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Biden, in a Burst of Climate Orders, Rejoins the Paris Agreement
The president also canceled the Keystone XL pipeline and ordered federal agencies to begin the process of reinstating environmental regulations reversed under the Trump administration.
1h
Monarch butterfly population moves closer to extinction
The number of western monarch butterflies wintering along the California coast has plummeted precipitously to a record low, putting the orange-and-black insects closer to extinction, researchers announced Tuesday.
1d
BioNTech/Pfizer vaccine found effective against Covid-19 variant
Laboratory-based study shows mutations were neutralised by antibodies in blood of vaccinated patients
13h
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This fossilized butthole gives us a rare window into dinosaur sex
The Psittacosaurus specimen, from Senckenberg Museum of Natural History. (Jakob Vinther, University of Bristol and Bob Nicholls/Paleocreations.com 2020/) Dinosaur fossils can be, for lack of a better term, rather bare-bones—particularly in their delicate, easily-destroyed nether regions, which can fall prey to the ravages of scavengers, or an explosive release of postmortem gas. But after working
27min
An Ancient Form of European Money: Bronze Rings, Ribs and Blades
Because the objects had a standardized weight, scientists suggest they were a form of currency used some 3,500 years ago.
30min
Unlock Your Personal Health Secrets With a Health Intelligence Test From Viome
Every year around this time people resolve to grab the proverbial bull by the horns when it comes to their health , only to realize a month or so later that they don't actually know how to do it. Simply eating a bunch of "clean" foods you read about on some health blog is not going to get you where you want to go. What you really need for your health and wellness journey is professional guidance
31min
Overtime Pays Off for Ness Crew | Gold Rush
Stream Full Episodes of Gold Rush: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/gold-rush Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/GoldRush/ https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discovery We're on Instagram!
32min
Biden Moves To Have U.S. Rejoin Climate Accord
President Biden signed an executive order to have the country reenter the Paris Climate Agreement, less than four months after formally withdrawing. (Image credit: Francois Guillot/AFP via Getty Images)
42min
The most exciting new laptop tech coming in 2021
AMD is taking a big swing with its Ryzen 5000 mobile processors. (AMD/) This year's all-digital Consumer Electronics Show was a mixed bag of new products. Without a show floor for companies to demonstrate their new gadgets, it was hard to pick out the stuff that really mattered. In the land of laptops, however, there were some clear standouts, most of which were driven by new silicon tech from AM
55min
Biden's first steps as president: Action on covid and climate
A flurry of executive orders is expected to take place over the next few days from the new US president as he takes residence in the White House. Here are the highlights of those he has signed so far. The "100 day mask challenge" Biden's first order is part recommendation, part requirement: it requires people to wear masks on all federal property, and recommend that governors and local elected of
56min
Climate change: Biden's first act sets tone for ambitious approach
Re-joining the Paris climate pact is a symbolic and practical first step for the Biden White House.
57min
1h
Hematopoietic stem cell transplants may provide long-term benefit for people with MS
A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The study also found that in some people their disability improved over 10 years after treatment.
1h
Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates.
1h
Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects.
1h
On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a new study.
1h
Free online tool calculates risk of COVID-19 transmission in poorly-ventilated spaces
The vital role of ventilation in the spread of COVID-19 has been quantified by researchers, who have found that in poorly ventilated spaces, the virus spreads further than two meters in seconds, and is far more likely to spread through prolonged talking than through coughing.
1h
NAD+ can restore age-related muscle deterioration, research finds
Scientists have discovered that Alzheimer's-like protein aggregates underly the muscle deterioration seen in aging. But the aggregates can be reversed by boosting the levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), which turns on the defense systems of mitochondria in cells and restores muscle function.
1h
Biden To Move Quickly On Climate Change, Reversing Trump Rollbacks
President Biden has set his sights on more than 100 Trump administration environmental rollbacks as well as plans to rejoin the international climate accord. (Image credit: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images)
1h
A Tweak to Immune Cells Reverses Aging in Mice
Knocking out the receptor for a lipid that causes inflammation rejuvenates macrophage metabolism and restores cognitive function in an Alzheimer's disease model.
1h
Airport Jetpack Sighting May Have Actually Been Person-Shaped Drone
Unidentified Flying Object In September, several pilots in the airspace near Los Angeles International Airport spotted something odd : what appeared to be "a guy in a jetpack," as one bewildered pilot told LA's tower, flying around 3,000 feet. Several months later, and after investigation by local law enforcement, the FAA and the FBI, it's still unclear what the airline pilots saw. Even a Decembe
1h
What I Saw at the White House on Trump's Last Day
A t dawn this morning , workers loaded couches and tables into a moving truck parked outside the West Wing. Men wearing white coveralls and carrying roller brushes and paint cans walked across the north driveway. Inside the White House, pictures of the 45th president had been removed from the walls. Only the hooks remained, ready for a new set of portraits of the 46th. A lone Donald Trump press d
1h
Dead whale, one of Med's largest, found off Italy
The carcass of a huge whale has been recovered from the waters off southern Italy, the coastguard said Wednesday, calling it "probably one of the largest" ever found in the Mediterranean.
1h
Catnip leaves kitties feline groovy, wards off mosquitoes: study
Catnip is known to hold a special place in the hearts of felines, who often respond by rubbing their face and head in the plant, rolling around on the ground, then zoning out in a state of intoxicated repose.
1h
Dead whale, one of Med's largest, found off Italy
The carcass of a huge whale has been recovered from the waters off southern Italy, the coastguard said Wednesday, calling it "probably one of the largest" ever found in the Mediterranean.
1h
Catnip leaves kitties feline groovy, wards off mosquitoes: study
Catnip is known to hold a special place in the hearts of felines, who often respond by rubbing their face and head in the plant, rolling around on the ground, then zoning out in a state of intoxicated repose.
1h
Biden puts U.S. back into fight to slow global warming
President Joe Biden planned Wednesday to return the United States to the worldwide fight to slow global warming in one of his first official acts, and to immediately launch a series of climate-friendly efforts that would transform how Americans drive and get their power.
1h
Biden Moves Quickly On Climate Change, Reversing Trump Rollbacks
President Biden set his sights on more than 100 Trump administration environmental rollbacks, as well as rejoining the international climate accord. (Image credit: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images)
1h
Hematopoietic stem cell transplants may provide long-term benefit for people with MS
A new study shows that intense immunosuppression followed by a hematopoietic stem cell transplant may prevent disability associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) from getting worse in 71% of people with relapsing-remitting MS for up to 10 years after the treatment. The research is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology
2h
Brain pressure disorder that causes headache, vision problems on rise
A new study has found a brain pressure disorder called idiopathic intracranial hypertension is on the rise, and the increase corresponds with rising obesity rates. The study is published in the January 20, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study also found that for women, socioeconomic factors like income, education and housing may play
2h
Professional Gamer Retires After Career-Ending Injury to Thumb
Career-Ending Injury No matter where you stand on the "can video games be sports?" debate, it can't be denied that professional gaming has become a competitive commercial space , with many of the same things that make other sports so captivating like charismatic pros, major sponsorship deals, and massive events. But now, a more unfortunate overlap between Esports and conventional athletics is eme
2h
Biden team takes charge of Covid-19 response at crucial juncture
President warns the coming weeks could be the 'toughest and deadliest period' of pandemic yet
2h
News Feature: Tracing gold's cosmic origin story [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Astronomers thought they had finally figured out where the gold, platinum, and other heavy elements in the universe came from. In light of recent results, they're not so sure. Desperate phone calls made in the dead of night rarely convey good news, much less first word of a major scientific…
2h
Rational policymaking during a pandemic [Immunology and Inflammation]
Policymaking during a pandemic can be extremely challenging. As COVID-19 is a new disease and its global impacts are unprecedented, decisions are taken in a highly uncertain, complex, and rapidly changing environment. In such a context, in which human lives and the economy are at stake, we argue that using…
2h
Designing angle-independent structural colors using Monte Carlo simulations of multiple scattering [Engineering]
Disordered nanostructures with correlations on the scale of visible wavelengths can show angle-independent structural colors. These materials could replace dyes in some applications because the color is tunable and resists photobleaching. However, designing nanostructures with a prescribed color is difficult, especially when the application—cosmetics or displays, for example—requires specific comp
2h
Evolution in the weak-mutation limit: Stasis periods punctuated by fast transitions between saddle points on the fitness landscape [Evolution]
A mathematical analysis of the evolution of a large population under the weak-mutation limit shows that such a population would spend most of the time in stasis in the vicinity of saddle points on the fitness landscape. The periods of stasis are punctuated by fast transitions, in lnNe/s time (Ne,…
2h
Creating self-assembled arrays of mono-oxo (MoO3)1 species on TiO2(101) via deposition and decomposition of (MoO3)n oligomers [Chemistry]
Hierarchically ordered oxides are of critical importance in material science and catalysis. Unfortunately, the design and synthesis of such systems remains a key challenge to realizing their potential. In this study, we demonstrate how the deposition of small oligomeric (MoO3)1–6 clusters—formed by the facile sublimation of MoO3 powders—leads to the…
2h
Interpretations of ground-state symmetry breaking and strong correlation in wavefunction and density functional theories [Physics]
Strong correlations within a symmetry-unbroken ground-state wavefunction can show up in approximate density functional theory as symmetry-broken spin densities or total densities, which are sometimes observable. They can arise from soft modes of fluctuations (sometimes collective excitations) such as spin-density or charge-density waves at nonzero wavevector. In this sense, an…
2h
Glycoconjugate pathway connections revealed by sequence similarity network analysis of the monotopic phosphoglycosyl transferases [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The monotopic phosphoglycosyl transferase (monoPGT) superfamily comprises over 38,000 nonredundant sequences represented in bacterial and archaeal domains of life. Members of the superfamily catalyze the first membrane-committed step in en bloc oligosaccharide biosynthetic pathways, transferring a phosphosugar from a soluble nucleoside diphosphosugar to a membrane-resident polyprenol phosphate. Th
2h
Liquid-crystal-based topological photonics [Physics]
Liquid crystals are complex fluids that allow exquisite control of light propagation thanks to their orientational order and optical anisotropy. Inspired by recent advances in liquid-crystal photo-patterning technology, we propose a soft-matter platform for assembling topological photonic materials that holds promise for protected unidirectional waveguides, sensors, and lasers. Crucial to…
2h
Hahn Resigns as F.D.A. Commissioner; Woodcock Named Interim Chief
The Biden administration has yet to name a permanent chief of the Food and Drug Administration, amid a deep review of potential treatments and vaccines against the coronavirus.
2h
Photos: The Inauguration of President Joseph R. Biden Jr.
In Washington, D.C. today, Joe Biden took the oath of office shortly before noon, becoming the 46th president of the United States of America. In front of a small, socially distanced, and well-guarded audience on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol, President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris were sworn in. The singers Lady Gaga, Jennifer Lopez, and Garth Brooks performed; the poet Amanda Gor
3h
The hygiene hypothesis, the COVID pandemic, and consequences for the human microbiome [Microbiology]
The COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to affect the human microbiome in infected and uninfected individuals, having a substantial impact on human health over the long term. This pandemic intersects with a decades-long decline in microbial diversity and ancestral microbes due to hygiene, antibiotics, and urban living (the hygiene hypothesis)….
3h
Coronavirus replication-transcription complex: Vital and selective NMPylation of a conserved site in nsp9 by the NiRAN-RdRp subunit [Microbiology]
RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRps) of the Nidovirales (Coronaviridae, Arteriviridae, and 12 other families) are linked to an amino-terminal (N-terminal) domain, called NiRAN, in a nonstructural protein (nsp) that is released from polyprotein 1ab by the viral main protease (Mpro). Previously, self-GMPylation/UMPylation activities were reported for an arterivirus NiRAN-RdRp nsp and…
3h
Control may explain money's grip on happiness
Contrary to previous influential work, new research on money and happiness finds that there's no dollar-value plateau at which money's importance lessens. One potential reason: Higher earners feel an increased sense of control over life . To answer this question, Matthew Killingsworth, senior fellow at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Business, collected 1.7 million data points
3h
Tiny bubbles shed light on massive volcanic eruptions
New research answers a longstanding question about explosive volcanic eruptions like the ones at Mount St. Helens in 1980, the Philippines' Mount Pinatubo in 1991, or Chile's Mount Chaitén in 2008. Microscopic bubbles can tell stories about Earth's biggest volcanic eruptions. Now, geoscientists have discovered some of those stories are written in nanoparticles. Geoscientists have long sought to u
3h
Researchers discover mechanism behind most severe cases of a common blood disorder
G6PD deficiency affects about 400 million people worldwide and can pose serious health risks. Now, researchers think they've found the cause of the most severe cases, which could finally lead to treatments.
3h
IsoPlexis LabTools
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In Video, NASA Head Bridenstine Gives Emotional Goodbye
See You With Donald Trump out of the White House, Jim Bridenstine's tenure as NASA Administrator is over. Bridenstine's time as NASA head included remarkable progress toward crewed exploration of the Moon and Mars, the culmination of long-brewing partnerships with other space agencies and private companies including SpaceX — and, perhaps most importantly, a surprising lack of the chaos perpetrate
3h
Biden vil bringe USA tilbage i klimakampen, men er forventningerne til ham for store?
Hvad betyder præsidentskiftet for klimakampen. Hør eksperternes bud.
3h
Hiring discrimination laid bare by mountain of data
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00157-1 Analysis of hundreds of thousands of job searches shows that recruiters will discriminate based on ethnicity and gender, and the neural circuitry behind a brief period of forgetting.
3h
A Site Published Every Face From Parler's Capitol Riot Videos
Faces of the Riot used open source software to detect, extract, and deduplicate every face from the 827 videos taken from the insurrection on January 6.
4h
UK ready to deploy tweaked vaccines, says Johnson
PM suggests Britain can give speedy approval to any jabs needed to deal with new variants of virus
4h
Intoxicating chemicals in catnip and silver vine protect felines from mosquito bites
Rubbing against catnip and silver vine transfers plant chemicals that researchers have now shown protect cats from mosquitoes. The results also demonstrate that engaging with nepetalactol, which the study identified as the most potent of many intoxicating iridoid compounds found in silver vine, activates the opioid reward system in both domesticated felines
4h
Deep sleep takes out the trash
By examining fruit flies' brain activity and behavior, the researchers found that deep sleep has an ancient, restorative power to clear waste from the brain. This waste potentially includes toxic proteins that may lead to neurodegenerative disease.
4h
Automated imaging reveals where TAU protein originates in the brain in Alzheimer's disease
Researchers have developed an automated method that can track the development of harmful clumps of TAU protein related to Alzheimer's disease in the brain, according to work involving 443 individuals.
4h
NIH researchers identify new genetic disorder that affects brain, craniofacial skeleton
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a new genetic disorder characterized by developmental delays and malformations of the brain, heart, and facial features.
4h
Squid-inspired robot swims with nature's most efficient marine animals
Scientists at the University of Southampton and University of Edinburgh have developed a flexible underwater robot that can propel itself through water in the same style as nature's most efficient swimmer – the Aurelia aurita jellyfish.
4h
Cats love silver vine and catnip for a more practical reason than developing euphoria
Catnip and silver vine have been known as cat attractant plants. Cat lovers use dry leaves of these plants and toys stuffed with the leaves to give joy to their pet cats. But how does this work? What is the biological significance of the responsive behavior? A research group at Iwate University, Nagoya University, Kyoto University, and University of Liverpool found that the behavior had more pract
4h
Researchers uncover potentially promising therapeutic combination for renal cell carcinoma
Investigators have demonstrated that ACE2 expression is a good prognostic factor in RCC, that loss of ACE2 mediates resistance to classical treatments, and that in preclinical models, treatment with a drug that is downstream of ACE2 can improve tumor responses in RCC and significantly prolong survival.
4h
Female Bengalese finches have lifelong preference for their father's song to other birds'
Daddies' girls? Female Bengalese finches prefer their father's song to that of other birds throughout their lives – while sons lose this preference as they grow up.
4h
Antibiotics combinations used regularly worldwide–but 80% of these not recommended by WHO
Fixed dose combinations of antibiotics are consumed in huge quantities globally, but 80 percent of combinations are not on the WHO Essential Medicines List, and 92 percent are not FDA-approved, – with inappropriate combinations risking inefficacy, toxicity, and selection for antimicrobial resistance.
4h
Over 34,000 street cattle roam the Indian city of Raipur (1 for every 54 human residents)
There may be over 34,000 street cattle in the Indian city of Raipur (one for every 54 human residents), with implications for road accidents and human-cattle conflict.
4h
Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects. Shraddhanand Shukla and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Climate Hazards Center, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 20, 202
4h
On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and C?t?lin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands.
4h
Describing the worldviews of the new 'tech elite'
The new tech elite share distinct views setting them apart from other segments of the world's elite more generally, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hilke Brockmann from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, and colleagues.
4h
What does it take to convince people to get vaccinated?
