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The Trump Organization Is in Big Trouble
If the facts alleged in yesterday's indictment are true, the Trump Organization and its longtime chief financial officer, Allen Weisselberg, have engaged in blatant tax evasion for more than a decade. Early reports characterized the crime in question as involving "fringe benefits." This gives entirely the wrong impression. The Trump Organization and Weisselberg aren't being charged with tripping
5h

LATEST

We Are Literally Begging You Idiots To Skip The Fireworks This Year
Kaboom! Right now, the northwest United States and the western chunk of Canada are in the throes of a relentless, infrastructure-melting heatwave that's already killed hundreds of people . Wildfires in the same areas are making matters worse, and severe drought has essentially turned much of the western US into a tinderbox waiting for a spark, It certainly seems like a good time for everyone to t
1d
Town Sets All-Time Heat Record, Then Burns to the Ground
From the Frying Pan Ninety percent of Lytton, British Columbia, a small village of approximately 250, burned to the ground after recording Canada's highest ever temperature ever of 49.6 degrees Celsius (121 Fahrenheit) — in the same week. "There won't be very much left of Lytton," Jan Polderman, mayor of the village, told the BBC . "There was fire everywhere." Much of the west coast is experienci
4h
Ohio Is Now Fully Trumpified
I n another lifetime, Representative Anthony Gonzalez was the Ohio Republican Party's dream candidate. Many of his future suburban-Cleveland constituents cheered for him at Byers Field when he was a high-school-football standout at St. Ignatius, and later again at the Shoe in Columbus during his star turn as an Ohio State University wide receiver. The son of a Cuban immigrant, he was a first-roun
11h
Scientists propose new source for rare subatomic particles
A paper based on joint research by Prof. Yuan Changzheng from Institute of High Energy Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Prof. Marek Karliner from Tel Aviv University of Israel, was published in Physical Review Letters. It points out a new abundant source of antineutrons and hyperons. These rare subatomic particles are essential for studying forces governing the behavior of matter at
6h
First high-altitude drop test success for ExoMars parachute
After several weeks of bad weather and strong winds, the latest pair of high-altitude drop tests of the ExoMars parachutes took place in Kiruna, Sweden. The 15 m-wide first stage main parachute performed flawlessly at supersonic speeds, while the 35 m-wide second stage parachute experienced one minor damage, but decelerated the mock-up of the landing platform as expected.
7h
Brain circuit for spirituality?
Using datasets from neurosurgical patients and those with brain lesions, researchers mapped lesion locations associated with spiritual and religious belief to a specific human brain circuit.
20h
Guess Who's Going to Space With Jeff Bezos?
In the beginning, the small group of Americans who aspired to become astronauts had to pass an isolation test. Spaceflight wasn't going to be easy, and the country wanted people with tough minds. For his test, John Glenn sat at a desk in a dark, soundproofed room. He found some paper in the darkness, pulled a pencil out of his pocket, and spent the test writing some poems in silence. He walked ou
23h
Richard Branson aims to beat Jeff Bezos into space by nine days
Virgin Galactic founder has announced he will take off on board the next test flight on 11 July Richard Branson is aiming to beat fellow billionaire Jeff Bezos into space by nine days. Branson's Virgin Galactic company announced on Thursday that its next test flight would take place on 11 July and that its founder would be among the six people on board. All other passengers will be company employ
20h
Olympic Hopeful Suspended for Marijuana, Which Is the Dumbest Thing We've Ever Heard
American sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson was set to break records at the Tokyo Olympics this month, but a positive marijuana test could force her to miss the event entirely. Richardson won the women's 100-meter race at the US track and field Olympic trials in Oregon in June, putting her at the forefront of US hopefuls. At a blistering 10.86 seconds, that made her a favorite to go for gold in Tokyo,
3h
A common treatment for endometriosis could actually be making things worse
Repeat surgeries for endometriosis could be exacerbating pain symptoms, experts say It has long been believed that the best way to treat endometriosis, a chronic inflammatory condition that affects one in 10 women globally, is by performing laparoscopic surgery to remove damaged tissue from the body. But experts now say the surgery may not be as effective as once thought in relieving symptoms, an
16h
Mischievous Richard Branson Slams Accelerator, Will Go to Space 9 Days Before Jeff Bezos
Billionaire Brawl Take that, Jeff Bezos! Virgin Galactic founder Richard Branson just one-upped the Amazon and Blue Origin founder in the race for the first billionaire tech founder to leave the Earth. Early last month, Bezos announced that he and his brother would fulfill a lifelong dream by dipping their toes into space on one of his company's rockets on July 20. But Branson couldn't let that h
6h
Condo Buildings Are at Risk. So Is All Real Estate.
