Search Posts

Nyheder2021juli01

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

 

KRÆFTBEHANDLING-BILLEDANALYSE FOR DIAGNOSE KAN FORBEDRES VED HJÆLP AF KUNSTIG INTELLIGENS: Doctors have programmed an AI that can help diagnose oesophageal cancer in its early stages. This is important because it is easy to overlook and is hard to treat if not caught early. The AI analyses pictures taken during endoscopy and highlights concerning areas giving doctors second opinion for diagnosis.
How Rumsfeld Deserves to Be Remembered
In 2006, soon after I returned from my fifth reporting trip to Iraq for The New Yorker , a pair of top aides in the George W. Bush White House invited me to lunch to discuss the war. This was a first; until then, no one close to the president would talk to me, probably because my writing had not been friendly and the administration listened only to what it wanted to hear. But by 2006, even the Bu
19h
The 3 Simple Rules That Underscore the Danger of Delta
Fifteen months after the novel coronavirus shut down much of the world, the pandemic is still raging. Few experts guessed that by this point, the world would have not one vaccine but many, with 3 billion doses already delivered. At the same time, the coronavirus has evolved into super-transmissible variants that spread more easily. The clash between these variables will define the coming months a
9h
China Is Building 119 Mysterious Missile Silos in the Desert
Missile Command According to a recent investigation of commercial satellite images, China is constructing about 119 identical missile silos in a desert near the city of Yumen in northwest China. Experts are worried the project could signal a massive expansion of China's nuclear capabilities, as the sites contain the same features observed at other launch facilities capable of launching nuclear-ti
4h
Fibromyalgia may be a condition of the immune system not the brain – study
New research challenges widely held view of the condition and could pave way for better treatment Fibromyalgia – a poorly understood condition that causes widespread pain throughout the body and extreme tiredness – may be caused by be an autoimmune response that increases the activity of pain-sensing nerves throughout the body. The findings, published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation , ch
2h
Trump Is Preparing for the Worst
"How did you go bankrupt?" Bill asked. "Two ways," Mike said. "Gradually and then suddenly." "What brought it on?" "Friends," said Mike. "I had a lot of friends." — Ernest Hemingway, The Sun Also Rises Like Hemingway's Mike Campbell, the Trump Organization is confronting troubles that accumulated gradually and have coalesced suddenly. And once again, friends are at the bottom of it. A grand-jury
1h
A crystal made of electrons
Researchers at ETH Zurich have succeeded in observing a crystal that consists only of electrons. Such Wigner crystals were already predicted almost ninety years ago but could only now be observed directly in a semiconductor material.
5h
Physicists identify energy states of individual atoms following a collision
Physicists at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern in the team of Professor Dr. Herwig Ott have succeeded for the first time in directly observing collisions between highly excited atoms, so-called Rydberg atoms, and atoms in the ground state. Particularly interesting is that they can precisely identify the energy states of the individual atoms, which was impossible until now. The researchers hav
8h
'I usually end up calling an ambulance': why migraine pain is not just a bad headache
The neurological disease affects up to 20% of people, but research funding is sorely lacking. Women are more than three times likely to suffer from it than men My first experience with migraine was when I was a child, pressing a flannel to my mum's head and bringing her a bucket to vomit in, stroking her head as she lay still on her bed in the dark in excruciating pain. These memories are so clea
15h
Scientists urge UK to expand official list of Covid symptoms
UK's narrow clinical definition only includes high fever, continuous cough, or loss of smell and taste Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Senior scientists have called for the UK to expand its official list of Covid symptoms to reduce the number of missed cases and ensure more people know they should self-isolate. The researchers, who include Prof Calum Semple, a member
21h
Pet owners urged to avoid their cats and dogs if they have Covid
Potential risk domestic animals could act as 'reservoir' for virus and reintroduce it to humans, study shows Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Cat or dog owners who have Covid-19 should avoid their pets while infected, experts have said. Scientists in the Netherlands have found coronavirus is common in pet cats and dogs where their owners have the disease. While cases
13h
We need to get rid of business jargon. Do I have your buy-in? | Adrian Chiles
I hate it when language is used to exclude and obscure. But it takes guts to resist My first job in journalism was in business news. This wasn't my first choice; in truth it would probably have been my last, but it was the only place that would have me. I was as bewildered as the next work experience bod but, since I had three weeks there, I thought I might as well try to get to the bottom of the
14h
Meet the Anti-MAGA Trolls
Late in the evening on Christmas Day, the lawyer and Donald Trump loyalist Lin Wood tweeted an elaborate infographic stating his views about the upcoming U.S. Senate runoff election in Georgia. The final tally would be corrupted by Dominion voting machines, it said, and the only way to expose the fraud would be to boycott the election. That would "break the algorithm" by producing a result in whi
7h
Australia 'at back of the queue' for Pfizer Covid vaccines, minister admits
Bulk of Pfizer and other mRNA vaccines expected to arrive in third quarter of this year, despite widespread lockdowns Australia's finance minister has said the country is at the "back of the queue" for Pfizer vaccines, contradicting assurances from the prime minister Scott Morrison and the health minister that "our strategy puts Australia at the front of the queue". Simon Birmingham on Thursday s
14h
Mediterranean diet with oily fish could help reduce migraine frequency
Omega-3 fatty acids linked to reduction of headaches in women, study finds Eating a Mediterranean diet containing lots of oily fish could help to reduce the frequency of migraines in people who suffer from them, data suggests. Roughly 10 million adults in the UK suffer from migraines , with women three times more likely to be affected than men. Although several new treatments have become availabl
22h
The US Military Will Test an Anti-Aging Pill Next Year
Starting next year, the US military's Special Operations Command (SOCOM) will start to test out an experimental pill that it says can actually stave off the effects of aging on soldiers. The experiment, Breaking Defense reports , is part of a push to augment human ability and keep combatants healthy and operating at peak performance for longer. And, pending successful performance and clinical tes
2h
'No one has waited longer': trailblazing female pilot Wally Funk will go to space with Bezos
Funk, who was denied the job of astronaut in the 1960s over her gender, will be the oldest person ever to travel into space Wally Funk, a trailblazing female pilot denied the job of astronaut in the 1960s over her gender, will finally get the chance to fulfill her dreams of going into space. Billionaire and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced Thursday on Instagram that Funk will be part of a four
3h
SpaceX Almost Ready to Move Super Heavy Booster to the Launch Pad
Making Moves SpaceX is inching closer to launching its first Super Heavy booster prototype, a gigantic rocket meant to propel the company's Starship spacecraft into orbit. In an early Thursday morning post on Twitter, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk revealed that the company is about to make some big moves on the project — literally. "Super Heavy moves tomorrow," the billionaire wrote, along with a photo sh
5h
China Isn't That Strategic
The oft-repeated compliment paid to China's leaders is that they "play the long game." Masters of strategic thinking, the narrative goes, Beijing's top cadres are always looking far ahead—planning, preparing, and plotting for the future. If only American politicians and businessmen could see past the next election cycle or quarterly earnings report, the Chinese wouldn't be eating our lunch. But t
10h
In Secret Recording, ExxonMobil Lobbyist Brags About Only Pretending to Care About Climate Change
Out Loud In a stunning undercover investigation, an ExxonMobil senior lobbyist admitted to Greenpeace activists posing as headhunters that the oil company actively fights against climate change legislation behind the scenes — all while pretending to support environmental policies in public. Lobbyist Keith McCoy made a number of startling admissions over a Zoom call, like how ExxonMobil helped dil
28min
After Ban, Chinese Bitcoin Miners Are Flooding the Market With GPUs
Price Drop Getting your hands on a graphics card has been near impossible lately, with cryptocurrency mining and chip shortages eating up all available inventory of graphics processing units (GPUs) and hiking prices to record levels. But there may soon be some respite. China is seriously starting to crack down on crypto mining within its borders, forcing miners to sell off their hardware in recor
1h
Democrats Have One Option Left
