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Moonstruck sleep: Synchronization of human sleep with the moon cycle under field conditions
Before the availability of artificial light, moonlight was the only source of light sufficient to stimulate nighttime activity; still, evidence for the modulation of sleep timing by lunar phases is controversial. Here, we use wrist actimetry to show a clear synchronization of nocturnal sleep timing with the lunar cycle in participants living in environments that range from a rural setting with an
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In Brazil, many smaller dams disrupt fish more than large hydropower projects
A new paper published Jan. 11 in Nature Sustainability quantifies the tradeoffs between hydroelectric generation capacity and the impacts on river connectivity for thousands of current and projected future dams across Brazil. The findings confirm that small hydropower plants are far more responsible for river fragmentation than their larger counterparts due to their prevalence and distribution.
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Vaccine Factory Locked Down Due to "Suspicious Package"
Early on Wednesday, a vaccine manufacturing facility in the U.K. had to go into lockdown mode after a suspicious package arrived on the site. The pharmaceutical company Wockhardt UK announced that it shut down and evacuated its Wrexham vaccine factory in Wales. The facility had been responsible for bottling the AstraZeneca coronavirus vaccine into glass vials, according to ABC News , making it a
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Confirmed improvement in first responders' brain health after shortened training protocol
People believe that they can't change their brains, or their brain health will decline as they age. But the SMART training protocol, created by researchers and clinicians at the Center for BrainHealth®, has demonstrated over the past two decades to improve cognitive function and psychological well-being in laboratory participants. Research suggests that SMART can even make long-lasting improvement
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Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy. The research, published in the journal Food Chemistry, identified 20 proteins found in cricket food products which could cause serious allergic reactions.
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Here's What Traveling By Hyperloop Could Look Like
Virgin Hyperloop has released a new video showing what the experience of being shot inside a pod down a vacuum tube at breakneck speeds could one day look and feel like. It's an ambitious vision of the future of transportation. The concept video goes through each step in the travel process, from check-in to disembarking. The experience seems reminiscent of going to an airport to catch a plane. Th
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PTSD psychotherapy changes the brain's 'traffic'
Researchers have used neuroimaging to examine how psychotherapy for people with PTSD changes the brain areas responsible for generating emotional responses to threats. Trauma-focused psychotherapy is widely considered the best available treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the ways in which this method affects the brain to promote recovery from PTSD are not well understoo
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Why the Literary Origins of Lupin Matter
Before Arsène Lupin was the inspiration for an out-of-nowhere Netflix smash hit, projected to be watched by 70 million subscribers , the character was a French literary legend, a gentleman thief with the moral code of Robin Hood, the wits of Sherlock Holmes, and the anti-aristocratic instincts of Robespierre. In the 1906 story "The Queen's Necklace," one of Maurice Leblanc's first outings for the
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A mild way to upcycle plastics used in bottles into fuel and other high-value products
Plastic is ubiquitous in people's lives. Yet, when plastic-containing items have fulfilled their missions, only a small amount is recycled into new products, which are often of lower quality compared to the original material. And, transforming this waste into high-value chemicals requires substantial energy. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' JACS Au have combined a ruthenium-carbon catalyst and m
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Purported phosphine on Venus more likely to be ordinary sulfur dioxide, new study shows
In September, a team led by astronomers in the United Kingdom announced that they had detected the chemical phosphine in the thick clouds of Venus. The team's reported detection, based on observations by two Earth-based radio telescopes, surprised many Venus experts. Earth's atmosphere contains small amounts of phosphine, which may be produced by life. Phosphine on Venus generated buzz that the pl
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Precision measurements of intracluster light suggest possible link to dark matter
A combination of observational data and sophisticated computer simulations have yielded advances in a field of astrophysics that has languished for half a century. The Dark Energy Survey, which is hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, has published a burst of new results on what's called intracluster light, or ICL, a faint type of light found inside galax
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NASA's OSIRIS-REx Asteroid Sampler Will Head Back to Earth on May 10
NASA's OSIRIS-REx mission has been a smashing success so far. After reaching the asteroid Bennu at the very end of 2018, the spacecraft surveyed the surface and collected a sample. Now, NASA is making plans for OSIRIS-REx to head back to Earth with its precious cargo. According to the team, OSIRIS-REx will begin that journey on May 10th , but there are good reasons for the delay. OSIRIS-REx colle
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Juicing technique could influence healthfulness of fresh-squeezed juice
With the New Year, many people are making resolutions to eat healthier, by eating more vegetables, for example. But those who don't like the taste or texture of some vegetables might prefer to drink them in a home-squeezed juice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Food Science & Technology have found that the choice of household juicing technique can influence the phytochemical content and antioxid
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Best 2 in 1 laptops: Work hard, play hard with these versatile picks
Don't limit yourself to one position. (Brooke Cagle via Unsplash/) Buying a new laptop or tablet can be a stressful undertaking. With so many brands and models to choose from, how do you pick the one that best meets your needs? Dear indecisive shoppers: You're in luck. If you are in the market for both a new laptop and a new tablet, the best 2-in-1 laptops will give you both in a single device. T
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Dogs can make stressful workplaces better for people. Even the White House.
Presidential pup Major Biden stretches his legs on the White House lawn. (White House photo/Adam Schultz/) Ellen Furlong is an associate professor of Psychology at Illinois Wesleyan University. This story originally featured on The Conversation . On January 24 the White House welcomed two new residents: Champ and Major, the newly minted first dogs of the US. The first dogs are poised to offer spe
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Light pollution linked to preterm birth increase
Scientists conducted the first study to examine the fetal health impact of light pollution based on a direct measure of skyglow, an important aspect of light pollution. Using an empirical regularity discovered in physics, called Walker's Law, a team found evidence of reduced birth weight, shortened gestational length and preterm births.
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Adults with cognitive disabilities more than twice as likely to use e-cigarettes
In the first national study to assess use of e-cigarettes among adults with disabilities, George Mason University's College of Health and Human Services researchers found that e-cigarette use was more than twice as likely among adults with a cognitive disability (12.0%), an independent living disability (11.0%), or two or more disabilities (9.2%), compared to adults without disabilities (4.8%).
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New report charts path toward superior earthquake recovery
A committee of experts, formed by NIST and FEMA under the direction of Congress, has urged officials at all levels of government to support research and policies that could help get the buildings and services society depends on up and running quickly after an earthquake. In a report delivered to Congress, the committee outlines seven recommendations that, if acted upon, may greatly improve the res
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The Atlantic Ocean Is Growing Larger and Larger, Scientists Say
Drifting Apart The Atlantic Ocean is steadily growing wider, and our conventional understanding of plate tectonics can't quite explain why. When scientists from Italy and the U.K. dropped 39 seismometers to the bottom of the Atlantic to better understand seismic activity beneath the crust back in 2016, they expected their findings to be "very boring," Gizmodo reports . Instead, they say they've u
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The Guardian view on Britain's pandemic record: a monument to failure | Editorial
The terrible scale of the tragedy cannot be attributed to misfortune. It is a product of negligent government In Soho, central London, stands a replica of a 19th-century public water pump without a handle. The missing part is not a result of vandalism but a tribute to John Snow, the physician who correctly surmised that the pump, supplying contaminated water, was a super-spreading device for chol
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Cough and sore throat more common with UK Covid variant – study
ONS survey finds people more likely to have cough compared with old variants, though loss of taste or smell less likely Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Coughs, sore throats and fatigue are more common in people who test positive for the new variant of coronavirus, but a loss of taste or smell is less likely, a study has found. The highly transmissible variant of coro
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Cancer recurrence and lethality are enabled by enhanced survival and reversible cell cycle arrest of polyaneuploid cells [Medical Sciences]
We present a unifying theory to explain cancer recurrence, therapeutic resistance, and lethality. The basis of this theory is the formation of simultaneously polyploid and aneuploid cancer cells, polyaneuploid cancer cells (PACCs), that avoid the toxic effects of systemic therapy by entering a state of cell cycle arrest. The theory…
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Opinion: Will understanding the ocean lead to "the ocean we want"? [Sustainability Science]
The United Nations Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development (2021–2030, henceforth the Ocean Decade) aims to galvanize the international community to acquire and apply scientific knowledge of the ocean. The Ocean Decade is specifically intended to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), including its promise to "leave no…
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Biden will direct billions in federal spending power to climate change
President Joe Biden continues to make good on his campaign pledge to accelerate progress on climate change, rapidly working down the list of what he can accomplish on his own in his early days in office. On Wednesday, January 27, he will sign a second set of executive orders and memorandums on climate change that promise to bring about major changes in US energy policies and priorities: directing
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Purported phosphine on Venus more likely to be ordinary sulfur dioxide
Astronomers revisited and comprehensively reinterpreted the radio telescope observations underlying a widely reported 2019 claim that phosphine gas was present in the atmosphere of Venus. In a paper accepted to the Astrophysical Journal, they report that sulfur dioxide, a common gas in the atmosphere of Venus, is likely what was detected instead of phosphine.
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The Dogs Trained to Sniff Out COVID-19
Promising early results from several studies have encouraged researchers around the world to develop and expand canine programs that may screen people for COVID-19 infection at places like airports, hospitals, or sports venues. While these early experiments appear to demonstrate high levels of accuracy by the sniffer dogs, researchers also caution that peer-review processes and larger-scale studi
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Study reveals precarious employment on the rise long before COVID-19
A study led by a University of Illinois Chicago researcher uses a new approach to measure precarious, or low-quality, employment in the United States. And, according to those findings, precarious employment has increased 9% between 1988 and 2016. Precarious employment, or P.E., is defined as low-quality employment, which is often characterized by low wages, job insecurity and irregular hours, maki
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Germline whole exome sequencing reveals the potential role of hereditary predisposition and therapeutic implications in small cell lung cancer, a tobacco-related cancer
A study presented today by Dr. Nobuyuki Takahashi of the Center for Cancer Research (CCR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), Bethesda, Md. at the IASLC World Conference on Lung Cancer Singapore demonstrates that small cell lung cancer (SCLC) may have an inherited predisposition and lays the foundation for understanding the interaction between genotype and tobacco exposure in exacerbating SCLC risk
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Growth of northern Tibet proved the key to East Asian biodiversity
In a recent study, a joint research team led by scientists from Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden (XTBG) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the University of Bristol (UK) and the Open University (UK) has revealed the first direct mechanism explaining how the growth of mountains in Northern Tibet drastically altered climate, vegetation and plant diversity in East Asia.
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New malaria mosquito is emerging in African cities
Larvae of a new malaria mosquito species are abundantly present in water containers in cities in Ethiopia. The mosquito, Anopheles stephensi, is the main malaria mosquito in India but only appeared on the African continent a few years ago. It has now been found in cities and towns in urban settings in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Djibouti. Malaria can become an increasing problem for urban areas in Ethiop
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In tune with the moon
Does the moon affect women's menstrual cycles? This question has been controversial for a long time. A new study by chronobiologists from Würzburg (Germany) now suggest that such an influence does exist. It's complicated, though.