A big chunk of the country is still reluctant to get immunized against COVID-19, in part because they don't understand the characteristics of vaccines. (Belinda Fewings/Unsplash/) Matt Motta is an assistant professor of political science at Oklahoma State University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . Many Americans appear to be experiencing cautious optimism about the role that
4h
Diamond formation in an electric field under deep Earth conditions
Most natural diamonds are formed in Earth's lithospheric mantle; however, the exact mechanisms behind their genesis remain debated. Given the occurrence of electrochemical processes in Earth's mantle and the high electrical conductivity of mantle melts and fluids, we have developed a model whereby localized electric fields play a central role in diamond formation. Here, we experimentally demonstr
4h
The chromosomal protein SMCHD1 regulates DNA methylation and the 2c-like state of embryonic stem cells by antagonizing TET proteins
5-Methylcytosine (5mC) oxidases, the ten-eleven translocation (TET) proteins, initiate DNA demethylation, but it is unclear how 5mC oxidation is regulated. We show that the protein SMCHD1 (structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1) is found in complexes with TET proteins and negatively regulates TET activities. Removal of SMCHD1 from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells
4h
A deep sleep stage in Drosophila with a functional role in waste clearance
Sleep is a highly conserved state, suggesting that sleep's benefits outweigh the increased vulnerability it brings. Yet, little is known about how sleep fulfills its functions. Here, we used video tracking in tethered flies to identify a discrete deep sleep stage in Drosophila, termed proboscis extension sleep, that is defined by repeated stereotyped proboscis extensions and retractions. Probosci
4h
Safe harbor-targeted CRISPR-Cas9 homology-independent targeted integration for multimodality reporter gene-based cell tracking
Imaging reporter genes provides longitudinal information on the biodistribution, growth, and survival of engineered cells in vivo. A translational bottleneck to using reporter genes is the necessity to engineer cells with randomly integrating vectors. Here, we built homology-independent targeted integration (HITI) CRISPR-Cas9 minicircle donors for precise safe harbor-targeted knock-in of fluoresc
4h
Hidden destruction of older forests threatens Brazils Atlantic Forest and challenges restoration programs
Understanding the dynamics of native forest loss and gain is critical for biodiversity conservation and ecosystem services, especially in regions experiencing intense forest transformations. We quantified native forest cover dynamics on an annual basis from 1990 to 2017 in Brazil's Atlantic Forest. Despite the relative stability of native forest cover during this period (~28 Mha), the ongoing los
4h
Ultralow magnetic damping of a common metallic ferromagnetic film
For most magnetic materials, ultralow damping is of key importance for spintronic and spin-orbitronic applications, but the number of materials suitable for charge-based spintronic and spin-orbitronic applications is limited because of magnon-electron scattering. However, some theoretical approaches including the breathing Fermi surface model, generalized torque correlation model, scattering theo
4h
Annexin-A1 SUMOylation regulates microglial polarization after cerebral ischemia by modulating IKK{alpha} stability via selective autophagy
Annexin-A1 (ANXA1) has recently been proposed to play a role in microglial activation after brain ischemia, but the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that ANXA1 is modified by SUMOylation, and SUMOylated ANXA1 could promote the beneficial phenotype polarization of microglia. Mechanistically, SUMOylated ANXA1 suppressed nuclear factor B activation and the produc
4h
Laser vibrational excitation of radicals to prevent crystallinity degradation caused by boron doping in diamond
Pursuing high-level doping without deteriorating crystallinity is prohibitively difficult but scientifically crucial to unleashing the hidden power of materials. This study demonstrates an effective route for maintaining lattice integrity during the combustion chemical vapor deposition of highly conductive boron-doped diamonds (BDDs) through laser vibrational excitation of a growth-critical radic
4h
Experimental quantum reading with photon counting
The final goal of quantum hypothesis testing is to achieve quantum advantage over all possible classical strategies. In the protocol of quantum reading, this is achieved for information retrieval from an optical memory, whose generic cell stores a bit of information in two possible lossy channels. We show, theoretically and experimentally, that quantum advantage is obtained by practical photon-co
4h
3D anisotropic structure of the Japan subduction zone
How mantle materials flow and how intraslab fabrics align in subduction zones are two essential issues for clarifying material recycling between Earth's interior and surface. Investigating seismic anisotropy is one of a few viable technologies that can directly answer these questions. However, the detailed anisotropic structure of subduction zones is still unclear. Under a general hexagonal symme
4h
Real-time tracking of bacterial membrane vesicles reveals enhanced membrane traffic upon antibiotic exposure
Membrane vesicles are ubiquitous carriers of molecular information. A broad understanding of the biological functions of membrane vesicles in bacteria remains elusive because of the imaging challenges during real-time in vivo experiments. Here, we provide a quantitative analysis of the motion of individual vesicles in living microbes using fluorescence microscopy, and we show that while vesicle f
4h
Trabecular bone organoid model for studying the regulation of localized bone remodeling
Trabecular bone maintains physiological homeostasis and consistent structure and mass through repeated cycles of bone remodeling by means of tightly localized regulation. The molecular and cellular processes that regulate localized bone remodeling are poorly understood because of a lack of relevant experimental models. A tissue-engineered model is described here that reproduces bone tissue comple
4h
Genetic ancestry changes in Stone to Bronze Age transition in the East European plain
The transition from Stone to Bronze Age in Central and Western Europe was a period of major population movements originating from the Ponto-Caspian Steppe. Here, we report new genome-wide sequence data from 30 individuals north of this area, from the understudied western part of present-day Russia, including 3 Stone Age hunter-gatherers (10,800 to 4250 cal BCE) and 26 Bronze Age farmers from the
4h
Atomic-scale spin-polarization maps using functionalized superconducting probes
A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) with a magnetic tip that has a sufficiently strong spin polarization can be used to map the sample's spin structure down to the atomic scale but usually lacks the possibility to absolutely determine the value of the sample's spin polarization. Magnetic impurities in superconducting materials give rise to pairs of perfectly, i.e., 100%, spin-polarized subgap r
4h
Axodendritic versus axosomatic cochlear efferent termination is determined by afferent type in a hierarchical logic of circuit formation
Hearing involves a stereotyped neural network communicating cochlea and brain. How this sensorineural circuit assembles is largely unknown. The cochlea houses two types of mechanosensory hair cells differing in function (sound transmission versus amplification) and location (inner versus outer compartments). Inner (IHCs) and outer hair cells (OHCs) are each innervated by a distinct pair of affere
4h
The characteristic response of domestic cats to plant iridoids allows them to gain chemical defense against mosquitoes
Domestic cats and other felids rub their faces and heads against catnip ( Nepeta cataria ) and silver vine ( Actinidia polygama ) and roll on the ground as a characteristic response. While this response is well known, its biological function and underlying mechanism remain undetermined. Here, we uncover the neurophysiological mechanism and functional outcome of this feline response. We found that
4h
1-Methylnicotinamide is an immune regulatory metabolite in human ovarian cancer
Immune regulatory metabolites are key features of the tumor microenvironment (TME), yet with a few exceptions, their identities remain largely unknown. Here, we profiled tumor and T cells from tumor and ascites of patients with high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) to uncover the metabolomes of these distinct TME compartments. Cells within the ascites and tumor had pervasive metabolite differences,
4h
Linkage-specific deubiquitylation by OTUD5 defines an embryonic pathway intolerant to genomic variation
Reversible modification of proteins with linkage-specific ubiquitin chains is critical for intracellular signaling. Information on physiological roles and underlying mechanisms of particular ubiquitin linkages during human development are limited. Here, relying on genomic constraint scores, we identify 10 patients with multiple congenital anomalies caused by hemizygous variants in OTUD5 , encodin
4h
Haploid induction by a maize cenh3 null mutant
The production of haploids is an important first step in creating many new plant varieties. One approach used in Arabidopsis involves crossing plants expressing different forms of centromeric histone H3 (CENP-A/CENH3) and subsequent loss of genome with weaker centromeres. However, the method has been ineffective in crop plants. Here, we describe a greatly simplified method based on crossing maize
4h
Leadership or luck? Randomization inference for leader effects in politics, business, and sports
Anecdotal evidence suggests that some leaders are more effective than others but observed differences in outcomes between leaders could be attributable to chance variation. To solve this inferential problem, we develop a quantitative test of leader effects that provides more reliable inferences than previous strategies, and we implement the test in the settings of politics, business, and sports.
4h
Mga safeguards embryonic stem cells from acquiring extraembryonic endoderm fates
Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form multiprotein complexes that affect stem cell identity and fate decisions by still largely unexplored mechanisms. Here, by performing a CRISPR-based loss-of-function screen in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we identify PcG gene Mga involved in the repression of endodermal transcription factor Gata6 . We report that deletion of Mga results in peri-implantation embry
4h
Discovery of multivalley Fermi surface responsible for the high thermoelectric performance in Yb14MnSb11 and Yb14MgSb11
The Zintl phases, Yb 14 M Sb 11 ( M = Mn, Mg, Al, Zn), are now some of the highest thermoelectric efficiency p-type materials with stability above 873 K. Yb 14 MnSb 11 gained prominence as the first p-type thermoelectric material to double the efficiency of SiGe alloy, the heritage material in radioisotope thermoelectric generators used to power NASA's deep space exploration. This study investiga
4h
Electric field-catalyzed single-molecule Diels-Alder reaction dynamics
Precise time trajectories and detailed reaction pathways of the Diels-Alder reaction were directly observed using accurate single-molecule detection on an in situ label-free single-molecule electrical detection platform. This study demonstrates the well-accepted concerted mechanism and clarifies the role of charge transfer complexes with endo or exo configurations on the reaction path. An unprece
4h
Your Cat Isn't Just Getting High Off Catnip
A new study hints that plants like catnip and silver vine may also protect your feline friend from mosquitoes.
4h
Late rainy season reliably predicts drought in regions prone to food insecurity
The onset date of the yearly rainy season reliably predicts if seasonal drought will occur in parts of Sub-Saharan Africa that are particularly vulnerable to food insecurity, and could help to mitigate its effects. Shraddhanand Shukla and colleagues at the University of California, Santa Barbara's Climate Hazards Center, present these findings in the open-access journal PLOS ONE on January 20, 202
4h
On the origins of money: Ancient European hoards full of standardized bronze objects
In the Early Bronze Age of Europe, ancient people used bronze objects as an early form of money, even going so far as to standardize the shape and weight of their currency, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maikel H. G. Kuijpers and Catalin N. Popa of Leiden University, Netherlands.
4h
Describing the worldviews of the new 'tech elite'
The new tech elite share distinct views setting them apart from other segments of the world's elite more generally, according to a study published January 20, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Hilke Brockmann from Jacobs University Bremen, Germany, and colleagues.
4h
Why cats are crazy for catnip
Minty chemical in catniplike plant activates their opioid systems—and acts as a mosquito repellent
4h
Expert: We Could Vaccinate Everyone on Earth and Not Eliminate the Coronavirus
Even after vaccinating everyone on Earth against the coronavirus, COVID-19 could continue to spread. That's because scientists aren't yet sure whether the vaccines currently being deployed actually stop disease transmission or if they merely prevent symptomatic disease, Trinity College Dublin immunologist and biochemist Kingston Mills told New Scientist . That means there's a chance the vaccine d
4h
Making microwaves safer for children
Researchers worked diligently to document the frequency and severity of burn injuries resulting from removing hot contents from the microwave and young children's vulnerability to them.
4h
Amber-encased fossil shines light on evolution of bioluminescent insects
Trapped in amber for ~100 million years, an exceptionally well-preserved, light-producing beetle sheds light on the diversification of bioluminescent beetles in the Cretaceous period and provides the missing fossil link between fireflies' living relatives.
4h
Brain cell network supplies neurons with energy
Until recently, oligodendrocytes were primarily thought to be a kind of cellular insulating tape that accelerates the transmission of electrical signals in the brain. A study now shows that they are also important for the energy supply of neurons in some brain regions.
4h
Care homes confident of avoiding repeat of UK's first Covid wave
Even with rising infections, providers say better controls and vaccine rollout are preventing mass outbreak
4h
Daily briefing: How Biden will jump start climate action on his first day
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00169-x US President Joe Biden's first day will be a green sweep, the ten greatest predictions in physics and rogue antibodies could be driving severe COVID.
4h
A Sermon in America's Civic Religion
Midway through Joe Biden's first speech as president today, he said something that, in any other inaugural address, would have seemed so unobjectionable as to be pointless. "What are the common objects we as Americans love, that define us as Americans?" Biden said. "I think we know. Opportunity, security, liberty, dignity, respect, honor, and, yes, the truth." In 2021, however, that wasn't just a
4h
Can fatty acid in foods fight multiple sclerosis?
Dietary change might help treat some people with multiple sclerosis, new research suggests. According to a new study, the lack of a specific fatty acid in fat tissue can trigger the abnormal immune system response that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) by attacking and damaging the central nervous system. Fat tissue in patients diagnosed with MS lack normal levels of oleic acid, a monounsaturated fa
5h
COVID-19's Effects on the Brain
Autopsy studies have yet to find clear evidence of destructive viral invasion into patients' brains, pushing researchers to consider alternative explanations of how SARS-CoV-2 causes neurological symptoms.
5h
Unravelling the when, where and how of volcanic eruptions
There are about 1,500 potentially active volcanoes worldwide and about 50 eruptions occur each year. But it's still difficult to predict when and how these eruptions will happen or how they'll unfold. Now, new insight into the physical processes inside volcanoes are giving scientists a better understanding of their behaviour, which could help protect the 1 billion people who live close to volcanoe
5h
45% of adults over 65 lack account for COVID vaccine sign-up
As COVID-19 vaccines become available across the country, many older adults don't have access to the online accounts that could make it easier to schedule a vaccination appointment, according to a new poll. The poll finds that 45% of adults aged 65 to 80, and 42% of all adults aged 50 to 80, said they have not set up an account with their health provider's portal system. That's according to the n
5h
SpaceX Bought Two Huge Oil Rigs to Use as Floating Launchpads
Deimos and Phobos Public records dug up by reporters for NASASpaceflight show that SpaceX bought two deepwater oil rigs last summer in order to convert them into floating launchpads. The Elon Musk-led space company renamed the prospective launchpads to Deimos and Phobos, a nod to Mars' two moons. If everything goes according to plan, the launchpads will be used to send the company's massive Stars
5h
Why Trump's last-minute cyber order could have limited impact
The news: Hours before leaving the presidency, Donald Trump issued an executive order that requires American cloud computing companies to do more to verify the identities of their foreign customers. The stated aim is to help prevent hacking operations against the United States, although the timing and scope of the order mean it is surrounded by uncertainty. What it says: The order instructs the C
5h
Nail polish organizers to keep your collection in check
All your colors as a glance. (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/) If you are a nail polish aficionado, chances are you have a drawer, basket, bin etc. where you dump all of your favorite colors. It's a quick, easy thing to do but it can be a struggle when you return to it to find that perfect color amongst the ever-growing pile. A nail polish organizer is a great way to display your glitters and golds wh
5h
The US has topped 400,000 COVID-19 deaths
As the vaccine rolls out, masks are possibly more important than ever. (Anastasia Gepp/Pixabay/) Follow all of PopSci's COVID-19 coverage here , including the truth about herd immunity , advice for pregnant women , and a tutorial on making your own mask . If you've lost count (or never started), we are now at week 45 of the pandemic, which officially began on March 11, 2020, when the World Health
5h
Best winter hats: Comfortable hats to keep you warm
Don't fear the cold when you've got one of these warm winter hats on. (Roxane Clediere via Unsplash /) Winter is perpetually coming, which is why there is never a bad time to stock up on luxuriously warm winter hats. Though the notion that we lose half our body heat through the head might be a medical myth, wearing a hat does help retain heat and protect our extremities such as the ears, which ar
5h
The best trowels for your on the go needs
To help dig your way through life. (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/) If you frequent the outdoors, you know how important it is to follow the tenets of "Leave No Trace". They include never leaving any trash, camping on durable surfaces, leaving behind what you find, and burying your bowel movements. Having a sturdy trowel can be a huge help with that last one. You want to find a trowel that is lightwe
5h
Nepali climbers overcame 'treacherous' conditions to make history on K2
A Nepali climbing team which made history at the weekend by becoming the first to summit the world's second-highest mountain in winter told Wednesday how they battled hurricane-force winds and freezing temperatures to achieve the record.
5h
On ISS, Americans Give Food to Russians After Delayed Shipment
Stone Soup Russian cosmonauts at the International Space Station found themselves in a pickle after a launch carrying their next food shipment was delayed by two months. Thankfully, it seems that the NASA crewmembers stationed there had enough to go around, so the two countries are now sharing rations, according to the Russian state-operated news outlet RT . The move illustrates, if nothing else,
5h
Author Correction: Accelerated single cell seeding in relapsed multiple myeloma
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20978-y
5h
Author Correction: Nutrients cause grassland biomass to outpace herbivory
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20985-z
5h
Author Correction: Anthropogenic modification of forests means only 40% of remaining forests have high ecosystem integrity
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20999-7
5h
Compression socks to ease aches and support travel
The right fit. (Kevin Grieve via Unsplash/) If your sock drawer is only filled with ankle, crew, and tube socks — adding compression socks to the mix will vastly improve the quality of your strenuous activities and travel experiences. Compression socks apply pressure to your veins and muscles and air circulation from your feet to your heart. While air travelers frequently sing their praises, espe
5h
COVID-19 safeguards are easier if you make more money
The higher a person's income, the more likely they were to protect themselves at the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States, a new study finds. When it comes to adopting behaviors including social distancing and mask wearing, researchers detected a striking link to financial well-being. People who made around $230,000 a year were as much as 54% more likely to increase these ty
5h
Designer DNA therapeutic wipes out cancer stem cells, treats multiple myeloma in mice
A new study supports launch of Phase I clinical trial to test a designer DNA agent — an antisense oligonucleotide that targets a gene called IRF4 — in patients with multiple myeloma.
5h
Methamphetamine overdose deaths rise sharply nationwide
Methamphetamine overdose deaths surged in an eight-year period in the United States, according to a new study. The analysis revealed rapid rises across all racial and ethnic groups, but American Indians and Alaska Natives had the highest death rates overall.
5h
Age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US. Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks.
5h
New antifungal compound from ant farms
Attine ants are farmers, and they grow fungus as food. Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces bacteria are their farmhands, producing metabolites that protect the crop from pathogens. Surprisingly, these metabolites lack common structural features across bacteria from different geographic locations, even though the ants share a common ancestor. Now, researchers report they have identified the first share
5h
An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers have made a prototype of an anode-free, zinc-based battery t
5h
Study shows how network of marine protected areas could help safeguard Antarctic penguins
New research highlights how a proposed network of marine protected areas could help safeguard some of the most important areas at sea for breeding Antarctic penguins.
5h
Genesis of blue lightning into the stratosphere detected from ISS
Dark clouds, the smell of rain on a hot sidewalk, the flashes of intense light followed by a loud crackling and then a low, rolling thunder—who doesn't love a good summer thunderstorm? We've all seen one, heard one, or been completely soaked by one. But how much do we really know about this weather phenomenon?