Today's Supreme Court decision further weakening the Voting Rights Act affirmed that the only way Democrats can reverse the wave of restrictive voting laws in GOP-controlled states is to pass new federal voting rights by curtailing the Senate filibuster. Congressional action has long seemed the only realistic lever for Democrats to resist red states' surge of voter-suppression laws, which are pas
2h
Covid 'perfect storm' as more patients hit by fungal infections
Weakened lungs and immune systems make people increasingly vulnerable, warn scientists Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A rash of cases of a rare " black fungus " infection affecting thousands of critically ill Covid patients in India caused alarm last month. Now scientists are warning that other dangerous or even deadly fungal infections have spawned in critically il
3h
Astrobiologist Demands Pentagon Release Raw UFO Data
Data Dump In the wake of the military's mostly-inconclusive report on unexplained aerial phenomena (UAP) — the government's rebranded term, essentially, for UFO sightings — scientists are now demanding a closer look at the actual data so they can figure out what's up. NASA Administrator Bill Nelson — who announced this week that he suspects aliens are out there somewhere — recently tasked the spa
3h
The Most Complete Picture Yet of America's Changing Electorate
Can Big Data explain the passion and vitriol of American politics? Like almost everything else in modern life, the choices are multiplying for analysts looking to understand how the key groups in American society divide in presidential elections. Once, researchers and political operatives had only a few options: some postelection academic surveys (particularly the University of Michigan's America
5h
Uber Glitch Makes Drivers Pay for Their own Rides
Wrong Way! Uber's business model, in its most absolutely distilled form, is simple: Car owners can sign up to be algorithmically paired with passengers who need to get across town and, in exchange for their services, get to keep a chunk of the fare . So imagine drivers' surprise when they saw that the Uber platform started to actually charge them money for the rides they were giving passengers —
5h
AI software may help spot early signs of oesophageal cancer
Software in use at an NHS trust could prove a breakthrough in diagnosing one of the deadliest forms of cancer One of the NHS's leading hospital trusts has begun using artificial intelligence to help detect cancer in the gullet, which kills 8,000 Britons a year. It is hoped the technology will increase the number of cases of cancer in the oesophagus that doctors spot. Oesophageal cancer is one of
8h
Deep Space Atomic Clock moves toward increased spacecraft autonomy
Spacecraft that venture beyond our Moon rely on communication with ground stations on Earth to figure out where they are and where they're going. NASA's Deep Space Atomic Clock is working toward giving those far-flung explorers more autonomy when navigating. In a new paper published today in the journal Nature, the mission reports progress in their work to improve the ability of space-based atomic
12h
The Atlantic Daily: Bill Cosby's Release Is Not an Exoneration
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Matt Slocum / AP Bill Cosby is a free man again. The disgraced comedian, accused of sexual assault by dozens of women, today saw his court verdict overturned on a technicality. Cosby's case remain
18h
Flying Car Makes 35-Minute Test Flight Between Cities
Whenever the subject of the future comes up, it's always the same: Where are the flying cars? Well, you could argue that flying cars are finally here. A hybrid aircraft known as the AirCar has just completed its first successful flight between two airports . It's still a prototype, but it only looks a little bit ridiculous. The AirCar's designer, Stefan Klein, piloted the vehicle for an uneventfu
8h
Your guide to what's happening with vaccine passports in the US
A year ago, vaccines to tackle the covid pandemic seemed like a far-off idea. Today, though, doses have been delivered to almost one-quarter of the world's people—and some are being asked to prove they're among them, leading to the rise of so-called vaccine passports . The details of these credentials vary from place to place, but at their heart they are the same: digital health records, stored o
11h
The Happy Patriot, the Unhappy Nationalist
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. "I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection," Thomas Paine wrote in his pamphlet series The American Crisis . It was December 1776, shortly after the onset of the war for independence, and Paine was contemplating the purpose
10h
How Long COVID Keeps Us Sick
Understanding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the population means knowing more than just the total number of infections and deaths. As with many diseases, after the acute infection has passed, a constellation of symptoms known as sequelae can still linger. And while the end of the pandemic is finally coming into view, we're still in the early stages of comprehending post-acute sequelae o
6h
Manufacturing the core engine of cell division
It´s a cellular process going on since one billion years, yet we are not able to replicate it, nor to fully understand it. Mitosis, the mechanism of cell division that is so important for life, involves more that 100 proteins at its core. Now, the group of Andrea Musacchio from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Physiology in Dortmund has been able to fully reconstitute the engine of the mitosi
8h
Elon Musk Bitterly Feuds With CEO He Was Joking With Literally Yesterday
In a planet-scale mood swing, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk berated United Launch Alliance CEO Tony Bruno on Twitter this morning — not even a full 24 hours after jovially offering to bring "a few spare engines" to help the competitor out with the development of its Vulcan heavy launch rocket. When asked if the ULA's Vulcan can compete with the reusability of SpaceX's heavy lift rockets, Bruno argued that
1h
Keep your friends close, cortisol levels low for life
An interdisciplinary team has determined that older adult women converse more effectively with strangers than their younger counterparts; additionally, communicating with female friends decreases stress hormone levels for women across the lifespan.
22h
Vaccines Can Inflame Kids' Hearts, but COVID-19 Is Worse
The most reliable way to inflame the heart is to bother it with a virus. Many types of viruses can manage it— coxsackieviruses , flu viruses, herpesviruses, adenoviruses, even the new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 . Some of these pathogens bust their way straight into cardiac tissue, damaging cells directly; others rile up the immune system so overzealously that the heart gets caught in the crossfire.
4h
Patients need transparency around how new medicines are approved | Ranjana Srivastava
When new treatments are announced, patients are often unaware of the strength of the evidence used to grant regulatory approval One of my most uncomfortable professional moments occurred some years ago when I cared for a successful business owner with advanced cancer . Following a stable period for years, her illness eventually entered a rapid trajectory when successive therapies began failing. I
15h
NASA's Mars Rover Just Reached a New Area and It's Beautiful
Sandy Dunes NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover is making another pit stop on its journey to probe the surrounding Jezero Crater for signs of ancient life. "I've made it to my next lookout, overlooking a spot we're calling 'Séítah,'" the rover's official account tweeted just now . "It's an area of dunes with some good science targets in and around it," the rover added. "I'll spy a few from here, doing
now
The first commercially scalable integrated laser and microcomb on a single chip
Fifteen years ago, an electrical and materials professor pioneered a method for integrating a laser onto a silicon wafer. The technology has since been widely deployed in combination with other silicon photonics devices to replace the copper-wire interconnects that formerly linked servers at data centers, dramatically increasing energy efficiency — an important endeavor at a time when data traffi
20min
Using AI to predict 3D printing processes
Metal additive manufacturing (AM) experiments are slow and expensive. Engineers are using physics-informed neural networks to predict the outcomes of complex processes involved in AM. The team trained the model on supercomputers using experimental and simulated data. They recreated the dynamics of two benchmark experiments in metal AM. The method could lead to fast prediction tools for AM in the f
20min
The key role of astrocytes in cognitive development
Researchers have now uncovered their crucial role in closing the period of brain plasticity that follows birth, finding them to be key to the development of sensory and cognitive faculties. Over the longer term, these findings will make it possible to envisage new strategies for reintroducing brain plasticity in adults, thereby promoting rehabilitation following brain lesions or neurodevelopmental
20min
Earth's cryosphere is shrinking by 87,000 square kilometers per year
The global cryosphere—all of the areas with frozen water on Earth—shrank by about 87,000 square kilometers (about 33,000 square miles, an area about the size of Lake Superior) per year on average between 1979 and 2016, as a result of climate change, according to a new study. This research is the first to make a global estimate of the surface area of the Earth covered by sea ice, snow cover and fro
42min
Greece sizzles on hottest day of year
Greece sizzled Thursday as temperatures topped 43 degrees Celsius (109 Fahrenheit), the year's hottest, with authorities warning the public to stay indoors if possible.