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Fighting poverty reduces child neglect cases
To reduce cases of child neglect, provide economic relief to struggling families, research indicates. A 10% increase in a common benefit for low- to moderate-income working families, the Earned Income Tax Credit, led to a 9% decrease in the annual number of reports of child neglect made to child welfare agencies over a 14-year study period. That's a significant impact, researchers say, and can in
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The Navy Reportedly Experimented With a "Spacetime Modification Weapon"
Spacetime Modification Weapon According to documents obtained by The War Zone , the US Navy performed experiments on far-fetched technologies including a "spacetime modification weapon" which, researchers claimed internally, could revolutionize power and propulsion systems. The mysterious technologies were meant to take advantage of the "Pais effect," patented by American aerospace engineer Salva
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Lunar cycle has major effect on sleep, study suggests
Research finds people stay up later and sleep less before full moon, and do the opposite before new moon Folklore has saddled the moon with major responsibilities: moods, spikes in crime and even psychosis are blamed on the Earth's only constant natural satellite. But could the "lunar effect" interfere with sleep? Scientists have long understood that human activity is facilitated by light, be it
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Regulation of tumor immune suppression and cancer cell survival by CXCL1/2 elevation in glioblastoma multiforme
The invasiveness and high immune suppression of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) produce poor survival of afflicted patients. Unfortunately, in the past decades, no therapeutic approach has remarkably improved the survival time of patients with GBM. Our analysis of the TCGA database and brain tumor tissue arrays indicated that CXCL1 and CXCL2 overexpression is closely associated with GBM's aggressiv
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Anti-Na+/K+-ATPase immunotherapy ameliorates {alpha}-synuclein pathology through activation of Na+/K+-ATPase {alpha}1-dependent autophagy
Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA) plays important roles in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Conversely, reduced NKA activity has been reported in aging and neurodegenerative diseases. However, little is known about the function of NKA in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we report that reduction of NKA activity in NKAα1 +/– mice aggravates α-synuclein–induced pathology, including a reduc
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Structural basis for heme-dependent NCoR binding to the transcriptional repressor REV-ERB{beta}
Heme is the endogenous ligand for the constitutively repressive REV-ERB nuclear receptors, REV-ERBα (NR1D1) and REV-ERBβ (NR1D2), but how heme regulates REV-ERB activity remains unclear. Cellular studies indicate that heme is required for the REV-ERBs to bind the corepressor NCoR and repress transcription. However, fluorescence-based biochemical assays suggest that heme displaces NCoR; here, we s
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Fibrillin-1-enriched microenvironment drives endothelial injury and vascular rarefaction in chronic kidney disease
Endothelial cell injury leading to microvascular rarefaction is a characteristic feature of chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, the mechanism underlying endothelial cell dropout is poorly defined. Here, we show a central role of the extracellular microenvironment in controlling endothelial cell survival and proliferation in CKD. When cultured on a decellularized kidney tissue scaffold (KTS) fr
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Orographic evolution of northern Tibet shaped vegetation and plant diversity in eastern Asia
The growth of the Tibetan Plateau throughout the past 66 million years has profoundly affected the Asian climate, but how this unparalleled orogenesis might have driven vegetation and plant diversity changes in eastern Asia is poorly understood. We approach this question by integrating modeling results and fossil data. We show that growth of north and northeastern Tibet affects vegetation and, cr
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A CRISPR-Cas autocatalysis-driven feedback amplification network for supersensitive DNA diagnostics
Artificial nucleic acid circuits with precisely controllable dynamic and function have shown great promise in biosensing, but their utility in molecular diagnostics is still restrained by the inability to process genomic DNA directly and moderate sensitivity. To address this limitation, we present a CRISPR-Cas–powered catalytic nucleic acid circuit, namely, CRISPR-Cas–only amplification network (
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NOTCH1-driven UBR7 stimulates nucleotide biosynthesis to promote T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Ubiquitin protein ligase E3 component N-recognin 7 (UBR7) is the most divergent member of UBR box–containing E3 ubiquitin ligases/recognins that mediate the proteasomal degradation of its substrates through the N-end rule. Here, we used a proteomic approach and found phosphoibosyl pyrophosphate synthetases (PRPSs), the essential enzymes for nucleotide biosynthesis, as strong interacting partners
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A polymeric approach toward resistance-resistant antimicrobial agent with dual-selective mechanisms of action
Antibiotic resistance is now a major threat to human health, and one approach to combating this threat is to develop resistance-resistant antibiotics. Synthetic antimicrobial polymers are generally resistance resistant, having good activity with low resistance rates but usually with low therapeutic indices. Here, we report our solution to this problem by introducing dual-selective mechanisms of a
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A thermal activated and differential self-calibrated flexible epidermal biomicrofluidic device for wearable accurate blood glucose monitoring
This paper reports a flexible electronics-based epidermal biomicrofluidics technique for clinical continuous blood glucose monitoring, overcoming the drawback of the present wearables, unreliable measurements. A thermal activation method is proposed to improve the efficiency of transdermal interstitial fluid (ISF) extraction, enabling extraction with a low current density to notably reduce skin i
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Anisotropic electrostatic screening of charged colloids in nematic solvents
The physical behavior of anisotropic charged colloids is determined by their material dielectric anisotropy, affecting colloidal self-assembly, biological function, and even out-of-equilibrium behavior. However, little is known about anisotropic electrostatic screening, which underlies all electrostatic effective interactions in such soft or biological materials. In this work, we demonstrate anis
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Spatially resolved 3D metabolomic profiling in tissues
Spatially resolved RNA and protein molecular analyses have revealed unexpected heterogeneity of cells. Metabolic analysis of individual cells complements these single-cell studies. Here, we present a three-dimensional spatially resolved metabolomic profiling framework (3D-SMF) to map out the spatial organization of metabolic fragments and protein signatures in immune cells of human tonsils. In th
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The structure of the actin filament uncapping complex mediated by twinfilin
Uncapping of actin filaments is essential for driving polymerization and depolymerization dynamics from capping protein–associated filaments; however, the mechanisms of uncapping leading to rapid disassembly are unknown. Here, we elucidated the x-ray crystal structure of the actin/twinfilin/capping protein complex to address the mechanisms of twinfilin uncapping of actin filaments. The twinfilin/
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The keratin network of intermediate filaments regulates keratinocyte rigidity sensing and nuclear mechanotransduction
The keratin network of intermediate filaments provides keratinocytes with essential mechanical strength and resilience, but the contribution to mechanosensing remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the role of the keratin cytoskeleton in the response to altered matrix rigidity. We found that keratinocytes adapted to increasing matrix stiffness by forming a rigid, interconnected network
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Solar-assisted fabrication of large-scale, patternable transparent wood
Transparent wood is considered a promising structural and light management material for energy-efficient engineering applications. However, the solution-based delignification process that is used to fabricate transparent wood generally consumes large amounts of chemicals and energy. Here, we report a method to produce optically transparent wood by modifying the wood's lignin structure using a sol
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Architecture and regulation of an enterobacterial cellulose secretion system
Many free-living and pathogenic enterobacteria secrete biofilm-promoting cellulose using a multicomponent, envelope-embedded Bcs secretion system under the control of intracellular second messenger c-di-GMP. The molecular understanding of system assembly and cellulose secretion has been largely limited to the crystallographic studies of a distantly homologous BcsAB synthase tandem and a low-resol
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Nondestructive, high-resolution, chemically specific 3D nanostructure characterization using phase-sensitive EUV imaging reflectometry
Next-generation nano- and quantum devices have increasingly complex 3D structure. As the dimensions of these devices shrink to the nanoscale, their performance is often governed by interface quality or precise chemical or dopant composition. Here, we present the first phase-sensitive extreme ultraviolet imaging reflectometer. It combines the excellent phase stability of coherent high-harmonic sou
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Decoding the multicellular ecosystem of lung adenocarcinoma manifested as pulmonary subsolid nodules by single-cell RNA sequencing
Lung adenocarcinomas (LUAD) that radiologically display as subsolid nodules (SSNs) exhibit more indolent biological behavior than solid LUAD. The transcriptomic features and tumor microenvironment (TME) of SSN remain poorly understood. Here, we performed single-cell RNA sequencing analyses of 16 SSN samples, 6 adjacent normal lung tissues (nLung), and 9 primary LUAD with lymph node metastasis (mL
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A synthetic mechanogenetic gene circuit for autonomous drug delivery in engineered tissues
Mechanobiologic signals regulate cellular responses under physiologic and pathologic conditions. Using synthetic biology and tissue engineering, we developed a mechanically responsive bioartificial tissue that responds to mechanical loading to produce a preprogrammed therapeutic biologic drug. By deconstructing the signaling networks induced by activation of the mechanically sensitive ion channel
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EphrinB2 clustering by Nipah virus G is required to activate and trap F intermediates at supported lipid bilayer-cell interfaces
Paramyxovirus membrane fusion requires an attachment protein that binds to a host cell receptor and a fusion protein that merges the viral and host membranes. For Nipah virus (NiV), the G attachment protein binds ephrinB2/B3 receptors and activates F-mediated fusion. To visualize dynamic events of these proteins at the membrane interface, we reconstituted NiV fusion activation by overlaying F- an
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Women temporarily synchronize their menstrual cycles with the luminance and gravimetric cycles of the Moon
Many species synchronize reproductive behavior with a particular phase of the lunar cycle to increase reproductive success. In humans, a lunar influence on reproductive behavior remains controversial, although the human menstrual cycle has a period close to that of the lunar cycle. Here, we analyzed long-term menstrual recordings of individual women with distinct methods for biological rhythm ana
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Genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen identified KLF11 as a druggable suppressor for sarcoma cancer stem cells
Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are involved in tumorigenesis, recurrence, and therapy resistance. To identify critical regulators of sarcoma CSCs, we performed a reporter-based genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen and uncovered Kruppel-like factor 11 (KLF11) as top candidate. In vitro and in vivo functional annotation defined a negative role of KLF11 in CSCs. Mechanistically, KLF11 and YAP/TEAD bound to adja
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Meta-optics achieves RGB-achromatic focusing for virtual reality
Virtual and augmented realities are rapidly developing technologies, but their large-scale penetration will require lightweight optical components with small aberrations. We demonstrate millimeter-scale diameter, high-NA, submicron-thin, metasurface-based lenses that achieve diffraction-limited achromatic focusing of the primary colors by exploiting constructive interference of light from multipl
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Single-cell molecular profiling of all three components of the HPA axis reveals adrenal ABCB1 as a regulator of stress adaptation
Chronic activation and dysregulation of the neuroendocrine stress response have severe physiological and psychological consequences, including the development of metabolic and stress-related psychiatric disorders. We provide the first unbiased, cell type–specific, molecular characterization of all three components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, under baseline and chronic stress condi
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Complexes of the neurotensin receptor 1 with small-molecule ligands reveal structural determinants of full, partial, and inverse agonism
Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1) and related G protein–coupled receptors of the ghrelin family are clinically unexploited, and several mechanistic aspects of their activation and inactivation have remained unclear. Enabled by a new crystallization design, we present five new structures: apo-state NTSR1 as well as complexes with nonpeptide inverse agonists SR48692 and SR142948A, partial agonist RTI-
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Experimental taphonomy of organelles and the fossil record of early eukaryote evolution
The timing of origin of eukaryotes and the sequence of eukaryogenesis are poorly constrained because their fossil record is difficult to interpret. Claims of fossilized organelles have been discounted on the unsubstantiated perception that they decay too quickly for fossilization. We experimentally characterized the pattern and time scale of decay of nuclei, chloroplasts, and pyrenoids in red and
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Tio gyllene regler för att återställa skövlad regnskog
Storskalig trädplantering för att motverka klimatkrisen är inte problemfri. Restaurera förstörd skog i stället för att skapa nya planteringar. Skydda befintlig skog och lyft lokalbefolkningens roll. Det menar forskare som granskat olika försök att återställa skövlad regnskog. – Skogar är avgörande för livet på jorden, 75 procent av planetens växter och djurarter har sitt hem där. Skogarna ger oss
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New study points to better diagnostics for cancer
A new University of California, Irvine-led study finds a new method for identifying biomarkers may aid in early cancer diagnosis. The study focused on lung cancer, however the Cell Heterogeneity-Adjusted cLonal Methylation (CHALM) method has been tested on aging and Alzheimer's diseases as well and is expected to be effective for studying other diseases.