A fter most of a condominium tower in Surfside, Florida, collapsed last week, the second-guessing began almost immediately. Some residents accused the building's condominium association of acting too slowly to address known structural flaws identified in a 2018 engineering report. Recent news stories have emphasized dissension among the owners. As someone who studies condos—their history, archite
10h
Study suggests bacteria in cow's stomach can break down plastic
Scientists find micro-organisms from the bovine stomach have ability to degrade polyesters in lab setting Bacteria found in one of the compartments of a cow's stomach can break down plastic, research suggests. Since the 1950s, more than 8bn tonnes of plastic have been produced – equivalent in weight to 1 billion elephants – driven predominantly by packaging, single-use containers, wrapping and bo
11h
Call for global treaty to end production of 'virgin' plastic by 2040
Scientists say agreement must cover extraction of raw materials and pollution that blights seas and land A binding global treaty is needed to phase out the production of "virgin" or new plastic by 2040, scientists have said. The solution to the blight of plastic pollution in the oceans and on land would be a worldwide agreement on limits and controls, they say in a special report in the journal S
13h
Lawsuit Claims That Burning Tesla's High Tech Door Handles Trapped Driver Inside
Just weeks after Tesla officially started deliveries of its new sporty sedan, one of the first Tesla Model S Plaid vehicles on the road has gone up in flames — and in a lawsuit, the driver says that the vehicle's high tech door handles briefly trapped him inside thanks, The Washington Post reports . The local fire department told the Post that it had to battle the flames for two hours. A Gladwyne
5h
Oxford recognises Annie Cannon's 'invaluable contribution to astronomy' – archive, 2 July 1925
2 July 1925: The eminent astronomer from Harvard Observatory is conferred an honorary doctor of science degree The long double file of scarlet-robed doctors which "processed," at this year's brilliant Commemoration at Oxford, from Wadham, the vice-chancellor's College, to the Sheldonian Theatre was, from the feminist's point of view, less interesting from its inclusion of the prime minister, the
16h
Amazing New Images Show Auroras on Mars
A probe sent by the United Arab Emirates to study the Martian atmosphere has caught an exceedingly elusive event on camera, Space.com reports : a nightside aurora on Mars. Before the Hope orbiter's formal science mission even began, one of its scientific instruments caught the aurora, which is a notoriously fleeting phenomenon that has proved to be very difficult to study. Images released on Wedn
1h
Teenager Named Alexa Legally Changes Name Because of Amazon Product
What's in a Name? Children can be cruel. So in an era with seemingly ubiquitous "smart" tech, it shouldn't be too surprising to hear that children are particularly horrible to kids named "Alexa," thanks to the virtual assistant of the same name . The teasing has become a real problem, especially among children who never knew a world without smart speakers and the like. At least one family, the BB
2h
Elon Musk Tweets About Dogecoin Knockoff, Sending It Skyrocketing
Baby Doge After months of hyping up alternative cryptocurrency Dogecoin on Twitter, Tesla CEO Elon Musk appears to have adopted his next shiba — figuratively speaking, that is. "Baby Doge, doo, doo, doo, doo, doo," the billionaire wrote in a Thursday tweet, a song presumably about the synonymous alternative cryptocurrency, seemingly arranged to the tune of the hit children's song "Baby Shark." Ac
6h
Porsche's Electric Car Keeps Suddenly Dying in the Street
Red Light Porsche has finally issued a recall for a dangerous glitch in the Taycan's battery system that's causing the electric car to suddenly die while driving. The issue, which has been plaguing drivers for months but thankfully hasn't caused any injuries yet, can now be fixed by a software update, The Verge reports . Bizarrely, the problem seems to stem from a single 12-volt battery that hold
1h
The Atlantic Daily: Only Congress Can Save Voting Rights Now
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. ​​​​​In the legal battle over who gets to vote in America, Republicans just scored a point. Today the Supreme Court effectively green-lit a restrictive voting law in Arizona. The decision will mak
5h
Papers by women have fewer citations in top medical journals – study
Disparity is a 'thorny problem' as citations are a key metric in job evaluations and promotions While more women are entering the field of academic medicine, they are less likely to be recognised as experts, receive prestigious awards, hold leadership roles or author original research in major journals. Research has now shown that papers written by women as primary and senior authors have roughly
6h
3,000-year-old shark attack victim found
A team of researchers has determined that a man died of wounds from a shark attack 3000 years ago. The 790 wounds on his remains, including a missing leg and hand, are consistent with this hypothesis. Given how rare shark attacks are, this find is truly remarkable. Trying to learn about the distant past is often difficult. The remains of ancient humans can sometimes seem baffling, and trying to d
6h
3 Rules for Politeness During a Confusing Social Transition
The abrupt abandonment of handshakes and hugs. An expansion of personal space in public to six feet. And detailed conversations preceding any social plans about who else was invited and what risky behaviors they might have recently engaged in. Before the pandemic, any of these actions would have been considered rude, but over the past year, they became polite. Although etiquette has always had an
9h
What If Regulating Facebook Fails?
It seems increasingly likely that antitrust and content moderation tools aren't up to the task. Here's what we do next.
9h
Why Are Gamers So Much Better Than Scientists at Catching Fraud?
In the competitive pursuit of speedrunning, gamers vie to complete a given video game as quickly as humanly possible . It's a sport for the nerdier among us, and it's amazingly popular: Videos streaming and recording speedruns routinely rack up seven-figure view counts on Twitch and YouTube. So when one very prominent speedrunner—a U.S. YouTuber with more than 20 million subscribers who goes by t
10h
Are computers ready to solve this notoriously unwieldy math problem?
The computer scientist Marijn Heule is always on the lookout for a good mathematical challenge. An associate professor at Carnegie Mellon University, Heule has an impressive reputation for solving intractable math problems with computational tools. His 2016 result with the "Boolean Pythagorean triples problem" was an enormous headline-grabbing proof: " Two hundred terabyte maths proof is largest
11h
Research team publishes groundbreaking methane synthesis discovery
An interdisciplinary team of scientists from Montana State University's College of Agriculture and College of Letters and Science recently published research casting new light on a previously unknown element of the carbon cycle, thanks to data collected from Yellowstone National Park over more than a decade.
8h
Photos of the Week: Heat Wave, Paddy Day, Big Buddha
Ongoing anti-government protests in Colombia, stage four of the Tour de France, the Museum of the Future in Dubai, wildfires in California, Pride marches in New York and Pristina, a Chinese Communist Party anniversary gala, lightning in Arizona, ice-bath therapy in the United Arab Emirates, and much more
17h
Tiny beetle walks on the underside of the surface of water
A pair of researchers from the University of Newcastle and the German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research has documented a water scavenger beetle walking on the undersurface of a body of water. In their paper published in the journal Ethology, John Gould and Jose Valdez describe the beetle and suggest some theories to explain the unique behavior.
8h
Why does Mercury have such a big iron core? Magnetism!
A new study disputes the prevailing hypothesis on why Mercury has a big core relative to its mantle (the layer between a planet's core and crust). For decades, scientists argued that hit-and-run collisions with other bodies during the formation of our solar system blew away much of Mercury's rocky mantle and left the big, dense, metal core inside. But new research reveals that collisions are not t
2h
Penn scientists correct genetic blindness with single injection into the eye
This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have reversed a genetic form of blindness in a patient using just one course of antisense oligonucleotide therapy, Clinical OMICS reports. The therapy, which takes aim at mutant RNA, was injected into the patient's eyes a year ago, in a trial treating Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA)
3h
Pig genes in pig-boar hybrids in Fukushima exclusion zone found to be diminishing
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Japan, and one in Norway has found evidence that suggests domesticated pig genes in pig-boar hybrids living in the Fukushima exclusion zone are diminishing. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their genetic study of tissue samples taken from wild boar, pigs and hybrids in the exclusion zo
7h
NASA's self-driving Perseverance Mars rover 'takes the wheel'
NASA's newest six-wheeled robot on Mars, the Perseverance rover, is beginning an epic journey across a crater floor seeking signs of ancient life. That means the rover team is deeply engaged with planning navigation routes, drafting instructions to be beamed up, even donning special 3D glasses to help map their course.
