offer vaccines to 15 million people – the over-70s, healthcare workers and those required to shield b
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Intimate associations between SARS-CoV-2 and mitochondria suggest new angles of attack
As one wise pundit recently observed, "everybody is a virologist now." For the many people whose interest in biology formerly began and ended with "the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell," a second axiom can now be offered, namely, that the virus is the thief of power. In other words, what the mitochondria giveth, the virus taketh away.
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Intimate associations between SARS-CoV-2 and mitochondria suggest new angles of attack
As one wise pundit recently observed, "everybody is a virologist now." For the many people whose interest in biology formerly began and ended with "the mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell," a second axiom can now be offered, namely, that the virus is the thief of power. In other words, what the mitochondria giveth, the virus taketh away.
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Chip-kaos: Færre biler ruller ud af fabrikshallerne de næste måneder
Kombinationen af global handelskrig mellem Kina og USA, corona-krise, øget efterspørgsel på hardware og ekstremt ufleksible produktionsfaciliteter giver mangel på mikrochips verden over.
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Many scientists citing two scandalous COVID-19 papers ignore their retractions
Globally discredited hospital data from the company Surgisphere continues to live as reliable evidence—even in leading journals
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Mindre gris- och fågelkött för att bli kvitt EU:s stora sojaimport
EU:s stora import av soja bidrar till avskogningen i framförallt Sydamerika. Utan sojaimport och med bibehållet näringsintag skulle människorna i EU behöva äta mer från växtriket, och förändra produktionen av kött, mjölk och ägg, visar en studie från SLU. Forskare från SLU har undersökt hur produktionen av kött, mjölk och ägg skulle behöva förändras – om EU skulle producera så mycket mat som möjl
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Robot Toilets, Vibrating Headbands, and Other Oddities at CES
This week, we recap the news, trends, and stand-out gadgets from the first-ever virtual CES.
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2020 Was the One of the Hottest Years on Record
Officials from NASA and NOAA say the warming of both the planet's air and water are driving weather disasters.
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How to completely customize the way you control Windows
You thought these guys were your only options to control Windows? Think again. (Guillaume Issaly/Unsplash/) Just because you've always used your keyboard and your mouse to interact with your Windows computer, it doesn't mean this is necessarily the best way to get stuff done. Microsoft's OS provides a host of options when it comes to customizing your experience, whether it's tweaking the devices
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Ekstreme temperaturer truer verdens byer: 'Rigtig mange mennesker kommer til at lide helt enormt'
Klimaforandringer kan få temperaturen i nogle byer til at stige mere end fire grader frem mod år 2100.
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Blålysande framsteg för lysdiod av perovskit
Forskare vid Linköpings universitet har utvecklat lysdioder baserat på perovskiter som effektivt avger blått ljus. Upptäckten kan på sikt leda till ett billigt, energieffektivt och mer miljövänligt alternativ både för belysning och led-skärmar. Belysning står för cirka 20 procent av världens totala elförbrukning – men om alla ljuskällor istället bestod av lysdioder skulle motsvarande siffra vara
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EU countries decry 'very short notice' of delay in delivery of Pfizer vaccine
Drugmaker blames temporary cutback on factory revamp designed to boost production this year
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Trump Is Putting the Machinery of Death Into Overdrive
The first time I stood in an execution chamber, what I remember most was the stillness of the room. In November 2018, I visited Angola prison in Louisiana, and saw where the state injected prisoners with a cocktail that rendered them unconscious, paralyzed their muscles, discontinued their breathing, and stopped their hearts. The table was long and blue , its leather upholstery covering a thin la
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Djur och människor som lever i samma områden beter sig på samma sätt
Kanske är det miljö och inte bara kultur som påverkar mänskligt beteende. En ny studie visar nämligen att människors, däggdjurs och fåglars beteende liknar varandras när vi lever inom samma område.
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Why future homes could be made of living fungus
In the summer of 2014 a strange building began to take shape just outside MoMA PS1, a contemporary art centre in New York City. It looked like someone had started building an igloo and then got carried away, so that the ice-white bricks rose into huge towers. It was a captivating sight, but the truly impressive thing about this building was not so much its looks but the fact that it had been grown
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A new regime for analyzing properties of topological materials
Two recent studies demonstrate that there is a topological origin of two related metal alloys' ability to convert light into electrical current. New fundamental research on rhodium monosilicide (RhSi), published in NPJ Quantum Materials, and on cobalt monosilicide (CoSi), published in Nature Communications, could provide a new approach for developing devices such as photo detectors and solar cells
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Innovative gene stacks enhance wheat rust resistance
John Innes Centre researchers have helped in the development of pioneering gene stacking techniques to combat the growing threat of wheat rust.
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Project maps 'astronomical' number of celestial objects
Nearly 700 million astronomical objects have been carefully cataloged and made public as part of a major international collaboration involving researchers from The Australian National University (ANU).
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Blending rules for 3-D printing bone
By combining synthetic polymers and natural materials it is possible to increase the range of characteristics that might be fabricated using 3-D printing of components, according to research published in the International Journal of Nano and Biomaterials. In a proof of principle, the team has demonstrated how one such blend emulates the material properties of bone.
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Innovative gene stacks enhance wheat rust resistance
John Innes Centre researchers have helped in the development of pioneering gene stacking techniques to combat the growing threat of wheat rust.
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2020 was Earth's second-hottest year, just behind 2016
It's official: 2020 ranks as the second-hottest year on record for the planet, knocking 2019 down to third hottest, according to an analysis by NOAA scientists.
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Researcher discusses how social movements succeed
The summer of 2020 was not the first time activists marched in the streets of major U.S. cities, expressing their outrage over high-profile episodes of police brutality and demanding an end to racial inequities. Nor was it the first time that protesters pushed to reform police tactics or remove monuments to Confederate war heroes. Black Lives Matter—as a rallying cry and as an organization—had bee
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Optoacoustic sensor measures water content in living tissue
Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (US) have shown how optoacoustics can be used for monitoring skin water content, a technique which is promising for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and in cosmetology. The paper outlining these results was published in the Journal of Biophotonics.
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Phytoplankton factory in the Argentine Sea
The Goldilocks zone typically refers to the habitable area around a star where conditions are right for the existence of liquid water and possibly life. But on Earth, the South Atlantic Ocean has its own kind of Goldilocks zone. In spring and summer, conditions in the Argentine Sea off Patagonia often become just right for phytoplankton, and populations of the plant-like organisms explode into eno
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The Boogaloo Bois Prepare for Civil War
Updated at 8:47 a.m. ET on January 15, 2021. In the menagerie of right-wing populist groups, the boogaloo bois stand out for their fashion, for their great love of memes, and, to put it plainly, for the incoherence of their ideology. Which is saying a lot, considering that the riot at the Capitol last Wednesday featured partisans of the long-gone country of South Vietnam, Falun Gong adherents , e
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Feeling fit? A little more sweat could still help your heart
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00093-0 Data from nearly 100,000 people find no upper limit to the heart benefits of increasing exercise levels.
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China COVID vaccine reports mixed results — what does that mean for the pandemic?
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00094-z Scientists say CoronaVac could reduce cases of severe disease, particularly in countries with raging outbreaks.
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Optoacoustic sensor measures water content in living tissue
Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (US) have shown how optoacoustics can be used for monitoring skin water content, a technique which is promising for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and in cosmetology. The paper outlining these results was published in the Journal of Biophotonics.