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This VPN Makes Securing Your Online Privacy as Easy as Flipping a Switch
With online scams, data theft, and censorship on the rise, virtual private networks (VPNs) have practically become essential tools for safely browsing the Internet. While the benefits of VPN are numerous, the main purpose is to encrypt your data and help you stay anonymous online, protecting you from would-be hackers, intrusive marketers, and even your own Internet Service Provider (ISP). Though
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Bio-Rad Launches Its Western Blot Learning Center, an Online Multi-media Library of Resources on Immunoblotting
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), a global leader in life science research and clinical diagnostic products, today announced the launch of the Bio-Rad Western Blotting Learning Center, an online library that provides comprehensive resources, information, and guidance to help researchers improve their experimental western blotting (or immunoblotting) approaches to obtain high-quality
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Health experts and others shocked at Johnson defence of Covid crisis handling
Sage panel member says PM's claim of doing everything to minimise deaths "so transparently untrue" Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Bereaved families, government scientific advisers and public health experts have attacked Boris Johnson's claim that ministers "did everything [they] could … to minimise loss of life and to minimise suffering" during the coronavirus eme
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How Anthony Fauci Survived Donald Trump
Y ou couldn't have blamed Anthony Fauci if at any point over the past year he'd told Donald Trump he'd had enough, thank you , and quit. Everyone has a breaking point. There was the time the former president called him "a disaster" on a call with Trump-campaign staff. Or the day a White House official gave reporters an oppo-research-style memo claiming that Fauci had been "wrong on things" relate
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Precision measurements of intracluster light suggest possible link to dark matter
Faint light from rogue stars not bound to galaxies has been something of a mystery to scientists. The dimness of this intracluster light makes it difficult to measure, and no one knows how much there is. Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey, led by Fermilab, have made the most radially extended measurement of this light ever, and they've found that its distribution might point to the distribution
3h
Purported phosphine on Venus more likely to be ordinary sulfur dioxide, new study shows
A University of Washington-led team has revisited and comprehensively reinterpreted the radio telescope observations underlying a widely reported 2019 claim that phosphine gas was present in the atmosphere of Venus. In a paper accepted to the Astrophysical Journal, they report that sulfur dioxide, a common gas in the atmosphere of Venus, is likely what was detected instead of phosphine.
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Focusing on field analysis
One potential approach to developing a low-cost portable microscopy system is to use transparent microspheres in combination with affordable low-magnification objective lenses to increase image resolution and sensitivity.
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A mild way to upcycle plastics used in bottles into fuel and other high-value products
Plastic is ubiquitous in people's lives. Yet, when plastic-containing items have fulfilled their missions, only a small amount is recycled into new products, which are often of lower quality compared to the original material. And, transforming this waste into high-value chemicals requires substantial energy. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' JACS Au have combined a ruthenium-carbon catalyst and m
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Scientists use chaos to build the optimal laser beam
Lasers are great for measuring—if they can get a clear view of their target. In biomedical applications, there's often disordered stuff in the way of objects needing measurement. A new technique leverages that disorder to formulate a custom-made, optimal laser light beam. Lasers can make amazingly precise measurements. Invaluable for precision construction and manufacturing, they also allow biome
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AI hjälper till att bedöma risk för bröstcancer
I Sverige screenas alla kvinnor mellan 40 och 74 år för bröstcancer med mammografi ungefär vartannat år. För de som deltar upptäcks i dag 70 procent av bröstcancerfallen vid screening, medan resten hittas i mellantiden – så kallad "intervallcancer". Dessa är ofta allvarliga, då de utvecklats snabbt. Nu hoppas Fredrik Strand, forskare vid institutionen för onkologi-patologi på Karolinska Institutet
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Daily briefing: Scientists react to Biden's COVID plan
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00256-z Scientists welcome the US's science-based plan, but see a tough road ahead. Plus, reminisce with Operation Warp Speed's Moncef Slaoui and consider a different perspective on satellite images.
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Wildfire smoke cools climate more than we thought
Smoke from wildfires has more of a cooling effect on the climate system that most models have assumed, a new study of biomass-burning aerosols shows. When wildfires burn forests and grasslands, biomass-burning aerosols are produced, forming smoke clouds. The composition, size, and mixing state of biomass-burning aerosols determine the optical properties of the smoke plumes in the atmosphere, and
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Scientists Call For Massive Global Network of Carbon Capture Plants
Crash Deployment If we want any chance of meeting the ambitious climate goals laid out by the 2015 Paris Agreement, it's becoming increasingly clear that we'll need to find a way to actually reverse past emissions. That's why a team of scientists from the University of California San Diego and Texas A&M University published a call to arms, Wired reports , saying that a "wartime-like crash deploym
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The Myth That Gets Men Out of Doing Chores
"Birds at Home," 2006 (Julie Blackmon) When you think of messiness, you might think of the unsavory ways it manifests: sweaty socks left on the floor, food-encrusted dishes piled in the sink, crumbs on the counter. Messes themselves are easy to identify, but the patterns of behavior that produce them are a bit more nuanced. Really, messiness has two ingredients: making messes, and then not cleani
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Ask Dr. Hamblin: Am I Wrong to Tell Someone to Pull Up Her Mask?
Editor's Note: Every Wednesday, James Hamblin takes questions from readers about health-related curiosities, concerns, and obsessions. Have one? Email him at paging.dr.hamblin@theatlantic.com . Dear Dr. Hamblin, I'm a 65-year-old art teacher who has non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and rheumatoid arthritis. My small town in Georgia issued a mask mandate, but it was overruled by the governor, so I'm still a
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Mira's last journey: Exploring the dark universe
A team of physicists and computer scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory performed one of the five largest cosmological simulations ever. Data from the simulation will inform sky maps to aid leading large-scale cosmological experiments.
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Juicing technique could influence healthfulness of fresh-squeezed juice
With the New Year, many people are making resolutions to eat healthier, by eating more vegetables, for example. But those who don't like the taste or texture of some vegetables might prefer to drink them in a home-squeezed juice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Food Science & Technology have found that the choice of household juicing technique can influence the phytochemical content and antioxid
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Working memory can help tailor educational development
Imagine a 7-year-old and a college student both take a break from their virtual classes to get a drink of water. When they return, the 7-year-old has difficulty restarting the assignment, while the college student resumes working as if the break never occurred. Nelson Cowan, an expert in working memory at the University of Missouri, believes understanding this developmental age difference can help
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Scientists jump-start two people's brains after coma
In 2016, a team led by UCLA's Martin Monti reported that a 25-year-old man recovering from a coma had made remarkable progress following a treatment to jump-start his brain using ultrasound. Now, Monti and colleagues report that two more patients with severe brain injuries have also made impressive progress thanks to the same technique.
3h
Why so many people overuse antibiotics
A mistaken belief that antibiotics are beneficial for a broad array of conditions leads to their overuse, researchers report. The new study also finds that overuse occurs because doctors are willing to prescribe them when patients ask for medications. Researchers looked at more than 200 peer-reviewed studies to examine the causes behind antibiotic overuse, which can lead to harmful bacteria becom
3h
These 6 exoplanets somehow orbit their star in perfect rhythm
TOI-178 features six planets circling their host star in a tightly choreographed dance, which makes their disorderly arrangement all the more mysterious. (ESO/L. Calçada/spaceengine.org/) Two hundred light years away sits a planetary system unlike any other yet discovered. It contains at least six worlds, five of which are locked together in a particular type of gravitational tango. More bizarrel
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Beauty in imperfection: How crystal defects can help convert waste heat into electricity
Half-Heusler Ni-based alloys are thermoelectric materials with the potential for converting waste heat into electricity. However, the origin of their impressive conversion efficiency is not entirely clear. In a recent study, scientists from have attempted to uncover the role that Ni defects have in the crystal structure of these alloys and how their desirable thermoelectric properties are a conseq
3h
To combat false news, correct after reading
A new study co-authored by MIT scholars finds that fact-checking labels, when attached to online news headlines, actually work better after people read false headlines, not when the labels precede the headline or accompany it.
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Så kan coronapandemin drabba barnen på sikt
Barn från redan utsatta miljöer har större risk att drabbas av pandemin. Den ökande skolfrånvaron medför stora långsiktiga samhällskostnader, och unga kan få det svårt på arbetsmarknaden under långt tid. Det visar forskning från IFAU om hur pandemin kan drabba barn och unga på sikt. Rapporten från Institutet för arbetsmarknads- och utbildningspolitisk utvärdering (IFAU) baseras på tidigare forskn
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Global analysis suggests COVID-19 is seasonal
With cities around the globe locking down yet again amid soaring COVID-19 numbers, could seasonality be partially to blame? New research from the University of Illinois says yes. In a paper published in Evolutionary Bioinformatics, Illinois researchers show COVID-19 cases and mortality rates, among other epidemiological metrics, are significantly correlated with temperature and latitude across 221
3h
Ions in molten salts can 'go against the flow'
In a new article published in the scientific journal Communications Chemistry, a research group at Uppsala University show, using computer simulations, that ions do not always behave as expected. In their research on molten salts, they were able to see that, in some cases, the ions in the salt mixture they were studying affect one another so much that they may even move in the "wrong" direction—th
4h
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to lack greenspace today
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to have a paucity of greenspace today compared to other neighborhoods. The study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, demonstrates the lasting effects of redlining, a racist mortgage appraisal practice of the 1930s that established and exacerbated racia
4h
Technology could upend DNA sequencing for diagnosing certain DNA mutations
Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities. However, an innovative breakthrough developed by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Department of Physics promises to diag
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A NEAT reduction of complex neuronal models accelerates brain research
Unlike their simple counterparts in artificial intelligence (AI) applications, neurons in the brain use dendrites – their intricate tree-like branches – to find relevant chunks of information. Now, neuroscientists from the University of Bern have discovered a new computational method to make complex dendrite models much simpler. These faithful reductions may lead AI applications to process informa
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Pain patients who take opioids can't get in the door at over half of primary care clinics
People who take opioid medications for chronic pain may have a hard time finding a new primary care clinic that will take them as a patient if they need one, according to a new 'secret shopper' study of hundreds of clinics across the country. Stigma against long-term users of prescription opioids, likely related to the prospect of taking on a patient who might have an opioid use disorder or addict
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New benchmark set to deliver optimal osteoporosis care throughout Asia Pacific
The Asia Pacific Consortium on Osteoporosis (APCO) has today launched the first pan-Asia Pacific clinical practice standards for the screening, diagnosis, and management of osteoporosis, targeting a broad range of high-risk groups. Published in Osteoporosis International, 'The APCO Framework' comprises 16 minimum clinical standards set to serve as a benchmark for the provision of optimal osteoporo
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Highly specific synaptic plasticity in addiction
Addiction, or substance use disorder (SUD), is a complex neurological condition that includes drug-seeking behavior among other cognitive, emotional and behavioral features. Synaptic plasticity, or changes in the way neurons communicate with one another, drives these addictive behaviors. A new study now shows that players in the extracellular environment – not just at neuronal interfaces – contrib
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Major discovery helps explain coral bleaching
A scientist has made a major breakthrough in the understanding of coral bleaching — a process that causes corals to lose their color and eventually leads to their death. The process is triggered by warmer ocean temperatures, and, according to the study, it begins much earlier than previously thought. The bleaching apparently results from a disturbance in the metabolic equilibrium between corals a
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A University Is Using a Dead Professor to Teach an Online Class
Beyond the Grave Aaron Ansuini, a student at Concordia University in Montreal, Canada made a shocking discovery: He found that his art history professor wasn't alive anymore. "HI EXCUSE ME," Ansuini wrote in a tweet , "I just found out the the prof for this online course I'm taking *died in 2019* and he's technically still giving classes since he's *literally my prof for this course* and I'm lear
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Forget winning streaks, it's the bad times that fuse us together | Adrian Chiles
The latest research into the fans of rival football teams indicates what I've long suspected – adversity has a surprisingly powerful bonding effect I once wrote a book that sought to explore exactly what goes on between the ears of football fans. It was called We Don't Know What We're Doing and will now cost you anything up to 5op to buy. I spoke to fellow West Brom fans who had never missed a ga
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Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to lack greenspace today
Historically redlined neighborhoods are more likely to have a paucity of greenspace today compared to other neighborhoods. The study by researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, demonstrates the lasting effects of redlining, a racist mortgage appraisal practice of the 1930s that established and exacerbated racia
4h
VCU technology could upend DNA sequencing for diagnosing certain DNA mutations
Doctors are increasingly using genetic signatures to diagnose diseases and determine the best course of care, but using DNA sequencing and other techniques to detect genomic rearrangements remains costly or limited in capabilities. However, an innovative breakthrough developed by researchers at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and the VCU Department of Physics promises to diag
4h
Virus made inequality much worse across the world, says report
A new report by global poverty nonprofit OxFam finds inequality has increased in every country in the world. The alarming trend is made worse by the coronavirus pandemic, which strained most systems and governments. The gap in wealth, race and gender treatment will increase until governments step in with changes. The coronavirus has not only brought suffering and death to millions of people aroun
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China Is Now Using Anal Swabs to Test for COVID-19
When it comes to new innovations to combat the coronavirus pandemic, vaccines have certainly stolen the spotlight away from tests. But that doesn't mean that there aren't new-and-improved ways to test for COVID-19 rolling out. Just take health authorities in Beijing, China, who have started to use anal swabs to probe for signs of the coronavirus, according to Gizmodo . The Chinese government seem
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The Pandemic Has Erased Entire Categories of Friendship
A few months ago, when millions of Americans were watching the Netflix series Emily in Paris because it was what we had been given that week, I cued up the first episode and was beset almost immediately by an intense longing. Not for travel, or for opportunities to wear beautiful clothes—two commonly cited high points in an otherwise charmless show—but for sports. Specifically, watching sports in
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Empty seas: Oceanic shark populations dropped 71% since 1970
When marine biologist Stuart Sandin talks about sharks, it sounds like he's describing Jedis of the ocean. "They are terrific predators, fast swimmers and they have amazing senses—they can detect any disturbance in the ocean from great distance," such as smells or tiny changes in water currents.
