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KORTERE ARBEJDSUGE GIVER FORDELE: Experiment in Iceland shows promising results for shorter work weeks.  People from different work sectors participated in the experiment and not only the efficacy of their work improved, but also the quality of their personal lives. This could mean a change in work hours in future for everyone. 

https://futurism.com/the-byte/icelands-four-day-week-trial-workers-happier-productive
 
 
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Inherited memories of a chromosomal site
Most biological traits are inherited via genes, but there are exceptions to this rule. Two teams from the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have been investigating the location of centromeres—specific sites on chromosomes that are essential for cell division. They found that in the small worm Caenorhabiditis elegans, the transmission of the correct location of these sites to the offspring is not mediat
3h

LATEST

Double-jabbed contacts won't need to self-isolate from 16 August, says Javid
Close contacts of people in England who test positive will not have to self-isolate if they have had both vaccinations Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Close contacts of people in England who have tested positive for Covid will not have to self-isolate if they have received both their vaccinations, or if they are under 18, Sajid Javid has announced to the Commons. The
9h
Iceland's Four-Day Week Trial Made Workers Happier and More Productive
Long Weekend After an experimental drop to a four-day work week in Iceland, workers were both more productive and satisfied with their jobs and lives. The experiment, which included more than 2,500 Icelandic workers from a variety of public-sector industries including healthcare and education, supported the idea that paying people the same amount of money for less work resulted in widespread bene
3h
Chinese Scientists Say They Now Have the World's Most Powerful Quantum Computer
A team of researchers in China has claimed a new record in quantum computing, saying its new computer is far more powerful than any that came before it — including the best effort by the megacorporation Google. In a preprint uploaded to arXiv , the researchers claim their quantum computer was able to solve a problem using 56 out of its 66 qubits, the quantum equivalent of bits in a conventional c
5h
Ancient diamonds show Earth was primed for life's explosion at least 2.7 billion years ago
A unique study of ancient diamonds has shown that the basic chemical composition of the Earth's atmosphere which makes it suitable for life's explosion of diversity was laid down at least 2.7 billion years ago. Volatile gases conserved in diamonds found in ancient rocks were present in similar proportions to those found in today's mantle, which in turn indicates that there has been no fundamental
7h
Planting trees in Europe could lead to more rainfall
A combined team of researchers from ETH Zurich, Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science and Newcastle University, has found via statistical analysis and modeling that rainfall in Europe could be increased by planting more trees. In their paper published in the journal Nature Geoscience, the group describes using data from rain gauges across Europe to build their models. Jessica Baker with th
8h
Nordic countries endure heatwave as Lapland records hottest day since 1914
Kevo in Lapland recorded a temperature of 33.6C after Finland registered record heat in June Nordic countries have registered near-record temperatures over the weekend, including highs of 34C (93.2F) in some places. The latest figures came after Finland's national meteorological institute registered its hottest temperature for June since records began in 1844. Continue reading…
17h
11-Year-Old Gets Physics Degree, Says He'll Use It to Attain Technological Immortality
Getting Knowledge A 11-year-old boy from Belgium just graduated from the University of Antwerp with a bachelor's degree in physics, local newspaper De Telegraaf reports — and with the highest distinction. "I don't really care if I'm the youngest," Laurent Simons told the newspaper, as translated by Newsweek . "It's all about getting knowledge for me." It's an astonishing achievement — and in an e
4h
Neighbors Accuse Bitcoin Mining Facility of Warming Up Entire Lake
A retired gas-fired power plant was converted into a Bitcoin-mining facility in the Finger Lakes region of New York state — and NBC reports that neighbors say it's pumping serious amounts of heat into the lake's waters. "The lake is so warm you feel like you're in a hot tub," Abi Buddington, who loves close to the plant, told the outlet. The plant is taking in and pumping out over 100 million gal
7h
Scientists Spot Earth-Like Planets Floating Around Without Stars
Ridin' Solo A team of scientists managed to spot an entire population of freely-floating, Earth-sized exoplanets that are sailing through space rather than orbiting a star. By spotting the tiny fluctuations in a star's light when a planet passes in front of it — called a microlensing event because the planet's gravity lightly warps the star's light — researchers were able to spot dozens of free-f
3h
The 2 Ways to Raise a Country's Birth Rate
Americans aren't making as many babies as they used to. Last year, 3.6 million were born—the lowest count since 1979. The pandemic "baby bust" could push 2021's tally down even further; researchers have estimated that the coronavirus and its economic impact could lead to about 300,000 fewer births in the United States this year. News of declining birth rates is not always a bad thing. It can mean
6h
What Does Mitch McConnell Do Now?