8h
A Cultured Meat Factory in Israel Will Churn Out 5,000 Bioreactor Burgers a Day
In August 2013, food critics in London sampled the world's first lab-grown hamburger . Opinions on taste and texture varied, but most agreed it wasn't all that different than meat from an animal. At the time, the cultured meat's taste and texture didn't seem like too big of a concern, because the cost of making the burger—a cool $330,000—meant this technology was years away from reaching the aver
7h
Smart technology is not making us dumber: study
There are plenty of negatives associated with smart technology—tech neck, texting and driving, blue light rays—but there is also a positive: the digital age is not making us stupid, says University of Cincinnati social/behavioral expert Anthony Chemero.
2h
Baby beasts: Love and evolution in the animal kingdom
David Attenborough, asked a few years ago by journalist Joanna Nikodemska about the animal he finds most interesting, answered after some consideration that he's most fascinated by a three-year-old human child, whose potential for development and adaptation are simply limitless. The same journalist and I have been verifying this opinion for over eight years now – indeed, observing the development
4h
The Only Thing Integrating America
Stephen Menendian, a researcher at UC Berkeley, has long worried that Americans don't understand how pervasive housing segregation is. They couldn't, he reasoned: Much of the research on it has failed to fully capture its scope. The dominant tool that scholars have used to assess the problem, known as the dissimilarity index, measures how racially mixed a given area is. According to the dissimila
9h
The Books Briefing: The Quiet Skill of Mass-Market Novels
In dozens of novels written over a decades-long career, the romance writer Jackie Collins sharply observed the role of sex and power in Hollywood . She wrote incisively about abuse in the industry and empowered female characters who found liberation in a male-dominated world. She was brilliant and prescient—and overlooked in literary circles by those who wrote off her work as trashy airport smut.
6h
Synthetic biology circuits can respond within seconds
Synthetic biology offers a way to engineer cells to perform novel functions, such as glowing with fluorescent light when they detect a certain chemical. Usually, this is done by altering cells so they express genes that can be triggered by a certain input.
8h
Aristotle's guide to the elderly and ancient Greek wisdom
Life is full of complicated and difficult moments, but we can become better at dealing with them. This practical wisdom is a cornerstone of Aristotle's ethics. When we practice this skill, we become more adept at seeing situations and people differently — not unlike an artist viewing a painting. The elderly and experienced of this world have such wisdom in spades. But those of us in the West rare
8h
The Near-Holy Experience of Watching Euro 2020
After having been postponed for a year because of the coronavirus pandemic, the quadrennial European soccer championship began in June, hosted by 11 different cities across the continent. Euro 2020 (as it has continued to be called despite now taking place in 2021) follows a season unlike any we had seen before in world football, during which many teams across the globe played the majority of the
4h
A globally important microbial process hidden on marine particles
Nitrogen is essential for all life on Earth. In the global oceans however, this element is scarce, and nitrogen availability is therefore critical for the growth of marine life. Some bacteria found in marine waters can convert nitrogen gas (N2) to ammonia (known as N2 fixation), and thereby supply the marine food web with nitrogen.
2h
BBC Mocked For Teaching Kids Climate Change Will Have Nice Upsides
Both Sides Even reputable news organizations can utterly screw up, which is exactly what the BBC did when it published a widely-mocked study guide for children that listed 15 "positive impacts" that global climate change could have on the world and the UK. The guide was promptly scrubbed of its "climate change is good, actually" content after widespread criticism, Earther reports . But the fact r
9min
Observation, simulation, and AI join forces to reveal a clear universe
Astronomers have developed a new artificial intelligence (AI) technique to remove noise in astronomical data due to random variations in galaxy shapes. After extensive training and testing on large mock data created by supercomputer simulations, they then applied this new tool to actual data from Japan's Subaru Telescope and found that the mass distribution derived from using this method is consis
19min
How ethane-consuming archaea pick up their favorite dish
Hot vents in the deep sea are home to microbes that feed on ethane. Now researchers have succeeded in finding an important component in the microbial conversion of the gas. They were able to decode the structure of the enzyme responsible for the ethane fixation.
48min
Loss of function of a DMR6 ortholog in tomato confers broad-spectrum disease resistance [Plant Biology]
Plant diseases are among the major causes of crop yield losses around the world. To confer disease resistance, conventional breeding relies on the deployment of single resistance (R) genes. However, this strategy has been easily overcome by constantly evolving pathogens. Disabling susceptibility (S) genes is a promising alternative to R…
54min
Death toll from Northwest heat wave expected to keep rising
Each day, more deaths are being linked to the heat wave that struck the Pacific Northwest this past week, with medical staff who treated people overwhelmed by temperatures well above 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 Celsius) saying the toll from the extreme weather will keep creeping up.
1h
Solving a long-standing mystery about the desert's rock art canvas
Wander around a desert most anywhere in the world, and eventually you'll notice dark-stained rocks, especially where the sun shines most brightly and water trickles down or dew gathers. In some spots, if you're lucky, you might stumble upon ancient art—petroglyphs—carved into the stain. For years, however, researchers have understood more about the petroglyphs than the mysterious dark stain, calle
2h
After routing de Soto, Chickasaws repurposed Spanish objects for everyday use
Archaeologists have unearthed a rare trove of more than 80 metal objects in Mississippi thought to be from Hernando de Soto's 16th-century expedition through the Southeast. Many of the objects were repurposed by the resident Chickasaws as household tools and ornaments, an unusual practice at a time when European goods in North America were few and often reserved for leaders.
2h
Graphene additive manufacturing for flexible and printable electronics
Research led by Kansas State University's Suprem Das, assistant professor of industrial and manufacturing systems engineering, in collaboration with Christopher Sorensen, university distinguished professor of physics, shows potential ways to manufacture graphene-based nano-inks for additive manufacturing of supercapacitors in the form of flexible and printable electronics.