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How metal atoms can arrange themselves on an insulator
In order to produce tiny electronic memories or sensors in the future, it is essential to be able to arrange individual metal atoms on an insulating layer. Scientists at Bielefeld University's Faculty of Chemistry have now demonstrated that this is possible at room temperature: molecules of the metal-containing compound molybdenum acetate form an ordered structure on the insulator calcite without
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Scientists propose novel bifunctional catalysts on biomass-derived carbon
Environmentally friendly energy-conversion technologies, such as fuel cells and water-splitting systems, have attracted considerable attention. However, application of these electrochemical devices is hindered due to the high energy barrier of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER).
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Studies provide answers about promising 2-D materials
Two-dimensional, layered materials hold great promise for a number of applications, such as alternative platforms for the next-generation of logic and memory devices and flexible energy storage devices. There's still much, however, that remains unknown about them.
4h
Ions in molten salts can go 'against the flow'
In a new article published in the scientific journal Communications Chemistry, a research group at Uppsala University show, using computer simulations, that ions do not always behave as expected. In their research on molten salts, they were able to see that, in some cases, the ions in the salt mixture they were studying affect one another so much that they may even move in the "wrong" direction –
4h
Check out the double-rotor helicopter that could be the US Army's next Black Hawk
The Defiant X employs two coaxial rotors up top, with a propeller in the back to help it accelerate and decelerate. (Sikorsky/Boeing/) The Defiant X is a sleek, futuristic helicopter that's designed to go fast and far. While it doesn't exist as a production aircraft, it's one of two candidates that could be the new Black-Hawk-type helicopter for the U.S. Army. This machine, which is made by Sikor
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Best fitness tracker: Hit your health goals and sleep better with these picks
Whether you're looking for sleep trackers, a traditional wearable, or heart rate monitors, look no further. (Cameron Venti via Unsplash/) The very first fitness trackers were rudimentary step-counters, but technology has advanced since then. Now, whether you want to hit that 10,000 daily step goal, monitor your sleep, or train in a specific heart rate zone, there's a wrist-mounted wearable for yo
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Well connected through amides
Linking molecular components through amide bonds is one of the most important reactions in research and the chemical industry. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new type of reaction for making amide bonds. Called an ASHA ligation, this reaction is fast, efficient, works under mild aqueous conditions, and is broadly applicable.
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Olika personligheter i svamparnas värld
Svampar besitter individuella karaktärsdrag, och deras hyfer (enskilda svamptrådar i jorden) beter sig på olika sätt när de utforskar och tar sig fram genom jordens mikroskopiska labyrinter. I jakt på föda. Det är forskare vid Uppsala universitet som undersökt hyfers beteende hos olika svamparter. Studierna är gjorda i laboratorium och de underjordiska gångarna har tillverkats syntetiskt av silik
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The Number of Americans Who Want a COVID Vaccine Is Slowly Growing
Despite the fact that the coronavirus pandemic has killed nearly 420,000 people in the United States, Americans are still shockingly reluctant to actually get the vaccine once it becomes available to them. But the number that are willing is slowly growing. The Kaiser Family Foundation's COVID-19 Vaccine Monitor released new poll findings on Wednesday that show an overall decline in vaccine hesita
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I spoke to 99 big thinkers about what our 'world after coronavirus' might look like – this is what I learned
Back in March, my colleagues at the Frederick S. Pardee Center for the Study of the Longer-Range Future at Boston University thought that it might be useful to begin thinking about "the day after coronavirus." For a research center dedicated to longer-term thinking, it made sense to ask what our post-COVID-19 world might look like. In the months that followed, I learned many things. Most importan
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A technique to sift out the universe's first gravitational waves
In the moments immediately following the Big Bang, the very first gravitational waves rang out. The product of quantum fluctuations in the new soup of primordial matter, these earliest ripples through the fabric of space-time were quickly amplified by inflationary processes that drove the universe to explosively expand. Primordial gravitational waves, produced nearly 13.8 billion years ago, still
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5 strategies for cultivating hope this year
The raging coronavirus pandemic, along with political turbulence and uncertainty, have overwhelmed many of us. From almost the start of 2020, people have been faced with bleak prospects as illness, death , isolation and job losses became unwelcome parts of our reality. Early in the year, many of us watched in horror and despair as insurgents stormed the U.S. Capitol . Indeed, all through these ti
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Wikipedia at 20: Why it often overlooks stories of women in history
Movements like #MeToo have drawn increased attention to the systemic discrimination facing women in a range of professional fields, from Hollywood and journalism to banking and government. Discrimination is also a problem on user-driven sites like Wikipedia. Wikipedia's 20th birthday is on Jan. 15, 2021 and today it is the thirteenth most popular website worldwide . In December 2020, the online e
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Culture shapes willingness to share personal data to reduce COVID-19 spread
Culture, civic-mindedness and privacy concerns influence how willing people are to share personal location information to help stem the transmission of COVID-19 in their communities, a new study finds. Such sharing includes giving public health authorities access to their geographic information via data gathered from phone calls, mobile apps, credit card purchases, wristband trackers or other tech
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COVID's attack on the brain may explain odd symptoms
Infecting the nasal passages of mice with the virus that causes COVID-19 led to a rapid, escalating attack on the brain that triggered severe illness, researchers report. The attack happened even after the lungs were successfully clearing themselves of the virus. The findings have implications for understanding the wide range in symptoms and severity of illness among humans who are infected by SA
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A monotreme-like auditory apparatus in a Middle Jurassic haramiyidan
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03137-z A fossil of the Middle Jurassic haramiyidan Vilevolodon diplomylos with a well-preserved malleus, incus and ectotympanic sheds light on the evolutionary transition from a dual to a single function for the ossicles in mammals.
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Systematic analysis of binding of transcription factors to noncoding variants
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03211-0 An ultra-high-throughput multiplex protein–DNA binding assay is used to assess binding of 270 human transcription factors to 95,886 noncoding variants in the human genome, providing data to improve prediction of the effects of noncoding variants on transcription factor binding and thereby increase understanding of molecular
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Palaeoclimate puzzle explained by seasonal variation
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00115-x Scientists have long been baffled by the mismatch of climate simulations of the past 12,000 years with temperature reconstructions from geological records. It now emerges that seasonal biases in the records explain the disparity.
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Measuring the α-particle charge radius with muonic helium-4 ions
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03183-1 The 2S–2P transitions in muonic helium-4 ions are measured using laser spectroscopy and used to obtain an α-particle charge-radius value five times more precise than that from electron scattering.
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Integrated spatial genomics reveals global architecture of single nuclei
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03126-2 Multiplexed imaging of 3,660 chromosomal loci in individual mouse embryonic stem cells by DNA seqFISH+ with immunofluorescence of 17 chromatin marks and subnuclear structures reveals invariant organization of loci within individual cells, and heterogeneous and long-lived distinct combinatorial chromatin states in cellular s
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Helium nucleus measured with record precision
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00120-0 The size of the helium nucleus has been determined using exotic helium atoms in which one electron has been replaced with its heavier cousin, a muon. The result sheds light on a decade-old puzzle regarding the proton radius.
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Metastability of diamond ramp-compressed to 2 terapascals
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03140-4 X-ray diffraction measurements of solid carbon compressed to pressures of about two terapascals (approximately twenty million atmospheres) find that carbon retains a diamond structure even under these extreme conditions.
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Half a century of global decline in oceanic sharks and rays
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-020-03173-9 The global abundance of oceanic sharks and rays has decreased by 71% since 1970 and 24 species are threatened with extinction owing to a concomitant increase in fishing pressure.
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New-found brake calibrates insulin action in β-cells
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00141-9 Insulin is produced by pancreatic β-cells. The identification of a regulator of insulin signalling in these cells cements the long-standing idea that this pathway has a key role in β-cell biology.
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Lend an ear to a classic tale of mammalian evolution
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00064-5 Newly discovered fossil evidence has led to a re-evaluation of one of the fundamental transitions in mammalian evolution: the transformation of bones of the lower jaw into those of the middle ear.
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Single-neuronal predictions of others' beliefs in humans
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03184-0 Recordings of cells in the human dorsomedial prefrontal cortex identify a population of neurons that encode information about others' beliefs and distinguish them from self-belief-related representations, providing insight into cellular-level processing underlying human theory of mind.
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Antibodies periodically wax and wane in survivors of Ebola
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-020-03044-3 For those fortunate enough to have survived a deadly disease, a vital question remains: how long does their hard-earned immunity last? Tracking of antibodies in Ebola survivors reveals a surprising pattern.
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METTL3 regulates heterochromatin in mouse embryonic stem cells
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03210-1 Binding of METTL3 to chromatin is enriched over IAP family endogenous retroviral elements in mouse embryonic stem cells, helping to ensure the integrity of heterochromatin at these elements.
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Elon Musk's Mom Says She Knew He Was a Genius at Age Three
Proud Mommy In a new interview with People magazine , Elon Musk's mother Maye Musk said that she knew the Tesla and SpaceX CEO was destined to do great things from an early age. "Well at three, I knew he was a genius, but you still don't know if he's going to do great things," Maye told People . "Because many geniuses end up in a basement being a genius but not applying it," she said. "So I was s
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The Breakout Pop Song of the Year Is a Cinematic Universe
I'm not proud to say that my first reaction to Olivia Rodrigo's "Drivers License," the ballad that seemed to come out of nowhere to break streaming records in the first month of 2021, was, That's it? Rodrigo, a 17-year-old Disney actor, sings in the quavery, Lorde-derived vocal style that seemed all too faddish a half-decade ago . Her heartbroken lyrics skip the sort of fun wordplay that Taylor S
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Size of helium nucleus measured more precisely than ever before
In experiments at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, an international research collaboration has measured the radius of the atomic nucleus of helium five times more precisely than ever before. With the aid of the new value, fundamental physical theories can be tested and natural constants can be determined even more precisely. For their measurements, the researchers needed muons—these particles are
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Vaccination Against the New Variants: Real-World Data
We're definitely not out of the pandemic woods yet, and neither is this blog – so let's talk some more about antibodies today, in the hopes that we're getting closer to the time when I (and all of us) can ignore immunology for a while. But we're not ignoring it today! There's a lot of news, a lot of worry, and a lot of speculation about the variant forms of the coronavirus and what that means for
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Getting to net zero — and even net negative — is surprisingly feasible, and affordable
Reaching zero net emissions of carbon dioxide from energy and industry by 2050 can be accomplished by rebuilding U.S. energy infrastructure to run primarily on renewable energy, at a net cost of about $1 per person per day, according to new research published by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, the University of San Francisco (USF), and the consulting firm Evolved Energy Research.