To visit Mitch McConnell at his office in the Capitol, you must first pass through a faded world that he has meticulously preserved. A fireplace in the reception room still bears a crack left by a fire British soldiers set during the War of 1812. Through a doorway, a conference room displays portraits of former GOP Senate leaders, among them the luckless Charles McNary, who landed the job just wh
9h
To mask or not to mask: what will Johnson and others do after 19 July?
The PM says he will keep his covering in crowded places after England's rules change but what do his ministers and experts think? Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson has said he will continue to wear a mask in "crowded places" after mandatory requirements are dropped in England on 19 July. "What we're trying to do is move from a universal government diktat
11h
'Social' Mitochondria, Whispering Between Cells, Influence Health
During his doctoral research on the ties between aging and mitochondria, Martin Picard frequently saw micrographs of those energy-producing organelles. Yet it wasn't until fairly late in his graduate work that he first watched sped-up video of mitochondria moving inside live human cells, and the sight came as a revelation. Tagged with fluorescent dye, the mitochondria were neon squiggles crawling
5h
The Autocrat's Legacy
"W e have destroyed the myth that Fidesz is unbeatable," Gergely Karácsony said after defeating Viktor Orbán's party in Budapest's mayoral race in 2019. Now, he hopes to prove it at the national level too. After 12 years, Orbán claims near-complete control over Hungary's public funds, its institutions, and its media ecosystem. Hungarian elections are "free in the sense that no one stuffs the ball
11h
Elon Musk Says New Spacecraft Will "Chomp Up" Space Junk
Chomp L 'oeil Earth's orbit is becoming increasingly littered with our leftover garbage. More than 27,000 pieces of orbital debris of varying sizes are being tracked by the Department of Defense's global Space Surveillance Network. That could make launching rockets increasingly difficult in the future, let alone the danger space debris poses to space travelers. But in a Saturday tweet , SpaceX CE
1h
We Talked to the Guy Who Flies Around on a Giant Drone That He Built Himself
Last month, a mysterious man shocked New Yorkers and the world as he soared over Times Square on what appeared to be a giant drone — something approaching a real-life hoverboard, and which drew immediate comparison to the fictional Spider-Man villain, the Green Goblin. The man was Hunter Kowald, and he says the drone-like vehicle is his own design and creation that he calls the SkySurfer. Kowald'
5h
Scammers Inject Thousands of People With Fake Vaccines
Police in India recently broke up a massive ring of scammers who injected thousands of people with fake COVID-19 vaccines — and collected the profits from the worthless shots. The scammers injected about 2,500 victims with salt water instead of the coronavirus vaccines they promised, making off with about $28,000, CNN reports . The scammers ran over a dozen fake vaccination sites in and around Mu
6h
Elon Musk Says He's Surprised to Discover That Self-Driving Cars Are Difficult
Shocked-Pikachu.png After Tesla once again delayed the launch of its next "Full Self-Driving" (FSD) software beta, Elon Musk admitted that he's been caught off guard by just how difficult it is to develop autonomous vehicles. The upcoming beta of FSD 9 won't actually make a Tesla fully autonomous no matter what the name implies, Insider notes . But whenever it does come out, the beta will still b
1h
The Pop Music You Listen to Really Does Matter
Eras of music are commonly defined by particular sounds. The '80s had gated reverb , the aughts had Timbaland's beats, and the early 2020s have had the froggy, rasping splendor of Doja Cat's voice. On a slew of recent hits and on her new, third album, Planet Her , the 25-year-old rapper and singer continues to prove she has an extremely now sensibility: steeped in online humor, thrilled by physic
6h
The mystery of heavy elements in galactic cosmic rays
Scientists have used data from the Southwest Research Institute-led Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission to explain the presence of energetic heavy elements in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). GCRs are composed of fast-moving energetic particles, mostly hydrogen ions called protons, the lightest and most abundant elements in the universe. Scientists have long debated how trace amounts of heavy ions
5h
How much does it cost to start a business? There's a world map for that
As the old adage goes, you must spend money to make money. Just about anywhere, setting up shop requires a significant bit of cash. But as this world map shows, the cost varies greatly by country. Starting a business in the U.S. costs $735, which is relatively affordable at just 16 percent of the average monthly paycheck. Credit : Jason Kempin/Getty Images for iHeart Media Starting your own busin
6h
Stephen Hawking's Black Hole Theorem Confirmed by Gravitational Waves