5h
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Plumbojarosite, an insoluble lead–iron hydroxysulfate mineral. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons/John Sobolewski (JSS), licensed under CC BY 3.0. Reducing lead bioavailability in soil Childhood exposure to lead can lead to long-term adverse health effects. A significant source of lead exposure in children is contaminated soil and dust. Because of…
6h
Environment-based object values learned by local network in the striatum tail [Neuroscience]
Basal ganglia contribute to object-value learning, which is critical for survival. The underlying neuronal mechanism is the association of each object with its rewarding outcome. However, object values may change in different environments and we then need to choose different objects accordingly. The mechanism of this environment-based value learning is…
6h
Synthetic protein conjugate vaccines provide protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice [Immunology and Inflammation]
The global incidence of tuberculosis remains unacceptably high, with new preventative strategies needed to reduce the burden of disease. We describe here a method for the generation of synthetic self-adjuvanted protein vaccines and demonstrate application in vaccination against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Two vaccine constructs were designed, consisting of full-length ESAT6 protein…
6h
Photopatterned biomolecule immobilization to guide three-dimensional cell fate in natural protein-based hydrogels [Applied Biological Sciences]
Hydrogel biomaterials derived from natural biopolymers (e.g., fibrin, collagen, decellularized extracellular matrix) are regularly utilized in three-dimensional (3D) cell culture and tissue engineering. In contrast to those based on synthetic polymers, natural materials permit enhanced cytocompatibility, matrix remodeling, and biological integration. Despite these advantages, natural protein-based
6h
Autoinhibitory elements of the Chd1 remodeler block initiation of twist defects by destabilizing the ATPase motor on the nucleosome [Biochemistry]
Chromatin remodelers are ATP (adenosine triphosphate)-powered motors that reposition nucleosomes throughout eukaryotic chromosomes. Remodelers possess autoinhibitory elements that control the direction of nucleosome sliding, but underlying mechanisms of inhibition have been unclear. Here, we show that autoinhibitory elements of the yeast Chd1 remodeler block nucleosome sliding by preventing initia
6h
Acceleration of catalysis in dihydrofolate reductase by transient, site-specific photothermal excitation [Chemistry]
We have studied the role of protein dynamics in chemical catalysis in the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), using a pump–probe method that employs pulsed-laser photothermal heating of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) to directly excite a local region of the protein structure and transient absorbance to probe the effect on enzyme…
6h
The Tiger Rattlesnake genome reveals a complex genotype underlying a simple venom phenotype [Evolution]
Variation in gene regulation is ubiquitous, yet identifying the mechanisms producing such variation, especially for complex traits, is challenging. Snake venoms provide a model system for studying the phenotypic impacts of regulatory variation in complex traits because of their genetic tractability. Here, we sequence the genome of the Tiger Rattlesnake,…
6h
Quantum phases of Rydberg atoms on a kagome lattice [Physics]
We analyze the zero-temperature phases of an array of neutral atoms on the kagome lattice, interacting via laser excitation to atomic Rydberg states. Density-matrix renormalization group calculations reveal the presence of a wide variety of complex solid phases with broken lattice symmetries. In addition, we identify a regime with dense…
6h
Structure and assembly of the diiron cofactor in the heme-oxygenase-like domain of the N-nitrosourea-producing enzyme SznF [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
In biosynthesis of the pancreatic cancer drug streptozotocin, the tridomain nonheme-iron oxygenase SznF hydroxylates Nδ and Nω′ of Nω-methyl-l-arginine before oxidatively rearranging the triply modified guanidine to the N-methyl-N-nitrosourea pharmacophore. A previously published structure visualized the monoiron cofactor in the enzyme's C-terminal cupin domain, which promotes the final rearrangem
6h
Surface boulder banding indicates Martian debris-covered glaciers formed over multiple glaciations [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Glacial landforms, including lobate debris aprons, are a global water ice reservoir on Mars preserving ice from past periods when high orbital obliquity permitted nonpolar ice accumulation. Numerous studies have noted morphological similarities between lobate debris aprons and terrestrial debris-covered glaciers, an interpretation supported by radar observations. On Earth and…
6h
Accumulation of styrene oligomers alters lipid membrane phase order and miscibility [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Growth of plastic waste in the natural environment, and in particular in the oceans, has raised the accumulation of polystyrene and other polymeric species in eukyarotic cells to the level of a credible and systemic threat. Oligomers, the smallest products of polymer degradation or incomplete polymerization reactions, are the first…
6h
DNA origami demonstrate the unique stimulatory power of single pMHCs as T cell antigens [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
T cells detect with their T cell antigen receptors (TCRs) the presence of rare agonist peptide/MHC complexes (pMHCs) on the surface of antigen-presenting cells (APCs). How extracellular ligand binding triggers intracellular signaling is poorly understood, yet spatial antigen arrangement on the APC surface has been suggested to be a critical…
6h
Experienced well-being rises with income, even above $75,000 per year [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
What is the relationship between money and well-being? Research distinguishes between two forms of well-being: people's feelings during the moments of life (experienced well-being) and people's evaluation of their lives when they pause and reflect (evaluative well-being). Drawing on 1,725,994 experience-sampling reports from 33,391 employed US adults, the present results…
6h
Discrete TrkB-expressing neurons of the dorsomedial hypothalamus regulate feeding and thermogenesis [Neuroscience]
Mutations in the TrkB neurotrophin receptor lead to profound obesity in humans, and expression of TrkB in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) is critical for maintaining energy homeostasis. However, the functional implications of TrkB-fexpressing neurons in the DMH (DMHTrkB) on energy expenditure are unclear. Additionally, the neurocircuitry underlying the effect of…
6h
Moireless correlations in ABCA graphene [Applied Physical Sciences]
Atomically thin van der Waals materials stacked with an interlayer twist have proven to be an excellent platform toward achieving gate-tunable correlated phenomena linked to the formation of flat electronic bands. In this work we demonstrate the formation of emergent correlated phases in multilayer rhombohedral graphene––a simple material that also…
6h
Discovery of a hidden transient state in all bromodomain families [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Bromodomains (BDs) are small protein modules that interact with acetylated marks in histones. These posttranslational modifications are pivotal to regulate gene expression, making BDs promising targets to treat several diseases. While the general structure of BDs is well known, their dynamical features and their interplay with other macromolecules are poorly…
6h
Multiple cannabinoid signaling cascades powerfully suppress recurrent excitation in the hippocampus [Neuroscience]
Recurrent excitatory neural networks are unstable. In the hippocampus, excitatory mossy cells (MCs) receive strong excitatory inputs from dentate granule cells (GCs) and project back onto the proximal dendrites of GCs. By targeting the ipsi- and contralateral dentate gyrus (DG) along the dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus, MCs form an…
6h
Structurally silent peptide anchor modifications allosterically modulate T cell recognition in a receptor-dependent manner [Immunology and Inflammation]
Presentation of peptides by class I MHC proteins underlies T cell immune responses to pathogens and cancer. The association between peptide binding affinity and immunogenicity has led to the engineering of modified peptides with improved MHC binding, with the hope that these peptides would be useful for eliciting cross-reactive immune…
6h
Bifurcation of excited state trajectories toward energy transfer or electron transfer directed by wave function symmetry [Chemistry]
This work explores the concept that differential wave function overlap between excited states can be engineered within a molecular chromophore. The aim is to control excited state wave function symmetries, so that symmetry matches or mismatches result in differential orbital overlap and define low-energy trajectories or kinetic barriers within the…
6h
Native American fire management at an ancient wildland-urban interface in the Southwest United States [Environmental Sciences]
The intersection of expanding human development and wildland landscapes—the "wildland–urban interface" or WUI—is one of the most vexing contexts for fire management because it involves complex interacting systems of people and nature. Here, we document the dynamism and stability of an ancient WUI that was apparently sustainable for more than…
6h
Synaptotagmin-1-, Munc18-1-, and Munc13-1-dependent liposome fusion with a few neuronal SNAREs [Biochemistry]
Neurotransmitter release is governed by eight central proteins among other factors: the neuronal SNAREs syntaxin-1, synaptobrevin, and SNAP-25, which form a tight SNARE complex that brings the synaptic vesicle and plasma membranes together; NSF and SNAPs, which disassemble SNARE complexes; Munc18-1 and Munc13-1, which organize SNARE complex assembly; and the…
6h
Live-cell epigenome manipulation by synthetic histone acetylation catalyst system [Biochemistry]
Chemical modifications of histones, such as lysine acetylation and ubiquitination, play pivotal roles in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Methods to alter the epigenome thus hold promise as tools for elucidating epigenetic mechanisms and as therapeutics. However, an entirely chemical method to introduce histone modifications in living cells without genetic…
6h
Growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists ameliorate chronic kidney disease-induced heart failure with preserved ejection fraction [Medical Sciences]
Therapies for heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are lacking. Growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists (GHRH-As) have salutary effects in ischemic and nonischemic heart failure animal models. Accordingly, we hypothesized that GHRH-A treatment ameliorates chronic kidney disease (CKD)-induced HFpEF in a large-animal model. Female Yorkshire pigs (n = 16) underwent…
6h
Impact of transnational land acquisitions on local food security and dietary diversity [Sustainability Science]
Foreign investors have acquired approximately 90 million hectares of land for agriculture over the past two decades. The effects of these investments on local food security remain unknown. While additional cropland and intensified agriculture could potentially increase crop production, preferential targeting of prime agricultural land and transitions toward export-bound crops…
6h
Results from a 2020 field experiment encouraging voting by mail [Political Sciences]
The ability to cast a mail ballot can safeguard the franchise. However, because there are often additional procedural protections to ensure that a ballot cast in person counts, voting by mail can also jeopardize people's ability to cast a recorded vote. An experiment carried out during the COVID-19 pandemic illustrates…
6h
PIAS1 modulates striatal transcription, DNA damage repair, and SUMOylation with relevance to Huntington's disease [Neuroscience]
DNA damage repair genes are modifiers of disease onset in Huntington's disease (HD), but how this process intersects with associated disease pathways remains unclear. Here we evaluated the mechanistic contributions of protein inhibitor of activated STAT-1 (PIAS1) in HD mice and HD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and find…
6h
A short ORF-encoded transcriptional regulator [Genetics]
Recent technological advances have expanded the annotated protein coding content of mammalian genomes, as hundreds of previously unidentified, short open reading frame (ORF)-encoded peptides (SEPs) have now been found to be translated. Although several studies have identified important physiological roles for this emerging protein class, a general method to define…
6h
Identification of the Younger Dryas onset was confused by the Laacher See volcanic eruption [Physical Sciences]
Cheng et al. (1) provide data on oxygen-isotope δ18O in nine speleothems of Younger Dryas (YD) age from caves situated in several continents between 42°27′ N and 21°05′ S and dated by the U-Th method. They compare this data with δ18O records in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica…
6h
Long-range structural defects by pathogenic mutations in most severe glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency [Medical Sciences]
Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common blood disorder, presenting multiple symptoms, including hemolytic anemia. It affects 400 million people worldwide, with more than 160 single mutations reported in G6PD. The most severe mutations (about 70) are classified as class I, leading to more than 90% loss of activity…
6h
Multiple domain interfaces mediate SARM1 autoinhibition [Neuroscience]
Axon degeneration is an active program of self-destruction mediated by the protein SARM1. In healthy neurons, SARM1 is autoinhibited and, upon injury autoinhibition is relieved, activating the SARM1 enzyme to deplete NAD+ and induce axon degeneration. SARM1 forms a homomultimeric octamer with each monomer composed of an N-terminal autoinhibitory ARM…
6h
Longitudinal shear stress response in human endothelial cells to atheroprone and atheroprotective conditions [Systems Biology]
The two main blood flow patterns, namely, pulsatile shear (PS) prevalent in straight segments of arteries and oscillatory shear (OS) observed at branch points, are associated with atheroprotective (healthy) and atheroprone (unhealthy) vascular phenotypes, respectively. The effects of blood flow-induced shear stress on endothelial cells (ECs) and vascular health have…
6h
Reply to Stuchlik et al.: The Younger Dryas onset at 12.87 ky B.P. is still ȷustified if the Laacher See eruption is considered [Physical Sciences]
We thank Stuchlík et al. for their comments (1) on our paper (2). First, for the sake of clarity, we note that Stuchlík et al. may have inadvertently stated "δ18O records in several ice cores from Greenland and Antarctica that were originally dated by the radiocarbon method." This is obviously…
6h
Mdm2 phosphorylation by Akt regulates the p53 response to oxidative stress to promote cell proliferation and tumorigenesis [Cell Biology]
We have shown previously that phosphorylation of Mdm2 by ATM and c-Abl regulates Mdm2-p53 signaling and alters the effects of DNA damage in mice, including bone marrow failure and tumorigenesis induced by ionizing radiation. Here, we examine the physiological effects of Mdm2 phosphorylation by Akt, another DNA damage effector kinase….
6h
IMITATION SWITCH is required for normal chromatin structure and gene repression in PRC2 target domains [Genetics]
Polycomb Group (PcG) proteins are part of an epigenetic cell memory system that plays essential roles in multicellular development, stem cell biology, X chromosome inactivation, and cancer. In animals, plants, and many fungi, Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) catalyzes trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) to assemble transcriptionally repressed…
6h
Pervasive cropland in protected areas highlight trade-offs between conservation and food security [Sustainability Science]
Global cropland expansion over the last century caused widespread habitat loss and degradation. Establishment of protected areas aims to counteract the loss of habitats and to slow species extinctions. However, many protected areas also include high levels of habitat disturbance and conversion for uses such as cropland. Understanding where and…
6h
The joint dynamics of investor beliefs and trading during the COVID-19 crash [Economic Sciences]
We analyze how investor expectations about economic growth and stock returns changed during the February−March 2020 stock market crash induced by the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as during the subsequent partial stock market recovery. We surveyed retail investors who are clients of Vanguard at three points in time: 1) on…
6h
Positive epistasis between disease-causing missense mutations and silent polymorphism with effect on mRNA translation velocity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Epistasis refers to the dependence of a mutation on other mutation(s) and the genetic context in general. In the context of human disorders, epistasis complicates the spectrum of disease symptoms and has been proposed as a major contributor to variations in disease outcome. The nonadditive relationship between mutations and the…
6h
Self-inhibition effect of metal incorporation in nanoscaled semiconductors [Chemistry]
There has been a persistent effort to understand and control the incorporation of metal impurities in semiconductors at nanoscale, as it is important for semiconductor processing from growth, doping to making contact. Previously, the injection of metal atoms into nanoscaled semiconductor, with concentrations orders of magnitude higher than the equilibrium…
6h
Evolution and demise of passive margins through grain mixing and damage [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
How subduction—the sinking of cold lithospheric plates into the mantle—is initiated is one of the key mysteries in understanding why Earth has plate tectonics. One of the favored locations for subduction triggering is at passive margins, where sea floor abuts continental margins. Such passive margin collapse is problematic because the…
6h
Distinct electrophysiological signatures of task-unrelated and dynamic thoughts [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Humans spend much of their lives engaging with their internal train of thoughts. Traditionally, research focused on whether or not these thoughts are related to ongoing tasks, and has identified reliable and distinct behavioral and neural correlates of task-unrelated and task-related thought. A recent theoretical framework highlighted a different aspect…
6h
Pathogenic role of delta 2 tubulin in bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy [Neuroscience]
The pathogenesis of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is poorly understood. Here, we report that the CIPN-causing drug bortezomib (Bort) promotes delta 2 tubulin (D2) accumulation while affecting microtubule stability and dynamics in sensory neurons in vitro and in vivo and that the accumulation of D2 is predominant in unmyelinated fibers…
6h
Using data-driven approaches to improve delivery of animal health care interventions for public health [Sustainability Science]
Rabies kills ∼60,000 people per year. Annual vaccination of at least 70% of dogs has been shown to eliminate rabies in both human and canine populations. However, delivery of large-scale mass dog vaccination campaigns remains a challenge in many rabies-endemic countries. In sub-Saharan Africa, where the vast majority of dogs…
6h
Self-organized biotectonics of termite nests [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The termite nest is one of the architectural wonders of the living world, built by the collective action of workers in a colony. Each nest has several characteristic structural motifs that allow for efficient ventilation, cooling, and traversal. We use tomography to quantify the nest architecture of the African termite…
6h
Nonlinear elasticity and damping govern ultrafast dynamics in click beetles [Applied Physical Sciences]
Many small animals use springs and latches to overcome the mechanical power output limitations of their muscles. Click beetles use springs and latches to bend their bodies at the thoracic hinge and then unbend extremely quickly, resulting in a clicking motion. When unconstrained, this quick clicking motion results in a…
6h
Wireless, soft electronics for rapid, multisensor measurements of hydration levels in healthy and diseased skin [Engineering]
Precise, quantitative measurements of the hydration status of skin can yield important insights into dermatological health and skin structure and function, with additional relevance to essential processes of thermoregulation and other features of basic physiology. Existing tools for determining skin water content exploit surrogate electrical assessments performed with bulky, rigid,…
6h
Symmetrical arrangement of proteins under release-ready vesicles in presynaptic terminals [Neuroscience]
Controlled release of neurotransmitters stored in synaptic vesicles (SVs) is a fundamental process that is central to all information processing in the brain. This relies on tight coupling of the SV fusion to action potential-evoked presynaptic Ca2+ influx. This Ca2+-evoked release occurs from a readily releasable pool (RRP) of SVs…
6h
New Gene Therapy Reverses Aging in Mice
A team of Chinese scientists have developed a gene therapy that they say reverses some aspects of aging — and extend lifespans — in mice, Reuters reports . While plenty more research still needs to be done, the research sheds light on the underlying processes involved in aging, and reveals a twinkle of hope for a therapy that turns back the biological clock for human patients. The team's therapy,
6h
Swamp Thing
"Drain the swamp." Of all Trump's lies, that was one of the most puzzling. It's not just that Trump himself was and is crooked, or even that he so obviously likes and admires crooks. It's that Trump's particular form of crookedness was exactly the kind of crookedness that people have in mind when they imagine Washington, D.C., as a "swamp." Trump's first Manhattan real-estate deal —the first deal
6h
Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then 'wake up'.
6h
NINJ1 mediates plasma membrane rupture during lytic cell death
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03218-7
6h
Lessons from the host defences of bats, a unique viral reservoir
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03128-0 Unique biological traits of bats and adaptive evolution associated with flight confer immunotolerance of viral infection that may help to make bats special reservoir hosts for viruses.
6h
A reprogrammable mechanical metamaterial with stable memory
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03123-5 A reprogrammable mechanical metamaterial constructed of bistable unit cells that can be switched independently and reversibly between two stable states with distinct mechanical properties using magnetic actuation is demonstrated.
6h
Lake heatwaves under climate change
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03119-1 Modelling and remote sensing show that by the end of the twenty-first century, lake heatwaves will be several degrees Celsius warmer and some will be months longer, with potentially major adverse consequences for lake ecosystems.
6h
A stable low-temperature H2-production catalyst by crowding Pt on α-MoC
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03130-6 A stable, low-temperature water–gas shift catalyst is achieved by crowding platinum atoms and clusters on α-molybdenum carbide; the crowding protects the support from oxidation that would cause catalyst deactivation.
6h
Dopamine-based mechanism for transient forgetting
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03154-y A dopamine neuron that underpins transient forgetting in Drosophila is activated by the presentation of interfering stimuli immediately before memory retrieval, modulating this retrieval by stimulating a dopamine receptor in mushroom body neurons.
6h
Striatal activity topographically reflects cortical activity
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03166-8 Simultaneous mapping of activity across the cortex and dorsal striatum in mice shows that activity in each part of the striatum precisely mirrors that in topographically associated cortical regions, consistently across behavioural contexts.
6h
Trapped fractional charges at bulk defects in topological insulators
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03117-3 It is experimentally shown that crystallographic defects may trap fractional charges, as well as topological states, in the bulk of topological crystalline insulators.
6h
Monitoring hiring discrimination through online recruitment platforms
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03136-0 An analysis of the search behaviour of recruiters on a Swiss online recruitment platform shows that jobseekers from minority ethnic groups are less likely to be contacted by recruiters, and also provides evidence of gender-based discrimination.
6h
Survey of spiking in the mouse visual system reveals functional hierarchy
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03171-x A large, open dataset containing parallel recordings from six visual cortical and two thalamic areas of the mouse brain is presented, from which the relative timing of activity in response to visual stimuli and behaviour is used to construct a hierarchy scheme that corresponds to anatomical connectivity data.
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Observation of the onset of a blue jet into the stratosphere
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03122-6 Observations from the International Space Station show a blue jet that is initiated by an intense blue flash in the top of a thunderstorm cloud.