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Findings may help close door on COVID-19
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) at Galveston have discovered what may be the Achilles' heel of the coronavirus, a finding that may help close the door on COVID-19 and possibly head off future pandemics.
5h
Well connected through amides
Linking molecular components through amide bonds is one of the most important reactions in research and the chemical industry. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced a new type of reaction for making amide bonds. Called an ASHA ligation, this reaction is fast, efficient, works under mild aqueous conditions, and is broadly applicable.
5h
Antibody highs and lows in survivors of Ebola
A high proportion of survivors of Ebola experienced a resurgence in antibody levels nearly a year after recovery, a new University of Liverpool study has found. Published today in Nature, the finding hints that hidden reservoirs of virus could exist long after symptoms ease and has implications for monitoring programmes and vaccine strategies.
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A new study reveals an "Achilles heel" of cancer cells
? For the first time, a study shows how an abnormal number of chromosomes (aneuploidy) – a unique characteristic of cancer cells that researchers have known about for decades – can become a vulnerability of these cells. ? The study could lead, in the future, to the development of drugs that will use this trait to eliminate cancer.
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Scientists identify individual neurons responsible for complex social reasoning in humans
Until now, how neurons represent another individual's belief and thoughts was unknown. Prior to undergoing planned neurosurgery, patients agreed to perform brief behavioral tasks as neuroscientists recorded the activity of individual neurons. The study revealed the basic cellular mechanism involved in a fundamental cognitive process vital to successful social interactions. Now researchers have a f
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Schizophrenia second only to age as greatest risk factor for COVID-19 death
People with schizophrenia, a mental disorder that affects mood and perception of reality, are almost three times more likely to die from the coronavirus than those without the psychiatric illness, a new study shows. Their higher risk, the investigators say, cannot be explained by other factors that often accompany serious mental health disorders, such as higher rates of heart disease, diabetes, an
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Top 10 insights in climate science in 2020 selected by 57 leading global researchers
In a report presented today to Patricia Espinosa, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), report authors outlined some of 2020's most important findings within the field of climate science, ranging from improved models that reveal the need for aggressive emission cuts in order to meet the Paris Agreement to the growing use of human rights litigati
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Scientists find new mechanism to keep cell death pathway suppressed
A research group led by Prof. Hiroyasu Nakano at the Department of Biochemistry, Toho University Faculty of Medicine, identified Mind bomb-2 (MIB2) as an enzyme that ubiquitinates and modifies the protein cFLIP, which plays a central role in suppressing cell death. This finding indicates that ubiquitination of cFLIP by MIB2 plays an essential role in suppressing caspase 8-mediated cell death, sugg
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Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
A research group from Kumamoto University (Japan) has developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespans using nematodes (C. elegans). Based on qualitative differences in lifespans, this system can classify populations of nematodes that are, on average, healthy and long-lived, healthy and die prematurely, and living with long periods of poor health. Since there are many similari
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New study identifies bird species that could spread ticks and Lyme disease
Birds play an underrecognized role in spreading tickborne disease due to their capacity for long-distance travel and tendency to split their time in different parts of the world—patterns that are shifting due to climate change. Knowing which bird species are able to infect ticks with pathogens can help scientists predict where tickborne diseases might emerge and pose a health risk to people.
5h
Scientists find new mechanism to keep cell death pathway suppressed
A research group led by Prof. Hiroyasu Nakano at the Department of Biochemistry, Toho University Faculty of Medicine, identified Mind bomb-2 (MIB2) as an enzyme that ubiquitinates and modifies the protein cFLIP, which plays a central role in suppressing cell death. This finding indicates that ubiquitination of cFLIP by MIB2 plays an essential role in suppressing caspase 8-mediated cell death, sugg
5h
Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
A research group from Kumamoto University (Japan) has developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespans using nematodes (C. elegans). Based on qualitative differences in lifespans, this system can classify populations of nematodes that are, on average, healthy and long-lived, healthy and die prematurely, and living with long periods of poor health. Since there are many similari
5h
New study identifies bird species that could spread ticks and Lyme disease
Birds play an underrecognized role in spreading tickborne disease due to their capacity for long-distance travel and tendency to split their time in different parts of the world—patterns that are shifting due to climate change. Knowing which bird species are able to infect ticks with pathogens can help scientists predict where tickborne diseases might emerge and pose a health risk to people.
5h
Newly discovered fossil named after paleontologist
A newly discovered trace fossil of an ancient burrow has been named after University of Alberta paleontologist Murray Gingras. The fossil, discovered by a former graduate student, has an important role to play in gauging how salty ancient bodies of water were, putting together a clearer picture of our planet's past.
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Humanizing yeast ORC sheds light on cancer therapy and human development
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKSUST) and the University of Hong Kong (HKU) recently demonstrated that the selectivity determinant of Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) for DNA binding lies in a 19-amino acid insertion helix in the Orc4 subunit, which is present in yeast but absent in human. Removal of this motif from Orc4 transforms the yeast ORC, which select
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Sharks and rays are far less abundant in the world's oceans than 50 years ago
Researchers have been observing serious declines in oceanic and coastal shark populations around the Atlantic Ocean and in the waters off of South Africa and Australia for decades. (Pixabay/) Over the past half-century, oceanic sharks and rays have diminished around the globe, an international team of scientists reported on January 27 in the journal Nature . The researchers analyzed records datin
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Humanizing yeast ORC sheds light on cancer therapy and human development
Researchers from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKSUST) and the University of Hong Kong (HKU) recently demonstrated that the selectivity determinant of Origin Recognition Complex (ORC) for DNA binding lies in a 19-amino acid insertion helix in the Orc4 subunit, which is present in yeast but absent in human. Removal of this motif from Orc4 transforms the yeast ORC, which select
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Deep-sea plastic accumulations by turbidity currents: NW South China sea
Benthic plastic litter is a main source of pollutants in oceans, but how it disperses is largely unknown. This study by Guangfa Zhong and Xiaotong Peng, published today in Geology, presents novel findings on the distribution patterns and dispersion mechanisms of deep-sea plastic waste in a submarined canyon located in the northwestern South China Sea.
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A vacuum-ultraviolet laser with submicrometer spot for spatially resolved photoemission spectroscopy
If vacuum ultraviolet lasers can be focused into a small beam spot, it will allow investigation of mesoscopic materials and structures and enable the manufacture of nano-objects with excellent precision. Towards this goal, Scientist in China invented a 177 nm VUV laser system that can achieve a sub-micron focal spot at a long focal length. This system can be re-equipped for usage in low-cost angle
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History of the Champagne vineyards revealed
Although the reputation of Champagne is well established, the history of Champagne wines and vineyards is poorly documented. However, a research team led by scientists from the CNRS and the Université de Montpellier at the Institut des sciences de l'évolution de Montpellier has just lifted the veil on this history by analyzing the archaeological grape seeds from excavations carried out in Troyes a
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Climate crisis: world is at its hottest for at least 12,000 years – study
Scientists say temperatures globally at highest level since start of human civilisation The planet is hotter now than it has been for at least 12,000 years, a period spanning the entire development of human civilisation, according to research. Analysis of ocean surface temperatures shows human-driven climate change has put the world in "uncharted territory", the scientists say. The planet may eve
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Hospital incursions by Covid deniers putting lives at risk, say health leaders
Healthcare and police chiefs also say online activity is channelling hatred against NHS staff Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Lives are being put at risk and the care of patients disrupted by a spate of hospital incursions from Covid-19 deniers whose online activity is channelling hatred against NHS staff, say healthcare and police chiefs. In the latest example of a
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History of the Champagne vineyards revealed
Although the reputation of Champagne is well established, the history of Champagne wines and vineyards is poorly documented. However, a research team led by scientists from the CNRS and the Université de Montpellier at the Institut des sciences de l'évolution de Montpellier has just lifted the veil on this history by analysing the archaeological grape seeds from excavations carried out in Troyes a
5h
Even machines need their greens
A tree grows strong from years of generating its own food. Now imagine if products could be strengthened with the same living materials that provide nutrients to strengthen trees. This is the work of USC Viterbi School of Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Professor Qiming Wang whose research lab is one of the first to infuse 3-D printer ink with living material. The material has pote
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Concern over 'worrying' disparities in Covid vaccine coverage in England
Doctors call for extra efforts amid signs black people and those in poor areas are less likely to receive jabs Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Doctors have raised concerns about "worrying" disparities in vaccine coverage in England amid signs black people and those in more deprived areas were less likely to receive the vaccine than others in the first weeks of rollou
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Were there "early warning signs" of COVID-19 on Twitter?
The first human cases of COVID-19 (subsequently named SARS-Cov-2) were first reported by officials in Wuhan City, China, in December 2019. The first cases of the virus in Europe were discovered at the end of January 2020. Although there were really no preventative measures that could have completely stopped the pandemic, a new study takes a retrospective look at the months preceding the rapid spr
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Unique solar system views from NASA sun-studying missions
Though they focus on the star at the center of our solar system, three of NASA's Sun-watching spacecraft have captured unique views of the planets throughout the last several months. Using instruments that look not at the Sun itself, but at the constant outflow of solar material from the Sun, the missions—ESA and NASA's Solar Orbiter, NASA's Parker Solar Probe, and NASA's Solar and Terrestrial Rel
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Biden Commits to Vaccinating 300 Million Americans by End of Summer
President Joe Biden made a bold commitment on Tuesday, promising that the United States will vaccinate 300 million residents against the coronavirus by the end of summer. It's an extremely ambitious timeline, and there are no guarantees he'll succeed. But if the country pulls it off, Americans will finally have a chance of returning to a semblance of normal life. "To a nation waiting for action,
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'Unicorn' Discovery Points to a New Population of Black Holes
Almost a decade ago, Feryal Özel and her colleagues noticed something odd. While a variety of possible black holes had been found in our galaxy, none appeared to fall below a certain size. "There seemed to be a dearth of black holes below 5 solar masses," she said. "Statistically, this was very significant." Since Özel, an astrophysicist at the University of Arizona, published a paper on the prob
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Biden aims for most ambitious US effort on climate change
President Joe Biden on Wednesday was undertaking the most ambitious effort ever to cut America's oil, gas and coal emissions and stave off the worst effects of climate change. New executive orders target federal subsidies for those industries and halt new oil and gas leases on federal lands and waters.
6h
What will the economy look like after the COVID recession?