42min
Rethinking plastics
In a new issue of Science, devoted to the plastics problem, University of Delaware researchers LaShanda Korley and Thomas Epps, III, join collaborators in calling for new approaches to plastics design, production and use, with the goal of keeping plastics out of landfills and waterways, reusing the valuable resources they represent indefinitely in a "circular" plastics economy.
46min
Reducing plastic waste will require fundamental change in culture
Plastic waste is considered one of the biggest environmental problems of our time. Researchers surveyed consumers in Germany about their use of plastic packaging. Their research reveals that fundamental changes in infrastructures and lifestyles, as well as cultural and economic transformation processes, are needed to make zero-waste shopping the norm.
48min
Study identifies risk factors for severe COVID-19 in individuals with sickle cell disease
New research finds that certain factors, such as a history of severe pain episodes and coexisting organ conditions, increase the risk of severe COVID-19 illness, including hospitalization, in individuals living with sickle cell disease (SCD). According to researchers, the study results underscore the need for COVID-19 risk reduction strategies and vaccination for this medically vulnerable populati
48min
Multitalented filaments in living cells
Living cells are constantly exposed to a wide variety of mechanical stresses: heart and lungs must withstand expansion and contraction; our skin must be resistant to tearing whilst retaining elasticity; immune cells are squashy so they can move through the body. 'Intermediate filaments' (special protein structures), play an important role here. Researchers have now measured what determines the pro
48min
Cleaner air has boosted US corn and soybean yields, research shows
A key factor in America's prodigious agricultural output turns out to be something farmers can do little to control: Clean air. A new Stanford-led study estimates pollution reductions between 1999 and 2019 contributed to about 20 percent of the increase in corn and soybean yield gains during that period—an amount worth about $5 billion per year.
1h
COVID-19 aggravates antibiotic misuse in India, study finds
Antibiotic sales soared during India's first surge of COVID-19, suggesting that the drugs were inappropriately used to treat mild and moderate COVID-19 infections, according to new research. The excessive usage is especially concerning because antibiotic overuse increases the risk for drug-resistant infections — not just in India, but worldwide.
1h
Good food in a nice setting: Wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Mass-flowering crops such as oilseed rape or faba bean provide valuable sources of food for bees, which, in turn, contribute to the pollination of both the crops and nearby wild plants. But not every arable crop that produces flowers is visited by the same bees. A team investigated how the habitat diversity of the agricultural landscape and the cultivation of different mass-flowering crops affect
1h
Breakthrough CRISPR Gene Therapy Could Be a 'One and Done' Injection
CRISPR gene editing has had a big decade. The technology, which earned two of its discovers a Nobel Prize in 2020, can target and edit genes more easily than its predecessors. Still, as tantalizing (and controversial ) as the technology's been over the years, it's mostly been developed in the lab. That's changing now as a growing number of clinical trials are beginning to test gene therapies in h
1h
UMaine-led study: Imaging spectroscopy can predict water stress in wild blueberry fields
Imaging spectroscopy can help predict water stress in wild blueberry barrens, according to a University of Maine-led study. Researchers deployed a drone with a spectrometer to photograph wild blueberry fields, then process the images to measure reflected light spectra from plants for properties that would help them estimate water potential. Incorporating data from the images into models allowed th
1h
Can 'couples therapy' bring red and blue Americans together?
Workshops that resemble couples therapy left college students less politically polarized, report researchers. Thanks to countless recent surveys and studies, it is now a widely accepted fact that the ideological chasm between Republicans and Democrats today has grown larger than at any other time in American history, save for the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. Many believe the two parties are
1h
A dynamical model for generating synthetic data to quantify active tactile sensing behavior in the rat [Neuroscience]
As it becomes possible to simulate increasingly complex neural networks, it becomes correspondingly important to model the sensory information that animals actively acquire: the biomechanics of sensory acquisition directly determines the sensory input and therefore neural processing. Here, we exploit the tractable mechanics of the well-studied rodent vibrissal ("whisker") system…
1h
Contrasting genetic signal of recolonization after rainforest fragmentation in African trees with different dispersal abilities [Evolution]
Although today the forest cover is continuous in Central Africa, this may have not always been the case, as the scarce fossil record in this region suggests that arid conditions might have significantly reduced tree density during the ice ages. Our aim was to investigate whether the dry ice age…
1h
Ultrasound-on-chip platform for medical imaging, analysis, and collective intelligence [Medical Sciences]
Over the past half-century, ultrasound imaging has become a key technology for assessing an ever-widening range of medical conditions at all stages of life. Despite ultrasound's proven value, expensive systems that require domain expertise in image acquisition and interpretation have limited its broad adoption. The proliferation of portable and low-cost…
1h
Tryptophan-metabolizing gut microbes regulate adult neurogenesis via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor [Systems Biology]
While modulatory effects of gut microbes on neurological phenotypes have been reported, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that indole, a tryptophan metabolite produced by tryptophanase-expressing gut microbes, elicits neurogenic effects in the adult mouse hippocampus. Neurogenesis is reduced in germ-free (GF) mice and in GF mice monocolonized…
1h
A fluorescence-based genetic screen reveals diverse mechanisms silencing small RNA signaling in E. coli [Microbiology]
As key players of gene regulation in many bacteria, small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) associated with the RNA chaperone Hfq shape numerous phenotypic traits, including metabolism, stress response and adaptation, as well as virulence. sRNAs can alter target messenger RNA (mRNA) translation and stability via base pairing. sRNA synthesis is generally…
1h
Postinfection treatment with a protease inhibitor increases survival of mice with a fatal SARS-CoV-2 infection [Microbiology]
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection continues to be a serious global public health threat. The 3C-like protease (3CLpro) is a virus protease encoded by SARS-CoV-2, which is essential for virus replication. We have previously reported a series of small-molecule 3CLpro inhibitors effective for inhibiting replication of human…
1h
New Evidence That Therapy Can Make You Happier – Facts So Romantic
What are the interventions that are supposed to make us happier? What doesn't work? And if something does work, how much good does it do? Pixabay In "All Eyes on Me," a song from his new Netflix special Inside , the musician-comedian Bo Burnham pauses to ask, "You want to hear a funny story?" He tells us that, five years ago, he quit performing live because, while on stage, he'd experience severe
1h
Using computation to improve words: Novel tool could improve serious illness conversations
Conversations between seriously ill people, their families and palliative care specialists lead to better quality-of-life. Understanding what happens during these conversations — and how they vary by cultural, clinical, and situational contexts — is essential to guide healthcare communication improvement efforts. True understanding requires methods to study conversations in large, inclusive, and
2h
COVID-19 aggravates antibiotic misuse in India
Antibiotic sales soared during India's first surge of COVID-19, suggesting that the drugs were inappropriately used to treat mild and moderate COVID-19 infections, according to research led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The excessive usage is especially concerning because antibiotic overuse increases the risk for drug-resistant infections — not just in India, but world
2h
Unfinding a split electron
Scientists from the Nanoelectronics group at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria were looking for half an electron as a basis for a quantum computer. Together with researchers from University of Copenhagen and the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), they investigated a promising experimental setup just to find that the signals they measured were not telling the truth. They
2h
Babies curious about 'magic' grow up to be curious toddlers
Infants' responses to surprising events like magic tricks are linked to later cognitive ability, researchers find. The first-of-its-kind longitudinal study of infant curiosity found that months-old babies most captivated by magic tricks became the most curious toddlers. The work suggests a pre-verbal baby's level of interest in surprising aspects of the world remains constant over time and could
2h
The fracking boom is over. Where did all the jobs go?