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Restoring metabolism of myeloid cells reverses cognitive decline in ageing
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03160-0 In aged mice, inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signalling through its receptor EP2 improves cellular bioenergetics, reduces inflammatory responses and restores hippocampal plasticity to youthful levels, resulting in an improvement in spatial memory and cognition.
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Decoding and perturbing decision states in real time
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03181-9 In macaque motor cortex, moment-to-moment fluctuations in neurally derived decision variables are tightly linked to decision state and predict behavioural choices with better accuracy than condition-averaged decision variables or the visual stimulus alone, and can be used to distinguish between different models of decision
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Bulk–disclination correspondence in topological crystalline insulators
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03125-3 It is experimentally shown that topological states exist at crystallographic defects in the bulk and that disclination defects trap fractional charges characteristic of topological crystalline insulators.
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Tracking break-induced replication shows that it stalls at roadblocks
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03172-w A method of tracking break-induced replication reveals the details of this repair process and shows that it can be impaired by certain genomic elements and by transcription.
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Reversal of immune-cell shutdown protects the ageing brain
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00063-6 Immune cells called macrophages have been found to shut down major metabolic pathways during ageing. Restoring metabolism in these cells is sufficient to alleviate age-associated cognitive decline in mice.
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Mechanical memory written and read remotely
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00080-5 A device has been developed that consists of mechanical bits, analogous to the magnetic bits used in computer hard drives. Information encoded in the bits programs the mechanical properties of the device.
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Electrons broken into pieces at crystal defects
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00079-y Fractional electric charges have been observed at crystal defects in artificial structures resembling materials called topological crystalline insulators. Such fractional charges could have various engineering applications.
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A Glimpse Inside the Mind of Dreaming Animals
It seems that animals dream, based on similar sleep patterns in humans. But, this dreaming may be different than ours.
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Affordable electric car battery aims to end 'range anxiety'
A new lithium iron phosphate battery for electric cars offers a range of 250 miles with the ability to recharge in 10 minutes. It could make "range anxiety," the fear of running out of power before being able to recharge an electric car, a thing of the past, researchers say. "We developed a pretty clever battery for mass-market electric vehicles with cost parity with combustion engine vehicles,"
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Ask Dr. Hamblin: So When Can We Stop Wearing Masks?
Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, I'm still confused about what our lives will be like after we are vaccinated. As I understand it, it will still be possible to get the virus, but hopefully the course won't be as severe o
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Covid vaccines may need updating to protect against new variant, study suggests
Neutralising ability of antibodies typically falls eight-fold with South African variant Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coronavirus vaccines may need to be redesigned this year to boost protection against a new variant that emerged rapidly in South Africa, research suggests, while past Covid sufferers may not be protected against reinfection. Research by South Afric
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Forsker advarer mod brint-­satsning: Udslip kan forstærke klimaforandringer
PLUS. Norsk forskningsprojekt med deltagelse af Equinor, Shell og Statkraft skal undersøge konsekvenserne af brintudslip til atmosfæren, hvor brinten vil virke som en indirekte drivhusgas.
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Designer DNA therapeutic wipes out cancer stem cells, treats multiple myeloma in mice
UC San Diego study supports launch of Phase I clinical trial to test a designer DNA agent — an antisense oligonucleotide that targets a gene called IRF4 — in patients with multiple myeloma.
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Association of social, economic inequality with COVID-19 across US counties
This investigation analyzed U.S. county-level associations of income inequality, racial/ethnic composition and political attributes with COVID-19 cases and mortality.
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Factors associated with US public motivation to use, distribute COVID-19 self-tests
Researchers examined individuals' motivation to self-test and to distribute self-test kits given the urgent need to increase COVID-19 testing coverage and contact tracing.
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Stanford study reveals immune driver of brain aging
Stanford scientists have identified a key factor in mental aging and shown that it might be prevented or reversed by fixing a glitch in the immune system's frontline soldiers.
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Associations of government-mandated closures, restrictions with mobility, SARS-CoV-2 infections in Nigeria
This observational study examined how COVID-19-related government-mandated closures and restrictions were associated with changes in mobility and the spread of COVID-19 in Nigeria.
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New metamaterial offers reprogrammable properties
EPFL scientists have developed a metamaterial whose mechanical properties can be reprogrammed on demand and whose internal structure can be modified by applying a magnetic field.
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Diabetes powerfully associated with premature coronary heart disease in women
To understand what factors put younger individuals at higher risk of premature coronary heart disease, researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Mayo Clinic analyzed more than 50 risk factors in 28,024 women who participated in the decades-long Women's Health Study. Notably, women under 55 with type-2 diabetes had a tenfold greater risk of having CHD over the next two decades, with lip
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Methamphetamine overdose deaths rise sharply nationwide
Methamphetamine overdose deaths surged in an eight-year period in the United States, according to a study published today in JAMA Psychiatry. The analysis revealed rapid rises across all racial and ethnic groups, but American Indians and Alaska Natives had the highest death rates overall. The research was conducted at the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), part of the National Institutes of
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Plant Cells of Different Species Can Swap Organelles
More than a decade ago, plant geneticists noticed something peculiar when they looked at grafted plants. Where two plants grew together, the cells of each plant showed signs of having picked up substantial amounts of DNA from the other one. In itself, that wasn't unprecedented, because horizontal transfers of genes are not uncommon in bacteria and even in animals, fungi and plants. But in this ca
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Scientists Fire Volcanic Rocks at Rooftops to Prove Volcanoes Are Dangerous
Bombs Away! A team of scientists in New Zealand are taking a very hands-on approach to volcano safety: blasting rooftops with volcanic rocks to see which are left standing. Thankfully, their fiery target practice doesn't involve anyone's actual home, but rather the University of Canterbury team is firing volcanic ballistics at mock roofing, according to a university press release . The goal is to
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Why some people think they hear the voices of the dead
Both spiritualist mediums and schizophrenics hear voices. For the former, this constitutes a gift; for the latter, mental illness. A study explores what the two phenomena have in common. Even different definitions of the word "clairaudience" reflect the way different people respond to the experience. Merriam-Webster defines it as "hearing something not present to the ear but regarded as having ob
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Best ski goggles: What to look for in a pair you'll love
A great pair of goggles means a better day on the slopes. (Cenk Basbolat via Unsplash/) Getting out on the slopes is a thrilling experience, whether it's your first time on the bunny hill or whether you are a seasoned park rat. It's a sport that is exhilarating, providing what the vets refer to as "bluebird days" filled with fresh air, exercise, and plain old fun. For beginners, however, getting
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Ancient indigenous New Mexican community knew how to sustainably coexist with wildfire
Wildfires are the enemy when they threaten homes in California and elsewhere. But a new study led by SMU suggests that people living in fire-prone places can learn to manage fire as an ally to prevent dangerous blazes, just like people who lived nearly 1,000 years ago.
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Lægeforeningen svarer på debatindlæg: Omskæring af drenge uden medicinsk indikation er etisk uacceptabelt
Det er ikke korrekt, når det hævdes, at Lægeforeningen tøver med at anbefale en 18-års mindstealder for et operativt indgreb på raske drengebørn, skriver formand Camilla Noelle Rathcke.
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Why vaccinating everyone on the planet may still not wipe out covid-19
More transmissible coronavirus variants, coupled with questions about whether the vaccines prevent transmission, means it might be impossible to wipe out covid-19
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Global spread of UK coronavirus variant could overwhelm health systems
The highly infectious B.1.1.7 coronavirus variant from the UK has now been reported in more than 50 countries, placing new urgency on the race to vaccinate the vulnerable
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How worried should we be about the new coronavirus variants?
New versions of coronavirus that spread faster and might evade the immune system are causing fears about vaccine efficacy and a rise in covid-19 deaths. Here's what you need to know
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An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have made a prototype of an a
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New metamaterial offers reprogrammable properties
Over the past 20 years, scientists have been developing metamaterials, or materials that don't occur naturally and whose mechanical properties result from their designed structure rather than their chemical composition. They allow researchers to create materials with specific properties and shapes. Metamaterials are still not widely used in everyday objects, but that could soon change. Tian Chen,
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New antifungal compound from ant farms
Attine ants are farmers, and they grow fungus as food. Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces bacteria are their farmhands, producing metabolites that protect the crop from pathogens. Surprisingly, these metabolites lack common structural features across bacteria from different geographic locations, even though the ants share a common ancestor. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science they have ide
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Storing information with light
New photo-ferroelectric materials allow storage of information in a non-volatile way using light stimulus. The idea is to create energy efficient memory devices with high performance and versatility to face current challenges. The study has been published in Nature Communications by Josep Fontcuberta and co-workers and opens a path towards further investigations on this phenomenon and to neuromorp
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New antifungal compound from ant farms
Attine ants are farmers, and they grow fungus as food. Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces bacteria are their farmhands, producing metabolites that protect the crop from pathogens. Surprisingly, these metabolites lack common structural features across bacteria from different geographic locations, even though the ants share a common ancestor. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science they have ide
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All the best ways to stream the Biden Inauguration
Today, Joe Biden will be inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States and the event will be live streaming on a wide variety of platforms. Here's a rundown of when and where you can watch the festivities as they happen. The PBS NewsHour stream is embedded above. It's running on YouTube, which should make it readily available to watch on a phone, in a browser, or cast to any number of st
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3 ways to upgrade democracy for the 21st century | Max Rashbrooke
Democracy needs an update — one that respects and engages citizens by involving them in everyday political decisions, says writer and researcher Max Rashbrooke. He outlines three global success stories that could help move democratic systems forward and protect society against the new challenges this century is already bringing.
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Cowi fastholder: Tæt løb på prisen mellem to typer energiøer
PLUS. Opdateret rapport fra regeringens rådgiver viser, at en energiø, der kan tage imod 3 GW, koster knap 60 mia. kr., uanset om den er udformet som platform eller en kunstig ø. Ved 10 GW vokser forskellen.
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Idk if this has already been posted, but artificial photosynthesis could be the future of renewable energy. It thought this was a cool concept. [2019]
Could artificial photosynthesis be the holy grail of renewables? | Greenbiz [2019] It's an older article but it provides a basic insight into artificial photosynthesis. submitted by /u/CyberGod1209 [link] [comments]
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What kinds of internet websites will evolve to become Virtual reality environments in the future?
I believe that many websites will become vr worlds in the future as it would more useful to do it in VR form: Shopping websites like Amazon or Ebay could become a shopping mall vr environment. The shopping itself would be Amazon while the stores would be the sellers themselves; Social media forums like here Reddit could evolve into a lounge or a nightclub virtual environment which could be divide
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This Artificial Heart Will Soon Be on the Market in Europe
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Project On Self-Deleting Genes Takes Aim At Mosquito-Borne Diseases
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Biotech Drives the Water Purification Industry Towards a Circular Economy
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Business could be on the precipice of an automation explosion
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Chinese scientists develop gene therapy which could delay ageing
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Artificial cornea restores patient's vision
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Anti-ageing gene therapy in mice developed by Chinese scientists
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Spending on Global Energy Transition Hits Record $500 Billion
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InSight's heat probe has failed on Mars. Is the mission a failure?
For two years now, NASA's InSight probe has sat on the surface of Mars, attempting to dig 5 meters (16 feet) deep in order to install the lander's heat probe. The instrument was going to effectively take the planet's temperature and tell scientists more about the internal thermal activity and geology of Mars. InSight never even got close to realizing that goal. On January 14, NASA announced that
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Man Faced 10 Year Sentence for Wielding Elon Musk Flamethrower
Flame War It likely wasn't the intention of Boring Company CEO Elon Musk to get anyone thrown in jail abroad. Yet in June 2018, Musk chose to sell 20,000 flamethrowers with the tongue-in-cheek name "Not a Flamethrower" under the tunnel-digging brand. The not-flamethrowers were a huge success, selling out almost immediately. But some chose to take their new glorified propane-burning barbeque start
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Can brain zaps curb obsessive-compulsive behavior?
A drug-free and noninvasive technique shows promise in reducing the kinds of behaviors that come with obsessive-compulsive disorder, researchers report. At times, we all "double-check" whether we locked the door, or wash our hands again "just to be sure." However, one billion people worldwide experience these urges so intensely and continuously that they cannot help but do these actions compulsiv
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Biden's First Climate Actions Include Rejoining Paris Agreement
He will also rescind a permit for the Keystone XL pipeline and order a review of Trump administration environmental rollbacks — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feast your eyes on this 50-million-year-old assassin bug and its exquisite genitalia
A fossilized big found in Colorado, which represents a new genus and species of predatory insects known as assassin bugs. Researchers named the new species, Aphelicophontes danjuddi. (Image courtesy Palaeontological Association/) A 50-million-year-old assassin bug offers a rare peek at reproductive structures that aren't usually visible in fossilized insects. The "extraordinarily well-preserved"
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A Taxonomy of Donald Trump's Facial Expressions
Of the many head-benders of the Trump era, the dialectic between absurdity and extreme gravity has been one of the hardest to manage. We have been obliged to take an unserious person very seriously indeed. It has hurt our brains. It has reminded us, again and again, that the 45th president of the United States is simultaneously a reality-television star and an aspiring despot. Is it possible to s
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Covid testing plan for English schools paused after health bodies' warning
Government told that balance between risks of keeping children in class and benefits of daily tests is 'unclear'
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Zoom fatigue saps grant reviewers' attention
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00161-5 Referees for the US National Institutes of Health report engaging less during virtual panel meetings — but most think review quality doesn't suffer.
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This Artificial Heart Will Soon Be on the Market in Europe
Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death in the world, particularly in the US and Western Europe. Medical science has come up with some ingenious solutions to common heart problems, like pacemakers (which correct abnormal heart rhythms), stents (to hold clogged arteries open so blood can flow through), and bypass surgery (which implants a healthy blood vessel from another part of the b
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Indian hesitancy sets back world's biggest Covid vaccination drive
Low uptake fuelled by fears over safety of vaccine and spread of misinformation Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage India's Covid-19 vaccine drive has been hampered by turnout as low as 22% in some states, as fears over the safety of the vaccine and the spread of misinformation has fuelled widespread hesitancy. On Saturday, India launched the world's largest vaccination
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Black Americans Are Getting COVID Vaccines at Lower Rates Than White Americans
In 16 states that have released data by race, white residents are being vaccinated at much higher rates—in many cases two to three times higher — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Eggs reveal what may happen to brain on impact
Our brains consist of soft matter bathed in watery cerebrospinal fluid inside a hard skull, and in a new article, researchers describe studying another system with the same features, an egg, to search for answers about concussions. Considering that in most concussive brain injuries, the skull does not break, they wanted to find out if it was possible to break or deform the egg yolk without breakin
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DNA origami enables fabricating superconducting nanowires
Researchers describe how to exploit DNA origami as a platform to build superconducting nanoarchitectures. The structures they built are addressable with nanometric precision that can be used as a template for 3D architectures that are not possible today via conventional fabrication techniques. Inspired by previous works using the DNA molecule as a template for superconducting nanowires, the group
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New biomaterials can be 'fine-tuned' for medical applications
Researchers have succeeded in 'fine tuning' a new thermoplastic biomaterial to enable both the rate at which it degrades in the body and its mechanical properties to be controlled independently.
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Video Shows Agonized Man Crawling Out of Hospital
Newly-released of Toronto's Humber River Hospital shows a disturbing scene in which a man named David Pontone crawls out the exit on all fours after being denied care for excruciating leg pain. Pontone went to the emergency room for his leg pain on April 18, 2018. As soon as he disclosed that he had bipolar affective disorder, he says that the medical staff immediately stopped taking him or his s
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What Scientists Are Learning About Covid-19 Using the Nation's Blood Supply
Labs and blood banks collect millions of blood samples each month, offering a distinctive source of data on the disease
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3-D printing highly stretchable hydrogel with diverse UV curable polymers
Hydrogel-polymer hybrids are widely used across a variety of applications to form biomedical devices and flexible electronics. However, the technologies are presently limited to hydrogel-polymer hybrid laminates containing silicone rubbers. This can greatly limit the functionality and performance of hydrogel-polymer-based devices and machines. In a new study, Qi Ge, and a team of scientists in mec
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Italian police find stolen copy of Leonardo 'Salvator Mundi'
Italian police have recovered a 500-year-old copy of Leonardo da Vinci's 16th century "Salvator Mundi" painting of Jesus Christ that was stolen from a Naples church during the pandemic without the priests even realizing it was gone.
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Stressed out? Video games can help—if you follow these tips.
You don't need to pick Animal Crossing for a relaxing gaming experience. (Sam Pak via Unsplash/) If you're reading this, you're probably stressed. Never fear: We've dug through the evidence to reveal what science really says about finding zen—and holding onto it through tough times. Want to try meditation ? Take better baths ? Stop anxiety in its tracks ? Welcome to Calm Month . Nintendo's Animal
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Physicist proposes human-populated mega-satellite orbiting Ceres
Physicist Pekka Janhunen with the Finnish Meteorological Institute has developed a novel idea to colonize a place other than the Earth—and it is not the moon or Mars. Instead, Janhunen is suggesting in a paper posted on the arXiv preprint server that humans populate a giant satellite that orbits Ceres, a dwarf planet in the asteroid belt between Jupiter and Mars.
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Epitaph on a Tyrant (Sort Of)
You came in to the sound of oligarch chuckles and bullies at gas stations cracking their knuckles. And now, now that every trigger finger is itchy, you're going out like an exorcised Liberace. Hectic, comedic, toxic, alone, a flaming meringue on a tide of brimstone. How we adored your escapades. We swallowed your words like ghosts swallowing grenades. The dusty construction guy made common cause
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Saga requires all cruise customers to have Covid vaccine
Group serving over-50s will only allow people to travel after receiving two doses of jab
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Fear of the empty
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00122-y Broken dreams.
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Machine learning could cut delays from traffic lights
A new self-learning system uses machine learning to improve the coordination of vehicles passing through intersections. Traffic lights at intersections are managed by simple computers that assign the right of way to the nonconflicting direction. However, studies looking at travel times in urban areas have shown that delays caused by intersections make up 12-55% of daily commute travel , which cou
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Mellanstadieflickor har gott självförtroende
Svenska mellanstadietjejer sticker ut med sitt goda självförtroende. Deras värdering av sig själva har rakat i höjden, medan högstadieflickornas självbild försämrats sedan 80-talet. Det visar en jämförande studie från Lunds universitet. Forskarna tror att ett aktivt jämställdhetsarbete å ena sidan och en större exponering av ouppnåeliga kvinnoideal å den andra, spelar in. Hur har grundskoleelever
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Fornax A galaxy investigated with AstroSat
Using the AstroSat spacecraft, Indian astronomers have performed an imaging and spectroscopic study of the Fornax A galaxy. Results of the study, published January 13 on the arXiv preprint server, provide more clues on the properties of the galaxy and ultraviolet emission from this source.