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Phytoplankton factory in the Argentine Sea
The Goldilocks zone typically refers to the habitable area around a star where conditions are right for the existence of liquid water and possibly life. But on Earth, the South Atlantic Ocean has its own kind of Goldilocks zone. In spring and summer, conditions in the Argentine Sea off Patagonia often become just right for phytoplankton, and populations of the plant-like organisms explode into eno
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How to care for people with Covid at home
As coronavirus cases rise across the UK, here are steps to take if someone falls ill in your household Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With roughly one in 30 Londoners testing positive for coronavirus, and other areas of the country experiencing rapid rises in cases, there's a fair chance that someone in your household may become infected at some point. The growing b
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Så påverkade vårens nedstängningar luften
I våras införde flera länder nedstängningar vilket drastiskt minskade utsläppen. En ny studie visar att luftföroreningar minskat, men inte lika mycket som många trott. Spela videon för att höra om vad det beror på.
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AI-Powered Text From This Program Could Fool the Government
A Harvard medical student submitted auto-generated comments to Medicaid; volunteers couldn't distinguish them from those penned by humans.
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Wikipedia Is Basically a Massive RPG
Sure, the metaphor is imperfect. But as the encyclopedia enters its 20th year, it's worth reflecting on the "rules of the game"—and how they might change.
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How to Preorder the Samsung Galaxy S21—and Which One to Get
Should you go Ultra or snag the S21+? We break down the differences between the company's new phones and round up the best deals.
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Everything We Know Now About Schools, Kids, and Covid-19
Researchers are finally getting good data on how severely SARS-CoV-2 affects children and how they transmit it. What does it mean for reopening classrooms?
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I Am Not a Soldier, but I Have Been Trained to Kill
A sprawling tactical industry is teaching American civilians how to fight like Special Ops forces. By preparing for violence at home, are they calling it into being?
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Tre firmaer arbejder på digitalt vaccinepas
Microsoft, Oracle og Epic arbejder sammen med en række andre virksomheder om projektet.
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Scientists Weigh In on India's Citizenship Debate
Repressive measures by India's government are sparking a backlash in the nation's scientific community — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Telescopes on Far Side of the Moon Could Illuminate the Cosmic Dark Ages
Instruments deployed on missions to the lunar far side might give us an unprecedented view of the early universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Israel studies new forest home for endangered mountain gazelle
Israel is one of the last places where the endangered mountain gazelle roams in the wild but, as development shrinks their natural savannah habitat, ecologists are studying if they can also thrive in forests.
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Israel studies new forest home for endangered mountain gazelle
Israel is one of the last places where the endangered mountain gazelle roams in the wild but, as development shrinks their natural savannah habitat, ecologists are studying if they can also thrive in forests.
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Telescopes on Far Side of the Moon Could Illuminate the Cosmic Dark Ages
Instruments deployed on missions to the lunar far side might give us an unprecedented view of the early universe — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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MAGA Is an Extreme Aberration
T he moment at which the "Make America great again" movement became completely unmoored from the democratic process arrived at around 1 p.m. on January 6, when Congress was about to start certifying the 2020 electoral vote and, in doing so, seal President Donald Trump's defeat. On a stage near the White House, the president was an hour into a rambling speech. Supervising the electoral-vote count
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Ekspert om løs trailer på Storebælt: Umuligt at undgå med den slags vogne
PLUS. Ifølge en tidligere undersøgelseschef hos DSB er det svært at sikre at om traileren på vognen er låst korrekt. Derfor bør man køre med vogne som bremser, hvis traileren går løs.
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Flu cases have been shockingly low during the pandemic. Here why.
Vaccines, behavior changes, and viral interactions may all play a role. (CDC/) This year's public health headlines have mostly focused on COVID-19, and for good reason. Despite the pandemic's impact on all of us, sick and healthy, we've actually seen a record-breaking low amount of another icky, highly-contagious respiratory virus—the flu. Just to put it in perspective, from late September to lat
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Climate Change Survey: Majority of Voters Support Initiatives
A survey carried out after the November election found that 66 percent of respondents said that developing sources of clean energy should be a high or very high priority.
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Vaccinated veterans, it's time to reclaim the cities!
There is no longer any excuse for the new Covid-secure senior citizens not to do their bit
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Worried about your firm's AI ethics? These startups are here to help.
Rumman Chowdhury's job used to involve a lot of translation. As the "responsible AI" lead at the consulting firm Accenture, she would work with clients struggling to understand their AI models. How did they know if the models were doing what they were supposed to? The confusion often came about partly because the company's data scientists, lawyers, and executives seemed to be speaking different l
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"There can be no justification for such studies": Paper on artificial eyes for dogs earns expression of concern
A journal has issued an expression of concern for a 2020 paper by researchers in Korea who have used 3-D printing to create artificial eyes for dogs. The study triggered a slew of critical comments from readers, who were outraged by the ethics of the research and what they saw as inadequate protections for the … Continue reading
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Enantioselective preparation of mechanically planar chiral rotaxanes by kinetic resolution strategy
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20372-0 Since the discovery of mechanically planar chiral rotaxanes and topologically chiral catenanes, their asymmetric synthesis has been a long-standing challenge. Here, the authors report enantioselective preparation of mechanically planar chiral rotaxanes with up to 99.9% ee in 29% yield.
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Charged particle guiding and beam splitting with auto-ponderomotive potentials on a chip
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20592-4 There is interest in controlling particle beams using electric fields and using them in compact devices. Here the authors demonstrate guiding and splitting of charged particle (electron and ion) beams on a chip designed with special structures.
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High-pressure phase diagrams of FeSe1−xTex: correlation between suppressed nematicity and enhanced superconductivity
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20621-2 Despite studies in FeSe1−xSx, it is yet unconfirmed whether nematic fluctuation can induce superconductivity. Here, the authors study single crystals of FeSe1−xTex showing enhanced superconductivity upon suppression of nematicity.
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Massively parallel cantilever-free atomic force microscopy
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20612-3 Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides high resolution, but is limited to small areas. Here, the authors introduce a massively parallel AFM approach with >1000 probes in a cantilever-free probe architecture, and present an optical method for detecting probe–sample contact with sub-10 nm vertical precision.
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The circadian cryptochrome, CRY1, is a pro-tumorigenic factor that rhythmically modulates DNA repair
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20513-5 Cryptochrome 1 (CRY1) is a transcriptional coregulator associated with the circadian clock. Here the authors reveal that CRY1 is hormone-regulated, stabilized by genomic insult, and promotes DNA repair and cell survival through temporal transcriptional regulation.
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Plasmon-driven nanowire actuators for on-chip manipulation
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20683-2 Implementing metal nanowires in photonic circuits is challenging due to lack of suitable manipulation techniques. Here, the authors present an earthworm-like peristaltic crawling motion mechanism, based on surface plasmons and surface acoustic waves, and show on-chip manipulations of single nanowires.
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The nature of active sites for carbon dioxide electroreduction over oxide-derived copper catalysts
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20615-0 The active sites over oxide-derived copper (OD-Cu) catalysts for CO2 electroreduction are unclear. Here, the authors show atom-level product-specific active sites on OD-Cu surface models, where planar and convex square sites are responsible for ethylene while the step square site favours alcohols generation.