Black holes can be perplexing and counterintuitive because they exist at the very edge of our current understanding of physics. Even as they're warping the fabric of the universe, black holes have to obey certain rules. For the first time, we have direct confirmation of a vitally important property of these dead stars. Researchers from MIT and other institutions have confirmed Stephen Hawking's b
10h
How Virtual Reality Unveiled a Unique Brain Wave That Could Boost Learning
As the rats ran down a short balance beam, stopping occasionally to poke their noses at a water fountain, their brains knew something was off. Inside the hippocampus, a brain region that documents the stories of your life, neurons sparked a strange type of electrical wave that washed over the region, altering its normal rhythm. You see, the rats were running in virtual reality (VR), one so rich a
6h
The Perverse Consequences of the NCAA Ruling
The Supreme Court has changed college admissions forever. The justices' decision late last month allowing NCAA Division I football and men's basketball programs to provide new educational incentives to student athletes created an overdue avenue for compensating student athletes in commercially lucrative sports, many of whom come from low-income backgrounds. And new rules the NCAA rolled out last
10h
Galaxy cluster Abell 3158 inspected in X-rays
Astronomers from the University of Bonn, Germany and elsewhere have used the eROSITA telescope onboard the Spektrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) mission to perform X-rays observations of a nearby galaxy cluster known as Abell 3158. Results of this observational campaign, published June 28 on arXiv.org, offer more clues on the properties of this giant structure.
9h
Want to tackle poverty? Start with blindness
One of the underreported tragedies of our time is that nearly 90% of the world's blind live in low-income countries where poverty and blindness perpetuate in a descending cycle. The main cause of this often needless and frequently avoidable blindness is cataracts , which affect 95 million people worldwide. In low- and middle-income countries cataracts account for 50% of all blindness , compared t
4h
Studies add to concern about climate tipping
Two model studies document the probability of climate tipping in Earth subsystems. The findings support the urgency of restricting CO2 emissions as abrupt climate changes might be less predictable and more widespread in the climate system than anticipated. The work is part of the European TiPES project, coordinated by the University of Copenhagen, Denmark but was conducted by Professor Michael Ghi
1h
We tried out the first statewide vaccine passport
On June 20, about 20,000 fans gathered at Madison Square Garden in New York City for a Foo Fighters concert. The venue was at full capacity for the first time since the start of the pandemic, but it wasn't a full return to normalcy: To get in, ticket holders needed to show proof that they'd been vaccinated—in the form of either a paper card or the state's Excelsior Pass, a much-debated smartphone
11h
Doctors Are Really Psyched About This New Weight Loss Drug
On the fourth of July, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new weight loss drug called semaglutide that doctors say could be a huge improvement in treatment for overweight patients. The drug, which is being marketed as Wegovy by Novo Nordisk, is actually the synthetic version of a hormone found in a Gila monster's deadly venom, according to Vox . In one clinical trial, the averag
2h
Study: In college, quarters are better than semesters
American universities often use semester calendars, but many still use the quarter system. Students at schools that switched to semesters from quarters got lower grades and took longer to graduate. The higher number of concurrent classes may be the cause of students' woes. An academic debate — "Are semesters or quarters better for college students?" — may finally have a definitive answer. A new s
4h
Understanding chronic pain (part one) – podcast
Chronic pain affects about 40% of the UK population. While there is growing recognition that pain can be an illness in and of itself, there is still a lot we don't know. Anand Jagatia hears from fibromyalgia sufferer Vicky Naylor on what it's like to live with chronic pain, and the Guardian's science correspondent Linda Geddes about the causes for these sometimes debilitating conditions Continue
11h
'I can't remember feeling as excited about the future': redesigning space travel for women
The drive for more women and greater diversity in the space sector will lead to new ideas and innovations, from spacesuits to toilets and beyond "Remember when Nasa sent a woman to space for only six days and they gave her 100 tampons and asked will that be enough?" So goes last year's viral TikTok referring to astronaut Sally Ride being asked by Nasa engineers in 1983 whether 100 tampons would b
6h
Significant solar flare erupts from sun
The sun emitted a significant solar flare peaking at 10:29 a.m. EDT on July 3, 2021. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event.