Controlling COVID is essential to restoring the economy, Lisa Kahn says In a typical recession in the US economy, most job losses are permanent. Only a small percentage are considered temporary, where a worker can reasonably expect to be called back. "The shutdowns are not what have been driving the economic collapse; it's the global pandemic." But Kahn , a professor of economics at the Universit
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Measures used to reduce the spread of COVID found to reduce contacts 50-62 percent in school children
A team of researchers from several institutions in the U.K., one in the U.S. and one in Spain has found that measures to promote social distancing of school children to reduce COVID-19 exposure reduced contacts on average by 50 to 62% in a study of students in British schools. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes conducting interviews with school
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The Night of the Rubber Knives
Forty-five senators voted yesterday not to proceed with a second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. That should come as some relief for the ex-president: Twice impeached, he will likely be twice acquitted. But how much relief? The Senate will still hold a trial. The whole country will again view the video of Trump inciting a crowd to attack Congress as he aimed to coerce his own vice president in
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Video: EDRS: the space data highway
The European Data Relay System, or EDRS, uses cutting-edge laser technology to greatly reduce the time it takes for information to be sent from low-Earth orbiting spacecraft—such as the Earth observing Sentinel satellites—to Earth.
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How an Israeli Startup Is Using AI to Help People Make Babies
The first baby conceived using in-vitro fertilization (IVF) was born in the UK in 1978 . Over 40 years later, the technique has become commonplace, but its success rate is still fairly low at around 22 to 30 percent . A female-founded Israeli startup called Embryonics is setting out to change this by using artificial intelligence to screen embryos. IVF consists of fertilizing a woman's egg with h
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How worried should we be about the new Covid variants? | Sharon Peacock
Scientists are working to find out how to stop the transmission of mutations that started in England, South Africa and Brazil Sharon Peacock is director of the Covid-19 Genomics UK Consortium Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The recent announcement that the Covid variant first detected in the south of England could be more deadly than its predecessor was alarming to e
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Modified mosquitoes could stop Zika virus spread
Using CRISPR gene-editing technology, researchers have produced mosquitoes unable to replicate Zika virus and therefore also unable to infect a human through biting. In 2016, the World Health Organization called the Zika virus epidemic a "public health emergency of international concern" due to the virus causing birth defects for pregnant women in addition to neurological problems. Since then, re
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The Atlantic Daily: The Pandemic Is Finally Softening
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox . After weeks of brutal expansion, the pandemic is finally beginning to let up. The seven-day average of cases is down a third from its mid-January peak. But the U.S. needs to quickly distribute va
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More Evidence Links COVID to Mental Illness, Neurological Disease
Throughout the pandemic, one of the more puzzling aspects of the coronavirus has been the prevalence of new mental or neurological illnesses among COVID-19 patients. Now there's even more evidence linking the two. About one out of every eight coronavirus patients seems to end up getting diagnosed with their first neurological or psychiatric condition within six months, according to new follow-up
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When simpler is harder
Some languages require less neural activity than others. But these are not necessarily the ones we would imagine. In a study published today in the journal PLOS Biology, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown that languages that are often considered 'easy' actually require an enormous amount of work from our brains.
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How fat loss accelerates facial aging
For many of us, as we get older the skin on our face begins to sag and we seem to lose volume around our eyes, cheeks and chin. Is gravity taking its toll in our later years or do we lose fat over the course of several years that many of us associate with youth, vibrancy and energy? Understanding the cause is paramount to how plastic surgeons treat the signs of facial aging.
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Genome-editing tool TALEN outperforms CRISPR-Cas9 in tightly packed DNA
Researchers used single-molecule imaging to compare the genome-editing tools CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN. Their experiments revealed that TALEN is up to five times more efficient than CRISPR-Cas9 in parts of the genome, called heterochromatin, that are densely packed. Fragile X syndrome, sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and other diseases are the result of genetic defects in the heterochromatin.
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Pace of prehistoric human innovation could be revealed by 'linguistic thermometer'
A physics professor has joined forces with language experts to build a 'linguistic thermometer' that can record the temperature of 'hot' or 'cold' (ie fast or slow) developments in modern linguistic features to create a computer-based model that can provide a better understanding of the development in human language and innovation stretching back to pre-history.
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Is watching TV actually a good way to relax?
Tune in and tune out. (Nappy.co/) If you're reading this, you're probably stressed. Never fear: We've dug through the evidence to reveal what science really says about finding zen—and holding onto it through tough times. Want to try meditation ? Take better baths ? Stop anxiety in its tracks ? Welcome to Calm Month . It's a habit clipped straight from a 1950s sitcom: Get home from work, have dinn
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Black parents protect children's privacy through home schooling, research shows
Privacy is among the most cherished of American rights. Yet, one of society's most vulnerable populations—Black children—are denied the benefits of the right to privacy through discriminatory educational practices, and a growing number of Black parents are turning to home education to protect that right, according to a University of Kansas privacy law scholar.
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A new way to measure record-setting electron beams
Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) are figuring out new ways to accelerate electrons to record-high energies over record-short distances with a technique that uses laser pulses and exotic matter known as a plasma. But measuring the properties of the high-energy electron beams produced in laser-plasma acceleration experiments has prove
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Newly discovered molecule disrupts virus infections through protein quality control pathways
A chemical probe molecule—a "first gen" molecule that can be used for drug development—that targets a host cell's protein quality control pathways can dramatically reduce infection by Dengue and Zika viruses. The research led by Lars Plate, assistant professor of chemistry and biological sciences, is a significant step toward host-directed antiviral therapeutics that act on host cells and not the
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Simulating cities under pandemic conditions to make predictions about future outbreaks
An international team of researchers has used modeling techniques borrowed from chemistry applications to create a new kind of city simulator. In their paper published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society A, the group describes using their models to create simulations of of COVID-19 spread for two real-world cities: Birmingham England and Bogota Columbia.
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Genome-editing tool TALEN outperforms CRISPR-Cas9 in tightly packed DNA
Researchers used single-molecule imaging to compare the genome-editing tools CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN. Their experiments revealed that TALEN is up to five times more efficient than CRISPR-Cas9 in parts of the genome, called heterochromatin, that are densely packed. Fragile X syndrome, sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and other diseases are the result of genetic defects in the heterochromatin.
7h
Toho university scientists find new mechanism to keep cell death pathway suppressed
A research group led by Prof. Hiroyasu Nakano at the Department of Biochemistry, Toho University Faculty of Medicine, identified Mind bomb-2 (MIB2) as an enzyme that ubiquitinates and modifies the protein cFLIP, which plays a central role in suppressing cell death. This finding indicates that ubiquitination of cFLIP by MIB2 plays an essential role in suppressing caspase 8-mediated cell death, sugg
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Even machines need their greens
Image that products could be strengthened with the same living materials that provide nutrients to strengthen trees. Professor Qiming Wang's research lab is one of the first to infuse 3-D printer ink with living material. The material has potential for greater strength, to be flexible and self-heal.
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Healthy lifespan analysis using nematodes
Researchers have developed an automated measurement system to assess healthy lifespan using nematodes. This system performs a mini-population analysis to classify specific populations of nematodes based on qualitative differences in lifespan. Since there are many similarities between the mechanisms that determine the lifespan of nematodes and humans, this system could make it easier to develop dru
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Why people overuse antibiotics
The overuse of antibiotics occurs due to the mistaken widespread belief that they are beneficial for a broad array of conditions and because many physicians are willing to prescribe antibiotics if patients ask for the medication, according to a Rutgers study.
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A vacuum-ultraviolet laser with submicrometer spot for spatially resolved photoemission spectroscopy
If vacuum ultraviolet lasers can be focused into a small beam spot, it will allow investigation of mesoscopic materials and structures and enable the manufacture of nano-objects with excellent precision. Towards this goal, Scientist in China invented a 177 nm VUV laser system that can achieve a sub-micron focal spot at a long focal length. This system can be re-equipped for usage in low-cost ARPES
7h
Newly discovered molecule disrupts virus infections through protein quality control pathways
A chemical probe molecule—a "first gen" molecule that can be used for drug development—that targets a host cell's protein quality control pathways can dramatically reduce infection by Dengue and Zika viruses. The research led by Lars Plate, assistant professor of chemistry and biological sciences, is a significant step toward host-directed antiviral therapeutics that act on host cells and not the
7h
How chromosomes evolve to create new forms of life
3-D printing is a universal process in the sense that pretty much any part that can be drawn up in a CAD program can be printed, at least within a certain resolution. Machining a part on a mill or lathe, while having the advantage of greater accuracy and material options, is a slightly less universal process in that many possible designs that exist in theory could never be machined. A hollow spher
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How chromosomes evolve to create new forms of life
3-D printing is a universal process in the sense that pretty much any part that can be drawn up in a CAD program can be printed, at least within a certain resolution. Machining a part on a mill or lathe, while having the advantage of greater accuracy and material options, is a slightly less universal process in that many possible designs that exist in theory could never be machined. A hollow spher
7h
How the Pandemic Stoked a Backlash to Multilevel Marketing
For decades, multilevel-marketing companies had it easy. Cutco knives, Tupperware containers, and Pampered Chef bread mixes were inoffensive products sold at weeknight wine parties and, later, in themed Facebook groups. For the most part, they were an unremarkable part of women's lives . Multilevel marketing—a form of direct selling in which a major chunk of a person's income comes not from the s
7h
Astronomers discover new candidate redback millisecond pulsar
Astronomers report the finding of a new candidate redback millisecond pulsar (MSP) binary associated with a gamma-ray source known as 4FGL J0940.3–7610. The newly found object is a short-period compact binary exhibiting X-ray emission that consists of a low-mass neutron star and a companion star with a mass most likely over 0.4 solar masses. The discovery is detailed in a paper published January 2
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What Can the DOE Actually Do on Climate?
President Biden's nominee to lead the Department of Energy would control powerful levers to promote clean-energy technologies, though that's not the agency's only job. Still, here are five possible steps.
8h
High-resolution structures of the archaerhodopsin-3 protein shed new light on receptor desensitization
For the first time, an international team of researchers has visualized the light-sensitive protein archaerhodopsin-3 (AR3) at unprecedented resolution using the I24 and B23 beamlines at Diamond Light Source. The photoreceptor is expressed by Halorubrum sodomense, an organism that grows in the Dead Sea, but is best known for its applications in optogenetics experiments, in which it is used to sile
8h
BASE opens up new possibilities in the search for cold dark matter
The Baryon Antibaryon Symmetry Experiment (BASE) at CERN's Antimatter Factory has set new limits on the existence of axion-like particles, and how easily those in a narrow mass range around 2.97 neV could turn into photons, the particles of light. BASE's new result, published by Physical Review Letters, describes this pioneering method and opens up new experimental possibilities in the search for
8h
How climate caprices can trigger plants
Plants and other organisms can adapt their phenotypes to fluctuating environmental conditions within certain limits. The leaves of the dandelion, for example, are much more small in sunny locations than in shady places. In the sun, less leaf area is adequate to drive sufficient photosynthesis. This makes sense and is part of the dandelion's genetic programming.