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Climate-related species extinction possibly mitigated by newly discovered effect
Changes in climate that occur over short periods of time influence biodiversity. For a realistic assessment of these effects, it is necessary to also consider previous temperature trends going far back into Earth's history. Researchers from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg show this in a paper for Nature Ecology and Evolution. According to the paper, future clima
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Brazilian dam collapse could have been predicted with right monitoring technology, study finds
One of Brazil's worst environmental disasters—a dam collapse that also killed more than 200 people—could have been foreseen with the latest satellite radar imaging technique, according to a new study by the University of Nottingham and Durham University.
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Natural hazard events and national risk reduction measures unconnected
Countries where massive natural hazard events occur frequently are not more likely than others to make changes to reduce risks from future disasters. This is shown in an interdisciplinary Uppsala University study now published in Nature Communications.
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Red yeast from deep-sea sediment shows anticancer and antibacterial properties
Numerous natural products are awaiting discovery in all kinds of natural habitats. Especially microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi are able to produce diverse natural products with high biomedical application potential in particular as antibiotics and anticancer agents. This includes the so-called red yeast of the species Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, isolated from a deep-sea sediment sample from
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Climate-related species extinction possibly mitigated by newly discovered effect
Changes in climate that occur over short periods of time influence biodiversity. For a realistic assessment of these effects, it is necessary to also consider previous temperature trends going far back into Earth's history. Researchers from the University of Bayreuth and the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg show this in a paper for Nature Ecology and Evolution. According to the paper, future clima
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Red yeast from deep-sea sediment shows anticancer and antibacterial properties
Numerous natural products are awaiting discovery in all kinds of natural habitats. Especially microorganisms such as bacteria or fungi are able to produce diverse natural products with high biomedical application potential in particular as antibiotics and anticancer agents. This includes the so-called red yeast of the species Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, isolated from a deep-sea sediment sample from
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Social Media Bans Are Really, Actually, Shockingly Common
Booting Trump didn't set a precedent. From Yelp to Uber to Airbnb, platforms regularly ban users and content, but too often behind the scenes.
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WIRED's Picks for the 10 Books You Have to Read This Winter
It's cold and you're probably still quarantined. Time to get reading. Start with these tales of reimagined histories and cloned partners.
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Testing the antibacterial properties of hydrophobic surfaces on the ISS
A 'do not touch' directive applies to both a Matisse painting and this Matiss experiment on board the International Space Station.
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Could lab-grown plant tissue ease the environmental toll of logging and agriculture?
It takes a lot to make a wooden table. Grow a tree, cut it down, transport it, mill it … you get the point. It's a decades-long process. Luis Fernando Velásquez-García suggests a simpler solution: "If you want a table, then you should just grow a table."
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Feral colonies provide clues for enhancing honey bee tolerance to pathogens
Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that enable some feral honey bee colonies to tolerate pathogens and survive the winter in the absence of beekeeping management may help lead to breeding stocks that would enhance survival of managed colonies, according to a study led by researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
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Tiny structures generate powerful beams for enhanced optical imaging
Even the smallest molecule can tell a big story. For instance, observing a single molecule can throw light on underlying biological processes in the human body. In fact, molecular imaging procedures—which are noninvasive and painless—are being used to diagnose and manage the treatment of COVID-19, cancer, heart disease, and other serious health conditions.
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World's largest lakes reveal climate change trends
Sixteen years of remote sensing data reveals that in Earth's largest freshwater lakes, climate change influences carbon fixation trends.
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Success is all about making social connections—or is it?
There's a common adage that knowing the right people holds the secret to wealth and success. The flip side of that, however, is reminiscent of the country song, "Friends in Low Places": Sometimes social connections can prove detrimental.
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Even one arrest can delay a millennial's entry into homeownership, study shows
Getting arrested even once can keep a millennial from buying a home as quickly as peers with no arrest history, according to new research from a Rice University sociologist.
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Could lab-grown plant tissue ease the environmental toll of logging and agriculture?
It takes a lot to make a wooden table. Grow a tree, cut it down, transport it, mill it … you get the point. It's a decades-long process. Luis Fernando Velásquez-García suggests a simpler solution: "If you want a table, then you should just grow a table."
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Feral colonies provide clues for enhancing honey bee tolerance to pathogens
Understanding the genetic and environmental factors that enable some feral honey bee colonies to tolerate pathogens and survive the winter in the absence of beekeeping management may help lead to breeding stocks that would enhance survival of managed colonies, according to a study led by researchers in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.
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Vinder af 'Den Gyldne Tråd 2021': Halsnæs Kommune har succes med at opspore børn med tegn på mistrivsel
Halsnæs Kommune har vundet Kommunal Sundheds initiativpris 'Den Gyldne Tråd 2021' for at løse et problem, hvor praktiserende læger tidligere ikke kunne stille noget op. Når lægerne møder et barn eller en ung med tegn på mistrivsel, kan de I Halsnæs nu henvise direkte til PPR. Modellen fokuserer på tidlig opsporing og sikrer, at børn, der ellers går under PPR's radar, nu kan få den rette hjælp.
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Unique resistance gene to leaf spot disease successfully introduced in wheat
The fungus Zymoseptoria triciti is one of the most genetically diverse and devastating wheat pathogens in the world. An important step has been taken in the fight against this fungus: an international consortium that includes WUR has succeeded in cloning the resistant Stb16q-gene and successfully introducing it in wheat. The gene is now relatively easy to incorporate in commercial wheat varieties
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Discovery of new praying mantis species from the time of the dinosaurs
A McGill-led research team has identified a new species of praying mantis thanks to imprints of its fossilized wings. It lived in Labrador, in the Canadian Subarctic around 100 million years ago, during the time of the dinosaurs, in the Late Cretaceous period. The researchers believe that the fossils of the new genus and species, Labradormantis guilbaulti, helps to establish evolutionary relations
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Family matters: Why people can hold political views that disadvantage their own sex
The views of women and men can differ on important gendered issues such as abortion, gender equity and government spending priorities. Surprisingly, however, average differences in sex on this front are usually small. Many women adopt social and political positions that favor men and many men favor women-friendly positions.
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Unique resistance gene to leaf spot disease successfully introduced in wheat
The fungus Zymoseptoria triciti is one of the most genetically diverse and devastating wheat pathogens in the world. An important step has been taken in the fight against this fungus: an international consortium that includes WUR has succeeded in cloning the resistant Stb16q-gene and successfully introducing it in wheat. The gene is now relatively easy to incorporate in commercial wheat varieties
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Discovery of new praying mantis species from the time of the dinosaurs
A McGill-led research team has identified a new species of praying mantis thanks to imprints of its fossilized wings. It lived in Labrador, in the Canadian Subarctic around 100 million years ago, during the time of the dinosaurs, in the Late Cretaceous period. The researchers believe that the fossils of the new genus and species, Labradormantis guilbaulti, helps to establish evolutionary relations
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China revives conspiracy theory of US army link to Covid
Suspicions about army lab spread on social media after official's tit-for-tat response to US claim Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Attempts by Chinese authorities to shift the narrative around Covid-19's origins have reignited on social media this week after a government spokesperson revived a conspiracy theory that it came from a US army lab. Hua Chunying, a spokesp
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Boom i grøn brint-produktion
PLUS. Danske virksomheder er med i kapløbet om at opskalere produktionen af grøn brint for at få prisen banket i bund. Andre vil gerne have lov til at kalde brint produceret af atomkraft for bæredygtig.
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An anode-free zinc battery that could someday store renewable energy
Renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, could help decrease the world's reliance on fossil fuels. But first, power companies need a safe, cost-effective way to store the energy for later use. Massive lithium-ion batteries can do the job, but they suffer from safety issues and limited lithium availability. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have made a prototype of an a
10h
New antifungal compound from ant farms
Attine ants are farmers, and they grow fungus as food. Pseudonocardia and Streptomyces bacteria are their farmhands, producing metabolites that protect the crop from pathogens. Surprisingly, these metabolites lack common structural features across bacteria from different geographic locations, even though the ants share a common ancestor. Now, researchers report in ACS Central Science they have ide
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The Threat of Conspiracy Thinking to SBM
Conspiracy thinking is on the rise, and threatens the very notion of science and truth. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Fjärilens vingslag inspirerar till drönare
Fjärilarnas vingar är unikt stora och breda i förhållande till resten av kroppen jämfört med vingarna hos andra flygande insekter och hos fåglar. Nyttan med den extrema vingformen och de flexibla vingarna och kan komma till användning vid tillverkning av små drönare, menar Lundaforskare som studerat fjärilarnas aerodynamik. Forskare vid Lunds universitet har i detalj studerat fjärilarnas vingslag
10h
How to Get Great Tech Support—From Home
If you're in your home office for the long haul, you can still get the TLC you need for your IT. Here are some options.
10h
Vaping Won't Keep Young People From Smoking Cigarettes Later
It won't prevent teens from later becoming smokers. But some health experts say that focusing on the risk of addicting new smokers cuts off a chance to help adults quit.
10h
Dress like an Alaskan to weather the winter cold
The key is the right gear. And lots of layers. (Wojtek Kwiatkowski / Unsplash/) This story was originally featured on Outdoor Life . As we plunge into the depths of a winter that many have been dreading, one thing is clear—it's important to be prepared. And with more and more people looking to recreate outdoors this winter, that means a lot of folks will be pushed out of their comfort zones and i
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Publisher retracting 68 articles suspected of being paper mill products
It appears to be Paper Mill Sweeps Week here at Retraction Watch. On Tuesday, we reported on an editor who believes one such operation was responsible for the withdrawals of at least two articles in her journal. Now, the Royal Society of Chemistry is retracting 68 articles, across three of its titles, after an investigation … Continue reading
10h
Cereal crops fighting the climate chaos
Agriculture and climate experts have warned for some years that extreme climate events including severe droughts with frequent heatwaves drop the production of major staple food crops like wheat causing a severe threat to food security. Therefore, scientists are looking at grains that can better adapt to these circumstances: An international team, lead by Wolfram Weckwerth from the University of V
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Fremtidens rum-internet runder milepæl: Leverer nu lynhurtige (og ret dyre) hastigheder
Onsdag opsendes satellit nummer 1.000 i SpaceXs rum-internet Starlink.
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Cereal crops fighting the climate chaos
Agriculture and climate experts have warned for some years that extreme climate events including severe droughts with frequent heatwaves drop the production of major staple food crops like wheat causing a severe threat to food security. Therefore, scientists are looking at grains that can better adapt to these circumstances: An international team, lead by Wolfram Weckwerth from the University of V
10h
Research: Masculine offices add to the burden of female office workers during COVID-19 pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all aspects of life, including the lives of female workers.
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COVID-19 increased energy insecurity among low-income Americans
Nearly 4.8 million low-income American households were unable to pay an energy bill last year, a problem that intensified during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Low-income Black and Hispanic households were especially vulnerable to energy insecurity, as were households with small children or members who relied on electronic medical devices, and those with inefficient housing conditions.
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Secure digital collaboration important in shift to hybrid environments in education and healthcare
A dynamic alliance led by global technology giant Cisco and telecommunications leader Optus, in partnership with world class universities, La Trobe and Curtin, has produced a new paper which found that collaborative technology can benefit teams who are working remotely, especially in the government, health and education sectors.
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Research finding could slash energy use and cost in making silicon
Curtin University researchers have uncovered a method of making silicon, found commonly in electronics such as phones, cameras and computers, at room temperature.
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Oxford animal-only antibiotic lab could prop up intensive farming, critics say
New research centre to tackle overlap of livestock and human medicines, but campaigners fear "techno-fix" for factory farming An initiative to develop bespoke antibiotics for livestock has raised fears that it could be a "techno-fix" for more intensive farming. Mixed reactions have followed news that Ineos, a global petrochemical manufacturer, has donated £100m to establish the Ineos Oxford Unive
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Lex Letter from Seoul: China's vaccines and efficacy rates
Demand for Sinovac's CoronaVac will remain high. In most developing countries, it is the only option
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Scientists fire volcanic missiles to help Auckland prepare for threats
University of Canterbury scientists are unleashing volcanic ballistics onto Kiwi roofs hoping to help Aucklanders understand and manage their volcanic hazards.
10h
Scientists gain an unprecedented view of irradiated nuclear fuel
In a feat requiring perseverance, world-leading technology, and no small amount of caution, scientists have used intense X-rays to inspect irradiated nuclear fuel. The imaging, led by researchers at Purdue University and conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, revealed a 3-D view of the fuel's interior structure, laying the groundwork for better nuclear fuel
10h
Saturn's tilt caused by its moons
Two scientists from CNRS and Sorbonne University working at the Institute of Celestial Mechanics and Ephemeris Calculation (Paris Observatory—PSL/CNRS) have just shown that the influence of Saturn's satellites can explain the tilt of the rotation axis of the gas giant. Their work, published on 18 January 2021 in the journal Nature Astronomy, also predicts that the tilt will increase even further o
10h
Gold nanoparticles more stable by putting rings on them
Hokkaido University scientists have found a way to prevent gold nanoparticles from clumping, which could help towards their use as an anti-cancer therapy.
10h
New starfish-like fossil reveals evolution in action
Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered a fossil of the earliest starfish-like animal, which sheds light on the origins of the nimble-armed creature. The prototype starfish, which has features in common with both sea lilies and modern-day starfish, is a missing link for scientists trying to piece together its early evolutionary history.
10h
Optical data transmission speed increased by a factor of at least 10,000
Pulsed lasers repeatedly emit light for a short period of time as if blinking. They have the advantage of focusing more energy than a continuous wave laser, whose intensity is kept unchanged over time. If digital signals are loaded in a pulsed laser, each pulse can encode one bit of data. In this respect, the higher the repetition rate, the more the amount of data that can be transmitted. However,
10h
New starfish-like fossil reveals evolution in action
Researchers from the University of Cambridge have discovered a fossil of the earliest starfish-like animal, which sheds light on the origins of the nimble-armed creature. The prototype starfish, which has features in common with both sea lilies and modern-day starfish, is a missing link for scientists trying to piece together its early evolutionary history.
10h
The Second-Generation COVID Vaccines Are Coming
After Pfizer and Moderna, a slew of other candidates could fill gaps in efficacy, production, or distribution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Build Back Boring
Joe Biden has a real shot at being a boring president. It will require constant work. Many forces of commerce and human nature are arrayed against him, and countless obstacles stand in his path. But if the country is lucky, entire days will pass without the president's activities agitating the public mind. Success in the presidency can be measured in many ways. After Donald Trump, a new one might
11h
The Second-Generation COVID Vaccines Are Coming
Pfizer and Moderna may be the first past the post, but a slew of other candidates could address gaps in efficacy, production or distribution — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Lægemangel tvinger Region Midtjylland til at flytte psykiatriske behandlingstilbud
De seneste mange måneder har Regionspsykiatrien Vest i Region Midtjylland forgæves forsøgt at rekruttere læger til afdelingen. Senest har også vikarbureauerne måttet give fortabt, og som konsekvens rykkes flere af de psykiatriske behandlingstilbud nu midlertidigt andre steder hen i regionen.
11h
UK Covid live: Boris Johnson questioned over timing of border measures and loss of police records
Latest updates: PM says he does not know how many criminals have had records deleted; Starmer asks why he ignored advice on closing borders in March Priti Patel says she wanted UK borders shut last March Talking can spread Covid as much as coughing, says research Daily Covid testing plans 'paused' in English schools MPs demand answers over lack of support for self-employed Coronavirus – latest up
11h
Biden Should Go Big, Fast, and Simple
When Franklin D. Roosevelt became president in 1932, the nation was facing concentric crises: the immediate, house-on-fire disaster of rolling bank closures; the broader economic depression; and, beyond that, deeply entrenched problems that the depression had highlighted, including elderly poverty. Roosevelt's first 100 days addressed the first two crises with historic directness. He reopened the
11h
Biden's Covid Plan Will Define His Presidency
It's not just about the pandemic. How the new administration handles Covid-19 will be a test of every one of its policies—and its values.
11h
Palantir's God's-Eye View of Afghanistan
The company's software can sift through enormous amounts of data, and those metrics can be used to make life-or-death decisions.
11h
Elever utvecklas av att lära i naturen
Att ha friluftsundervisning på schemat lär inte bara elever att hantera stormkök och klä sig rätt. Elevernas egna upplevelse är att samarbetet stärks och att den egna identiteten blir tydligare. På fjället blir den teoretiska kunskapen dessutom mer greppbar än på plats i klassrummet. Vilka lärprocesser tar form i friluftslivsundervisningen? Det ville Åsa Tugetam ta reda på i sin avhandling "Att g
11h
The Evolutionary Origins of Friendship
The emergence of this crucial kind of relationship relied on the ability to recognize the unique benefits others have to offer — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
NASA Ends Efforts to Deploy Mars InSight's 'Mole'
After two years of futile struggles to penetrate surprisingly sticky soil, the heat probe's demise leaves large gaps in our understanding of the Red Planet's interior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
America Desperately Needs a New Age of Moral Leadership
The incumbent president, Donald Trump, rages, reads words that he doesn't believe from a teleprompter, and rages again. The president-elect, Joe Biden, calls on Americans to rise above "the flames of hate and chaos" and bring back democracy, decency, and the rule of law to their wounded land. This is the presidential voice Biden has been preparing since he began his campaign to "restore the soul
11h
NASA Ends Efforts to Deploy Mars InSight's 'Mole'
After two years of futile struggles to penetrate surprisingly sticky soil, the heat probe's demise leaves large gaps in our understanding of the Red Planet's interior — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Region Midtjyllands akutklinikker genåbner
Akutklinikkerne i Ringkøbing, Grenaa, Silkeborg og Skive genåbner 25. januar efter at have været midlertidigt lukket siden december på grund af coronakrisen.
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Trump Destroyed the Most Important Virtue in America
What should have been a week-long celebration of the resilience of American democracy has turned into a dark circus. Instead of citizens lining Pennsylvania Avenue to cheer and greet a new president, all of downtown Washington, D.C., is an armed camp. Soldiers patrol the streets while workers clean excrement off the walls of the Capitol, a perfect tableau for the end of the short and ghastly age
11h
Coexistence Is the Only Option
They could be real-estate agents or police officers, bakers or firefighters, veterans of American wars or CEOs of American companies. They might live in Boise or Dallas, College Park or College Station, Sacramento or Delray Beach. Some are wealthy. Some are not. Relatively few of them were at the United States Capitol on January 6, determined to stop Congress from certifying a legitimate election
11h
Ten computer codes that transformed science
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00075-2 From Fortran to arXiv.org, these advances in programming and platforms sent biology, climate science and physics into warp speed.
12h
China and the US clash over mission to find source of the coronavirus
The World Health Organization has begun its investigation to try to determine the source of the coronavirus, but there have already been clashes between the US and China over access to people and evidence
12h
Water may be even more crucial to life than we thought
Life as we know it depends on water, and not just as a liquid for DNA and protein to float around in – it is more actively involved in life's chemical reactions than we previously realised
12h
An Incompetent Authoritarian Is Still a Catastrophe
So what if he was bad at it? The five years of the Trump era—which began with his descent down the gilded escalator in Trump Tower in 2015 and are ending with a massive military presence in the nation's capital to protect the transfer of power to his successor—brought a sustained assault on self-government. This assault was most often futile, almost always buffoonish, and, as the conversion of th
12h
When are two masks better than one for preventing COVID-19?