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Cellular Heterogeneity–Adjusted cLonal Methylation (CHALM) improves prediction of gene expression
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20492-7 Here, the authors introduce Cell Heterogeneity–Adjusted cLonal Methylation (CHALM) as a methylation quantification method that considers the heterogeneity of sequenced bulk cells. They apply CHALM to methylation datasets to detect differentially methylated genes that exhibit distinct biological functions supp
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Book Review: Unlocking the World of Autism
In "An Outsider's Guide to Humans," Camilla Pang draws on science and personal experience to help readers understand the challenges of living on the spectrum. Since age eight, when she was diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder, Pang yearned for an instruction manual on humans — so she wrote one herself.
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»Jeg blev lidt forlegen over at blive kaldt en helt«
Læge Cecilie Bryld stod i corona-checkpoint i april og maj, men er nu tilbage som socialmediciner. At hun selv blev smittet med COVID-19 i efteråret og blev relativ syg, har betydet, at hun er blevet endnu mere stålsat om, at vi skal have bugt med den virus.
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Sammenhold har givet overskud
Christian S. Meyhoff, forskningsansvarlig overlæge på Anæstesiafdelingen, har både haft travlt med COVID-19-relateret forskning og deltaget i det store vagtarbejde. Selvom vaccinen nu er kommet, kan han ikke slippe tankerne om de patienter, der ikke klarede den.
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Stort ansvar midt i pandemi
Hygiejnesygeplejerske Marie Stangerup har haft travlt med undervisning og vejledning i klinikken og med at sikre opdaterede vejledninger for både personale og patienter.
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»Jeg er nervøs for, hvad der sker, når den endelig coronaregning kommer«
COVID-19 har været en stor stressfaktor for portørerne, men vaccinen hjælper på humøret. Selv har portør Emil Dinesen i første omgang takket nej, da han hellere ser sine kolleger blive vaccineret først.
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Kampen mod en fælles fjende har skabt sammenhold i en usikker tid
I en langstrakt pandemi, der trækker store veksler på personalet på Bispebjerg og Frederiksberg Hospital, står følelsen af fællesskab stadig stærkt hos både direktion, afdelingsledelser og læger.
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How South African police are tackling pangolin smugglers
The pangolin is said to be the world's most trafficked mammal. The BBC reports on a rescue operation.
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PODCAST: Fuld tryk på udviklingen af raketmotorer
Hvem har taget teten i udviklingen af raketter? Forrest står verdens to rigeste mænd, der konkurrerer om, hvem der har den største motor. Og så taler vi om, hvad man gør, når computere snyder dig for penge fra Udbetaling Danmark.
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'Can you work with less-qualified people?' and 19 other curveball questions to navigate at industry interviews
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00042-x Be ready for queries that reflect stereotypes about academia and that probe why you're switching sectors, says Tina Persson.
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Changing resilience of oceans to climate change
Oxygen levels in the ancient oceans were surprisingly resilient to climate change, new research suggests.
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An unexpected, and novel, target for prostate cancer – our biological clock
Researchers find that CRY-1, a regulator of circadian rhythms, promotes tumor progression by altering DNA repair.
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Hotspot generation for unique identification with nanomaterials
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79644-w
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Comparative analysis of nuclear, chloroplast, and mitochondrial genomes of watermelon and melon provides evidence of gene transfer
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80149-9
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Composition of the white precipitate formed on the surface of damaged triacetyl cellulose-based motion picture films
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80498-5
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Trends in mortality rate in patients with congenital heart disease undergoing noncardiac surgical procedures at children's hospitals
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81161-3
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High-speed and high-precision PbSe/PbI2 solution process mid-infrared camera
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80847-4 High-speed and high-precision PbSe/PbI 2 solution process mid-infrared camera
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Plasma tissue plasminogen activator and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 in hospitalized COVID-19 patients
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80010-z
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Co-introduction of precipitate hardening and TRIP in a TWIP high-entropy alloy using friction stir alloying
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81350-0
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Multi-energy spectral photon-counting computed tomography (MARS) for detection of arthroplasty implant failure
Scientific Reports, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80463-2
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The incredible physics behind quantum computing
While today's computers—referred to as classical computers—continue to become more and more powerful, there is a ceiling to their advancement due to the physical limits of the materials used to make them. Quantum computing allows physicists and researchers to exponentially increase computation power, harnessing potential parallel realities to do so. Quantum computer chips are astoundingly small,
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Alarming COVID variants show vital role of genomic surveillance
Nature, Published online: 15 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00065-4 Efforts to track SARS-CoV-2 sequences have helped identify worrying variants — but researchers are blind to emerging mutations in some regions.
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Changing resilience of oceans to climate change
Oxygen levels in the ancient oceans were surprisingly resilient to climate change, new research suggests.
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Video: Turistraket med Skywalker-dukke tog turen til rummet
Amazons raket Blue Origin er nu tæt på at flyve mennesker i rummet. 14. testflyvning blev med dukke ombord.
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UK Covid live: PM's plans for school testing in disarray; Wales introduces testing for international arrivals
Decision raises questions about proposed full return of England's schools in February; passengers arriving in Wales must prove negative test Regulator refuses to approve mass daily testing at English schools Testing times: how UK government fell short, again and again UK heads for double-dip recession as GDP falls 2.6% UK bans arrivals from South America over Brazilian variant Global coronavirus
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Chilipeppar vässar solcell
Genom att tillsätta en något oväntad ingrediens, kapsaicin som gör chili så kryddstarkt, har en kinesisk forskare lyckats öka effektiviteten hos en viss typ av så kallade perovskitsolceller. Det rör sig om en enklare form av perovskit som vanligtvis dras med effektivitetsförluster på grund av orenheter i materialet.
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Ørsted uddyber kritik: Vores platformsløsning er 4 mia. billigere end en energi-ø
PLUS. Selskabet frygter, at eksperimenter med en energiø kan give for dyr og for sen vindkraft til Danmarks grønne omstilling.
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Overlæge er ny doktor i leukæmi ved Aarhus Universitet
Ph.d. og overlæge Lene Sofie Granfeldt Østgård har for nyligt forsvaret sin doktordisputats ved Aarhus Universitet. Hun har undersøgt akut myeloid leukæmi i en række epidemiologiske studier, og håbet er, at disputatsen kan bidrage til bedre behandling og overlevelse for patienter med sygdommen.
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Tysk havvindmølle skal producere brint på stedet
I et nyt projekt skal to datterselskaber til Siemens udvikle en helt ny havvindmølle, så den kan producere brint direkte i mølletårnet. En fuldskala prototypen skal stå klar inden 2026 og være med til at levere brint til transport og industri.
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At least 34 dead as Indonesia quake topples homes, buildings
A strong, shallow earthquake shook Indonesia's Sulawesi island just after midnight Friday, toppling homes and buildings, triggering landslides and killing at least 34 people.
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Astronomers document the rise and fall of a rarely observed stellar dance
The sun is the only star in our system. But many of the points of light in our night sky are not as lonely. By some estimates, more than three-quarters of all stars exist as binaries—with one companion—or in even more complex relationships. Stars in close quarters can have dramatic impacts on their neighbors. They can strip material from one another, merge or twist each other's movements through t
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Researchers model regional impacts of specific anthropogenic activities, their influence on extreme fire weather risk
When the Thomas Fire raged through Ventura and Santa Barbara counties in December 2017, Danielle Touma, at the time an earth science researcher at Stanford, was stunned by its severity. Burning for more than a month and scorching 440 square miles, the fire was then considered the worst in California's history.
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Researchers rewind the clock to calculate age and site of supernova blast
Astronomers are winding back the clock on the expanding remains of a nearby, exploded star. By using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, they retraced the speedy shrapnel from the blast to calculate a more accurate estimate of the location and time of the stellar detonation.