2h
Transparent communication about negative features of COVID-19 vaccines decreases acceptance but increases trust [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
During the rapid development and rolling out of vaccines against COVID-19, researchers have called for an approach of "radical transparency," in which vaccine information is transparently disclosed to the public, even if negative information can decrease vaccine uptake. Consistent with theories about the psychology of conspiracy beliefs, these calls predict…
2h
Inhalable nanocatchers for SARS-CoV-2 inhibition [Medical Sciences]
The global coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)–like coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), presents an urgent health crisis. More recently, an increasing number of mutated strains of SARS-CoV-2 have been identified globally. Such mutations, especially those on the spike glycoprotein to render its higher binding affinity to…
2h
Ongoing global and regional adaptive evolution of SARS-CoV-2 [Microbiology]
Understanding the trends in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) evolution is paramount to control the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed more than 300,000 high-quality genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 variants available as of January 2021. The results show that the ongoing evolution of SARS-CoV-2 during the pandemic is characterized primarily…
2h
A postreplicative C5-cytosine hypermodification triggered by bacteriophage methyltransferase and hydroxylase [Biochemistry]
Viruses of bacteria, also known as bacteriophages, harbor the greatest diversity of DNA modifications identified to date. To fight against restriction endonucleases of their hosts, bacteriophages modify their genomic DNA through introduction of various moieties including amino acids, polyamines, and sugars (1, 2). A series of transformations are involved in…
2h
Statistical analysis of ENDOR spectra [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Electron–nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measures the hyperfine interaction of magnetic nuclei with paramagnetic centers and is hence a powerful tool for spectroscopic investigations extending from biophysics to material science. Progress in microwave technology and the recent availability of commercial electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometers up to an electron Larmor frequency…
2h
Cytoklepty in the plankton: A host strategy to optimize the bioenergetic machinery of endosymbiotic algae [Ecology]
Endosymbioses have shaped the evolutionary trajectory of life and remain ecologically important. Investigating oceanic photosymbioses can illuminate how algal endosymbionts are energetically exploited by their heterotrophic hosts and inform on putative initial steps of plastid acquisition in eukaryotes. By combining three-dimensional subcellular imaging with photophysiology, carbon flux imaging, a
2h
Emergent inequality and business cycles in a simple behavioral macroeconomic model [Economic Sciences]
Standard macroeconomic models assume that households are rational in the sense that they are perfect utility maximizers and explain economic dynamics in terms of shocks that drive the economy away from the steady state. Here we build on a standard macroeconomic model in which a single rational representative household makes…
2h
Matrix lumican endocytosed by immune cells controls receptor ligand trafficking to promote TLR4 and restrict TLR9 in sepsis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Infections and inflammation are profoundly influenced by the extracellular matrix (ECM), but their molecular underpinnings are ill defined. Here, we demonstrate that lumican, an ECM protein normally associated with collagens, is elevated in sepsis patients' blood, while lumican-null mice resolve polymicrobial sepsis poorly, with reduced bacterial clearance and greater body…
2h
Loss of peptide:N-glycanase causes proteasome dysfunction mediated by a sugar-recognizing ubiquitin ligase [Cell Biology]
Mutations in the human peptide:N-glycanase gene (NGLY1), which encodes a cytosolic de–N-glycosylating enzyme, cause a congenital autosomal recessive disorder. In rodents, the loss of Ngly1 results in severe developmental delay or lethality, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. In this study, we found that deletion of Fbxo6 (also known as…
2h
NYUAD study maps nanobody structure, leading to new ways to potentially fight diseases
For the first time in the UAE, researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi have used nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to determine the structure of a specific nanobody, Nb23, potentially leading to a better understanding of how this small protein derived from an antibody type, found only in camelids (i.e camels, llamas, and alpacas) and sharks, can fight diseases ranging from rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and
3h
Cancer: Immunotherapies without side effects?
Immunotherapy has revolutionized the field of cancer treatment. However, inflammatory reactions in healthy tissues frequently trigger side effects that can be serious. Scientists (UNIGE/Harvard Medical School) have succeeded in establishing the differences between deleterious immune reactions and those targeting tumor cells that are sought after. It appears that while the immune mechanisms are sim
3h
High-strength nanocrystalline intermetallics with room temperature deformability enabled by nanometer thick grain boundaries
Although intermetallics are attractive for their high strength, many of them are often brittle at room temperature, thereby severely limiting their potential as structural materials. Here, we report on a previously unidentified deformable nanocrystalline CoAl intermetallics with Co-rich thick grain boundaries (GBs). In situ micropillar compression studies show that nanocrystalline CoAl with thick
3h
On-chip transporting arresting and characterizing individual nano-objects in biological ionic liquids
Understanding and controlling the individual behavior of nanoscopic matter in liquids, the environment in which many such entities are functioning, is both inherently challenging and important to many natural and man-made applications. Here, we transport individual nano-objects, from an assembly in a biological ionic solution, through a nanochannel network and confine them in electrokinetic nanov
3h
Pinching the cortex of live cells reveals thickness instabilities caused by myosin II motors
The cell cortex is a contractile actin meshwork, which determines cell shape and is essential for cell mechanics, migration, and division. Because its thickness is below optical resolution, there is a tendency to consider the cortex as a thin uniform two-dimensional layer. Using two mutually attracted magnetic beads, one inside the cell and the other in the extracellular medium, we pinch the cort
3h
Changes in global terrestrial live biomass over the 21st century
Live woody vegetation is the largest reservoir of biomass carbon, with its restoration considered one of the most effective natural climate solutions. However, terrestrial carbon fluxes remain the largest uncertainty in the global carbon cycle. Here, we develop spatially explicit estimates of carbon stock changes of live woody biomass from 2000 to 2019 using measurements from ground, air, and spa
3h
Adhesion dynamics in the neocortex determine the start of migration and the post-migratory orientation of neurons
The neocortex is stereotypically organized into layers of excitatory neurons arranged in a precise parallel orientation. Here we show that dynamic adhesion both preceding and following radial migration is essential for this organization. Neuronal adhesion is regulated by the Mowat-Wilson syndrome-associated transcription factor Zeb2 (Sip1/Zfhx1b) through direct repression of independent adhesion
3h
Single-cell damagenome profiling unveils vulnerable genes and functional pathways in human genome toward DNA damage
We report a novel single-cell whole-genome amplification method (LCS-WGA) that can efficiently capture spontaneous DNA damage existing in single cells. We refer to these damage-associated single-nucleotide variants as "damSNVs," and the whole-genome distribution of damSNVs as the damagenome. We observed that in single human neurons, the damagenome distribution was significantly correlated with th
3h
Systematic dissection of transcriptional regulatory networks by genome-scale and single-cell CRISPR screens
Millions of putative transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) have been cataloged in the human genome, yet their functional relevance in specific pathophysiological settings remains to be determined. This is critical to understand how oncogenic transcription factors (TFs) engage specific TREs to impose transcriptional programs underlying malignant phenotypes. Here, we combine cutting edge CRISP
3h
Synthetic auxotrophy remains stable after continuous evolution and in coculture with mammalian cells