N95 masks continue to be the gold standard, but if you can't get your hands on them, a pair of surgical masks could better protect you. (RD Stock Photos/Deposit Photo/) What's better than one mask ? The answer is rather obvious: two. For the better part of the last year, public health officials have been advising people to wear a mask over their noses and mouths —sometimes to little avail. Now so
12h
Verdenssalget af elbiler accelererede i 2020 trods corona
Nu går salget hurtigere i Europa end i Kina. Forklaringen har flere elementer.
12h
Research on Golay-coded excitation in real-time imaging of high frequency ultrasound biomicroscopy
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80406-x
12h
Antibacterial apple cider vinegar eradicates methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and resistant Escherichia coli
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-78407-x
12h
Yawn contagion in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80545-1 Yawn contagion in domestic pigs ( Sus scrofa )
12h
Dynamics of the immediate behavioral response to partial social exclusion
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-80039-0
12h
New method for visualizing the dose rate distribution around the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant using artificial neural networks
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81546-4
12h
Direct reprogramming of epithelial cell rests of malassez into mesenchymal-like cells by epigenetic agents
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79426-4
12h
Identification of the raw and processed Crataegi Fructus based on the electronic nose coupled with chemometric methods
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-020-79717-w
12h
Aldehyde-specific responses of olfactory sensory neurons in the praying mantis
Scientific Reports, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41598-021-81359-5
12h
Jeff Zients: the 'Mr Fix It' in charge of tackling the US Covid crisis
Former management consultant is tasked by Joe Biden to overhaul vaccination programme
12h
Mammor och pappor till barn med cancer påverkas olika
Mammor och pappor till barn som drabbas av cancer påverkas på olika sätt ekonomiskt. Medan mammornas inkomster på kort sikt sjunker för att sedan stiga kommer de negativa ekonomiska konsekvenserna för papporna senare. Forskare vid Uppsala universitet har undersökt de socioekonomiska konsekvenserna för föräldrar till barn med cancer. Tidigare forskning har visat att när ett barn insjuknar i cancer
12h
Trump og andre smides af platforme – men hvor går grænsen?
Deplatforming – at fjerne nogens adgang til en offentlig kanal med et publikum – breder sig og åbner en lang række spørgsmål.
12h
How science can put the Sustainable Development Goals back on track
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00104-0 The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the UN's flagship plan to end poverty and protect the environment. Researchers need to launch a rapid response.
12h
Biodieselproducent anfægter uambitiøs transportaftale: »Vi er en del af løsningen«
PLUS. Man risikerer at sætte en udvikling i alternative biobrændstoffer i stå en flerårig periode i Danmark, mens vores nabolande overhaler os, påpeger den fynske producent Emmelev.
12h
UPRmt scales mitochondrial network expansion with protein synthesis via mitochondrial import in Caenorhabditis elegans
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20784-y The mitochondrial network expands to accommodate cell growth, but how scaling occurs is unclear. Here, the authors show in C. elegans that ATFS-1 mitochondrial import is reduced when mitochondrial proteins are highly expressed, activating the unfolded protein response and causing expansion.
13h
Molecular determinants and mechanism for antibody cocktail preventing SARS-CoV-2 escape
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20789-7 Antibody cocktails represent a promising approach to prevent SARS-CoV-2 escape. Here, Ku et al., identify SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies from a phage library and identify an antibody combination that prevents viral escape and protects mice from viral challenge.
13h
Unravelling an oxygen-mediated reductive quenching pathway for photopolymerisation under long wavelengths
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20640-z Photomediated-reversible-deactivation radical polymerisation has a limited scope of available photocatalysts due to multiple stringent requirements of properties. Here the authors show, an oxygen-mediated reductive quenching pathway for photoinduced electron transfer reversible addition-fragmentation chain tr
13h
Pseudo-bilayer architecture enables high-performance organic solar cells with enhanced exciton diffusion length
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20791-z The so-called pseudo-bilayer (PB) organic solar cell (OSC) device architecture can promote enhanced exciton dissociation and charge transport, leading to improved device performance. Here, the authors report high-efficiency OSCs that features a PB architecture and optimized ternary system.
13h
Catalytic enantioselective C(sp3)–H functionalization involving radical intermediates
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20770-4 Enantioselective functionalization of ubiquitous C(sp3)–H bonds via radical species has witnessed a renaissance in the past years. Here, the authors summarize the main achievements in the field by identifying two main reaction pathways determining the stereochemistry and give an outlook on future challenges a
13h
Single-cell analysis of Schistosoma mansoni identifies a conserved genetic program controlling germline stem cell fate
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20794-w Our understanding of how the germline of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni develops is limited. Here, the authors use single cell RNAseq and functional genomic analysis of juvenile worms to identify a regulatory program that mediates the fate of germline stem cells between proliferation and different
13h
Structure of a microtubule-bound axonemal dynein
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20735-7 Axonemal dyneins are tethered to doublet microtubules inside cilia to drive ciliary beating but the mechanisms regulating their localization and function are poorly understood. Here authors report a cryo-EM reconstruction of a three-headed axonemal dynein natively bound to doublet microtubules isolated from c
13h
Short H2A histone variants are expressed in cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20707-x Short H2A variants are testis-specific histones that destabilize nucleosomes during spermatogenesis. In this study, the authors show that these variants are expressed in an array of different cancers and identify splicing changes associated with nucleosome instability in these malignancies.
13h
With Fewer Resources, Rural America Tackles Vaccine Distribution
As the United States begins its massive vaccine rollout, health departments across the country are scrambling to plan and adjust, often while managing a surge in new Covid-19 cases. Rural clinics with limited resources face unique logistical challenges in delivering doses to remote regions.
13h
Volcano in Ecuador can trigger avalanches that travel 60 kilometres
Sangay volcano in Ecuador has collapsed twice in the past 250,000 years, unleashing debris avalanches that caused devastation over 60 kilometres away
13h
People in Scotland to be asked about reintroducing lynx to the country
Conservationists are taking the first step towards a potential reintroduction of the Eurasian lynx to Scotland, with the launch of a year-long study into public attitudes
13h
Male mantises fight females to mate – but they get eaten if they lose
Female praying mantises often attack their mates during a sexual encounter, but some males attack too – and if they fail to win the fight they end up as lunch
13h
Covid-19 news: One in 10 people in the UK had antibodies in December
The latest coronavirus news updated every day including coronavirus cases, the latest news, features and interviews from New Scientist and essential information about the covid-19 pandemic
13h
Can coronavirus variants reinfect people and evade the vaccines?
It looks like some of the new coronavirus variants can evade parts of our immune response, but it's not yet clear if we need to update the vaccines
13h
Stunning fossil suggests dinosaurs lured mates with smell and vision
A reconstruction of the only fossilised dinosaur genital orifice in existence suggests the ancient animals attracted a mate using colour contrasts and musky smells
13h
'UK ARPA' to launch as soon as possible despite Dominic Cummings exit
The UK government has confirmed it still plans to create an independent £800 million "blue skies" research agency as soon as possible, despite the resignation of its key proponent
13h
Warmed-up lithium-based batteries could make electric vehicles cheaper
Lithium batteries that operate at a higher temperature could be cheaper and safer than other batteries for electric cars
13h
Australian lungfish has largest genome of any animal sequenced so far
The Australian lungfish's genome is around 14 times larger than the human one, and its DNA confirms it is closely related to land-based animals with a backbone
13h
To improve our response to crises like covid-19 we must think smarter
Our narrow definition of intelligence has worsened social, economic and racial inequalities, and left us ill-equipped to come together to solve global problems
13h
Så blev vargen tam – ny teori från finska forskare
Människan är en typisk allätare. Vi kan inte leva av enbart kött utan behöver också fett och kolhydrater för att täcka vårt energibehov. Vargen däremot, är en utpräglad köttätare som kan livnära sig på enbart kött månader i sträck. Enligt en ny teori från finska forskare utgör den skillnaden grunden till domesticeringen, som gav oss hunden.
13h
ALS Patients To Gain Quicker Access To Disability Benefits And Medicare
Lou Gehrig's disease can take months to diagnose, then rapidly incapacitate patients, leaving many families bankrupt before disability payments and Medicare kick in. A recent law aims to change that. (Image credit: LumiNola/Getty Images)
13h
Daily Covid testing plans 'paused' in English schools
PHE says potential benefits of daily testing unclear in light of emergence of new variant Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has told schools to pause the daily coronavirus testing of students and staff in England, five weeks after it was announced as a "milestone moment" by the education secretary, Gavin Williamson. Public Health England (PHE) said the b
13h
Nasa efter fejl i hydraulik-system: Vores måneraket har det rigtig godt
Et mindre problem med det hydrauliske system var årsag til, at SLS-rakettens hovedmotorer automatisk slukkede under test.
13h
Hidsige konsulentbesparelser i 2021 får eksperter til at frygte for offentlige it-projekter
PLUS. Regeringens milliardbesparelser blandt konsulenter i det offentlige skal i stor stil gennemføres i indeværende år. Det frigør milliarder til denne regeringsperiode, som kan bruges til velfærd og grøn omstilling. Men eksperter frygter flere grundstødte it-projekter.
13h
Biden's science adviser, COVID reinfections and vaccine tests
Nature, Published online: 20 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00074-3 The latest science news, in brief.
13h
These are the world's greatest threats in 2021
Billions are at risk of missing out on the digital leap forward, as growing disparities challenge the social fabric. In the medium-term, the global economy will be threatened by the knock-on effects of the coronavirus crisis, while geopolitical stability will be critically fragile over the next 5 to 10 years. Environmental risks continue to threaten: they remain top risks by likelihood and impact
13h
How the male mantis keeps its head during rough sex
A male Springbok praying mantis looking for a hook up doesn't have to worry about a female stealing his heart away.
14h
Reducing air pollution 'could prevent 50,000 EU deaths'
Limiting air pollution to levels recommended by the World Health Organization could prevent more than 50,000 deaths in Europe annually, according to research published Wednesday that called for urgent action.
14h
How the male mantis keeps its head during rough sex
A male Springbok praying mantis looking for a hook up doesn't have to worry about a female stealing his heart away.
14h
Butterflies create jet propulsion with a clap of their wings
The whimsical, wafting flight of butterflies may not give the impression of top aerodynamic performance, but research published on Wednesday suggests their large flexible wings could be perfectly designed to give them a burst of jet propulsion.
14h
Butterflies create jet propulsion with a clap of their wings
The whimsical, wafting flight of butterflies may not give the impression of top aerodynamic performance, but research published on Wednesday suggests their large flexible wings could be perfectly designed to give them a burst of jet propulsion.
14h
Alabama museum to restore full-sized mockup of space shuttle
The U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Alabama announced plans Tuesday to restore the world's only full-sized mockup of a space shuttle coupled with an external fuel tank and twin rocket boosters.
14h
Minispeglar banar väg för laserskalpell
Att operera utan att öppna stora delar av kroppen har många fördelar. Det ger generellt mindre smärta efter operationen, kortare läkningstid och lägre risk för komplikationer. Ett kirurgiskt verktyg i samma anda är laserskalpellen, som kirurger kontrollerar med hjälp av robotik. Med lasern kan kirurger exempelvis skära bort polyper på ömtåliga, svåråtkomliga ställen, eftersom tekniken möjliggör sn
14h
Protected areas vulnerable to growing emphasis on food security
Protected areas are critical to mitigating extinction of species; however, they may also be in conflict with efforts to feed the growing human population. A new study shows that 6% of all global terrestrial protected areas are already made up of cropland, a heavily modified habitat that is often not suitable for supporting wildlife. Worse, 22% of this cropland occurs in areas supposedly enjoying t
14h
Unge føler sig mere ensomme under nedlukning
Når samfundet lukkes ned, stiger graden af ensomhed og angst blandt unge under 30 år og mennesker,…
14h
Protected areas vulnerable to growing emphasis on food security
Protected areas are critical to mitigating extinction of species; however, they may also be in conflict with efforts to feed the growing human population. A new study shows that 6% of all global terrestrial protected areas are already made up of cropland, a heavily modified habitat that is often not suitable for supporting wildlife. Worse, 22% of this cropland occurs in areas supposedly enjoying t
14h
Researchers develop a mathematical model to explain the complex architecture of termite mounds
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds.
14h
Researchers develop a mathematical model to explain the complex architecture of termite mounds
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds.
14h
Do simulations represent the real world at the atomic scale?
Computer simulations hold tremendous promise to accelerate the molecular engineering of green energy technologies, such as new systems for electrical energy storage and solar energy usage, as well as carbon dioxide capture from the environment. However, the predictive power of these simulations depends on having a means to confirm that they do indeed describe the real world.
14h
Appearance, social norms keep students off Zoom cameras
When the semester shifted online amid the COVID-19 pandemic last spring, Cornell University instructor Mark Sarvary, and his teaching staff decided to encourage—but not require—students to switch on their cameras.
14h
Study shows how network of marine protected areas could help safeguard Antarctic penguins
New research led by BirdLife International, the University of East Anglia (UEA) and British Antarctic Survey highlights how a proposed network of marine protected areas could help safeguard some of the most important areas at sea for breeding Antarctic penguins.
14h
Study shows how network of marine protected areas could help safeguard Antarctic penguins
New research led by BirdLife International, the University of East Anglia (UEA) and British Antarctic Survey highlights how a proposed network of marine protected areas could help safeguard some of the most important areas at sea for breeding Antarctic penguins.
14h
Covid unlikely to die out, says New Zealand health chief Ashley Bloomfield
Director general says virus may become less deadly over time and warned of vigilance needed to keep out new variants Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Covid-19 is unlikely to ever die out, even with vaccination efforts, but it could become more transmissible and less deadly, New Zealand's director general of health has warned. "If you think about influenza, which was f
15h
Stealing the spotlight in the field and kitchen
Plant breeders are constantly working to develop new bean varieties to meet the needs and desires of the food industry. But not everyone wants the same thing.
15h
Teachers having to work harder than any other professionals, says study
Teachers are working harder than ever before and more than any other occupation, according to a study published in the peer-reviewed journal Oxford Review of Education authored by researchers from UCL .
15h
Stealing the spotlight in the field and kitchen
Plant breeders are constantly working to develop new bean varieties to meet the needs and desires of the food industry. But not everyone wants the same thing.
15h
Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
The Tiger Rattlesnake possesses the simplest, yet most toxic venom of any rattlesnake species, and now new research from a team lead by a University of South Florida biologist can explain the genetics behind the predator's fearsome bite.
15h
Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then "wake up".
15h
Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
The Tiger Rattlesnake possesses the simplest, yet most toxic venom of any rattlesnake species, and now new research from a team lead by a University of South Florida biologist can explain the genetics behind the predator's fearsome bite.
15h
Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then "wake up".
15h
Monism versus Dualism
Which do you identify as and why? submitted by /u/ilovechadscock [link] [comments]
16h
Sound to brain waves?
Layman´s question, hope it´s ok: Does anyone know if there are studies on correlations between sound and brain waves? Specifically, I´m trying to find info on whether listening to so called binaural beats actually stimulate the brain to produce the type of waves being played (like Theta, for instance), or if it´s all unsubstantial / placebo. My searches has so far failed to return any results I t
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Plantwatch: weeds – appreciating the wild things on our streets
Lockdown may have given us more respect for the wild plants, and the work they do, in our urban areas Weeds have a public image problem – unloved, trodden on, dug up and sprayed with herbicides. But during lockdown, the weeds in towns and cities have given a contact with nature, no matter how humble their roots. These are, after all, wild plants growing under our feet and they deserve respect. A
17h
17h
China escalates fight against new Covid outbreak and US blame game
New restrictions imposed as Beijing hits back against Trump administration over pandemic's origins
17h
Columbia study finds new way to extract energy from black holes
In 1969, the physicist Roger Penrose first proposed a way in which it might be possible to extract energy from a black hole. A new study builds upon similar ideas to describe how chaotic magnetic activity in the ergosphere of a black hole may produce vast amounts of energy, which could potentially be harvested. The findings suggest that, in the very distant future, it may be possible for a civili
18h
New Parkinson's disease therapeutics discovered by Ben-Gurion U researchers
Dr. Claude Brodski, M.D., head of the BGU's Laboratory for Molecular Neuroscience, discovered that BMP5/7 signaling in neurons was significantly reduced in dopamine-producing brain cells, which could contribute to Parkinson's disease advancement.
18h
Breakthrough in understanding 'tummy bug' bacteria
Scientists have discovered how bacteria commonly responsible for seafood-related stomach upsets can go dormant and then "wake up".
18h
Stealing the spotlight in the field and kitchen
New dry beans from UC Davis combine desirable qualities for both farmers and consumers
18h
Making microwaves safer for children
Researchers at Rush University Medical Center and other leaders of the campaign, worked diligently to document the frequency and severity of burn injuries resulting from removing hot contents from the microwave and young children's vulnerability to them, published the results of their efforts in The Journal of Pediatrics on Jan. 20.
18h
Severe menopause symptoms often accompany premature ovarian insufficiency
Hot flashes, insomnia, and vaginal dryness are commonly reported symptoms that accompany the menopause transition. A new study suggests that such symptoms–especially psychological and sexual problems–are worse for women who have premature ovarian insufficiency (POI) than for women undergoing natural menopause. Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North Americ
18h
Study shows how network of marine protected areas could help safeguard Antarctic penguins
New research led by BirdLife International, the University of East Anglia (UEA) and British Antarctic Survey highlights how a proposed network of marine protected areas could help safeguard some of the most important areas at sea for breeding Antarctic penguins.
18h
Mayo Clinic study indicates age influences sex-related outcomes after heart attack
Approximately 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes occur every year in men and women in the US Sex and age play a large part in who experiences a heart attack, the methods used to treat these heart attacks, and the eventual post hospital outcomes of the people who experience heart attacks. Mayo Clinic researchers discuss these sex and age differences in study findings published in Mayo Clinic Pro
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Lower-income countries fall behind in race for vaccines
Dose shortages risk prolonging pandemic for years, experts warn
18h
Portugal suffers surging Covid-19 deaths after mastering first wave
Country records highest seven-day average of new infections per inhabitant after Christmas easing
18h
Undersøgelse: P-piller sænker risiko for kræft i æggestokke og livmoder med omkring 30 procent
Til gengæld kan de i andre tilfælde øge risikoen for brystkræft. Derfor er p-piller en individuel vurdering.
18h
SLS: Nasa finds cause of 'megarocket' test shutdown
An issue with hydraulic systems led to the early shutdown of a test for Nasa's new "megarocket".
19h
The Oldest City in The Americas Is an Archeological Wonder, And It's Under Invasion
"They're destroying 5,000-year-old cultural evidence."