10h
New nanotech will enable a 'healthy' electric current production inside the human body
A new nanotechnology development by an international research team led by Tel Aviv University researchers will make it possible to generate electric currents and voltage within the human body through the activation of various organs (mechanical force). The researchers explain that the development involves a new and very strong biological material, similar to collagen, which is non-toxic and causes
5h
Nitrous oxide, a powerful greenhouse gas, is on the rise from ocean dead zones
In October 2019, I set sail with a team of scientists aboard the Canadian Coast Guard Vessel John P. Tully in the northeast Pacific Ocean, off the coast of Vancouver Island. Battling rough seas and lack of sleep, we spent the better part of a week working shoulder-to-shoulder in a small stand-up refrigerator, analyzing seafloor sediments to learn more about the effects of low-oxygen conditions on
10h
Scientists rejuvenate mouse brains with ketamine or flickering light
In defining periods of development, the brain re-organizes connections between its neurons more freely than in its adult form. Researchers have now discovered two methods to reopen such plasticity: repeated ketamine anesthesia and non-invasive 60 hertz light flickering. The findings may have the potential to become a therapeutic tool applicable to humans.
3min
A protein complex from plant stem cells regulates their division and response to stress
Researchers have discovered that two proteins, which are involved in the control of stem cells' division in plant roots, need each other for these cells to function properly. The study combines experimental work with plants and mathematical modeling. The mechanism provides knowledge that could be useful, for agriculture and for the design of efficient strategies in medicine and cosmetics that slow
38min
Get the Comprehensive Mental Healthcare You Need Without Leaving the House
More people than ever are suffering from things like anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Researchers started seeing the trend among millennials in the mid 2010s , citing things like student loan debt, the economy, and social media as possible causes. And things have only gotten worse during the pandemic. The good news is that, over the last decade, there has been a huge shift in the way people per
46min
In Lawsuit, Family Blames Tesla Autopilot For Death of Son
Autopilot Crash A fatal crash involving a Tesla Model 3 with Autopilot turned on is raising questions about the safety of the car company's self-driving feature, The New York Times reports . In August 2019, 15-year-old Jovani Maldonado died after being thrown from his family's Ford Explorer — he was reportedly not wearing a seatbelt — after being a collision with a Tesla Model 3, which was travel
46min
Schools in Barcelona create a map of the city's air pollution thanks to citizen science
A study led by University of Barcelona researchers and carried out together with more than 1,650 students and their family members from 18 educational centers in Barcelona shows that citizen science is a valid approach able for doing high quality science, and in this case, able to provide nitrogen dioxide values with an unprecedented resolution and to assess the impact of the pollution in the heal
50min
mRNA vaccines slash risk of COVID-19 infection by 91% in fully vaccinated people
People who receive mRNA COVID-19 vaccines are up to 91 percent less likely to develop the disease than those who are unvaccinated, according to a new nationwide study of eight sites, including Salt Lake City. For those few vaccinated people who do still get an infection, or "breakthrough" cases, the study suggests that vaccines reduce the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and shorten its duration.
53min
Secret to weathering climate change lies at our feet
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently discovered that the ability of agricultural grasses to withstand drought is directly related to the health of the microbial community living on their stems, leaves and seeds.
56min
Relationship between chromosomal instability and senescence revealed in Drosophila
Chromosomal instability is a feature of solid tumors such as carcinoma. Likewise, cellular senescence is a process that is highly related to cellular aging and its link to cancer is becoming increasingly clear. Scientists led by ICREA researcher Dr. Marco Milán at IRB Barcelona have revealed the link between chromosomal instability and cellular senescence.
1h
The evolution of vinegar flies is based on the variation of male sex pheromones
By analyzing the genomes of 99 species of vinegar flies and evaluating their chemical odor profiles and sexual behaviors, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology show that sex pheromones and the corresponding olfactory channels in the insect brain evolve rapidly and independently. Female flies are able to recognize conspecific males through their specific odor profiles. Intere
1h
Personalized medicine for cats with heart disease
Veterinarians at the University of California, Davis, have found that a cat's DNA alters how it responds to a life-saving medication used to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM, a heart disease that affects 1 in 7 cats. The study was published in the journal Scientific Reports.