Shale gas and oil extraction, also known as fracking, is often credited by conservatives with creating hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of US manufacturing jobs. As the " Saudi Arabia of natural gas ," Pennsylvania has been the poster child for the fracking industry. But far fewer jobs were created there and in neighboring states like Ohio than boosters claim, and many have since vanished.
2h
Scientists advance the understanding of potential topological quantum bits
Quantum computers promise great advances in many fields—from cryptography to the simulation of protein folding. Yet, which physical system works best to build the underlying quantum bits is still an open question. Unlike regular bits in your computer, these so-called qubits cannot only take the values 0 and 1, but also mixtures of the two. While this potentially makes them very useful, they also b
2h
Is global plastic pollution nearing an irreversible tipping point?
Current rates of plastic emissions globally may trigger effects that we will not be able to reverse, argues a new study by researchers from Sweden, Norway and Germany published on July 2nd in Science. According to the authors, plastic pollution is a global threat, and actions to drastically reduce emissions of plastic to the environment are "the rational policy response".
2h
Plastics in the Earth system
Plastic contamination of the environment is a global problem whose magnitude justifies the consideration of plastics as emergent geomaterials with chemistries not previously seen in Earth's history. At the elemental level, plastics are predominantly carbon. The comparison of plastic stocks and fluxes to those of carbon reveals that the quantities of plastics present in some ecosystems rival the q
2h
Plastic ingestion as an evolutionary trap: Toward a holistic understanding
Human activities are changing our environment. Along with climate change and a widespread loss of biodiversity, plastic pollution now plays a predominant role in altering ecosystems globally. Here, we review the occurrence of plastic ingestion by wildlife through evolutionary and ecological lenses and address the fundamental question of why living organisms ingest plastic. We unify evolutionary,
2h
The global threat from plastic pollution
Plastic pollution accumulating in an area of the environment is considered "poorly reversible" if natural mineralization processes occurring there are slow and engineered remediation solutions are improbable. Should negative outcomes in these areas arise as a consequence of plastic pollution, they will be practically irreversible. Potential impacts from poorly reversible plastic pollution include
2h
Toward polymer upcycling–adding value and tackling circularity
Plastics have revolutionized modern life, but have created a global waste crisis driven by our reliance and demand for low-cost, disposable materials. New approaches are vital to address challenges related to plastics waste heterogeneity, along with the property reductions induced by mechanical recycling. Chemical recycling and upcycling of polymers may enable circularity through separation strat
2h
Astrocytes close the mouse critical period for visual plasticity
Brain postnatal development is characterized by critical periods of experience-dependent remodeling of neuronal circuits. Failure to end these periods results in neurodevelopmental disorders. The cellular processes defining critical-period timing remain unclear. Here, we show that in the mouse visual cortex, astrocytes control critical-period closure. We uncover the underlying pathway, which invo
2h
Nontopological zero-bias peaks in full-shell nanowires induced by flux-tunable Andreev states
A semiconducting nanowire fully wrapped by a superconducting shell has been proposed as a platform for obtaining Majorana modes at small magnetic fields. In this study, we demonstrate that the appearance of subgap states in such structures is actually governed by the junction region in tunneling spectroscopy measurements and not the full-shell nanowire itself. Short tunneling regions never show s
2h
Monolithic optical microlithography of high-density elastic circuits
Polymeric electronic materials have enabled soft and stretchable electronics. However, the lack of a universal micro/nanofabrication method for skin-like and elastic circuits results in low device density and limited parallel signal recording and processing ability relative to silicon-based devices. We present a monolithic optical microlithographic process that directly micropatterns a set of ela
2h
Single-molecule laser nanospectroscopy with micro-electron volt energy resolution
Ways to characterize and control excited states at the single-molecule and atomic levels are needed to exploit excitation-triggered energy-conversion processes. Here, we present a single-molecule spectroscopic method with micro–electron volt energy and submolecular-spatial resolution using laser driving of nanocavity plasmons to induce molecular luminescence in scanning tunneling microscopy. This
2h
Laser soliton microcombs heterogeneously integrated on silicon
Silicon photonics enables wafer-scale integration of optical functionalities on chip. Silicon-based laser frequency combs can provide integrated sources of mutually coherent laser lines for terabit-per-second transceivers, parallel coherent light detection and ranging, or photonics-assisted signal processing. We report heterogeneously integrated laser soliton microcombs combining both indium phos
2h
Synthesis of thermally stable SBT and SBS/SBT intergrowth zeolites
UCSB-6 (framework type SBS ) and UCSB-10 ( SBT ), two three-dimensional phosphate-based molecular sieves with supercages accessible through 12-ring (circumscribed by 12 tetrahedral atoms) windows, are structurally similar to the hexagonal and cubic polytypes of faujasite or zeolite Y, an industrially relevant catalyst, but the cage structures are substantially different. Nonetheless, their inhere
2h
The missing ocean plastic sink: Gone with the rivers
Plastic floating at the ocean surface, estimated at tens to hundreds of thousands of metric tons, represents only a small fraction of the estimated several million metric tons annually discharged by rivers. Such an imbalance promoted the search for a missing plastic sink that could explain the rapid removal of river-sourced plastics from the ocean surface. On the basis of an in-depth statistical
2h
Embryo-scale, single-cell spatial transcriptomics
Spatial patterns of gene expression manifest at scales ranging from local (e.g., cell-cell interactions) to global (e.g., body axis patterning). However, current spatial transcriptomics methods either average local contexts or are restricted to limited fields of view. Here, we introduce sci-Space, which retains single-cell resolution while resolving spatial heterogeneity at larger scales. Applyin
2h
Crystal structure of a key enzyme for anaerobic ethane activation
Ethane, the second most abundant hydrocarbon gas in the seafloor, is efficiently oxidized by anaerobic archaea in syntrophy with sulfate-reducing bacteria. Here, we report the 0.99-angstrom-resolution structure of the proposed ethane-activating enzyme and describe the specific traits that distinguish it from methane-generating and -consuming methyl-coenzyme M reductases. The widened catalytic cha
2h
Nurse cell{-}-derived small RNAs define paternal epigenetic inheritance in Arabidopsis
The plant male germline undergoes DNA methylation reprogramming, which methylates genes de novo and thereby alters gene expression and regulates meiosis. Here, we reveal the molecular mechanism underlying this reprogramming. We demonstrate that genic methylation in the male germline, from meiocytes to sperm, is established by 24-nucleotide small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) transcribed from transpos
2h
An engineered protein-phosphorylation toggle network with implications for endogenous network discovery
Synthetic biological networks comprising fast, reversible reactions could enable engineering of new cellular behaviors that are not possible with slower regulation. Here, we created a bistable toggle switch in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a cross-repression topology comprising 11 protein-protein phosphorylation elements. The toggle is ultrasensitive, can be induced to switch states in seconds,
2h
Sequencing of 640,000 exomes identifies GPR75 variants associated with protection from obesity