8h
High-resolution structures of the archaerhodopsin-3 protein shed new light on receptor desensitization
For the first time, an international team of researchers has visualized the light-sensitive protein archaerhodopsin-3 (AR3) at unprecedented resolution using the I24 and B23 beamlines at Diamond Light Source. The photoreceptor is expressed by Halorubrum sodomense, an organism that grows in the Dead Sea, but is best known for its applications in optogenetics experiments, in which it is used to sile
8h
Surprising behavior of transcription factors challenges theories of gene regulation
How cells develop and the diseases that arise when development goes wrong have been a decades-long research focus in the laboratory of Distinguished Professor of Biology Ellen Rothenberg. In particular, the lab studies the development of immune cells known as T cells, which act as "intelligence agents"—they circulate throughout the body, detect threats, and determine what kind of response the immu
8h
Surprising behavior of transcription factors challenges theories of gene regulation
How cells develop and the diseases that arise when development goes wrong have been a decades-long research focus in the laboratory of Distinguished Professor of Biology Ellen Rothenberg. In particular, the lab studies the development of immune cells known as T cells, which act as "intelligence agents"—they circulate throughout the body, detect threats, and determine what kind of response the immu
8h
Detecting trace amounts of multiple classes of antibiotics in foods
Widespread use of antibiotics in human healthcare and livestock husbandry has led to trace amounts of the drugs ending up in food products. Long-term consumption could cause health problems, but it's been difficult to analyze more than a few antibiotics at a time because they have different chemical properties. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have deve
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Clicks on a job site reveal hiring discrimination
Scientists have leveraged big data from recruitment platforms and machine learning to study hiring discrimination. They find that discrimination against immigrants depends, among other things, on the time of day, and that both men and women face discrimination. This type of discrimination violates the principle of equal opportunities. For those affected, this may have long-term disadvantages, suc
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CRISPR vs TALEN
There are more than one genetic engineering technologies available. Here's a comparison. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
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Detecting trace amounts of multiple classes of antibiotics in foods
Widespread use of antibiotics in human healthcare and livestock husbandry has led to trace amounts of the drugs ending up in food products. Long-term consumption could cause health problems, but it's been difficult to analyze more than a few antibiotics at a time because they have different chemical properties. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have deve
8h
Ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs could improve SARS-CoV-2 test sensitivity
Rapid, sensitive diagnosis of COVID-19 is essential for early treatment, contact tracing and reducing viral spread. However, some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 receive false-negative test results, which might put their and others' health at risk. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs that could reduce the number of false-negative tests by
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När det inte riktigt är Parkinson
Ibland visar sig det som först kunde tolkas som Parkinsons sjukdom bero på något annat och betydligt mer aggressivt. Forskarna kallar det atypisk parkinsonism och jobbar intensivt med att förstå de bakomliggande mekanismerna. De flesta av oss vet ungefär vad Parkinson är. Sjukdomen uppstår när kroppen inte klarar att producera tillräckligt med dopamin, en signalsubstans som hjärnans celler använd
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Putting bugs on the menu, safely
The thought of eating insects is stomach turning for many, but new Edith Cowan University (ECU) research is shedding light on allergy causing proteins which could pose serious health risks for those suffering from shellfish allergy.
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A CubeSat will test out water as a propulsion system
Novel propulsion systems for CubeSats have been on an innovative tear of late. UT has reported on propulsion systems that use everything from solid iodine to the Earth's own magnetic field as a way of moving a small spacecraft. Now, there is a potential solution using a much more mundane material for a propellant—water.
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Så påverkas älgar av jakt med löshund
Jakt med löshund ökar älgens energiförbrukning, vilket på sikt kan öka risken för negativa effekter på kroppskonditionen. Men, om störningarna inte upprepas frekvent, verkar älgen kunna kompensera energiförlusten med att vila och använda mindre energi dagen efter jakt. Runt 80 000 älgar fälls varje år i Sverige, och merparten av dessa jagas med hund. Genom att mäta hjärtfrekvens, kroppstemperatur
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How to use advanced editing tools without ruining your photos
There's something utterly wrong with this photo. (Harry Guinness/) With great editing power comes great responsibility—the more easily you can change things about your photos, the more carefully you have to do it. Over the past few years image editing tools have gotten more advanced, more user-friendly, and, in some cases, even completely automatic . Now, with a few clicks you can swap the sky in
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Ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs could improve SARS-CoV-2 test sensitivity
Rapid, sensitive diagnosis of COVID-19 is essential for early treatment, contact tracing and reducing viral spread. However, some people infected with SARS-CoV-2 receive false-negative test results, which might put their and others' health at risk. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Nano Letters have developed ultra-absorptive nanofiber swabs that could reduce the number of false-negative tests by
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Researchers reveal recipe for engineering ribosomes
Ribosomes are complex molecular machines in the cell that catalyze the production of proteins. Ahmed Badran, a Broad Fellow at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, and his lab aim to engineer new kinds of ribosomes that generate proteins with novel properties.
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OSIRIS-REx mission plans for May asteroid departure
Since its launch in September 2016, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft has traveled billions of miles, mapped the surface of an asteroid in unprecedented detail, and made new scientific discoveries about near-Earth asteroids. Now, it's preparing to bring a piece of asteroid Bennu home.
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Mathematical model verifies a correct understanding of epidemic's severity
A research team led by City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has built a mathematical model to explore and analyze the relationship between disease transmission, people's awareness about the disease and their resulting behaviors, as well as information spread by the mass media and opinion leaders. The research may shed some insights on responding to COVID-19 and other similar infectious diseases.
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How blood stem cells maintain their lifelong potential for self-renewal
A characteristic feature of all stem cells is their ability to self-renew. But how is this potential maintained throughout life? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Technology and Experimental Medicine (HI-STEM) have now discovered in mice that cells in the so-called stem cell niche are responsible for this: Blood vessel cells of the ni
8h
Ancient proteins help track early milk drinking in Africa
Tracking milk drinking in the ancient past is not straightforward. For decades, archaeologists have tried to reconstruct the practice by various indirect methods. They have looked at ancient rock art to identify scenes of animals being milked and at animal bones to reconstruct kill-off patterns that might reflect the use of animals for dairying. More recently, they even used scientific methods to
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Philippine forest trees threatened by deforestation and climate change
The tree species in the Dipterocarpaceae family dominate many tropical forest formations in Southeast Asia (see Figure 1). The Philippines is home to more than 50 dipterocarp tree species, of which 25 cannot be found anywhere else on Earth. About 97% of the Philippines' tropical forest have been subjected to logging activities, and are often converted to other land uses such as for agriculture. He
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Arctic ocean expedition advances climate modeling
As the climate warms and Arctic sea ice retreats, more research vessels and commercial ships are sailing into the Arctic Ocean, but the accuracy and sensitivity of regional weather and marine forecasts for these hazardous waters still lag well behind those of their lower-latitude counterparts, with significant differences between regional models. Direct measurements of atmospheric conditions, such
8h
How blood stem cells maintain their lifelong potential for self-renewal
A characteristic feature of all stem cells is their ability to self-renew. But how is this potential maintained throughout life? Scientists at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Technology and Experimental Medicine (HI-STEM) have now discovered in mice that cells in the so-called stem cell niche are responsible for this: Blood vessel cells of the ni
9h
Philippine forest trees threatened by deforestation and climate change
The tree species in the Dipterocarpaceae family dominate many tropical forest formations in Southeast Asia (see Figure 1). The Philippines is home to more than 50 dipterocarp tree species, of which 25 cannot be found anywhere else on Earth. About 97% of the Philippines' tropical forest have been subjected to logging activities, and are often converted to other land uses such as for agriculture. He
9h
SpaceX's Newest Starlink Satellites Have Space Lasers
What a SpaceX Starlink satellite looks like in orbit. SpaceX made history recently when it launched a record 143 satellites on a single rocket . Among the plethora of spacecraft were ten new Starlink internet satellites. According to CEO Elon Musk, these are the first nodes in SpaceX's network that have fully operational laser communication systems , allowing the satellites to talk to each other
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AstraZeneca denies pulling out of talks as EU Covid vaccine row deepens
Latest round of crunch talks to discuss breakdown in supplies still happening, says spokesman Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Britain is on a collision course with the EU over vaccine shortages after Brussels refused to accept that people in the UK have first claim on Oxford/AstraZeneca doses produced in local plants. The EU's health commissioner outright dismissed o
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Here are five ways the government could have avoided 100,000 Covid deaths | Devi Sridhar
The UK needs to learn from the lessons of the past year and come up with a concrete plan to avert a disastrous third wave Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Yesterday Britain passed a grim milestone. A further 1,631 deaths from Covid-19 were recorded, taking the official tally above 100,000, though data from the Office for National Statistics suggests the total number w
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How epidemiology has shaped the COVID pandemic
Nature, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-00183-z Nature's third progress report, coming at the end of the pandemic's first year, highlights key findings from epidemiology — from sounding the early alarm to following the impact of new variants.
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The Great Free-Speech Reversal
Updated at 9:33 a.m. ET on January 27, 2021. There is a rich historical irony to the fact that today, conservatives are the ones who argue most forcefully that the decisions by private companies to "deplatform" certain speakers threaten what President Donald Trump described in 2020 as the " bedrock " American right to freedom of speech. Until very recently, this was an argument made almost exclus
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Why You Can't Just Get Vaccinated at Your Doctor's Office
The Grants Pass Clinic in southern Oregon is more than ready to administer the COVID-19 vaccine to its 20,000-some patients. It has seven exam rooms devoted to vaccination. The staff has ordered fridges and syringes. The phones ring nonstop, with patients calling to ask when they can come in to get their shot. But the clinic has barely any doses to give out. Christi Siedlecki, the CEO of the clin
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The Victims Left Behind by Genetic Genealogy
The victims of the so-called Golden State Killer lived in subdivisions and middle-class neighborhoods. They included a nurse, a medical student, a bank loan officer, and a lawyer shortlisted for a county-court judgeship. Investigators puzzled over these cold cases for more than 30 years. Then, in April 2018, their efforts finally paid off when they identified a suspect, a 72-year-old former polic
9h
Rymdsten orsakade meteoritfall
Den bolid, rymdsten, som lyste upp himlen över Mellansverige i november förra året gav upphov till ett meteoritfall. Det bekräftar forskare efter att fragment av rymdstenen har hittats och undersökts. Det är det första svenska fyndet efter ett observerat meteoritfall på över 66 år. Klockan 22.27 den 7 november lystes himlen upp under cirka tre sekunder över stora delar av östra Svealand. I västra
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Indonesia's Most Active Volcano Erupts
Indonesia, an archipelago of 270 million people, sits along the Pacific "Ring of Fire," which leaves the country prone to earthquakes, tsunamis and eruptions. (Image credit: Agung Supriyanto/AFP via Getty Images)
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Vaccinated People Are Going to Hug Each Other
When Americans began receiving coronavirus vaccines last month, people started fantasizing about the first thing they'd do when the pandemic ends: go back to work, visit family, hug friends. But the public discussion soon shifted. One news article after another warned about everything that could go wrong: Protection isn't immediate; vaccinated people can still transmit the virus; vaccinated peopl
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China starts using anal swabs to test 'high-risk' people for Covid
Method can increase detection rate among infected people, senior Beijing doctor tells state TV Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage China has begun using anal swabs to test those it considers to be at high risk of contracting Covid-19, state TV has reported. Officials took anal swabs from residents of neighbourhoods with confirmed Covid-19 cases in Beijing last week, acco
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Most poor nations 'will take until 2024 to achieve mass Covid-19 immunisation'
Forecast predicts handful of developed countries fully vaccinated by late 2021 while others race to catch up Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Most poor countries will not achieve mass Covid-19 immunisation until at least 2024 and some may never get there, according to a new forecast, which maps a starkly divided world over the next few years in which a handful of deve
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'Immortal time bias' fells JAMA journal asthma paper
One of the many fun things about reporting on retractions is that we get to expand our statistical knowledge. To wit, follow along as we explore the concept of immortal time bias. A JAMA journal has retracted and replaced a paper by authors at the University of Massachusetts after another researcher identified a critical statistical … Continue reading
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This is how America gets its vaccines
After just a week in office, the Biden administration is already under immense public pressure to fix America's mangled vaccine rollout. Operation Warp Speed injected enormous sums into developing vaccines but left most of the planning—and cost—of administering them to states, which are now having to cope with the fallout. The reliance on chronically underfunded health departments has exposed a t
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Not obese after all: Captive Asian elephants less fat than average human
When Daniella Chusy, currently at Indiana University, U.S., learned that many captive elephants were thought to be overweight and that their low birth rates suggested that they may be facing a fertility crisis, she began seeing parallels with the obesity crisis humans face currently. But no one had actually measured how much fat captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in zoos carry. "I was inter
11h
Not obese after all: Captive Asian elephants less fat than average human
When Daniella Chusy, currently at Indiana University, U.S., learned that many captive elephants were thought to be overweight and that their low birth rates suggested that they may be facing a fertility crisis, she began seeing parallels with the obesity crisis humans face currently. But no one had actually measured how much fat captive Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in zoos carry. "I was inter
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NiH-catalyzed asymmetric hydroarylation of N-acyl enamines to chiral benzylamines
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20888-5 Chiral benzylamines are found in many pharmacologically active molecules. Here, the authors report an enantio- and regio-selective reductive hydroarylation of N-acyl enamines with a NiH/chiral bis-imidazoline catalytic system affording a range of enantioenriched benzylamines.