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Managing large-scale construction projects to avoid cost overruns
Researchers from University of Stavanger, University of Melbourne, and University of Wisconsin-Madison published a new paper in the Journal of Marketing that examines how major projects undertaken by temporary organizations can be better managed so that cost overruns are minimized.
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New fossil provides clarity to the history of Alligatoridae
Families are complicated. For members of the Alligatoridae family, which includes living caimans and alligators—this is especially true. They are closely related, but because of their similarity, their identification can even stump paleontologists.
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New fossil provides clarity to the history of Alligatoridae
Families are complicated. For members of the Alligatoridae family, which includes living caimans and alligators—this is especially true. They are closely related, but because of their similarity, their identification can even stump paleontologists.
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Researchers offer insights on how diet ultimately reshapes language
Anthropologist Caleb Everett and former student Sihan Chen used a novel data analysis of thousands of languages, in addition to studying a unique subset of celebrities, to reveal how a soft food diet—contrasted with the diet of hunter-gatherers—is restructuring dentition and changing how people speak.
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Climate change doesn't spare the smallest
In a normal year, biologists Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs spend about six months in Costa Rica, where they conduct research and pursue conservation efforts in Área de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), a World Heritage Site in the northwest that encompasses, a network of parks and preserves they helped establish in the 1980s and that has grown to more than 400,000 acres, including marine, dry fo
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Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows.
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Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows.
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Forskare kritiska till hur modeller använts för att beräkna effekt av åtgärder mot corona
Forskare från Imperial College tog fram en modell för att bedöma effekter av olika åtgärder för att minska spridningen av corona. Men modellen har stora brister och kunde inte användas för att dra de publicerade slutsatserna, skriver svenska forskare från bland annat Lund universitet i tidskriften Nature.
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Danske kræftforskere starter forsøg med revolutionerende præcisionskirurgi
Forskere og læger fra Rigshospitalet, Københavns Universitet, Danmarks Tekniske Universitet og Sjællands Universitetshospital har udviklet en ny billeddiagnostisk metode til få kræftvæv til at lyse op og gøre det meget lettere for kirurgen at fjerne.
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Final Word: Different Analyses Show 2020 Either in a Tie for Warmest Year or in 2nd Place
The world's seven warmest years have all occurred since 2014.
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Edgar Dahlin fylder 90: Hvis man bliver ved længe nok, så bliver man moderne igen
Anders Beich, praktiserende læge og formand for Dansk Selskab for Almen Medicin, sender en fødselsdagshilsen til tidligere praktiserende læge Edgar Dahlin
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90 år i dag: »Almen praksis er den mest fascinerende form for lægeliv«
Edgar Dahlin, der stoppede som landets ældste praktiserende læge i august 2019, fylder 90 år i dag, 15. januar.
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Wuhan is at the heart of a battle over the roots of coronavirus
Rival narratives about the origin of the pandemic compete in the Chinese city where it began a year ago
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Country diary: the woodworm's map of whimsy
Stamford, Lincolnshire : The trademark fingerprint of the wood-boring beetles is often hidden from sight "Contracted" is the word that springs to mind as I look closely at the log I've pulled from the pile in my garden. It's cold with frost-shimmer, and as I study its micro-landscape of moss-forest and bark-gully, I find where the rind has flaked away … something on the bare wood beneath. I pick
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DNA test can quickly identify pneumonia in patients with severe COVID-19, aiding faster treatment
Researchers have developed a DNA test to quickly identify secondary infections in COVID-19 patients, who have double the risk of developing pneumonia while on ventilation than non-COVID-19 patients.
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Guppies have varying levels of self-control
Just like humans trying to stick to New Year's resolutions, guppies have varying levels of self-control, a new study shows.
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Managing large-scale construction projects to avoid cost overruns
Supplier selection and pricing format decisions that reflect key characteristics of the project, such as the size of the project, duration, and type of customer, are best at reducing a significant part of cost overruns.
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New fossil provides clarity to the history of Alligatoridae
"From what we have, we are able to understand a little bit more about the evolutionary history of caimans and the alligatorid group, which includes alligators and caimans."
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Dairy product purchasing differs in households with and without children
American dairy consumers are often influenced by a variety of factors that can affect their buying habits. These factors include taste, preference, government information, cultural background, social media, and the news. In an article appearing in JDS Communications , researchers found that households that frequently bought food for children are interested in dairy as part of their diet and purcha
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Why TikTok (and Everyone Else) Is Singing Sea Chanteys
It has a lot to do with unity—and a little something to do with earworms.
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Accelerating US vaccinations 'easier said than done', experts say
More states follow Florida in making anyone over 65 eligible for a jab but bottlenecks may thwart their aims
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The Atlantic Daily: The Danger That Will Outlast the Trump Presidency
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . Anna Moneymaker / The New York Times / Redux The social-media bans hit before the impeachment vote. President Donald Trump is facing repercussions—inside the halls of Congress and out of it—as th
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New year, new outbreak: China rushes to vaccinate 50 million as holiday looms
Drive to immunise 3.5% of the population in weeks comes ahead of the lunar new year festival and as three major cities are locked down Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage At a Shenzhen hospital, 21-year-old airport worker Wang Shuyue lines up to receive her second shot. "I feel it's safe because so many people around the country have taken the vaccine so there shouldn't
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Fagfolk og forskere kræver skærpet tilsyn: Automatisk forvaltning skaber behov for ny it-kyndig domstol
PLUS. Digital sagsbehandling af offentlige ydelser presser borgernes retssikkerhed, mener flere eksperter.
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Bagsiden: Hvordan kommer båden under broen?
Er der en ingeniør til stede?
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Bagsiden: Dimsen fra Døllefjelde
Kender du den: Hvad er det for en dims, Rune Michaelsen har samlet op mellem småstenene på en rasteplads?
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How plants produce defensive toxins without harming themselves
Scientists describe the biosynthesis and exact mode of action of diterpene glycosides in wild tobacco. These antiherbivory compounds attack the cell membrane. To protect themselves from their own toxins, tobacco plants store them in a non-toxic form. Autotoxicity and the protection against it seem to play a greater role in the evolution of plant defenses than previously thought.
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Scientists discover electric eels hunting in a group
Deep in the Brazilian Amazon River basin, scientists discovered a small, river-fed lake filled with more than 100 adult electric eels. Researchers witnessed the electric eels working together to herd small fish into tightly packed balls. Groups of up to 10 eels periodically split off to form cooperative hunting parties. Those smaller groups then surrounded the prey and launched simultaneous electr
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Bird flu epidemic stokes Indian anxiety
Authorities are racing to repress the outbreak in a country already reeling from coronavirus
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The Worst Week for Deaths Since the Pandemic Began
Editor's Note: The Atlantic is making vital coverage of the coronavirus available to all readers. Find the collection here . Updated at 10:00 a.m. ET on January 15, 2021. For 16 weeks, throughout the fall and then straight through the data disruptions around Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day, the number of people currently hospitalized with COVID-19 has risen. On October 13, there were
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New state of matter in one-dimensional quantum gas
By adding some magnetic flair to an exotic quantum experiment, physicists produced an ultra-stable one-dimensional quantum gas with never-before-seen 'scar' states – a feature that could someday be useful for securing quantum information.