Large-scale human exome sequencing can identify rare protein-coding variants with a large impact on complex traits such as body adiposity. We sequenced the exomes of 645,626 individuals from the United Kingdom, the United States, and Mexico and estimated associations of rare coding variants with body mass index (BMI). We identified 16 genes with an exome-wide significant association with BMI, inc
2h
Diet-regulated production of PDGFcc by macrophages controls energy storage
The mechanisms by which macrophages regulate energy storage remain poorly understood. We identify in a genetic screen a platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)–family ortholog, Pvf3, that is produced by macrophages and is required for lipid storage in fat-body cells of Drosophila larvae. Genetic and pharmacological experiments indicate that the mouse Pvf3 o
2h
5 things you should know about the Delta variant
As the new coronavirus strain, called the Delta variant, spreads, experts are taking it seriously. For the first time in more than a year, we're feeling some hope—or at least cautious optimism—that the pandemic could recede to the background. But experts want us to know that there is still a concern that new mutations of the virus could bring it back, and it might be even stronger. Around the wor
2h
G-quadruplex-forming DNA molecules enhance enzymatic activity of myoglobin
A collaboration led by Distinguished Professor Dr. Kazunori Ikebukuro from Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT), Japan, discovered that G-quadruplex (G4)-forming DNA binds myoglobin through a parallel-type G4 structure. Through the G4 binding, the enzymatic activity of myoglobin increases over 300-fold compared to that of myoglobin alone. This finding indicates that DNA may work a
3h
New GSA Bulletin articles published ahead of print in June
The Geological Society of America regularly publishes articles online ahead of print. GSA Bulletin topics include multiple articles about the dynamics of China and Tibet; the end-Permian terrestrial extinction paradigm in South Africa; prehistoric lava flows from the urban district of Catania (Etna volcano, Italy); the debated origins of granite, and "a tale of two Tweefonteins."
3h
How You Can Still Make Money Mining Cryptocurrency
Feature image by Jernej Furman If you're a Bitcoin (BTC) mining veteran, sulking over how zillion-dollar, ASIC-based data centers have stolen the spotlight, you're probably already well into alternative coins. But maybe you've scored a cool-new GPU in the Newegg lottery or just happen to have one lying around. Or maybe you're curious about whether all those hard drives you've got in your closet c
3h
Mefloquine: A promising drug 'soldier' in the battle against COVID-19
In the 'war' that the world has been fighting against COVID-19, scientists have been scanning their arsenals of previously used drugs in hopes of finding any that can be used to treat the disease. One of the contenders under scrutiny, an anti-malarial drug called mefloquine shows great promise, according to a new breakthrough study by a team of Japanese scientists, perhaps giving us a better fight
3h
The rise and fall of elephants
Earth-historical events such as ice ages or the shifting of continental plates are mainly responsible for the evolutionary success of proboscideans, but also for their decline. This is the main conclusion of a study published this week in Nature Ecology & Evolution by an international research team from Spain, Finland, Great Britain, Germany and Argentina with the participation of the Museum für N
3h
Rebalancing the data economy: Startups for a restart
The big data era has created valuable resources for public interest outcomes, like health care. In the last 18 months, the speed with which scientists were able to respond to the covid-19 pandemic—faster than any other disease in history—demonstrated the benefits of gathering, sharing, and extracting value from data for a wider good. Access to data from 56 million National Health Service (NHS) pa
3h
Rewiring the adult brain — Scanning the mind of a blind ‘Batman’ reveals that novel maps can emerge in the adult brain
The adult brain is more malleable than previously thought, according to researchers from IDC Herzliya. They trained a 50-year-old man, blind from birth, to "see" by ear, and found that neural circuits in his brain formed so-called topographic maps – a brain organization previously thought to emerge only in infancy. This finding, reported in Neuroimage, sheds new light on the brain's ability for ch
3h
Chasing the cells that predict death from severe COVID-19
By studying T cells, a team of scientists at Gladstone Institutes has uncovered fundamental differences between patients who overcome severe COVID-19 and those who succumb to it. The team also found that dying patients harbor relatively large numbers of T cells able to infiltrate the lung, which may contribute to the extensive lung deterioration that is a hallmark of fatal COVID-19.
3h
Wild bees need diverse agricultural landscapes
Mass-flowering crops such as oilseed rape or faba bean (also known as broad bean) provide valuable sources of food for bees, which, in turn, contribute to the pollination of both the crops and nearby wild plants when they visit. But not every arable crop that produces flowers is visited by the same bees. A team from the University of Göttingen and the Julius Kühn Institute (JKI) in Braunschweig ha
3h
A remote laboratory for performing experiments with real electronic and communications equipment
Laboratories are an inherent part of technology qualifications, as practical experiments are essential for students to acquire the competencies and skills that they will need during their future professional development. Providing this learning in a virtual format is one of the challenges posed by the current COVID-19 pandemic—a challenge that distance universities have been addressing for years.
3h
Catalyzing the conversion of biomass to biofuel
Zeolites are extremely porous materials: Ten grams can have an internal surface area the size of a soccer field. Their cavities make them useful in catalyzing chemical reactions and thus saving energy. An international research team has now made new findings regarding the role of water molecules in these processes. One important application is the conversion of biomass into biofuel.
4h
Why condensed matter physicists reject reductionism
Reductionism — the philosophical position that all phenomena can be explained by interactions between particles — is not inherently a part of the scientific method. For example, most biological processes cannot be explained by appealing to quarks. Those who study complex phenomena, such as condensed matter physicists, often reject reductionism and embrace its alternative, known as emergence. Fund
4h
Unlocking the power of the microbiome
Not only animals and humans host a complex community of microorganisms — plants do this as well. Researchers at ETH Zurich have recently published two new studies that shed light on fundamental aspects of these close — and often overlooked — relationships.
4h
Fibromyalgia likely the result of autoimmune problems
New research from the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King's College London, in collaboration with the University of Liverpool and the Karolinska Institute, has shown that many of the symptoms in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) are caused by antibodies that increase the activity of pain-sensing nerves throughout the body.The results show that fibromyalgia is a disease of
4h
Mars's glowing auroras snapped by Hope spacecraft
Nature, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01811-4 Images from the orbiter are the most detailed yet of the planet's discrete auroras, ultraviolet emissions that follow the patterns of a decaying magnetic field.
4h
Researchers hone in on the best software for detecting microRNAs in plants
Almost twenty years ago, the process of RNA silencing was discovered in plants, whereby small fragments of RNA inactivate a portion of a gene during protein synthesis. These fragments—called microRNAs (abbreviated as miRNAs)—have since been shown to be essential at nearly every stage of growth and development in plants, from the production of flowers, stems, and roots to the ways plants interact w
4h
Near-death experiences, a survival strategy ?
A new study conducted jointly by the University of Copenhagen (Denmark) and the University of Liege (Belgium) and published in Brain Communications shows how near-death experiences in humans may have arisen from evolutionary mechanisms. Researchers attribute for the first time a biological purpose to NDEs.