Understanding the evolutionary stability and possible context dependence of biological containment techniques is critical as engineered microbes are increasingly under consideration for applications beyond biomanufacturing. While synthetic auxotrophy previously prevented Escherichia coli from exhibiting detectable escape from batch cultures, its long-term effectiveness is unknown. Here, we report
3h
COUP-TFI specifies the medial entorhinal cortex identity and induces differential cell adhesion to determine the integrity of its boundary with neocortex
Development of cortical regions with precise, sharp, and regular boundaries is essential for physiological function. However, little is known of the mechanisms ensuring these features. Here, we show that determination of the boundary between neocortex and medial entorhinal cortex (MEC), two abutting cortical regions generated from the same progenitor lineage, relies on COUP-TFI (chicken ovalbumin
3h
Novel insights into the design of stretchable electrical systems
Soft electronics have recently gathered considerable interest because of their biomechanical compatibility. An important feature of deformable conductors is their electrical response to strain. While development of stretchable materials with high gauge factors has attracted considerable attention, there is a growing need for stretchable conductors whose response to deformation can be accurately e
3h
The mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein is essential for initiation of mtDNA replication
We report a role for the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA binding protein (mtSSB) in regulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication initiation in mammalian mitochondria. Transcription from the light-strand promoter (LSP) is required both for gene expression and for generating the RNA primers needed for initiation of mtDNA synthesis. In the absence of mtSSB, transcription from LSP is strongly u
3h
A live single-cell reporter assay links intratumor heterogeneity to metastatic proclivity in Ewing sarcoma
Targeting of the most aggressive tumor cell subpopulations is key for effective management of most solid malignancies. However, the metastable nature of tumor heterogeneity, which allows cells to transition between strong and weak tumorigenic phenotypes, and the lack of reliable markers of tumor-promoting properties hamper identification of the most relevant cells. To overcome these obstacles, we
3h
ACTN3 genotype influences skeletal muscle mass regulation and response to dexamethasone
Homozygosity for the common ACTN3 null polymorphism ( ACTN3 577X) results in α-actinin-3 deficiency in ~20% of humans worldwide and is linked to reduced sprint and power performance in both elite athletes and the general population. α-Actinin-3 deficiency is also associated with reduced muscle mass, increased risk of sarcopenia, and altered muscle wasting response induced by denervation and immob
3h
Restructuring of the plasma membrane upon damage by LC3-associated macropinocytosis
The plasma membrane shapes and protects the eukaryotic cell from its surroundings and is crucial for cell life. Although initial repair mechanisms to reseal injured membranes are well established, less is known about how cells restructure damaged membranes in the aftermath to restore homeostasis. Here, we show that cells respond to plasma membrane injury by activating proteins associated with mac
3h
Syntrophic interspecies electron transfer drives carbon fixation and growth by Rhodopseudomonas palustris under dark, anoxic conditions
In natural anoxic environments, anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria fix CO 2 by photoheterotrophy, photoautotrophy, or syntrophic anaerobic photosynthesis. Here, we describe electroautotrophy, a previously unidentified dark CO 2 fixation mode enabled by the electrosyntrophic interaction between Geobacter metallireducens and Rhodopseudomonas palustris. After an electrosyntrophic coculture is formed
3h
Root-knot nematode chemotaxis is positively regulated by L-galactose sidechains of mucilage carbohydrate rhamnogalacturonan-I
Root-knot nematodes (RKNs) are plant parasites and major agricultural pests. RKNs are thought to locate hosts through chemotaxis by sensing host-secreted chemoattractants; however, the structures and properties of these attractants are not well understood. Here, we describe a previously unknown RKN attractant from flaxseed mucilage that enhances infection of Arabidopsis and tomato, which resemble
3h
Exendin-4 gene modification and microscaffold encapsulation promote self-persistence and antidiabetic activity of MSCs
Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based therapy to combat diabetic-associated metabolic disorders is hindered by impoverished cell survival and limited therapeutic effects under high glucose stress. Here, we genetically engineered MSCs with Exendin-4 (MSC-Ex-4), a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analog, and demonstrated their boosted cellular functions and antidiabetic efficacy in the type 2 diabetes m
3h
Protection of K18-hACE2 mice and ferrets against SARS-CoV-2 challenge by a single-dose mucosal immunization with a parainfluenza virus 5-based COVID-19 vaccine
Transmission-blocking vaccines are urgently needed to reduce transmission of SARS-CoV 2, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic. The upper respiratory tract is an initial site of SARS-CoV-2 infection and, for many individuals, remains the primary site of virus replication. An ideal COVID-19 vaccine should reduce upper respiratory tract virus replication and block transmission as well as protect again
3h
A methylotrophic origin of methanogenesis and early divergence of anaerobic multicarbon alkane metabolism
Methanogens are considered as one of the earliest life forms on Earth, and together with anaerobic methane-oxidizing archaea, they have crucial effects on climate stability. However, the origin and evolution of anaerobic alkane metabolism in the domain Archaea remain controversial. Here, we present evidence that methylotrophic methanogenesis was the ancestral form of this metabolism. Carbon dioxi
3h
More than half of wheelchair users with spinal cord injury needed repairs in past 6 months
"Based on what we learned in the survey, there are some simple measures, such as providing a borrowed wheelchair to people so they have mobility while their chair is being repaired, that could reduce the adverse consequences," said Dr. Dyson-Hudson. "Other facilitators include increasing the speed of repairs, training people in wheelchair maintenance, and routinely scheduling follow-up appointment
3h
Insect-sized robot navigates mazes with the agility of a cheetah
Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have created an insect-scale robot that can swerve and pivot with the agility of a cheetah, giving it the ability to traverse complex terrain and quickly avoid unexpected obstacles. Small, robust robots like these could be ideal for conducting search and rescue operations or investigating other hazardous situations, such as scoping out potential
4h
Lottery-based incentives do not increase COVID-19 vaccination rates
Would you be more willing to get vaccinated against the COVID-19 virus if you could participate in a lottery for cash and prizes? The answer was surprisingly no, according to Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers who found that Ohio's "Vax-a-Million" lottery-based incentive system, intended to increase COVID-19 vaccination rates, was not associated with an increase in COVD-19 vac
4h
American Journal of Medical Quality supplement explores innovative solutions to health care quality and performance improvement
For health care organizations looking to improve performance and patient experiences, implementing data-driven solutions can be effective when focusing on addressing health equity and reducing patient length of stay. These topics are explored in selected member-submitted abstracts from the 2020 Vizient® Connections Education Summit that appear in a special supplement to the July/August 2021 issue
5h
Solar hydrogen for Antarctica — study shows advantages of thermally coupled approach
Their conclusion: in extremely cold regions, it can be considerably more efficient to attach the PV modules directly to the electrolyser, i.e. to thermally couple them. This is because the waste heat from the PV modules increases the efficiency of electrolysis in this environment. The results of this study are also relevant for other cold regions on Earth, such as Alaska, Canada, and high mountain
5h
Inside the lungs, a new hope for protection against flu damage
The molecule, known as DAF, increases disease severity in mice upon infection with Influenza A virus, the most prevalent cause of the seasonal flu. Understanding this novel virulence mechanism of influenza and identifying the intrinsic factors that determine disease severity opens new possibilities for finding therapeutic targets for resilience to viral infections.