19h
Testing the waters: Analyzing different solid states of water on other planets and moons
Scientists develop theoretical models to predict the presence of clathrate hydrates outside Earth, shedding light on the evolution of other atmospheres.
19h
24 kommuner sender i blinde børns persondata til Google
24 ud af 45 undersøgte kommuner videregiver børns data til Google uden at have noget overblik over potentielle risici. Det er »meget kritisabelt« mener eksperter i persondataret og en far fra Randers Kommune.
20h
Light-controlled Higgs modes found in superconductors; potential sensor, computing uses
Researchers have discovered a short-lived form of the famous Higgs boson — subject of a groundbreaking search at the Large Hadron Collider — within an iron-based superconductor. This Higgs mode can be accessed and controlled by laser light flashing on the superconductor at trillions of pulses per second.
21h
Fastener with microscopic mushroom design holds promise
A fastener with a microscopic design that looks like tiny mushrooms could mean advances for everyday consumers and scientific fields. Currently available fasteners are called hook and loop fasteners and require harder, stiff material. In Biointerphases, researchers describe a design that can use softer materials and still be strong. The team believes a 3D mushroom design can be made with softer, m
21h
Research identifies genetic risk factor for stroke
A team of researchers has identified a common genetic variant as a risk factor for stroke, especially in patients older than 65.
21h
Alcohol consumption linked to portion of cancer incidence and mortality, report shows
A new study finds that alcohol consumption accounts for a considerable portion of cancer incidence and mortality in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.
21h
»Dybt skuffende«: I fremtiden skal der blandes mindre biobrændsel i benzin og diesel
PLUS. Mens Venstre frygter, at fremtidens lave krav til iblanding vil skade den danske produktion af biobrændsel, glæder det Rådet for Grøn Omstilling.
21h
Butterfly wings captured in slow motion footage
Scientists, using a wind tunnel and high-speed cameras, have captured the butterfly's flying skill.
21h
Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
Researchers captured and comparted hi-res images of ribosome structures from sensitive and resistant bacteria and report that a water molecule needed for antibiotic binding was not present in the ribosomes from the drug-resistant bugs.
21h
Land deals meant to improve food security may have hurt
Large-scale land acquisitions by foreign investors, intended to improve global food security, had little to no benefit, increasing crop production in some areas while simultaneously threatening local food security in others, according to researchers who studied their effects.
21h
Exploring the solar wind with a new view of small sun structures
Scientists have combined NASA data and cutting-edge image processing to gain new insight into the solar structures that create the Sun's flow of high-speed solar wind. This first look at relatively small features, dubbed 'plumelets,' could help scientists understand how and why disturbances form in the solar wind.
21h
Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features.
21h
Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
Researchers captured and comparted hi-res images of ribosome structures from sensitive and resistant bacteria and report that a water molecule needed for antibiotic binding was not present in the ribosomes from the drug-resistant bugs.
21h
Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
A team of researchers has decoded the genome of the Tiger Rattlesnake, which has venom 40 times more toxic than that of Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes, the largest venomous snake in North America.
21h
How to train a robot (using AI and supercomputers)
Computer scientists developed a deep learning method to create realistic objects for virtual environments that can be used to train robots. The researchers used TACC's Maverick2 supercomputer to train the generative adversarial network. The network is the first that can produce colored point clouds with fine details at multiple resolutions.
21h
Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds.
21h
Potential COVID-19 drug is successful in lab study
A new therapy is showing success as a way to prevent COVID-19 symptoms in mice.
21h
ALS study reveals a unique population
The secrets long hidden in the DNA of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) living in Malta have been unlocked, according to a new study.
21h
NASA's Decision for S.L.S. Moon Rocket: Test Again, or Prepare for Launch?
The booster of the Space Launch System was in good condition after a test was cut short, officials said.
21h
22h
Appearance, social norms keep students off Zoom cameras
Researchers surveyed 312 students found that while some students had concerns about the lack of privacy or their home environment, 41% of the 276 respondents cited their appearance, as their reason not to switch on their cameras on zoom.
22h
Protected areas vulnerable to growing emphasis on food security
New study shows croplands are prevalent in protected areas, challenging their efficacy in meeting conservation goals.
22h
Counting elephants from space
Scientists have successfully used satellite cameras coupled with deep learning to count animals in complex geographical landscapes, taking conservationists an important step forward in monitoring populations of endangered species.
22h
22h
A Tragic Beginning to a Presidency
Tomorrow, America inaugurates a new president. With the transfer of power comes the transfer of responsibility for the COVID-19 pandemic. On the eve of Joe Biden's inauguration, the toll of the pandemic stands at 23.9 million cases and 392,428 deaths, according to the COVID Tracking Project at The Atlantic. There are 123,820 people hospitalized. Today alone, states reported 144,047 cases and 2,14
23h
Talking can spread Covid as much as coughing, says research
Tiny aerosols of the virus emitted when speaking linger in air for longer than larger droplets from a cough Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Speaking to a friend when infected with the coronavirus could be as dangerous as coughing near them thanks to lingering particles, research has suggested. Covid can be spread through a number of routes, including virus-containing
23h
Like humans, wasps seem to recognize faces as more than the sum of their parts
Experiment suggests social wasps evolved an efficient facial recognition system
23h
Free online tool calculates risk of COVID-19 transmission in poorly-ventilated spaces
The vital role of ventilation in the spread of COVID-19 has been quantified by researchers, who have found that in poorly-ventilated spaces, the virus spreads further than two meters in seconds, and is far more likely to spread through prolonged talking than through coughing.
23h
Amber-encased fossil shines light on evolution of bioluminescent insects
Trapped in amber for ~100 million years, an exceptionally well-preserved, light-producing beetle sheds light on the diversification of bioluminescent beetles in the Cretaceous period and provides the missing fossil link between fireflies' living relatives.
23h
Amber-encased fossil shines light on evolution of bioluminescent insects
Trapped in amber for ~100 million years, an exceptionally well-preserved, light-producing beetle sheds light on the diversification of bioluminescent beetles in the Cretaceous period and provides the missing fossil link between fireflies' living relatives.
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23h
Could a Small Test Screen People for Covid-19?
A new modeling study hints that odor-based screens could quash outbreaks. But some experts are skeptical it would work in the real world.
23h
New negative pressure ventilator requiring fewer staffing resources developed in fight against COVID-19
A new negative pressure ventilator which could provide additional treatment options for patients with respiratory failure, including those with COVID-19 – and whose design can be easily adapted to developing countries – has been created by a team that includes anaesthetists, nurses and engineers.
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A 'Nerve Center' for Climate in the Biden White House
President Joseph R. Biden Jr. brings with him the largest team of climate change experts ever assembled in the White House, and action on global warming is expected quickly.
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Spacey 'super puffs' are changing our understanding of how planets form
An artistic rendering of WASP-107b orbiting in front of its star (ESA/Hubble, NASA, M. Kornmesser/) When Caroline Piaulet first started looking at an exoplanet called WASP-107b, a gas giant orbiting a star in the Virgo constellation about 212 light years away, she was mostly interested in finding out what was inside it. "I essentially wanted to get the most precise data on what the atmosphere was
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New biomaterials can be 'fine-tuned' for medical applications
Researchers have succeeded in 'fine tuning' a new thermoplastic biomaterial to enable both the rate at which it degrades in the body and its mechanical properties to be controlled independently.
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Cheap antiparasitic could cut chance of Covid-19 deaths by up to 75%
Researchers hail ivermectin findings but say more studies needed on using drug
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Grout scrub brushes that tackle even the toughest stains
Scrub away the grime. (Sam Loyd via Unsplash/) You just finished laying out the tile of your dreams, or maybe you're renting your apartment and finding the tiling needs a bit of scouring. Even the best laid grout eventually needs a good scrubbing—whether for maintenance or deep cleaning—especially in rooms like kitchens and bathrooms, which can get messy quickly. A good scrub brush makes all the
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The best mattress protectors for ensuring your bed lasts a long time
Sleep better knowing your mattress is safe. (Ty Carlson via Unsplash/) A good night's sleep is one of the healthiest choices we can make to stay feeling and looking good. This starts with deciding on the type of mattress you want, an investment which can be expensive. For a fraction of the cost of the bed, you can add years of life to your mattress by protecting it with the right mattress protect
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How to save important photos and video from the web
Protests are often historical events, but you should take care when taking and saving photos and footage. (Koshu Kunii/Unsplash/) We can't say exactly why you want to save images, videos, social media posts, or other types of information from the internet. We can, however, guess that you're probably doing it for personal, historical, or accountability reasons. Whatever your goal, grabbing the goo
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Could a Smell Test Screen People for Covid?
A new modeling study hints that odor-based screens could quash outbreaks. But some experts are skeptical it would work in the real world.
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No more cuddly selfies with our ape cousins, top conservation body warns scientists
New rules are meant avoid misleading the public about wild animals
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The best gadgets to track your fitness
Make sure you stay on top of your steps. (Charlotte Karlsen via Unsplash/) Living in today's information-based society can have its perks. Fitness trackers function as handy assistants to give you up-to-the-second information on things like your heart rate, the number of steps you've taken today, and how much sleep you're getting. Having all that information at your fingertips helps you optimize
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College classrooms are still chilly for women, as men speak more, study finds
Men speak 1.6 times more often than women in college classrooms, revealing how gender inequities regarding classroom participation still exist, according to a new study. By comparison, women are more hesitant to speak and are more apt to use apologetic language.
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Cosmic beasts and where to find them
Two giant radio galaxies have been discovered with South Africa's powerful MeerKAT telescope. These galaxies are thought to be amongst the largest single objects in the Universe.
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Researchers identify how cancer cells adapt to survive harsh tumor microenvironments
To better understand the conditions that select for the Warburg Effect and the mechanisms where cells can express this metabolic adaptation, researchers subjected nonmalignant cells to the harsh tumor microenvironment that is present during early carcinogenesis, known as ductal carcinoma in situ. In a new research article, the team shows that these conditions select for cells to express a Warburg
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Eggs reveal what may happen to brain on impact
Our brains consist of soft matter bathed in watery cerebrospinal fluid inside a hard skull, and in a new article, researchers describe studying another system with the same features, an egg, to search for answers about concussions. Considering that in most concussive brain injuries, the skull does not break, they wanted to find out if it was possible to break or deform the egg yolk without breakin
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All-purpose dinosaur opening reconstructed
Researchers have described in detail a dinosaur's cloacal or vent — the all-purpose opening used for defecation, urination and breeding.
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Obese, snoring mini pigs show how air flows through the throat during sleep apnea
A study has found that obese Yucatan mini pigs have naturally occurring sleep apnea and that MRI scans taken while they're in sedated sleep can be used to gain new insights into what happens in the airways during sleep apnea episodes via computational flow dynamic (CFD) analysis.
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DNA origami enables fabricating superconducting nanowires
Researchers describe how to exploit DNA origami as a platform to build superconducting nanoarchitectures. The structures they built are addressable with nanometric precision that can be used as a template for 3D architectures that are not possible today via conventional fabrication techniques. Inspired by previous works using the DNA molecule as a template for superconducting nanowires, the group
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Appreciating a flower's texture, color, and shape leads to better drone landings
Researchers present an optical flow-based learning process that allows robots to estimate distances through the visual appearance (shape, color, texture) of the objects in view. This artificial intelligence (AI)-based learning strategy increases the navigation skills of small flying drones and entails a new hypothesis on insect intelligence.
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New California Variant May Be Driving Virus Surge There, Study Suggests
Researchers found that the variant originated in California and showed up in more than half of samples tested last week by researchers in Los Angeles.
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Rush researchers demonstrate success with new therapy for COVID-19
A new therapy developed by researchers at Rush University Medical Center is showing success as a way to prevent COVID-19 symptoms in mice.
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Exploration of toxic Tiger Rattlesnake venom advances use of genetic science techniques
A team of researchers led by the University of South Florida has decoded the genome of the Tiger Rattlesnake, which has venom 40 times more toxic than that of Eastern Diamondback Rattlesnakes, the largest venomous snake in North America.
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Protected areas vulnerable to growing emphasis on food security
New study shows croplands are prevalent in protected areas, challenging their efficacy in meeting conservation goals.
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Samsung's 870 EVO SSDs: SATA Strikes Back
Update (1/20/2021): An earlier version of this story stated incorrect prices on the new drives, due to a mistake in Samsung's press copy. This story has been updated with new pricing. Remember SATA? We don't talk about the older storage standard much anymore, not since M.2 became popular, but there are still a huge number of SATA SSDs on the market. Samsung's 870 EVO SSD family is the latest iter
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Spinal cord injury breakthrough makes paralyzed mice walk again
Researchers from Germany use a designer protein to treat spinal cord damage in mice. The procedure employs gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibers that carry signals to and from the brain. The scientists aim to eventually apply the technique to humans. When spinal cord injuries result in paralysis, science hasn't so far been able to provide a way to repair the damage and reverse the condi
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New clues help explain why PFAS chemicals resist remediation
Chemicals used in firefighting foam and other products can last for decades in the environment, resisting efforts to remove them. New research suggest why that happens and new avenues for remediation.
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Researchers create 'sheets' of meat in the lab that stack up well against their natural counterparts
Researchers have developed a new form of cultivated meat using a method that promises more natural flavor and texture than other alternatives to traditional meat from animals.
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New research finds connection: Inflammation, metabolism and scleroderma scarring
A new study finds that NAD+ break down leads to multi organ scarring, providing now a previously undiscovered pathogenic role of the enzyme CD38 in disease scarring.
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How dietary choice influences lifespan in fruit flies
Giving flies a choice of foods changes the chemical messaging in their brain that is responsible for coordinating metabolism, shortening their lifespan as a result.
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The Weekly Planet: How to Think About President Biden's Big Climate Plans
Every Tuesday, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . Tomorrow, pending calamity or misfortune, Joe Biden will take the oath of office and become president of the United States. In that moment, the United
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The best VR games: Enjoy a lifelike gaming experience at home
Experience games in an entirely new way with a VR headset. (Lux Interaction vis Unsplash/) Not long ago, virtual reality seemed like a loose concept that might just manifest sometime far into the future. What fools we were. As of 2016, over 230 companies started developing and producing VR technologies with no end in sight. Our visions of the future have certainly caught up with us, and you can n
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Appearance, social norms keep students off Zoom cameras
University researchers surveyed the 312 students found that while some students had concerns about the lack of privacy or their home environment, 41% of the 276 respondents cited their appearance, as their reason not to switch on their cameras on zoom.
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Genome editing to treat human retinal degeneration
Gene editing therapies, including CRISPR-Cas systems, offer the potential to correct mutations causing inherited retinal degenerations, a leading cause of blindness. Technological advances in gene editing, continuing safety concerns, and strategies to overcome these challenges
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Do simulations represent the real world at the atomic scale?
A multidisciplinary research team has developed a strategy to validate computer simulations of oxide/water interfaces at the atomic scale using X-ray reflectivity experiments. Such interfaces are key in many energy applications.
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Constructing termite turrets without a blueprint
Following a series of studies on termite mound physiology and morphogenesis over the past decade, researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences have now developed a mathematical model to help explain how termites construct their intricate mounds.
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Bitcoin Miners Are Heating Chicken Coops With Their Rigs
Space Heater Cryptocurrency mining computers don't just eat up a ton of power; they can also put out so much heat that some miners are making their rigs work double duty by mining bitcoin and keeping their homes warm, as The Wall Street Journal reports . In fact, some cryptocurrency miners are using their beastly systems to warm chicken coops in the winter, or maintaining temperatures in small gr
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New clues help explain why PFAS chemicals resist remediation
Chemicals used in firefighting foam and other products can last for decades in the environment, resisting efforts to remove them. New research suggest why that happens and new avenues for remediation.
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Technique Talk: Troubleshooting Quantitative PCR (qPCR)
In this workshop, you will learn about the critical factors that ensure qPCR accuracy and success.
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Astronomers Discover "Spider Stars" That Tear Apart Other Stars
An international team of astronomers have spotted a new type of "spider star" — highly energetic pulsars that tear up their companion stars in binary systems. These highly energetic celestial objects have long fascinated astronomers because they flicker in the night sky in regular rhythms. But before we go on, let's take a couple of steps back. When a supergiant star collapses in on itself follow
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Fatty acid may help combat multiple sclerosis, study finds
The abnormal immune system response that causes multiple sclerosis (MS) by attacking and damaging the central nervous system can be triggered by the lack of a specific fatty acid in fat tissue, according to a new study. The finding suggests that dietary change might help treat some people with the autoimmune disease.
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Scientists to global policymakers: Treat fish as food to help solve world hunger
Fish provide 17 percent of the animal protein consumed globally and are rich in micronutrients and essential fatty acids. In a new article, experts argue seeing fish in a food system perspective.
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Acidification impedes shell development of plankton off the U.S. West Coast, study shows
Results from a 2016 research cruise show ocean acidification has interfered with shell development of zooplankton that are a critical part of the marine food web.
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How to train a robot (using AI and supercomputers)
Computer scientists from UT Arlington developed a deep learning method to create realistic objects for virtual environments that can be used to train robots. The researchers used TACC's Maverick2 supercomputer to train the generative adversarial network. The network is the first that can produce colored point clouds with fine details at multiple resolutions. The team presented their results at the
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Worker safety goes beyond human error
Disasters in high-risk industries can have catastrophic environmental, financial and human safety consequences. One way these industries help prevent and mitigate disasters is formal procedures designed to standardize how work is done. These procedures typically come in the form of a written document workers use while performing a task.
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They Should Have Taken Them at Their Word
They never saw it coming. Ben Goldey resigned as Representative Lauren Boebert's communications director after the January 6 attempted coup. Lauren Blair Bianchi quit the same job in Senator Ted Cruz's office. George Erwin Jr. had rallied local law-enforcement backers for Representative Madison Cawthorn and was preparing to take a job working for him, but has now disavowed him . Charles Johnson,
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Monarch butterfly population moves closer to extinction
The number of western monarch butterflies wintering along the California coast has plummeted precipitously to a record low, putting the orange-and-black insects closer to extinction, researchers announced Tuesday.
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The Science Behind How COVID-19 Vaccines Work
COVID-19 vaccines prevent most people from becoming seriously ill. But they may not prevent infection or one's ability to spread the virus. So it's still worth wearing a mask — even after the shots.
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Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, Jan
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Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
New high-resolution structures of the bacterial ribosome determined by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago show that a single water molecule may be the cause—and possible solution—of antibiotic resistance.
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NASA explores solar wind with new view of small sun structures
Scientists have combined NASA data and cutting-edge image processing to gain new insight into the solar structures that create the Sun's flow of high-speed solar wind, detailed in new research published today in The Astrophysical Journal. This first look at relatively small features, dubbed "plumelets," could help scientists understand how and why disturbances form in the solar wind.
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Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers, a new study from Oregon State University has found.
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Land deals meant to improve food security may have hurt
Large-scale land acquisitions by foreign investors, intended to improve global food security, had little to no benefit, increasing crop production in some areas while simultaneously threatening local food security in others, according to researchers who studied their effects.