4h
Drug dissolved net-like structures in airways of severely ill COVID-19 patients
When researchers in Sweden performed advanced analyses of sputum from the airways of severely ill COVID-19 patients, they found high levels of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs). It is already a known fact that NETs can contribute to sputum thickness, severe sepsis-like inflammation and thrombosis. After being treated with an already existing drug, the NETs were dissolved and patients improved.
4h
Dolichomitus meii wasp discovered in Amazonia is like a flying jewel
Parasitoid wasps are one of the most species rich animal taxa on Earth, but their tropical diversity is still poorly known. Now, scientist have discovered the Dolichomitus meii and Polysphincta parasitoid wasp species previously unknown to science in South America. The new species found in the rainforests entice with their colors and exciting habits.
4h
Eruption of the Laacher See volcano redated
The eruption of the Laacher See volcano in the Eifel in Germany is one of Central Europe's largest eruptions over the past 100,000 years. Technical advances in combination with tree remains buried in the course of the eruption now enabled an international research team to accurately date the event. Accordingly, the eruption of the Laacher See volcano occurred 13,077 years ago and thus 126 years ea
4h
The Climate Change-Linked Heatwave Has Now Killed Hundreds of People
Getting Worse Not even 24 hours ago, we published a grim article about how the horrific heatwave in western Canada and the northwestern United States had already killed dozens . Now it's clear that things are much worse, with local governments announcing several hundred new heat-related deaths. Over the past five days, a tragic 486 people have died in British Columbia alone, the BBC reports . Tha
4h
"If the data were not [correct], whose fault is this?" Authors of highly criticized COVID-19 vaccine study defend it
Earlier this week, we reported that a paper claiming that two deaths resulted from COVID-19 vaccination for every three cases that were prevented had earned an expression of concern. The authors, including Harald Walach, who was also co-author of a just-published paper in JAMA Pediatrics questioning the safety of masks in children, had used data … Continue reading
5h
Fire ants found to create 'appendages' on self-made rafts when put in water
A team of researchers at the University of Colorado has found that fire ants can create 'appendages' on the rafts they make out of their own bodies when they find themselves in water. In their paper published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, the group describes their study of the behavior of fire ants in water and what they learned.
5h
Seek diversity to solve complexity
Nature, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01832-z A wide range of perspectives brings unique insight to societal problems, says Katrin Prager.
5h
New study darkens hope for Earth-like planets
A new study examines if exoplanets get enough stellar radiation to support photosynthesis. Many planets within the habitable zones of stars do not receive enough energy to support plant life. Earth-like planets are probably very rare. Since 1961, astrobiologists and others interested in finding extraterrestrial life have used the Drake equation to speculate on the possible number of technological
5h
Tämja vilda växter – ett sätt att få mat till fler
Trots att det finns tiotusentals ätliga växter äter vi väldigt få. För att få mat i framtiden behöver vi ta tillvara betydligt fler, varnar forskare. I Sverige görs försök att med växtförädling göra rapsens vilda kusin fältkrassingen till en lukrativ jordbruksgröda. I tjugo år har det pågått i skymundan – ett av mycket få försök i världen att domesticera en vild växt för mänsklig konsumtion. Proj
5h
Older folks lose sense of smell for some things, but not others
The sense of smell in older adults declines when it comes to meat, but not vanilla, researchers report. The researchers reached this conclusion after examining a large group of older Danes' and their intensity perception of common food odors. The sense of smell gradually begins to decline from about the age of 55. Until now, it was believed that one's sense of smell broadly declined with increasi
5h
New approach can add diversity to crop species without breeding GMOs
Breeding better crops through genetic engineering has been possible for decades, but the use of genetically modified plants has been limited by technical challenges and popular controversies. A new approach potentially solves both of those problems by modifying the energy-producing parts of plant cells and then removing the DNA editing tool so it cannot be inherited by future seeds. The technique
5h
High-performance computer provides new insights into the structure and function of ion channels
An international team that includes researchers at TU Darmstadt has gained new insights into the protein structure and function of the ion channels that control the heartbeat. The results have now been published in the journal Molecular Cell, and could contribute to the development of cardiac drugs with fewer side effects.
5h
Singlet oxygen selectively degrades oxytetracycline in fenton-like oxidation
Recently, a research team led by Prof. KONG Lingtao at the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has prepared a type of hollow amorphous Co/C composites to activate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to generate singlet oxygen, achieving selective elimination of oxytetracycline (OTC) in complicated water matrices. The relevant results was published in Chemical
5h
Scientists reveal effects of biotic and abiotic factors on stemflow production in woody ecosystems
Stemflow refers to a part of precipitation that is intercepted by leaves, twigs, and branches and eventually channeled into soil through trunk or stem, which further could be transported and redistributed into deeper soil layers through preferential pathways such as roots. Numerous field observations indicate that stemflow, as a highly localized point input of rainwater and solutes around tree/shr
5h
Scientists risk overestimating numbers of wild bonobos
There might be fewer bonobos left in the wild than we thought. For the last 40 years, scientists have estimated the abundance of endangered bonobos by counting the numbers of sleeping nests left by the apes in forests of the Congo Basin. Now, researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior report that the rate of sleeping nest 'decay' has lengthened by 17 days over the last 15 years a
5h
Deadly heat wave slams Canada, US
Millions of people in western Canada and the northwestern United States were under heat alerts Wednesday as the region baked in record-breaking temperatures and police reported scores of deaths likely linked to the scorching conditions.
5h
Closing the gap on the missing lithium
There is a significant discrepancy between theoretical and observed amounts of lithium in our universe. This is known as the cosmological lithium problem, and it has plagued cosmologists for decades. Now, researchers have reduced this discrepancy by around 10%, thanks to a new experiment on the nuclear processes responsible for the creation of lithium. This research could point the way to a more c
6h
Common cold exposure can protect against COVID-19
Exposure to the rhinovirus, the most frequent cause of the common cold, can protect against infection by the virus that causes COVID-19, researchers have found. In a new study, the researchers found that the common respiratory virus jumpstarts the activity of interferon-stimulated genes, early-response molecules in the immune system that can halt replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus within airway
6h
Researchers discover Golgi-derived vesicle regulating endosome fission
The endosome has highly dynamic motility and frequently undergoes fission and fusion events to coordinate endocytic trafficking. Endosome fission has been reported to be associated with cargo sorting. After internalization, cargoes can be segregated into distinct domains allocated for their destination, proceeding to either lysosomes for degradation, or the plasma membrane or trans-Golgi network (
6h
A new approach to preventing weapons-related violence at California schools
At some schools in California, nearly 1 in 5 students say they have either carried a weapon or been injured or threatened with one, according to a new study co-authored by UCLA social welfare professor Ron Avi Astor that examines the presence of weapons in the state's public middle and high schools and recommends focusing on campus-level conditions that could serve as warning signs for violence.
6h
Producing clean energy can diminish earthquake risk
In the months following the July 5, 2019 magnitude-7.1 earthquake in Ridgecrest, California, seismologists recorded thousands of aftershocks in the region. Surprisingly, none were seen in the Coso geothermal field, an area only about 10 kilometers from the surface ruptures caused by the main shock.
6h
Researchers account for some of the lithium missing from our universe
There is a significant discrepancy between theoretical and observed amounts of lithium in our universe. This is known as the cosmological lithium problem, and it has plagued cosmologists for decades. Now, researchers have reduced this discrepancy by around 10%, thanks to a new experiment on the nuclear processes responsible for the creation of lithium. This research could point the way to a more c
6h
Benefits of acute aerobic exercise on cognitive function: Why do 50% of studies find no connection?