5h
Big data are no substitute for personal input in surveys
When the analysis of digital data reaches its limits, methods that focus on observations made by individuals can be useful. In contexts such as the coronavirus pandemic, a method called human social sensing can elicit information that is difficult to obtain from digital trace data. Prof. Frauke Kreuter at Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich is now using this method with the global "Cov
5h
How ethane-consuming archaea pick up their favorite food
Hot vents in the deep sea are home to microbes that feed on ethane. They were discovered recently from scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology. Now the researchers from Bremen succeeded in finding an important component in the microbial conversion of the gas. They were able to decode the structure of the enzyme responsible for the ethane fixation. The structure highlights so
5h
Three-in-one approach boosts the silencing power of CRISPR
Originally discovered as a bacterial mode of defense against invading viruses, the remarkable ability of CRISPR-Cas9 to modify specific locations of DNA has made it a researcher favorite among gene editing tools. The ongoing effort to explore further possibilities of the CRISPR-Cas9 system is ushering in newer developments to this tool. In one of the latest refinements of the technique, as illustr
5h
How music streaming transformed songwriting | Björn Ulvaeus
Money, money, money … in the music business, there seems to be little left for the songwriters that fuel it. ABBA co-founder Björn Ulvaeus calls for the industry to support its most valuable asset, breaking down how the streaming revolution impacts creator royalties, careers and craft — and outlines what can be done to truly thank artists for the music.
6h
Air pollution during pregnancy may affect growth of newborn babies
Maternal exposure to air pollution during pregnancy has often been linked to adverse effects on the health of the newborn. However, there are very few studies on the subject. A study conducted at the UPV/EHU has just concluded in a paper published in the journal Environmental Research that the stages most sensitive to air pollution are the early and late months of pregnancy.
6h
Energy production at Mutriku remains constant even if the wave force increases
The EOLO research group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has confirmed the increase in the power flow of the waves in the Bay of Biscay from 1900 onwards. It has identified ten types of sea state and has used a statistical model to link them to the output of the Mutriku wave farm. So it has been possible to calculate the amount of electrical power that could have been produced durin
6h
Surprise bills for childbirth
What The Study Did: Researchers estimated the frequency and magnitude of surprise bills for deliveries and newborn hospitalizations, which are the leading reasons for hospitalization in the United States, to illustrate the potential benefits of federal legislation that will protect families from most surprise bills.
6h
The liver may be key to new diabetes treatments
Researchers believe the liver may hold the key to new, preventative Type 2 diabetes treatments. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin , a scientific breakthrough that transformed Type 1 diabetes, once known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes, from a terminal disease into a manageable condition. Today, Type 2 diabetes is 24 times more prevalent than Type
6h
Open-source camera system that images natural habitats as they appear to rodents
During the course of evolution, animals have adapted to the particular demands of their local environments in ways that increased their chances of survival and reproduction. This is also true of diverse aspects of the sensory systems that enable species to perceive their surroundings. In the case of the visual system, these adaptations have shaped features such as the positioning of the eyes and t
6h
How the potato blight pathogen penetrates the plant
In the 19th century, the notorious pathogen Phytophthora infestans caused a large famine in Ireland and other parts of Western Europe. To this day, it continues to pose a major threat to global food production. It has long been a mystery how this microscopically small organism and other members of the Phytophthora genus mechanically gain entry through the protective layer on the leaves of crops. I
6h
Efficient phosphorus use can prevent cropland expansion
More efficient use of phosphorus fertilizers would make it possible to meet food demand in 2050, without using more of the world's land for agriculture. This is what environmental scientists José Mogollón and colleagues have discovered by working out various future scenarios for food production and trade. This could be achieved with only 7% more phosphorus fertilizer. And if our future is more sus
6h
Guadalupe fur seals continue to recover as new colony discovered
Guadalupe fur seals (Arctocephalus townsendi) have established a large resting colony in the Gulf of California—bringing the total number of sites where this endangered species now occurs to just four. This new haul-out was discovered on El Farallón de San Ignacio Island, along the mainland coast of Mexico, according to researchers from Mexico and the University of British Columbia.
6h
The missing ocean 'plastic sink'
Plastics are a growing problem for natural ecosystems around the globe, and in particular for our marine and freshwater environments. Rivers are the leading source of plastic pollution, as it has been estimated that they deliver several million metric tons of plastic annually to our oceans from poor land-based waste management. The problem is that the estimates made for plastics flowing from the r
6h
Researchers develop a viscosity measurement technique for both liquids and gases
NIMS and Harvard University jointly developed a technique capable of measuring the viscosity of both liquids and gasses using the same device. This device can be used to identify unknown fluids based on their viscosities and may potentially be used to analyze biological fluids (e.g., breath and blood) for health monitoring and medical checkups. The device may also be used to investigate the physic
6h
A novel strategy for natural product biosynthesis
Microorganisms produce natural products, for example, as disease-causing virulence factors or as defense substances against predators and competitors. A team led by Dr. Robin Teufel and first author Ying Duan from the Institute of Biology II at the Faculty of Biology of the University of Freiburg, together with researchers from the University of Bonn, have now discovered a novel enzyme that is cru
6h
At what temperature the weather becomes a problem
When extreme heat becomes more frequent and temperatures remain high for extended periods of time, as it is currently in Canada and in the American Northwest, physiological stress increases in humans, animals and crops. Prof. Senthold Asseng, director of the World Agricultural Systems Center at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an overview of thresholds and adaptation strategies.