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Fastener with microscopic mushroom design holds promise
A Velcro-like fastener with a microscopic design that looks like tiny mushrooms could mean advances for everyday consumers and scientific fields like robotics.
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Light-controlled Higgs modes found in superconductors; potential sensor, computing uses
Even if you weren't a physics major, you've probably heard something about the Higgs boson.
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Minnesota's forests, land offer chance to cut greenhouse gases
Reforestation and cover cropping should be on the front lines of Minnesota's fight to reduce greenhouse gases, and could cut up to one-fifth of the state's heat-trapping emissions.
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Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
New high-resolution structures of the bacterial ribosome determined by researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago show that a single water molecule may be the cause—and possible solution—of antibiotic resistance.
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Unlocking 'the shape of water' in mechanisms of antibiotic resistance
Researchers captured and comparted hi-res images of ribosome structures from sensitive and resistant bacteria and report that a water molecule needed for antibiotic binding was not present in the ribosomes from the drug-resistant bugs.
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Astronomers dissect the anatomy of planetary nebulae using Hubble Space Telescope images
Images of two iconic planetary nebulae taken by the Hubble Space Telescope are revealing new information about how they develop their dramatic features. Researchers from Rochester Institute of Technology and Green Bank Observatory presented new findings about the Butterfly Nebula (NGC 6302) and the Jewel Bug Nebula (NGC 7027) at the 237th meeting of the American Astronomical Society on Friday, Jan
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NASA explores solar wind with new view of small sun structures
Scientists have combined NASA data and cutting-edge image processing to gain new insight into the solar structures that create the Sun's flow of high-speed solar wind, detailed in new research published today in The Astrophysical Journal. This first look at relatively small features, dubbed "plumelets," could help scientists understand how and why disturbances form in the solar wind.
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Coronavirus Variant Linked to COVID-19 Outbreaks in California
It's too early to know whether the L452R version of SARS-CoV-2 is highly infectious like the B.1.1.7 UK variant that is also spreading around the US.
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Here's How Biden Could Save the Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout
It goes without saying that the coronavirus vaccine rollout in the United States has gone, well, imperfectly. Despite its ambitious goals, the Trump administration failed to communicate — and perhaps even fully develop — a COVID-19 vaccination plan until the first shots were already being shipped out. And then, when it came time to distribute vaccines, the federal government left it up to individ
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Plant pruners to shape up your saplings
Keep your plants in check and where they belong. (Kelli Tungay via Unsplash/) Forget using scissors to tend to your indoor our outdoor plants. A pruner should be your go-tool for trimming and shaping your flora and fauna while preserving plant tissue and extending the life of your greenery. Consider the type of handle, blade, and other features you'll need in a gardening tool while browsing some
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Rogue antibodies could be driving severe COVID-19
Nature, Published online: 19 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00149-1 Evidence is growing that self-attacking 'autoantibodies' could be the key to understanding some of the worst cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection.
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Statisticians hail early departure of U.S. Census director
Steven Dillingham accused of undermining agency's integrity by not resisting Trump agenda
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Receive and transmit clear messages with these reliable walkie-talkies
Stay in touch. (Amazon /) For all the technological feats and features of modern cell phones, they are still rendered useless in areas without mobile or GPS signals. Originally developed to aid military personnel during the Second World War, walkie-talkies are handheld portable radios that work off single frequency wireless signals to broadcast messages miles away. Whether you're filming on set,
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Inflammation gives C. diff 2 survival benefits
The inflammation that a Clostridioides difficile infection causes gives the pathogen a two-fold advantage, researchers report. First, the inflammation creates an inhospitable environment for competing bacteria and, second, it provides nutrients that enable C. diff to thrive. C. diff is a bacterium that causes diarrhea, often with severe or even fatal consequences. As part of its growth cycle, it
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A psychiatric diagnosis can be more than an unkind 'label'
When I was training as a clinical psychologist, I had a rotation in a low-cost psychotherapy clinic. Among the first people I met was a young man who believed that he might be responsible for harm coming to his family if he didn't engage in time-consuming rituals, including arranging his shoes very particularly for up to half an hour. The logic motivating this man's behaviour was notably rather m
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Wing imprints reveal dino-era praying mantis
Researchers have identified a new species of praying mantis thanks to imprints of its fossilized wings. It lived in Labrador, in the Canadian Subarctic around 100 million years ago, during the time of the dinosaurs, in the Late Cretaceous period. Artist's interpretation of Labradormantis guilbaulti in liftoff among the leaves of a sycamore tree in Labrador around 100 million years ago. (Credit: A
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Who needs a teacher? Artificial intelligence designs lesson plans for itself
Machines—like people—learn best when tasks are just hard enough
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A little friction goes a long way toward stronger nanotube fibers
Carbon nanotube fibers are not nearly as strong as the nanotubes they contain, but researchers are working to close the gap with a computational model that shows nanotube length and the friction between them are equal contributors.
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Scientists reveal structure of plants' energy generators
Researchers have revealed the first atomic structures of the respiratory apparatus that plants use to generate energy.
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New carbon budget framework provides a clearer view of our climate deadlines
Researchers present a new framework for calculating the remaining carbon budget that is able to generate a much narrower estimate and its uncertainty. The researchers estimate that between 230 and 440 billion more tonnes of CO2 from 2020 onwards can be emitted into the atmosphere and still provide a reasonable chance of limiting global warming to 1.5°C.
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Tiny bubbles tell tales of big volcanic eruptions
Microscopic bubbles can tell stories about Earth's biggest volcanic eruptions and geoscientists have discovered some of those stories are written in nanoparticles.
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Light-induced twisting of Weyl nodes switches on giant electron current
Scientists have discovered a new light-induced switch that twists the crystal lattice of the material, switching on a giant electron current that appears to be nearly dissipationless.
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Tool reveals best antibiotic combos for tough bacteria
A new tool speeds up the process of choosing the most effective combination of antibiotics to kill treatment-resistant bacteria. Multi-drug-resistant bacteria are a major global problem. The number of new resistant bacteria is constantly increasing, and there are no new types of antibiotics on the way for the patients in the foreseeable future. Therefore, existing antibiotics must be utilized eff
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Among the Guardsmen
Photographs by Tavon Taylor Beyond the dozen National Guardsmen stationed behind the Library of Congress, the seven-foot-tall fence lining the back side of the Capitol, and the men in balaclavas carrying assault rifles, 67-year-old Rick Genderson sells liquor and old wine in his store, Schneider's of Capitol Hill. With its narrow aisles stocked with gin and brandy and rare wine labels—an 1887 Con
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Best cordless vacuum: Suck up debris without getting yourself tangled
Keep dust and dirt off your floor with one of these sweet cordless vacuums. (Nathan Van Egmond via Unsplash/) It was the late 1970s when Black & Decker first pioneered the idea of a battery-powered vacuum cleaner that could free people from the tyranny of cables and plug sockets while still getting an effective clean. But that dustbuster style design has long since been superseded by more sophist
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Even a small amount of gender bias in hiring can be costly to employers
Tiny amounts of gender bias in employee hiring decisions contribute to concerning rates of discrimination and productivity losses that together represent significant costs, financial and otherwise, for employers.
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Land deals meant to improve food security may have hurt
Large-scale land acquisitions by foreign investors, intended to improve global food security, had little to no benefit, increasing crop production in some areas while simultaneously threatening local food security in others, according to Notre Dame researchers who studied their effects.
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Individual and organizational capacity to change can reduce health care workforce burnout
New George Mason University Study finds that health care professionals with a greater personal ability to respond to change experienced lower rates of burnout when their work environments offered strong communication, teamwork, and leadership support. This is one of the first studies to explore the effect of individual and organizational capacity for change on burnout among health care professiona
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10 things you may not know about anxiety
When we feel anxious, the brain's fight or flight instinct kicks in, and the blood flow is redirected from your extremities towards the torso and vital organs. According to the CDC , 7.1% of children between the ages of 3-17 (approximately 4.4 million) have an anxiety diagnosis. Anxiety disorders will impact 31% of Americans at some point in their lives. Here's what you may not know about anxiety
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COVID-19 Slashed the US Life Expectancy by More Than a Year
Thanks to the coronavirus pandemic, the average life expectancy in the United States dropped more suddenly than it had previously in over 40 years. Researchers from the University of Southern California (USC) and Princeton University found that U.S. life expectancy dropped by 1.13 years in 2020, according to research published last week in the journal PNAS . And that's the national average — marg
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Buildings: The unbreakable bond
Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory developed self-healing elastomers that demonstrated unprecedented adhesion strength and the ability to adhere to many surfaces, which could broaden their potential use in industrial applications.
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Volcanic microbes
Oak Ridge National Laboratory contributed to an international study that found almost 300 novel types of microbes living near a deep sea volcano. These microbes, which could be used in biotechnology, reveal new insights about their extreme underwater environment.
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Volcanic microbes
Oak Ridge National Laboratory contributed to an international study that found almost 300 novel types of microbes living near a deep sea volcano. These microbes, which could be used in biotechnology, reveal new insights about their extreme underwater environment.
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Disease threatens to decimate western bats
A four-year study recently published in Ecology and Evolution concludes that the fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, poses a severe threat to many western North American bats.
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Counting elephants from space, for the first time
For the first time, scientists have successfully used satellite cameras coupled with deep learning to count animals in complex geographical landscapes, taking conservationists an important step forward in monitoring populations of endangered species.
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Fastener with microscopic mushroom design holds promise
A fastener with a microscopic design that looks like tiny mushrooms could mean advances for everyday consumers and scientific fields. Currently available fasteners are called hook and loop fasteners and require harder, stiff material. In Biointerphases, researchers describe a design that can use softer materials and still be strong. The team believes a 3D mushroom design can be made with softer, m
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New COVID-19 model shows little benefit in vaccinating high-risk individuals first
Maurizio Porfiri, Institute Professor at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, led a team that developed a novel theory and simulation platform for modeling COVID spread over the entire town of New Rochelle, located in Westchester County in New York State. The paper, "High-Resolution Agent-Based Modeling of COVID-19 Spreading in a Small Town," published in Advanced Theory and Simulations, details
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Light-controlled Higgs modes found in superconductors; potential sensor, computing uses
Iowa State University's Jigang Wang and a team of researchers have discovered a short-lived form of the famous Higgs boson — subject of a groundbreaking search at the Large Hadron Collider — within an iron-based superconductor. This Higgs mode can be accessed and controlled by laser light flashing on the superconductor at trillions of pulses per second.
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Disease threatens to decimate western bats
A four-year study recently published in Ecology and Evolution concludes that the fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, poses a severe threat to many western North American bats.
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Counting elephants from space, for the first time
For the first time, scientists have successfully used satellite cameras coupled with deep learning to count animals in complex geographical landscapes, taking conservationists an important step forward in monitoring populations of endangered species.
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Testing the waters: Analyzing different solid states of water on other planets and moons
Just like on Earth, water on other planets, satellites, and even comets comes in a variety of forms depending on multiple factors such as pressure and temperature. Aside from the gaseous, liquid, and solid states we are accustomed to, water can form a different type of crystalline solid called clathrate hydrate. Although they look similar to ice, clathrate hydrates have actually small water-based
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Disease threatens to decimate western bats
A four-year study concludes that the fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, poses a severe threat to many western North American bats.
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Where do our minds wander? Brain waves can point the way
Anyone who has tried and failed to meditate knows that our minds are rarely still. But where do they roam? New research has come up with a way to track the flow of our internal thought processes and signal whether our minds are focused, fixated or wandering.
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Mental health conditions alarmingly high among children with autism, study finds
Nearly 78 per cent of children with autism have at least one mental health condition and nearly half have more than that, according to a new study. Mental health conditions were present in 44.8 per cent of pre-school age children with autism — a group among which prevalence had not previously been established using a large, population-based sample. Only 14.1 per cent of children without autism (a
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Prenatal BPA exposure may contribute to the male bias of autism spectrum disorder
Autism has a higher prevalence in males than females. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a common chemical found in plastics, our food, and even the human placenta. Higher prenatal exposure to BPA is thought to increase the risk of autism. Researchers have identified autism candidate genes that may be responsible for the sex-specific effects of BPA.
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'Doctors Blackwell' Tells The Story Of 2 Pioneering Sisters Who Changed Medicine
Elizabeth Blackwell was the first woman in America to earn her medical degree. Her sister Emily followed in her footsteps. Janice Nimura tells the story of the "complicated, prickly" trailblazers. (Image credit: Bettmann/Getty Images)
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Despite huge size, super light planet is 'one of the puffiest'
The core mass of the giant exoplanet WASP-107b is much lower than what was thought necessary to build up the immense gas envelope surrounding giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn, according to new research. This intriguing discovery suggests that gas-giant planets form a lot more easily than previously believed. The new analysis of WASP-107b's internal structure has big implications. "This study
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Brain cell network supplies neurons with energy
Until recently, oligodendrocytes were primarily thought to be a kind of cellular insulating tape that accelerates the transmission of electrical signals in the brain. A study by the University of Bonn (Germany) now shows that they are also important for the energy supply of neurons in some brain regions. The findings are published in the journal Cell Reports.
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Heart attack patients in England 'fearful' of seeking medical help amid COVID crisis
Data analysis is revealing a second sharp drop in the number of people admitted to hospital in England with acute heart failure or a heart attack. The decline began in October, as the numbers of COVID-19 infections began to surge ahead of the second lockdown, which came into force in early November.
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Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women – scientists have found. Researchers discovered a chemical made in the sex glands of the males of one species of tropical butterfly is identical to a chemical produced by flowers to attract butterflies. The study published in PLOS Biology
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Court Voids a 'Tortured' Trump Climate Rollback
The ruling strikes down weak rules for coal-burning power plants and gives the Biden administration a freer hand to impose tighter restrictions.
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Biden's Pick to Lead FEMA Signals Urgency on Pandemic and Climate Change
Deanne Criswell, an experienced emergency manager, will be the first woman to lead the agency since it was created in 1979 — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Electric Car Battery Charges in Just Five Minutes
Hot Minute A factory in China has manufactured a car battery that can be charged completely in just five minutes, The Guardian reports . The batteries were developed by Israeli company StoreDot and built by Chinese manufacturer Eve Energy. There is one big catch, however: While the batteries can technically be fully charged in just five minutes, electric car chargers currently in use today wouldn
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Electrical Brain Stimulation May Alleviate Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors
Noninvasive electrical zaps, tuned specifically to individual brain-activity patterns, appear to reduce checking, hoarding and other compulsions for up to three months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Solar activity reconstructed over a millennium
An international team of researchers has reconstructed solar activity back to the year 969 using measurements of radioactive carbon in tree rings. Those results help scientists to better understand the dynamics of the sun and allow more precise dating of organic materials using the C14 method.
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New method heals skeletal injuries with synthetic bone
Researchers have developed a way of combining a bone substitute and drugs to regenerate bone and heal severe fractures in the thigh or shin bone. The study was conducted on rats, but the researchers think that the method in various combinations will soon be commonplace in clinical settings.
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Genetic rewiring behind spectacular evolutionary explosion in East Africa
Genetic rewiring could have driven an evolutionary explosion in the shapes, sizes and adaptations of cichlid fish, in East Africa's answer to Darwin's Galapagos finches.
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Gene-editing 'scissor' tool may also be a 'dimmer switch'
In a series of experiments with laboratory-cultured bacteria, scientists have found evidence that there is a second role for the widely used gene-cutting system CRISPR-Cas9 — as a genetic dimmer switch for CRISPR-Cas9 genes.
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Research establishes antibiotic potential for cannabis molecule
The main nonpsychoactive component of cannabis has been shown to kill the bacteria responsible for gonorrhoea, meningitis and legionnaires disease, which could lead to the first new class of antibiotics for resistant bacteria in 60 years.
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Bird 'Fitbit' and muscle samples indicate fit fliers
"Fitbit for birds" lets researchers use muscle structure and body size to predict the athletic performance of small gulls called black-legged kittiwakes. The wild seabirds can commute long distances each day to find food. Researchers studied a colony of black-legged kittiwakes that breed and nest in an abandoned radar tower on Middleton Island, Alaska. They attached GPS-accelerometers onto kittiw
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Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women—scientists have found.
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New method heals skeletal injuries with synthetic bone
Researchers have developed a way of combining a bone substitute and drugs to regenerate bone and heal severe fractures in the thigh or shin bone. The study was conducted on rats, but the researchers think that the method in various combinations will soon be commonplace in clinical settings.
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Gene-editing 'scissor' tool may also be a 'dimmer switch'
In a series of experiments with laboratory-cultured bacteria, scientists have found evidence that there is a second role for the widely used gene-cutting system CRISPR-Cas9 — as a genetic dimmer switch for CRISPR-Cas9 genes.
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Electrical Brain Stimulation May Alleviate Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors
Noninvasive electrical zaps, tuned specifically to individual brain-activity patterns, appear to reduce checking, hoarding and other compulsions for up to three months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Male butterflies mark their mates with repulsive smell during sex to 'turn off' other suitors
Butterflies have evolved to produce a strongly scented chemical in their genitals that they leave behind after sex to deter other males from pursuing their women—scientists have found.
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5G doesn't cause COVID-19, but the rumor it does spread like a virus
Research team investigated how COVID-19 misinformation proliferated using the same epidemiological techniques for modeling disease transmission.
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Electrical Brain Stimulation May Alleviate Obsessive-Compulsive Behaviors
Noninvasive electrical zaps, tuned specifically to individual brain-activity patterns, appear to reduce checking, hoarding and other compulsions for up to three months — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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An Inauguration Like No Other
As the final day of the Trump presidency passes, rehearsals and preparations are underway for the upcoming inaugural ceremony of President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President–elect Kamala Harris, set to take place on January 20. Amid unprecedented security concerns and an ongoing pandemic, the visual landscape of Washington is different from any previous inaugural ceremony. Roads have been closed
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Donald Trump Is Out. Are We Ready to Talk About How He Got In?
I've been thinking about Barbara Tuchman's medieval history, A Distant Mirror , over the past couple of weeks. The book is a masterful work of anti-romance, a cold-eyed look at how generations of aristocrats and royalty waged one of the longest wars in recorded history, all while claiming the mantle of a benevolent God. The disabusing begins early. In the introduction, Tuchman examines the ideal
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Halted rocket test could stall NASA moon shot, redo possible
NASA is considering a second firing of its moon rocket engines after a critical test came up short over the weekend, a move that could bump the first flight in the Artemis lunar-landing program into next year.
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Study identifies a nonhuman primate model that mimics severe COVID-19 similar to humans
New research suggests that aged African green monkeys may be suitable models for the study of severe forms of COVID-19.
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Study finds COVID-19 attack on brain, not lungs, triggers severe disease in mice
Researchers have found that infecting the nasal passages of mice with the virus that causes COVID-19 led to a rapid, escalating attack on the brain that triggered severe illness, even after the lungs were successfully clearing themselves of the virus.
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