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Flip the script: Cardiac rehabilitation is underused, but a simple change could fix that
Making doctors opt out from prescribing cardiac rehabilitation instead of opting in increased referrals by roughly 70 percent
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Measuring the belowground world
Life above ground depends on the soil and its countless inhabitants. Yet, global strategies to protect biodiversity have so far paid little attention to this habitat. Researchers call for greater consideration of soils in international biodiversity strategies, far beyond agriculture. The researchers explain their plan for systematic recording to enable comprehensive policy advisory.
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Greenland melting likely increased by bacteria in sediment
Bacteria are likely triggering greater melting on the Greenland ice sheet, possibly increasing the island's contribution to sea-level rise, according to scientists. That's because the microbes cause sunlight-absorbing sediment to clump together and accumulate in the meltwater streams, according to new study. The findings can be incorporated in climate models, leading to more accurate predictions o
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Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds.
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Pelosi Asks Military To Limit Trump's Nuclear Authority. Here's How That System Works
The House speaker told colleagues she had spoken with the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff about keeping the nuclear codes from an "unhinged President." (Image credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
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COVID-19: Science scepticism may be reinforced by UK rush to approve vaccines
Former director of public health Professor John Ashton has said that scientific scepticism may be reinforced by the UK's rush to approve COVID vaccines for public use and the apparent political desire to be the first out of the blocks in contrast to our European neighbours.
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New state of matter in one-dimensional quantum gas
By adding some magnetic flair to an exotic quantum experiment, physicists produced an ultra-stable one-dimensional quantum gas with never-before-seen 'scar' states – a feature that could someday be useful for securing quantum information.
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Following the hops of disordered proteins could lead to future treatments of Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have used machine learning techniques to predict how proteins, particularly those implicated in neurological diseases, completely change their shapes in a matter of microseconds.
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Toadlet peptide transforms into a deadly weapon against bacteria
Researchers have discovered remarkable molecular properties of an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of the Australian toadlet. The discovery could inspire the development of novel synthetic drugs to combat bacterial infections.
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Cancer models created by mechanical engineers offer new insight into tumor growth
Engineers have developed in vitro — in the lab — lymphatic vessel model to study the growth of tumor emboli, collections of tumor cells within vessels that are often associated with increased metastasis and tumor recurrence.
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Lead poisoning of children
A remediation and public education effort at an abandoned battery recycling facility in Bangladesh eliminated most lead soil contamination, but levels of the toxic metal in children living near the site did not decrease nearly as much. The discrepancy reveals the scope of other lead exposure sources and the challenge they present to public health.
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Geologic history written in garnet sand
Researchers probe deep secrets of trapped inclusions in garnet sand from Papua New Guinea.
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Turn off that camera during virtual meetings, environmental study says
A new study says that despite a record drop in global carbon emissions in 2020, a pandemic-driven shift to remote work and more at-home entertainment still presents significant environmental impact due to how internet data is stored and transferred around the world.
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Reverse engineering 3D chromosome models for individual cells
A new computational technique that uses heat map data to reverse engineer highly detailed models of chromosomes and researchers have uncovered new information about the close spatial relationships that chromatin folding creates between genes.
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Feces and algorithms: Artificial Intelligence to map our intestinal bacteria
The intestines and their bacteria are sometimes called our 'second brain', but studying these bacteria in their natural environment is difficult. Now researchers have developed a method that uses artificial intelligence to map intestinal bacteria using feces. The researchers thus hope to gain more knowledge of the role played by these bacteria in various diseases.
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Physical virology shows the dynamics of virus reproduction
The reproductive cycle of viruses requires self-assembly, maturation of virus particles and, after infection, the release of genetic material into a host cell. New physics-based technologies allow scientists to study the dynamics of this cycle and may eventually lead to new treatments.
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Past SARS-CoV-2 Infection Mostly Protects Survivors
A large study of UK healthcare workers finds that immunity after coronavirus infection lasts for months, but those with antibodies may still be able to carry and spread the virus upon reexposure.
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What COVID-19 will look like once the pandemic ends
To better understand how the new virus might play out in years to come, researchers looked at how other known coronaviruses function. (Pixabay/) Right now, in the midst of a global pandemic, it might be hard to think more than a few months in advance. But centuries of data tell us that this too will end—it just won't mean the virus is gone forever. Years of data tell us that it's incredibly diffi
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Do pets understand our language?
Humans are unique in our use of sophisticated spoken language to communicate. While other animals use communicative calls and sounds, human language features complex grammar and structure that allows us to convey a nearly infinite number of ideas. Homo sapiens, the species name for modern humans, appears to have been far superior to other hominid […]
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A guide to being an ethical online investigator
As rioters stormed Capitol Hill on January 6, Theo—like many Americans—watched, dumbfounded and in horror. Then he had an idea. "What if we went on social and started pulling these screenshots together and tried to go around and crowdsource [the rioters'] identities?" he remembers thinking. So Theo bought a burner phone, set up a fake email address, and created an Instagram account over a VPN: @h
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COVID-19 reduced U.S. life expectancy, especially among Black and Latino populations
A new study finds that due to COVID-19 deaths last year, life expectancy at birth for Americans will shorten by 1.13 years to 77.48 years — the largest single-year decline in life expectancy in at least 40 years.
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COVID's toll on smell and taste: what scientists do and don't know
Nature, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00055-6 Researchers are studying the sensory impact of the coronavirus, how long it lasts and what can be done to treat it.
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About the Pandemic Technology Project
As covid-19 began spreading around the world, an avalanche of new digital services and data-driven approaches has emerged to aid pandemic response. From smartphone exposure notifications to vaccine allocation algorithms, these systems have been developed under the watch of politicians, public health officials, scientists and businesses. They have also faced many challenges. The Pandemic Technolog
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Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine collection highlights 15 years of scientific discovery
Editors of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine have identified some of the most significant articles in the publication's history, publishing new commentaries on them in a special 15th anniversary collection. The 15 commentaries from associate editors and members of the journal's editorial board describe the impact of the selected articles both at the time of their publication and today.
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Extreme fire weather
When the Thomas Fire raged through Ventura and Santa Barbara counties in December 2017, Danielle Touma, at the time an earth science researcher at Stanford, was stunned by its severity. Burning for more than a month and scorching 440 square miles, the fire was then considered the worst in California's history.
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Scholars link diet, dentition, and linguistics
University of Miami anthropologist Caleb Everett and former student Sihan Chen used a novel data analysis of thousands of languages, in addition to studying a unique subset of celebrities, to reveal how a soft food diet–contrasted with the diet of hunter-gatherers–is restructuring dentition and changing how people speak. Their findings were published this week in Scientific Reports.
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Climate change doesn't spare the smallest
With a combined century of experience in the tropics, the University of Pennsylvania's Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They share new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower t
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Scientists uncover new path toward treating a rare but deadly neurologic condition
Molybdenum cofactor (Moco) is a compound that is little known but is essential for life. Children born without the ability to synthesize Moco die young. It has not been possible to create Moco supplements because the compound is so unstable. Studies in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that by combining, Moco with certain proteins, it becomes stable and can repair deficiency.
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Metformin use reduces risk of death for patients with COVID-19 and diabetes, study finds
Use of the diabetes drug metformin — before a diagnosis of COVID-19 — is associated with a threefold decrease in mortality in COVID-19 patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. Diabetes is a significant comorbidity for COVID-19. This beneficial effect remained, even after correcting for age, sex, race, obesity, and hypertension or chronic kidney disease and heart failure.