An international research collaboration has conducted an IPD meta-analysis with the aim of resolving discrepancies between previous research as to what beneficial effects, if any, short bouts of aerobic exercise have on cognitive function. Their results highlight the importance of appropriate test design that takes into account individual differences between participants. The findings of this anal
6h
Over 100 fire scientists urge the US West: Skip the fireworks this record-dry 4th of July
The heat wave hitting the northwestern U.S. and Canada has been shattering records, with temperatures 30 degrees Fahrenheit or more above normal. With drought already gripping the West, the intense heat has helped suck even more moisture from millions of acres of forests and grasslands, bringing dead vegetation in many regions to record-dry levels and elevating the fire danger to its highest categ
6h
Retainer test is first step toward restoring mouth function
A new study is a first step toward building electrical stimulation implants that can restore essential functions of the mouth lost due to nerve or brain damage, say the researchers. Even the mundane act of swallowing requires a well-coordinated dance of more than 30 muscles of the mouth. The loss of function of even one of these, due to disease or injury, can be extremely debilitating. For these
6h
Liquid chalk highly effective in killing SARS-CoV-2 and influenza A viruses
Melbourne researchers have found that liquid chalk, commonly used in gyms to improve grip, acts as an antiseptic against highly infectious human viruses, completely killing both SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) and influenza A viruses.University of Melbourne Professor Jason Mackenzie, a laboratory head at the Peter Doherty Institute of Infection and Immunity (Doherty Institute) wanted t
6h
Experts discuss the nutrition profile of cicadas
This year, billions of Brood X cicadas emerged in the United States and generated quite a buzz, according to environmental experts. They also prompted questions about whether they are safe to eat, and who would want to eat them.
7h
Carbon black recycled from car tires
Until now, waste tires have been used mainly for recovering energy sources: Only small proportions of the carbon black contained in these tires are recycled, since mineral ash accounts for around 20 percent of its content. A new process developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics IBP is able to isolate almost all of this ash—allowing both the carbon black and the minerals from the a
7h
Rare tadpole is new to science
New collaborative research led by Manchester Museum, part of The University of Manchester, has resulted in the first scientific description of an extremely rare tadpole.
7h
Evidence based recommendations to support physical exercise for adults with obesity
Exercise training can help support management of overweight and obesity in adults, and can contribute to health benefits beyond "scale victories". The supplement published today in Obesity Reviews, based on the work of an expert group convened under the auspices of the European Association for the Study of Obesity (EASO), provides scientific evidence on health and wellbeing benefits of exercise tr
7h
Limits for human embryo research have changed: This calls for public debate
For 40 years, research into early human development has been guided by the principle that after 14 days, an embryo should not be used for research and must be destroyed. This rule has been part of the law of more than 12 countries. But new guidelines released by the International Society for Stem Cell Research have removed this rule. This makes it possible to conduct research on human embryos that
7h
Supplying sustainably sourced biomaterial building blocks from plant feedstocks
One challenge in the production of bioproducts (chemicals and materials made from living organisms) is supplying large amounts of cheap and sustainably sourced building blocks from which these products can be made. The Joint Bioenergy Institute (JBEI) is addressing this challenge by developing sustainable methods to produce these bioproduct building blocks. Most recently, JBEI scientists in the Fe
7h
Hooded blankets are cozy, but they are not great for oceans or our health
Last year, Australian kids hounded parents for Ooshies—character-based plastic collectibles distributed by supermarket chain Woolworths. But like the attention span of a five year old, the contentious marketing campaign quickly faded. This year, the similarly named Oodies are gaining viral attention—and presenting their own plastic problem.
7h
Ei-ichi Negishi (1935–2021)
Nature, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01828-9 Organic chemist whose cross-coupling reaction builds many drugs.
7h
This Cutting-Edge Sleep Supplement Gives Your Body Fuel for Restorative Sleep
Want to know the secret to a successful, productive, and happy life? Get a good night's sleep . That may sound overly simplistic, but it's true. Without deep restorative sleep on a regular basis, it is biologically impossible to achieve peak physical or cognitive performance. And that means it's impossible to live your best life. Fortunately, getting good sleep is now a lot easier thanks to the t
7h
Recidivism: breaking the cycle from father to son
The average incarcerated person will return to prison seven times. A child with an incarcerated parent is six times likelier to become incarcerated. To break the recidivism cycle, our program provides resources that address mental health and addiction issues and teach life skills. Participants in our program have a 44 percent lower reincarceration rate. On Father's Day, when you heard the ancient
7h
Get Started Coding For Free, And Build The Bundle You Want From There
While some computers are coding by themselves , the demand for computer programmers isn't going away. In fact it's growing fast, and becoming a part of everyday careers. The 2021 Ultimate Learn to Code Training Build-a-Bundle from Mammoth Interactive gets you started for free, and you can build on your knowledge from there. Build a Bundle: The 2021 Ultimate Learn To Code Training Mammoth Interact
7h
Older patients with heart failure denied effective treatments
Heart failure patients aged 80 and above are less likely to receive recommended therapies and dosages compared to their younger counterparts, according to research presented today at Heart Failure 2021, an online scientific congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). 'Guidelines recommend the same treatments for all heart failure patients regardless of age,' said study author Dr. Davide
8h
Osmium activation in cancer cells
Cancer is a complex disease, and as such, there is no single way to tackle it. While cancer treatments are evolving toward personalized procedures, in most cases, standard chemotherapy treatments are still required. In chemotherapy, platinum drugs such as cisplatin (approved 42 years ago by FDA) are used, killing both cancerous and healthy cells and causing unwanted sided effects. In this regard,
8h
How does a regulatory protein know where to bind to modulate insulin production?
Some proteins in the body ensure that genes are turned on and off at the correct times. For example, the transcription factor protein Pdx1 (pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1) turns on the gene that codes for insulin, and the protein SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein) in turn binds to Pdx1 so that the body doesn't make too much insulin. But it's unclear how SPOP binds to Pdx1. Understanding where SPO
8h
In Vivo CRISPR
I know I just wrote about CRISPR , the powerful gene-editing tool that can make targeted specific alterations to genes, but there is another CRISPR news item I wanted to write about. A recent study published in the NEJM reports the results of a treatment trial using a CRISPR-Cas9 treatment injected into the blood. This is an important proof of concept with implications for the clinical impact of
8h
How planarians can regenerate during periods of starvation
Planarians are able to survive long periods of starvation unscathed by maintaining their stem cell pool and regenerative capacity. The molecular processes behind this are not yet known. Jena researchers from the Leibniz Institute on Aging—Fritz Lipmann Institute (FLI) were able to show that the suppression of the chaperonin subunits TRiC/CCT abolishes the regenerative capacity of planarians only d
8h
Nanopartikel kan motverka Alzheimer och Parkinson
En molekyl i nanostorlek med grundämnet Niob kan hålla tillbaka bildningen av plack i hjärnvävnaden. Upptäckten ger hopp om nya behandlingar av bland annat Alzheimer och Parkinson. När proteiner veckas fel ansamlas olösliga trådar, så kallade amyloider, i hjärnan. De är inblandade i flera svåra sjukdomar som Alzheimers och Parkinsons sjukdom, Skellefteåsjukan och galna ko-sjukan. Amyloidsamlingar
9h
Ep. 56: Understanding a Terrorist's Brain
This month: Scientists and counterterrorism experts believe understanding the underlying motivations of radical extremists will help them deradicalize people. Now, one group has studied the brain activity of active extremists after asking them to contemplate the values they are willing to fight and die for.