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Measurement, manipulation and modeling of brain-wide neural population dynamics
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20371-1 Neural recording technologies increasingly enable simultaneous measurement of neural activity from multiple brain areas. To gain insight into distributed neural computations, a commensurate advance in experimental and analytical methods is necessary. We discuss two opportunities towards this end: the manipula
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LEAFY is a pioneer transcription factor and licenses cell reprogramming to floral fate
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20883-w Pioneer transcription factors access their DNA binding motifs in closed chromatin and often act in cell fate reprogramming. Here, Jin et al. present biochemical evidence for a pioneer factor in plants and show that LFY promotes floral cell fate and locally unlocks chromatin by displacing histone H1 and recrui
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Integrating deep learning CT-scan model, biological and clinical variables to predict severity of COVID-19 patients
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20657-4 The SARS-COV-2 pandemic has put pressure on intensive care units, so that predicting severe deterioration early is a priority. Here, the authors develop a multimodal severity score including clinical and imaging features that has significantly improved prognostic performance in two validation datasets compare
11h
Rpd3/CoRest-mediated activity-dependent transcription regulates the flexibility in memory updating in Drosophila
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20898-x The flexibility of memory updating may be determined in the initial memory consolidation process. Here, the authors show the proteomic changes of the transcriptional repressor complexes required for initial memory consolidation and influencing the flexibility of future memory updating.
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Shadow enhanced self-charging power system for wave and solar energy harvesting from the ocean
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-20919-9 Ubiquitous shadows cast from moving objects in hybrid energy-harvesting systems are undesirable as they degrade the performance of the photovoltaic cells. Here the authors report the shadow of the moving object in a hybrid energy-harvesting system shortens charging time to charge a self-charging power system.
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Structures of the archaerhodopsin-3 transporter reveal that disordering of internal water networks underpins receptor sensitization
Nature Communications, Published online: 27 January 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-020-20596-0 Archaerhodopsin-3 (AR3) mutants are commonly used in optogenetics for neuron silencing and membrane voltage sensing. High-resolution crystal structures show that desensitization of the AR3 photoreceptor occurs when internal hydrogen-bonded water networks are modified in response to changes in chromophore isom
11h
Carbon-chomping soil bacteria may pose hidden climate risk
Much of the earth's carbon is trapped in soil, and scientists have assumed that potential climate-warming compounds would safely stay there for centuries. But new research from Princeton University shows that carbon molecules can potentially escape the soil much faster than previously thought. The findings suggest a key role for some types of soil bacteria, which can produce enzymes that break dow
11h
Genome-editing tool TALEN outperforms CRISPR-Cas9 in tightly packed DNA
Researchers used single-molecule imaging to compare the genome-editing tools CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN. Their experiments revealed that TALEN is up to five times more efficient than CRISPR-Cas9 in parts of the genome, called heterochromatin, that are densely packed. Fragile X syndrome, sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and other diseases are the result of genetic defects in the heterochromatin.
11h
Ancient proteins help track early milk drinking in Africa
Got milk? The 1990s ad campaign highlighted the importance of milk for health and wellbeing, but when did we start drinking the milk of other animals? And how did the practice spread? A new study led by scientists from Germany and Kenya highlights the critical role of Africa in the story of dairying, showing that communities there were drinking milk by at least 6,000 years ago.
11h
Genome-editing tool TALEN outperforms CRISPR-Cas9 in tightly packed DNA
Researchers used single-molecule imaging to compare the genome-editing tools CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN. Their experiments revealed that TALEN is up to five times more efficient than CRISPR-Cas9 in parts of the genome, called heterochromatin, that are densely packed. Fragile X syndrome, sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and other diseases are the result of genetic defects in the heterochromatin.
11h
Genome-editing tool TALEN outperforms CRISPR-Cas9 in tightly packed DNA
Researchers used single-molecule imaging to compare the genome-editing tools CRISPR-Cas9 and TALEN. Their experiments revealed that TALEN is up to five times more efficient than CRISPR-Cas9 in parts of the genome, called heterochromatin, that are densely packed. Fragile X syndrome, sickle cell anemia, beta-thalassemia and other diseases are the result of genetic defects in the heterochromatin.
11h
Carbon-chomping soil bacteria may pose hidden climate risk
Much of the earth's carbon is trapped in soil, and scientists have assumed that potential climate-warming compounds would safely stay there for centuries. But new research from Princeton University shows that carbon molecules can potentially escape the soil much faster than previously thought. The findings suggest a key role for some types of soil bacteria, which can produce enzymes that break dow
11h
With Mass Vaccination, Medical Volunteers Face a New Test
Since the pandemic began, hundreds of Medical Reserve Corps units have deployed volunteers to help with the Covid-19 response. They have since logged hundreds of thousands of volunteer hours, often with little public recognition. But some public health experts say the program is underutilized.
11h
Harpy eagles could be under greater threat than previously thought
Harpy eagles are considered by many to be among the planet's most spectacular birds. They are also among its most elusive, generally avoiding areas disturbed by human activity—therefore already having vanished from portions of its range—and listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as being 'Near-Threatened'.
12h
Harpy eagles could be under greater threat than previously thought
Harpy eagles are considered by many to be among the planet's most spectacular birds. They are also among its most elusive, generally avoiding areas disturbed by human activity—therefore already having vanished from portions of its range—and listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as being 'Near-Threatened'.
12h
The naming of Tooley crater
Like Einstein, Galileo, and Copernicus, former NASA program manager Craig Tooley now has a place on the Moon named in his honor. Tooley crater is a 7 km crater in a permanently shadowed region of Shoemaker crater near the lunar south pole. The new crater designation is official and can be used in journal articles and other publications.
13h
Coronavirus live news: UK to quarantine arrivals from high-risk countries; global Covid cases pass 100m
US states to get boost in vaccine next week ; Germany considering stopping most flights to country ; global coronavirus cases pass 100m UK hotel quarantine system to target travellers from high-risk areas New Zealand: two new cases emerge in people who had left quarantine German government challenges reports on AstraZeneca vaccine Why experts say there is no basis to AstraZeneca jab claims See al
14h
Jigsaw puzzles make you smarter – and I'm living proof | Arwa Mahdawi
Should I worry about my addiction to 1,000-piece brainteasers? Not according to the scientists If you looked at my Google search history (which I would obviously never let anyone do), an alarming percentage of it would consist of variations of: "Is X actually good for you?" With X being whichever bad habit I'm engaged in. The amazing thing about the internet is that you can always find a random s
14h
Secrets of traumatic stress hidden in the brain are exposed
Study explores lateralization changes in resting state brain network functional connectivity. Among military service members and Veterans with symptoms of traumatic stress, asymmetries of network and brain region connectivity patterns were identified prior to usage of HIRREM. A variety of changes in lateralized patterns of brain connectivity were identified post intervention. These laterality find
16h
'You say tomato, I say genomics': Genome sequences for two wild tomato ancestors
A research team led by University of Tsukuba has produced genome sequences for two wild species of tomato from South America, ancestors of the cultivated tomato. The ancestral species contain thousands of genes that are not present in modern types. The novel genes will help plant breeders produce new tomatoes with features like improved disease resistance, increased tolerance for the changing clim
16h
World's largest opinion survey on climate change: Majority call for wide-ranging action
An innovative UNDP global survey conducted in collaboration with Oxford University experts — the largest-ever opinion survey on climate change (1.2 million people in 50 countries) — finds 64% (+/- 2%) deem climate an 'emergency.' Worldwide, most people clearly want a strong and wide-ranging policy response, and 4 of 18 policy options received majority support.Distributed across mobile gaming net
16h
Not everyone has equal access to crucial information that can stop the spread of COVID-19
A newly-published global survey of national health authority websites in nearly 200 countries has directly quantified COVID-19 information accessibility. Only a few of the countries examined fully adhered to internationally recognized accessibility guidelines. Websites from the majority of countries surveyed continue to contain accessibility errors that present significant barriers to people with
17h
Offentlige sites er bagud med tilgængeligheden
23. september 2020 skulle offentlige sites overholde krav om webtilgængelighed. Men siderne får en score på 76 procent i en bred stikprøve, Version2 har udført. Skuffende, mener handicaporganisation. Vi er længst fremme i EU, svarer styrelse.
18h
Reef fish futures foretold
There are markedly different outcomes for different species of coral reef fishes under climate change – scientists are now another step closer to uncovering the 'winners and losers'.
19h
The microbial life of sourdough
In a study of 500 sourdough starters spanning four continents, scientists have garnered new insights into the environmental factors that contribute to each sourdough starter's microbial ecosystem, and how different types of microbes influence both a sourdough's aroma and how quickly the sourdough rises. The results may surprise sourdough enthusiasts.
19h
New control mechanism in innate immune system
Although the protein ITIH4 is found in large amounts in the blood, its function has so far been unknown. By combining many different techniques, researchers have discovered that ITIH4 inhibits proteases in the innate immune system via an unknown mechanism.
19h
Turbulence model could enhance rotorcraft, munitions performance
Design of aerial vehicles and weapon systems relies on the ability to predict aerodynamic behavior, often aided by advanced computer simulations of the flow of air over the body. High-fidelity simulations assist engineers in maximizing how much load a rotorcraft can lift or how far a missile can fly, but these simulations aren't cheap. A new turbulence model could change that.
19h
Simulating 800,000 years of California earthquake history to pinpoint risks
A new study presents a prototype Rate-State earthquake simulator that simulates hundreds of thousands of years of seismic history in California. Coupled with another code, the framework can calculate the amount of shaking that would occur for each quake. The new approach improves the ability to pinpoint how big an earthquake might occur in a given location, allowing building code developers and st
19h
Biologists unravel full sequence of DNA repair mechanism
Researchers have observed the entire sequence in break-induced replication, a method by which organisms from viruses to humans repair breaks in DNA that cannot be fixed otherwise but can introduce or cause genomic rearrangements and mutations contributing to cancer development.
19h
Biodegradable displays for sustainable electronics
Increasing use of electronic devices in consumables and new technologies for the internet of things are increasing the amount of electronic scrap. To save resources and minimize waste volumes, an eco-friendlier production and more sustainable lifecycle will be needed. Scientists have now been the first to produce displays, whose biodegradability has been checked and certified by an independent off
20h
A benchmark for single-electron circuits
Manipulating individual electrons with the goal of employing quantum effects offers new possibilities in electronics. In order to gain new insights into the physical origin and into metrological aspects of the small, but inevitable fundamental uncertainties governed by the rules of quantum mechanics, scientists have collaborated to develop a statistical testing methodology.
20h
Better bundled: New principle for generating x-rays
X-rays are usually difficult to direct and guide. X-ray physicists have developed a new method with which the X-rays can be emitted more precisely in one direction. To do this, the scientists use a structure of thin layers of materials with different densities of electrons to simultaneously deflect and focus the generated beams.
20h
Borderline personality disorder: Don't ignore it
Borderline Personality Disorder is treatable. New research is the first to show that adolescent borderline pathology follows a similar downward course after discharge from inpatient treatment previously demonstrated for adults.
20h
Gel boosts male libido and prevents pregnancy in rats
A new trifunctional contraceptive gel enhanced male libido and prevented pregnancy in 100% of cases when tested with rats, researchers report. They compared the gel, which contains spermicidal, anti-viral, and libido-enhancing agents in one formulation, to a commercially available contraceptive gel that has an average 87% effective rate. "We are using three pharmacological agents in a new formula
20h