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The richer you are, the more likely you'll social distance, study finds
The higher a person's income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, economists find.
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Astronomers document the rise and fall of a rarely observed stellar dance
Astronomers have catalogued 126 years of changes to HS Hydra, a rare evolving eclipsing binary star system. Analyzing observations from astro-photographic plates in the late 1800s to TESS observations in 2019, they show that the two stars in HS Hydrae began to eclipse each other around a century ago, peaking in the 1960s. The degree of eclipsing then plummeted over the course of just a half centur
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Acute itching in eczema patients linked to environmental allergens
New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis indicates that allergens in the environment often are to blame for episodes of acute itch in eczema patients, and that the itching often doesn't respond to antihistamines because the itch signals are being carried to the brain along a previously unrecognized pathway that current drugs don't target.
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UFC Investigating Whether Psychedelics Help Fighters With Traumatic Brain Injuries
The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) has a bit of a problem on its hands: Letting two fighters bludgeon each other in a ring tends to lead to serious brain injuries — not unlike boxing and football. Now the UFC is partnering with Johns Hopkins University's prominent psychedelics research lab to see if mind-altering drugs might be able to help remedy fighters' brain trauma, according to ESPN .
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Researchers rewind the clock to calculate age and site of supernova blast
Astronomers are winding back the clock on the expanding remains of a nearby, exploded star. By using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, they retraced the speedy shrapnel from the blast to calculate a more accurate estimate of the location and time of the stellar detonation.
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UNH researchers discover new inhibitor drug combination for rare form of cancer
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire took the novel approach of targeting specific cell proteins that control DNA information using inhibitors, or drugs, that were effective in reducing the growth of the Waldenström macroglobulinemia cancer cells and when combined with a third drug were even more successful in killing the WM cancer cells which could lead to more treatment options.
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RIP: Mars digger bites the dust after 2 years on red planet
NASA declared the Mars digger dead Thursday after failing to burrow deep into the red planet to take its temperature.
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Tesla Ordered to Recall 150K+ Vehicles to Repair Memory Failures
Tesla has been ordered to recall roughly 159,000 vehicles to fix a problem in the Media Control Unit. News broke several months ago that over 12,000 Tesla vehicles had suffered a significant NAND flash failure that killed the vehicle's touch screen. Many vehicle controls in a Tesla are accessed via touch screen, and the NHTSA (National Highway Traffic Safety Administration) began an investigation
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Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation.
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Cotton quality mapping as a tool for growers
Modern cotton-harvesting equipment can identify and track modules created during harvest down to the subfield. By combining these data with information such as yield maps and fiber quality results, producers can identify practices, conditions, and varieties that result in increased fiber quality and bale value.
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Research breaks new ground in understanding how a molecular motor generates force
A team of biophysicists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Penn State College of Medicine set out to tackle the long-standing question about the nature of force generation by myosin, the molecular motor responsible for muscle contraction and many other cellular processes. The key question they addressed—one of the most controversial topics in the field—was: how does myosin convert ch
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Blue Origin launches capsule to space with astronaut perks
Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin company launched a new capsule into space Thursday to test all the astronaut perks before people strap in.
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Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation.
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Cotton quality mapping as a tool for growers
Modern cotton-harvesting equipment can identify and track modules created during harvest down to the subfield. By combining these data with information such as yield maps and fiber quality results, producers can identify practices, conditions, and varieties that result in increased fiber quality and bale value.
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Research breaks new ground in understanding how a molecular motor generates force
A team of biophysicists from the University of Massachusetts Amherst and Penn State College of Medicine set out to tackle the long-standing question about the nature of force generation by myosin, the molecular motor responsible for muscle contraction and many other cellular processes. The key question they addressed—one of the most controversial topics in the field—was: how does myosin convert ch
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Understanding future species distribution: New data for biogeographers
Climate change impacts, affecting primarily ecosystems' functions and consequently human sectors, have become a crucial topic. Observed and expected variations in climate conditions can in fact undermine the ecosystems' ecological equilibrium: average climate patterns, mainly represented by intra-annual (monthly to seasonal) temperature and precipitation cycle, directly influence the distribution,
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Presidential inaugurations boost tourism, but not this year
While new research from West Virginia University economists finds that presidential inaugurations have gained popularity as must-see tourist events in recent years, major security threats will keep visitors away for the inauguration of President-Elect Joe Biden.
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Toadlet peptide transforms into a deadly weapon against bacteria
Researchers at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and EMBL Hamburg have discovered remarkable molecular properties of an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of the Australian toadlet. The discovery could inspire the development of novel synthetic drugs to combat bacterial infections.
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Tetris is no longer just a game, but an algorithm that ensures maximum hotel room occupancy
To achieve full occupancy, hotels used to rely exclusively on experience, concentration and human abilities. Then came online booking, which made the reservation collection process faster, but did not solve the risk of turning down long stays because of rooms previously booked for short stays.
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Galaxies hit single, doubles, and triple (growing black holes)
When three galaxies collide, what happens to the huge black holes at the centers of each? A new study using NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and several other telescopes reveals new information about how many black holes are furiously growing after these galactic smash ups.
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Biochemical pathway that protects cells from ferroptosis discovered
In an article published in Cell Metabolism , Moffitt Cancer Center researchers report on a newly discovered biochemical pathway that protects cells from a type of cell death called ferroptosis.
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Physical frailty syndrome: A cacophony of multisystem dysfunction
Aging experts synthesize converging evidence that the aging-related pathophysiology underpinning the clinical presentation of phenotypic frailty is a state of lower functioning due to severe dysregulation of the complex dynamics in our bodies that maintains health and resilience. When severity passes a threshold, the clinical syndrome and its phenotype are diagnosable. This paper summarizes eviden
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Mapping our sun's backyard
Astronomers have curated the most complete list of nearby brown dwarfs to date thanks to discoveries made by thousands of volunteers participating in the Backyard Worlds citizen science project. The list and 3D map of 525 brown dwarfs — including 38 reported for the first time — incorporate observations from a host of astronomical instruments including several NOIRLab facilities. The results con
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Toadlet peptide transforms into a deadly weapon against bacteria
Researchers at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology and EMBL Hamburg have discovered remarkable molecular properties of an antimicrobial peptide from the skin of the Australian toadlet. The discovery could inspire the development of novel synthetic drugs to combat bacterial infections.
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Keeping the costs of superconducting magnets down using ultrasound
Superconductivity already has a variety of practical applications, such as medical imaging and levitating transportation like the ever-popular maglev systems. However, to ensure that the benefits of applied superconductors keep spreading further into other technological fields, we need to find ways of not only improving their performance, but also making them more accessible and simpler to fabrica
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Reverse engineering 3-D chromosome models for individual cells
Genome analysis can provide information on genes and their location on a strand of DNA, but such analysis reveals little about their spatial location in relation to one another within chromosomes—the highly complex, three-dimensional structures that hold genetic information.
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Lack of managers keeps India's businesses small
In today's economy, American businesses often tap into professional management to grow, but most firms in India and other developing countries are family owned and often shun outside managers. A new study co-authored by Yale economist Michael Peters explores the effects that the absence of outside professional management has on India's businesses and the country's economy.
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Turn off that camera during virtual meetings, environmental study says
It's not just to hide clutter anymore—add "saving the planet" to the reasons you leave the camera off during your next virtual meeting.