6h
Ojämlikhet hinder för vänskap
Nyanlända och etablerade svenskar har träffats i ett vänskapsprojekt i Umeå. Men skillnad i gruppernas livsvillkor ställer sig ibland i vägen för vänskapen. De flesta kan nog skriva under på att vänskap är viktigt. Men kanske blir det särskilt tydligt för den som kommer ensam till ett nytt land. Att ha eller inte ha vänner kan göra stor skillnad för den som försöker starta ett nytt liv på en plat
6h
The Underside of the Aducanumab Approval
I would like to recommend this piece at Stat about the details of the Biogen aducanumab approval. It's behind the paywall, but it's a deeply reported piece from Adam Feuerstein, Matthew Herper, and Damian Garde about how in 2019 Biogen launched an effort to get their apparently failed drug approved by the FDA anyway. They called it "Project Onyx", renamed from the original "Project Phoenix" after
6h
Methylglyoxal detoxification deficits causes schizophrenia-like behavioral abnormalities
We generated a mouse model for a subgroup of schizophrenia patients by feeding Glo1 knockout mice VB6-deficent diets (KO/VB6(-)). We found that the KO/VB6(-) mice accumulated methylglyoxal (MG) in the brain and showed schizophrenia-like behavioral impairments. Furthermore, we found aberrant gene expression related to mitochondria function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of the KO/VB6(-) mice. Final
6h
Uncovering the genetic mechanism behind Rett syndrome
Kyushu University researchers found that the main gene that causes Rett syndrome, MeCP2, controls the differentiation pattern of neural stem cells through the microRNA miR-199a. Dysfunction in MeCP2 or miR-199a cause neural stem cells to produce more astrocytes than neurons. Furthermore, the researchers found that miR-199a mediates the production of Smad1, a downstream transcription factor of bone
6h
New solution for sleep apnoea
In an Australian world-first, researchers have successfully repurposed two existing medications to reduce the severity of sleep apnoea in people by at least 30 per cent. Affecting millions around the world, sleep apnoea is a condition where the upper airway from the back of the nose to the throat closes repetitively during sleep, restricting oxygen intake and causing people to wake as often as 100
6h
Color and flavor — pigments play a role in creating tasty tomatoes
Researchers from University of Tsukuba and University of Florida have found that pigments controlling the color of tomatoes also play a role in determining their flavor. By analyzing the pigment profiles of 157 different tomato varieties, the team showed that fruit with high chlorophyll levels had a higher sugar content, and that the carotenoid, prolycopene, is associated with an abundance of arom
6h
Lifespans of 130 years could be possible this century
Extreme longevity likely will continue to rise slowly by the end of this century, according to new research, with estimates showing that a lifespan of 125 years, or even 130 years, is possible. The number of people who live past the age of 100 has been on the rise for decades, up to nearly half a million people worldwide. There are, however, far fewer "supercentenarians," people who live to age 1
6h
Ryan vs. Big Chief | Street Outlaws: America's List
Stream Full Episodes of Street Outlaws: America's List: discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-americas-list Discovery ► https://go.discovery.com/tv-shows/street-outlaws-americas-list/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery We're on Instagram! https://instagram.com/Discovery Join Us on Facebook: https
7h
Rewilding cities: grow back greener, cleaner and healthier
One of the lasting legacies of COVID-19 pandemic, perhaps, is our increased appreciation of open green spaces across towns and cities. Those of us living in bustling cities, have experienced, to various extents, the power of nature, comforting us, both physically and mentally, during this unprecedented time of crisis.
7h
Improved algorithms help scientists monitor wildfires from space
Raging wildfires pump tiny pollutants into the air, degrading air quality across vast areas. These pollutants, or aerosols, can soar high into the atmosphere at the tops of smoke plumes or creep close to the ground where they pose a health risk to humans. To accurately track these pollutants and their spread, scientists need accurate monitoring systems that can see the whole picture.
7h
G4s: Another functional bit of the human genome?
A new study offers the first genome-wide evidence for the functional importance of unusual DNA structures. Some regions of the human genome where the DNA can fold into unusual three-dimensional structures called G-quadruplexes (G4s) show signs that they are preserved by natural selection. When G4s are located in the regulatory sequences that control how genes are expressed or in other functional,
7h
Modeling volcanic debris clouds
When a volcano violently erupts, a plume of ash and gases spews skyward. The hot slurry quickly rises into the atmosphere, where various atmospheric dynamics interact to shape the volcanic cloud's composition, height, and radiative properties. Volcanic clouds reflect solar radiation, cool Earth, cause weather extremes, and delay global warming, but scientists have long wondered exactly how volcani
7h
Image: Hubble sees a cluster of red, white, and blue
This image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope depicts the open star cluster NGC 330, which lies around 180,000 light-years away inside the Small Magellanic Cloud. The cluster—which is in the constellation Tucana (the Toucan)—contains a multitude of stars, many of which are scattered across this striking image.
8h
Image: Canada-US heatwave seen by satellite
While heatwaves are quite common during the summer months, the scorching heatwave hitting parts of western Canada and the U.S. has been particularly devastating—with temperature records shattered and hundreds of people falling victim to the extreme heat.
8h
This Fun Interactive Game Teaches Kids Coding Skills Without Computers or Tablets
As a parent, noone has to tell you how important STEM subjects are for your children's early development. That's because studies show an early education in STEM subjects help children develop the kinds of skills necessary to succeed in the jobs that are leading the future . Research also indicates early childhood is the critical window for development — not only for cognition, but also for behavi
8h
What to do with food waste? Well, that depends
The expected decline in the number of landfills across the United States coupled with bans on disposing large amounts of organic waste in landfills that have been enacted in multiple states has prompted researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to examine other ways to grapple with the issue of food waste disposal.
8h
Ten talismans for a new understanding of cities in post-pandemic times
For more than a year and a half, the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has kept the world locked down. Schools, universities, cafés and restaurants, cultural institutions and stores have been closed for long stretches of 2020 and 2021. In many parts of the world, travel has slowed to a crawl and sometimes stopped completely. While the number of flights is climbing as some restrictions are lifted, they remain si
8h
Emils hyss innehåller ett stort mått av solidaritet
Emil i Lönneberga utmålas ofta som en busunge på kant med vuxenvärlden. Men Emils hyss kan lika gärna förstås som solidariska handlingar, menar litteraturprofessor Björn Sundmark som hittat en ny ingång till Astrid Lindgrens författarskap. – Att Emil ses som en illbatting är ju bara vad som syns på ytan. Det finns i själva verket en stark solidaritet inom familjen men även till andra i socknen, s
9h
Get Summer's Best Gadgets For Up To 83% Off This 4th Of July
Summer means a need for new gadgets, especially when the outdoors beckons campers, fishing enthusiasts , and everyday folks hanging out in parks. For a limited time, check out these summer deals, on great gadgets and products for staying entertained outside, and comfortable inside. Sitpack 2.0 Compact Collapsible Seat Rated 4.5/5 stars by verified users, the Sitpack folds the size of a soda can a
10h
Any advances in curing Hyperthyroidism?