10h
Ny skalbagge funnen i fossilt bajs
Forskare har hittat, klassificerat och namngett en liten utdöd skalbaggsart i fossiliserad spillning. Till sin hjälp hade de en hungrig dinosaurie som svalde dem i mängder för 230 miljoner år sedan. Den nya skalbaggsarten Triamyxa coprolithica är den första insekten någonsin att bli vetenskapligt beskriven från en koprolit (fossilt bajs). Det är paleontologer från Uppsala universitet i samarbete
10h
Daily briefing: China eliminates malaria
Nature, Published online: 30 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01814-1 China is officially declared free of malaria, black holes swallow neutron stars in one gulp, and the endless variations of viruses.
10h
Microbial short-chain fatty acids modulate CD8+ T cell responses and improve adoptive immunotherapy for cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24331-1 The activity of immune cells can be regulated by the microbiome. Here, the authors show that the fatty acids pentanoate and butyrate—normally released by the microbiome—increase the anti-tumour activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and chimeric antigen receptor T cells through metabolic and epigenetic reprogrammin
10h
Structural basis of the activation of c-MET receptor
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24367-3 Activation of c-MET receptor tyrosine kinase involves hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and glycosaminoglycans, but the molecular mechanism is still under debate. Here, the authors present cryoEM structures of c-MET bound to two HGF splice variants and heparin, revealing the structural basis for c-MET activation.
10h
Out-of-sequence skeletal growth causing oscillatory zoning in arc olivines
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24275-6 Arc olivines are commonly explained through a paradigm of core-to-rim sequential growth and oscillatory zoning is interpreted to represent magma mixing. Here the authors show Fo–Ni–P oscillatory zoned olivines can grow as out-of-sequence crystal frames and complex zoning can occur in closed systems.
10h
Structural basis of ALC1/CHD1L autoinhibition and the mechanism of activation by the nucleosome
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24320-4 The oncogenic chromatin remodeler ALC1 (amplification in liver cancer 1), also known as CHD1L is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler that relaxes chromatin and plays an important role in the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 -mediated DNA repair pathway. Here, the authors present the ALC1 crystal structure and a cr
10h
ATR regulates neuronal activity by modulating presynaptic firing
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24217-2 Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) is a key regulator of replication stress response; yet, mutations within the ATR gene cause human ATR-Seckel Syndrome associated with microcephaly and intellectual disability. Here, the authors show neuron-specific ATR deletion increases intrinsic neuronal and epilept
10h
Binding of guide piRNA triggers methylation of the unstructured N-terminal region of Aub leading to assembly of the piRNA amplification complex
Nature Communications, Published online: 01 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24351-x PIWI protein contains arginine rich motifs that are post-translationally modified to symmetrically methylated arginine (sDMA) residues. Here the authors show that piRNA loading into Aub triggers sDMA modification which is recognized by Krimper to promote formation of Krimper-Aub-Ago3 complex for piRNA amplificat
10h
What the Media Gets Wrong About Red-State Vaccine Hesitancy
Vaccine hesitant conservatives are often portrayed in the media as anti-science and prone to conspiracy theory. But that narrative betrays a lack of curiosity and empathy: Many poor and rural conservatives have legitimate reasons to distrust the health care system and face real barriers to access.
11h
Leaders' pandemic policies engendered varying levels of trust
As the COVID-19 pandemic exploded across the globe in early 2020, the world's leaders were faced with a flurry of tough moral dilemmas. Should schools and businesses shut down, and if so, for how long? Who should receive scarce resources, such as ventilators, when there wouldn't be enough for everyone? Should people be required to practice contact tracing to control the spread of infection? Should
11h
Patients paying for unproven IVF add-on treatments
Despite only limited evidence that fertility add-ons increase the odds of having a baby, the majority of women (82%) have used one or more of these treatments as part of their IVF.This is the conclusion of a retrospective study of 1,590 Australian patients which also found more than seven in 10 (72%) had incurred additional costs for these unproven additional therapies and techniques which range f
11h
New study shows glo has similar impact on indicators of potential harm as quitting smoking
New research published today in the journal Internal and Emergency Medicine provides the first real-world evidence that people switching from cigarettes to exclusive use of glo, BAT's flagship Tobacco Heating Product (THP), can significantly reduce their exposure to certain toxicants and indicators of potential harm related to several smoking-related diseases compared with continuing to smoke.
14h
Is hay fever on the rise? – podcast
After 18 months of life being at a near standstill, Science Weekly's Shivani Dave found a lot of their conversations with friends turned to the severity of hay fever this year. Many claimed their allergies had never been worse. Shivani Dave asks horticulturist, Thomas Ogren, whether hay fever symptoms have become more severe in recent times Continue reading…
16h
Labs, Leaks, and Liability
The resurfaced conversation surrounding the idea that SARS-CoV-2 might have leaked from a lab in Wuhan, China, represents an opportunity to reexamine the confluence of science, politics, and public discourse.
16h
Is hay fever on the rise?
After 18 months of life being at a near standstill, Science Weekly's Shivani Dave found a lot of their conversations with friends turned to the severity of hay fever this year. Many claimed their allergies had never been worse. Shivani Dave asks horticulturist, Thomas Ogren, whether hay fever symptoms have become more severe in recent times. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.c
16h
Look it up. In Europe they made a 100% automated greenhouse using A.I., robotics, hydroponics, 3D laser scanning. From germination to market bound truck without touching a human hand. Using exact water instead of draining the water table & precisely correct nutrition. Eliminating pollution from trac
tors, chemical runoff like anhydrous and nitrogen running off from the rain water leaking into the rivers which render fish inedible, ruining ecosystems, pollution from tractors & the production of tractors, pollution from fule. 18wheelerz riding along side combines to empty their hopper. Conserving the Water table to boot. Ending children from dying just because they don't have food. The populat
17h
What Made Early Humans Smart – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
Talking to Jeremy DeSilva about human evolution was so fun. As was reading his recent book, First Steps: How Upright Walking Made Us Human . I learned something new and fascinating on every page. Do you picture our hominin ancestors as hunters? I did. Not so much. "They were the hunted," DeSilva writes. Let's take another look, as modern paleoanthropologists have, at the Taung child's skull, one
18h
The Human Family Tree, It Turns Out, Is Complicated – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
We're not the man we used to be. Over the last 20 years, genomics, ancient DNA, and paleoanthropology have joined forces to completely overhaul our understanding of the origin of our species. The true diversity and complexity of human evolution over the last few hundred millennia surpasses even the most unhinged imaginings we might have hazarded just a short generation ago. But greater clarity ha
18h
The Evolutionary Wonders in the Deep Sea – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
The deep sea is a part of our planet unlike any other. Accounting for over 95 percent of Earth's living space, it is cold, dark, and under extreme pressure, yet an astounding variety of creatures abound. Although relatively little is known about the biology and behavior of animals in the deep sea—defined as beginning at 650 feet down, where sunlight ceases to penetrate, and stretching to the bott
18h
I just discovered this field of study and I'm very excited.
Hello there. I just finished my sophomore year of undergrad Data Analytics and Business Intelligence in my hometown. For the last 6-8 months though, I've used most of my free time reading and learning about psychology, neuroscience and philosophy. I have very limited knowledge of A.I, mostly basic deep learning algorithms and machine learning fundamentals. Reading this you can imagine how fucking
22h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leave a Reply