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Geologic history written in garnet sand
On a beach on a remote island in eastern Papua New Guinea, a country located in the southwestern Pacific to the north of Australia, garnet sand reveals an important geologic discovery. Similar to messages in bottles that have traveled across the oceans, sediments derived from the erosion of rocks carry information from another time and place. In this case the grains of garnet sand reveal a story o
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Researchers show Irish soil can offer more hope in fight against antibiotic resistance
Scientists who highlighted the bug-busting properties of bacteria in Northern Irish soil have made another exciting discovery in the quest to discover new antibiotics.
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Posidonia marine seagrass can catch and remove plastics from the sea
Posidonia oceanica seagrass can take and remove plastic materials that have been left at the sea, according to a new study.
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Reverse engineering 3-D chromosome models for individual cells
Genome analysis can provide information on genes and their location on a strand of DNA, but such analysis reveals little about their spatial location in relation to one another within chromosomes—the highly complex, three-dimensional structures that hold genetic information.
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Researchers show Irish soil can offer more hope in fight against antibiotic resistance
Scientists who highlighted the bug-busting properties of bacteria in Northern Irish soil have made another exciting discovery in the quest to discover new antibiotics.
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Eating omega-3 fat helps hibernating Arctic ground squirrels warm up during deep cold
By feeding arctic ground squirrels special diets, researchers have found that omega-3 fatty acids, common in flax seed and fish oil, help keep the animals warmer in deep hibernation.
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Rare lichen unique to Florida discovered in museum collections, may be extinct
Scientists have found a new species of fleshy verdigris lichen, thanks to DNA analysis of museum specimens. Misidentified by its original collectors, the lichen is only known from 32 specimens collected in North and Central Florida scrubland between 1885 and 1985. Now the hunt is on to find it in the wild—if it still exists.
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Researchers conduct security analysis and improve quantum random number generation
Recently, the research team led by academician GUO Guangcan from the University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences has made security analysis and improvement of source independent quantum random number generators with imperfect devices.
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Rare lichen unique to Florida discovered in museum collections, may be extinct
Scientists have found a new species of fleshy verdigris lichen, thanks to DNA analysis of museum specimens. Misidentified by its original collectors, the lichen is only known from 32 specimens collected in North and Central Florida scrubland between 1885 and 1985. Now the hunt is on to find it in the wild—if it still exists.
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MIT Unveils Design for Hybrid-Electric Airliner
Hybrid Plane A team of engineers at MIT has created a concept for a hybrid-electric plane that could reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, harmful greenhouse gases that contribute to smog and acid rain, by 95 percent. Nitrogen oxides have also been shown to be associated with respiratory diseases and cardiovascular disorders, resulting in about 16,000 deaths a year, according to an MIT blurb . A 95 pe
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Population density and virus strains will affect how regions can resume normal life
As a new, apparently more transmissible version of the virus that causes COVID-19 has appeared in several countries, new research finds that the transmissibility of viral strains and the population density of a region will play big roles in how vaccination campaigns can help towns and cities return to more normal activities. The findings suggest that directing vaccines toward densely populated cou
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Posidonia marine seagrass can catch and remove plastics from the sea
Posidonia oceanica seagrass can take and remove plastic materials that have been left at the sea, according to a new study.
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Research breaks new ground in understanding how a molecular motor generates force
A team of biophysicists set out to tackle the long-standing question about the nature of force generation by myosin, the molecular motor responsible for muscle contraction. The key question they addressed – one of the most controversial topics in the field – was: how does myosin convert chemical energy, in the form of ATP, into mechanical work? The answer revealed new details into how myosin, the
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COVID-19 reduced US life expectancy, especially among Black and Latino populations
A new study finds that due to COVID-19 deaths last year, life expectancy at birth for Americans will shorten by 1.13 years to 77.48 years — the largest single-year decline in life expectancy in at least 40 years.
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Race Replay: Murder Nova vs. Ryan | Street Outlaws
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/StreetOutlaws Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://twitter.com/StreetOutlaws We're on Instagram! https://www.instagram.com/stoutlaws/ https://instagram.co
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Mary Catherine Bateson Dies at 81; Anthropologist on Lives of Women
After a well-documented childhood as the daughter of Margaret Mead, she earned her own renown with a book on women's lives that became a touchstone to feminists.
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Toyota to Pay a Record Fine for a Decade of Clean Air Act Violations
Toyota's $180 million settlement with the federal government follows a series of emissions-related scandals in the auto industry.
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Why large groups of people often come to the same conclusions
Large groups of people everywhere tend to come to the same conclusions. In small groups, there's a much wider diversity of ideas. The mechanics of a large group make some ideas practically inevitable. People make sense of the world by organizing things into categories and naming them. "These are circles." "That's a tree." "Those are rocks." It's one way we tame our world. There's a weird correspo
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What Does a More Contagious Virus Mean for Schools?
The coronavirus variant discovered in Britain is more easily spread among children, as it is among adults. Current safeguards should protect schools, experts said, but only if strictly enforced.
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Unexplained 7-fold variation in euthanasia rates across the Netherlands
There's a 7-fold unexplained variation in rates of euthanasia across The Netherlands, reveals an analysis of health insurance claims data, published online in the journal BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care.
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New classification marks paradigm shift in how conservationists tackle climate change
A new study introduces a classification called Resistance-Resilience-Transformation (RRT) that enables the assessment of whether and to what extent a management shift toward transformative action is occurring in conservation.
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Deep learning outperforms standard machine learning in biomedical research applications
Compared to standard machine learning models, deep learning models are largely superior at discerning patterns and discriminative features in brain imaging, despite being more complex in their architecture.
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New way to control electrical charge in 2D materials: Put a flake on it
Gaining control of the flow of electrical current through atomically thin materials is important to potential future applications in photovoltaics or computing. Physicists have discovered one way to locally add electrical charge to a graphene device.
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Study demonstrates efficacy of new treatment for neurofibromatosis type 1-related tumors
Based on preclinical studies of an investigational drug to treat peripheral nerve tumors, researchers have shown that the drug, cabozantinib, reduces tumor volume and pain in patients with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1).
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Males of all ages more affected by COVID-19 than females, study finds
Males are more likely to test positive for COVID-19, more likely to have complications and more likely to die from the virus than females, independent of age, according to a new study.
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SpaceX's "Darkened" Satellites Still Messing Up Research, Astronomers Say
Light Pollution Even after SpaceX launched dimmer versions of its internet-broadcasting Starlink satellites, astronomers are finding that the artificial constellation is still bright enough to interfere with their research — blocking their view of the sky and making it harder to see distant stars and galaxies. That's according to research led by National Astronomical Observatory of Japan astronom
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Emotionally neglected or severely sexually abused girls report riskier sexual behavior
Girls who are emotionally neglected or severely sexually abused early in their lives report riskier sexual behaviors during adolescence, Mount Sinai researchers report. The findings highlight the need–and suggest the potential for tailored approaches–to promote healthy sexual development in vulnerable populations.
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Common workplace interactions can trigger suicidal thoughts for employees with mood disorders
Perceived low-grade forms of workplace mistreatment, such as avoiding eye contact or excluding a coworker from conversation, can amplify suicidal thoughts in employees with mood disorders, based on a West Virginia University study.