Thyroid issues never progressed for decades. And the only 3 options has always been Surgery, a pill that destroy your thyroid and leave you on thyroid medicine for life, or the best option in my opinion which is taking methimazole for about a year and have about 50% of being cured And future treatments? submitted by /u/Nanoer [link] [comments]
11h
People are underestimating the threat of automation for society
Historically people shifted from one sector to another when automation reduced the number of workers needed. This time is different though because there is no fourth sector into which people can shift. Also nearly all good paying jobs are high skill. It is no longer possible to go from farming to the factory where you are trained for a few days or weeks and get a decent wage. Nowadays one require
11h
A curved host and second guest cooperatively inhibit the dynamic motion of corannulene
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24344-w The preparation of artificial host–guest systems that display dynamic adaptation during guest binding is challenging. Here the authors report a chiral self-assembled tetrahedral cage featuring curved walls that reconfigures stereochemically to fit fullerene guests, regulates corannulene inversion, and enables th
11h
Molecular-scale visualization of sarcomere contraction within native cardiomyocytes
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24049-0 Sarcomeres, the building blocks of striated muscles, comprise ordered actomyosin arrays involved in force production. Here, the authors visualize sarcomere organization in neonatal cardiomyocytes with in situ cryo-electron tomography, revealing a reduced order of the thin filaments, their sliding and functional
11h
Super-elasticity at 4 K of covalently crosslinked polyimide aerogels with negative Poisson's ratio
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24388-y The deep cryogenic temperatures present significant challenges for the performance of elastic materials. Here, the authors present a low density covalently crosslinked polyimide (PI) aerogels with super-elastic properties at deep cryogenic temperatures.
11h
The T cell receptor repertoire of tumor infiltrating T cells is predictive and prognostic for cancer survival
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24343-x Precision medicine needs prognostic markers to select the patients that will benefit more from targeted therapy. Authors show here that high level of baseline T cell receptor diversity is an indicator of favourable prognosis in multiple cancer types, and monoclonal expansion of T-cells correlates with good respo
11h
Dissecting spatial heterogeneity and the immune-evasion mechanism of CTCs by single-cell RNA-seq in hepatocellular carcinoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24386-0 Circulating tumour cells can be useful for monitoring disease progression but how they survive in the circulatory system is unclear. Here, the authors use single-cell sequencing of circulating tumour cells from multiple vascular sites in liver cancer patients and identify genes that may help the cells survive.
11h
Liquid flow reversibly creates a macroscopic surface charge gradient
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24270-x Reactions at the interface between mineral surfaces and flowing liquids are ubiquitous in nature. Here the authors explore, using surface-specific sum frequency generation spectroscopy and numeric calculations, how the liquid flow affects the charging and dissolution rates leading to flow-dependent charge gradie
11h
Book Review: Edgar Allan Poe's Engagement With American Science
In "The Reason for the Darkness of the Night," John Tresch makes the case for Edgar Allan Poe's overlooked role in the forging of American science. Along the way, Tresch offers a heady portrait of the crackpot theories, unscrupulous press, and genuine science taking shape around Poe in antebellum America.
11h
Psykiatrien har stadig svært ved at holde på psykiaterne
Problemer med rekruttering er velkendte i psykiatrien, der samtidig har svært ved at fastholde næste generation af psykiatere. Ny analyse fra Yngre Læger viser, at der ikke er sket forbedringer siden 2018 på områder som travlhed og videre- og efteruddannelse. Yngre læger efterlyser politisk prioritering.
12h
After Florida Condo Collapse, Engineers Search for Answers
The quiet, highly technical work of structural engineers and building inspectors entered the spotlight after the sudden collapse late last week of Champlain Towers South, a 12-story condo in Surfside, Florida. As of Thursday evening, 18 bodies had been recovered and some 145 more people remained missing.
12h
Autoantikroppar möjlig bidragande orsak till fibromyalgi
Forskare har hittat en möjlig bidragande orsak till den svårbehandlade smärtsjukdomen fibromyalgi. Den aktuella studien visar att fibromyalgipatienternas antikroppar spelar en viktig roll för utvecklingen av sjukdomssymtom. – Vår studie tyder på att det finns en autoimmun komponent i sjukdomsbilden hos patienter med fibromyalgi, och att dessa patienters antikroppar binder till celler som är en de
13h
Schneider Shorts 2.07.2021- Rethink Evolution!
Schneider Shorts 2.07.2021: fraudulent COVID-19 quackery gets learned society approval, China colonizes Mars, CNRS explains the difference between plagiarism and "unacknowledged borrowings", with Botox against depression from Germany, Nasal Telomere Extension from Harvard and Eugenics Superhero Vaccines from Stanford, and Smut Clyde slandering Ukrainians behind my back.
16h
Closer to cure: New imaging method tracks cancer treatment efficacy in preclinical studies
Several cancers grow through immunosuppression, making immunotherapy a promising approach to treating cancers. But several approaches against one highly sought-after target molecule for such treatment have failed in late stage clinical trials. To find out why, scientists will need to study what happens to the target molecule over time once the treatment is administered. Now, in a game-changer for
17h
Novel technique decodes mechanisms controlling executive functions of the primate brain
Executive functions allow humans to manage daily activities, which use working memory, and decision-making. However, how these functions are mapped in a primate brain like that of humans, had evaded researchers for a long time. A group of researchers in Japan have now devised a novel chemogenetic method to dissect the neural pathways involved in high-order executive functions. Their findings are p
17h
Participate in Research Experiment: Responses to Visual Stimuli (James Bond, Batman, Superman, Doctor Who)
Hi there, I am studying Neuroscience at QUT in Australia. I am looking for participants to complete my online behavioural experiment. My thesis is in the field of visual perception, specifically person recognition. This is a two-part study which involves completing a face-sorting screening test and completing a behavioural task. In the behavioural task, you will press keyboard responses "matched"
20h
Imaging spectroscopy can predict water stress in wild blueberry fields
Imaging spectroscopy can help predict water stress in wild blueberry barrens, according to a new study. Researchers deployed a drone with a spectrometer to photograph wild blueberry fields, then process the images to measure reflected light spectra from plants for properties that would help them estimate water potential. Incorporating data from the images into models allowed them predict water str
20h
UCLA scientists say COVID-19 test offers solution for population-wide testing
In an article appearing in Nature Biomedical Engineering, a team of scientists from the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and UCLA School of Engineering report real-world results on SwabSeq, a high-throughput testing platform that uses sequencing to test thousands of samples at a time to detect COVID-19. They were able to perform more than 80,000 tests in less than two months, with the test sho
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