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Metformin use reduces risk of death for patients with COVID-19 and diabetes
Use of the diabetes drug metformin — before a diagnosis of COVID-19 — is associated with a threefold decrease in mortality in COVID-19 patients with Type 2 diabetes, according to a racially diverse study at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Diabetes is a significant comorbidity for COVID-19. This beneficial effect remained, even after correcting for age, sex, race, obesity, and hypertensi
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Understanding future species distribution: new data for biogeographers
A new CMCC global and free access dataset of 35 bioclimatic indicators just presented on Nature Scientific Data. It will complement and enlarge the availability of spatialized bioclimatic information, crucial aspect in many ecological and environmental studies and for several disciplines, including forestry, biodiversity conservation, plant and landscape ecology.
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This Groundbreaking Sleep Supplement Helps Your Body Promote the Deep Sleep You Need
If the start of the new year has you thinking about ways to improve your physical and emotional well being, the first thing you need to do is figure out how to get better sleep . After all, you can drink a gallon of coffee to pump yourself up in the morning and eat a whole bag of CBD gummies to calm yourself down in the evening, but the reality is it's biologically impossible to achieve peak phys
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Experts remain divided over merits of mass Covid tests in schools
Analysis: some say lateral flow tests could help cut outbreaks, but others argue they offer false reassurance Regulator refuses to approve mass Covid testing at schools in England Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The education secretary, Gavin Williamson, has put mass testing for coronavirus at the heart of his strategy to reopen schools after the lockdown. It is a co
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Cancer research reveals how mutations in a specific gene cause different types of disease
Leading cancer expert solve long-standing question of how various types of mutations in just one gene cause different types of diseases.
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Strategies to improve water quality
Illinois residents value efforts to reduce watershed pollution, and they are willing to pay for environmental improvements, according to a new study from agricultural economists.
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New insight into why breastfed babies have improved immune systems
Research has revealed new insight into the biological mechanisms of the long-term positive health effects of breastfeeding.
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Reductions in 2020 US life expectancy due to COVID-19 and the disproportionate impact on the Black and Latino populations [Social Sciences]
COVID-19 has resulted in a staggering death toll in the United States: over 215,000 by mid-October 2020, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Black and Latino Americans have experienced a disproportionate burden of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality, reflecting persistent structural inequalities that increase risk of exposure to…
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Orthogonal immunoassays for IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 antigens reveal that immune response lasts beyond 4 mo post illness onset [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Immune response to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection during the current pandemic remains a field of immense interest and active research worldwide. Although the severity of acute infection may depend on the intensity of innate and adaptive immunity, leading to higher morbidity and mortality, the longevity of…
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On the utility of CSF1R inhibitors [Biological Sciences]
We refer to an article pointedly titled "CSF1R inhibition by a small-molecule inhibitor is not microglia specific; affecting hematopoiesis and the function of macrophages" in PNAS (1). This Brief Report addresses a straw man. Thirty years of studies on CSF1 signaling in peripheral populations, assessed via small-molecule inhibitors, antibodies, and…
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Reply to Green and Hume: Nonmicroglia peripheral immune effects of short-term CSF1R inhibition with PLX5622 [Biological Sciences]
Our study (1) was designed to provide definitive direct data to the microglia community that PLX5622 does not act solely on microglia but also affects other peripheral macrophage populations. Many microglia papers have assumed or claimed that CSFR1 inhibition has no to minimal effects on peripheral immune cells.* The nonmicroglia…
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An in vivo screen of noncoding loci reveals that Daedalus is a gatekeeper of an Ikaros-dependent checkpoint during haematopoiesis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Haematopoiesis relies on tightly controlled gene expression patterns as development proceeds through a series of progenitors. While the regulation of hematopoietic development has been well studied, the role of noncoding elements in this critical process is a developing field. In particular, the discovery of new regulators of lymphopoiesis could have…
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An immunohistochemical study of lymphatic elements in the human brain [Neuroscience]
Almost 150 papers about brain lymphatics have been published in the last 150 years. Recently, the information in these papers has been synthesized into a picture of central nervous system (CNS) "glymphatics," but the fine structure of lymphatic elements in the human brain based on imaging specific markers of lymphatic…
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Prior activation state shapes the microglia response to antihuman TREM2 in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease [Immunology and Inflammation]
Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2) sustains microglia response to brain injury stimuli including apoptotic cells, myelin damage, and amyloid β (Aβ). Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk is associated with the TREM2R47H variant, which impairs ligand binding and consequently microglia responses to Aβ pathology. Here, we show that TREM2…
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Warming oceans will be extra hard on big fish
Warming ocean waters could reduce the ability of fish, especially large ones, to extract the oxygen they need from their environment, researchers report. For their new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the researchers developed a new model to determine how water temperature, oxygen availability, body size, and activity affect metabolic demand for oxygen in fish. The r
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Exposure to violence takes a toll on the socioemotional well-being of Californians
A survey of Californians shows that exposure to violence has pervasive social and emotional impacts on people, especially when firearms are involved.
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AIs that read sentences are now catching coronavirus mutations
Galileo once observed that nature is written in math. Biology might be written in words. Natural-language processing (NLP) algorithms are now able to generate protein sequences and predict virus mutations, including key changes that help the coronavirus evade the immune system. The key insight making this possible is that many properties of biological systems can be interpreted in terms of words
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Publisher Correction: Consistent effects of pesticides on community structure and ecosystem function in freshwater systems
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20854-1
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Borrowing from birds, experts reduce search times for novel high-entropy alloys to seconds
Computational materials science experts have enhanced an algorithm that borrows its approach from the nesting habits of cuckoo birds, reducing the search time for new high-tech alloys from weeks to mere seconds.
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New method makes better predictions of material properties using low quality data
By combining large amounts of low-fidelity data with smaller quantities of high-fidelity data, nanoengineers have developed a new machine learning method to predict the properties of materials with more accuracy than existing models. Crucially, their approach is also the first to predict the properties of disordered materials — those with atomic sites that can be occupied by more than one element
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England's Covid infection rates ease as restrictions are reinforced
Prospect of tighter rules recedes despite NHS remaining under pressure and death rate rising
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The role of T cells in fighting cancer
Why do some hosts' immune systems reject tumors easily, while others have a harder time doing so? It depends on the types of the immune cells known as CD8 T cells and how a host's specific T cells match up with the neoantigens present in the tumor.
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Quantum computers to study the functioning of the molecules of life
A breakthrough that has implications for molecular biology, pharmacology and nanotechnologies. The fields of application are many. Identifying the mechanisms behind neurodegenerative processes in some proteins, for example, can help limit their proliferation. Understanding how a protein takes on a certain shape can open the way to use the nanomachines that nature has designed to cut, edit or block
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Measuring the belowground world
Life above ground depends on the soil and its countless inhabitants. Yet, global strategies to protect biodiversity have so far paid little attention to this habitat. Researchers led by the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), Leipzig University (UL) and Colorado State University call for greater consideration of soils in inte
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New state of matter in one-dimensional quantum gas
By adding some magnetic flair to an exotic quantum experiment, physicists produced an ultra-stable one-dimensional quantum gas with never-before-seen "scar" states – a feature that could someday be useful for securing quantum information.
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Model analyzes how viruses escape the immune system
MIT researchers have devised a way to computationally model viral escape, using models that were originally developed to model language. The model can predict which sections of viral surface proteins, including those of influenza, HIV, and SARS-CoV-2, are more likely to mutate in a way that allows the virus to evade the human immune system. It can also identify sections that are less likely to mut
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Hard to crack research reveals how crop roots penetrate hard soils
Scientists have discovered a signal that causes roots to stop growing in hard soils which can be 'switched off' to allow them to punch through compacted soil – a discovery that could help plants to grow in even the most damaged soils.
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