1h
Ultrathin semiconductors electrically connected to superconductors
Researchers have equipped an ultrathin semiconductor with superconducting contacts. These extremely thin materials with novel electronic and optical properties could pave the way for previously unimagined applications. Combined with superconductors, they are expected to give rise to new quantum phenomena and find use in quantum technology.
1h
New nanotech will enable a 'healthy' electric current production inside the human body, researchers report
Researchers have developed an innovative material that is eco-friendly, completely biological and non-toxic, and causes no harm to the body's tissues. The material is as strong as titanium and extremely flexible. The new development will allow for the charging of pacemakers using only the heartbeat, eliminating the need for batteries. The new material will make it possible to produce green energy
1h
Unraveling the mechanisms that create the individualized metabolism in leukemia
Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1), an enzyme involved in gene expression, produces individualized metabolism depending on the type of acute myeloid leukemia cells. Cancer cells have a unique ability to metabolize substances differently from normal cells, and this ability is considered to be a promising therapeutic target. New findings may contribute to the safe and effective use of LSD1 inhibit
1h
Satellite galaxies can continue forming stars when they pass close to their parent galaxies
Historically most scientists thought that once a satellite galaxy has passed close by its higher mass parent galaxy, its star formation would stop because the larger galaxy would remove the gas from it, leaving it shorn of the material it would need to make new stars. However, for the first time, a team led by Arianna di Cintio, a researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has s
1h
Researchers achieve improved prediction of Indian Monsoon onset using machine learning
The onset of the Indian summer monsoon has been predicted three months ahead for the last 40 years with the highest precision up until today. The result indicates longer seasonal forecasts based on machine learning may be a way to mitigate the consequences of an erratic monsoon system under future global warming. Dr. Takahito Mitsui and Dr. Niklas Boers of the Potsdam Institute of Climate Impact R
1h
Not enough women and minorities apply for a job? Change the recruitment committee
Amid calls for racial and social justice nationwide, businesses and educational institutions are grappling with how to adopt more inclusive organizational practices, including more diversified hiring. However, recruitment teams and strategic leaders often blame their lack of a diverse workforce on a lack of diverse applicants. A large study of recruitment data suggests a simple and efficient way o
1h
Study shows laboratory developed protein spikes consistent with COVID-19 virus
A new study has found that the key properties of the spikes of SARS-CoV-2 virus which causes COVID-19 are consistent with those of several laboratory-developed protein spikes, designed to mimic the infectious virus. The findings show how that viral spike manufactured through different methods in laboratories across the globe are highly similar and provide reassurance that the spike can be robustly
1h
From eyebrow beans to 'lost' rice: Community seedbanks are protecting China's crops
Wangjinzhuang village is nestled amongst the steep slopes of the South Taihang Mountains in Hebei Province, China. To prosper in the northern climate, the villagers have developed a tried-and-true strategy: Using the land to plant a hundred kinds of crops and not rely on the sky. Their fields contain red millet, white sorghum, purple and green eyebrow beans, and yellow radishes. Having survived fo
1h
Acid sensor discovered in plants
Climate change is causing increased flooding and prolonged waterlogging in northern Europe, but also in many other parts of the world. This can damage meadow grasses, field crops or other plants—their leaves die, the roots rot.
1h
Predicting the future of cod: Scientists develop new fisheries management planning tool
The future of cod stocks in the North Sea and the Barents Sea may be much easier to predict than before. This is the result of an international research project led by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon and its Institute of Coastal Systems—Analysis and Modeling. For the first time, the team has succeeded in predicting the development of stocks for ten years in advance, taking into account both changes d
1h
Why kiwi and kōkako are more vulnerable than fantails
Life history traits explain the vulnerability of endemic forest birds and predict recovery after predator suppression. New modeling, published in the New Zealand Journal of Ecology, has disentangled the limiting effects of predation, forest area, and food availability to predict the outcomes we can expect for different native bird species in a predator-free New Zealand.
2h
Editing light-emitting organic molecules via surface modification
Many researchers in the field of materials science constantly seek novel and versatile platforms that can be used to tailor materials to match their intended use. One example of this are covalent organic frameworks (COFs), an emerging class of crystalline porous polymers with a favorable set of fundamental properties, namely crystallinity, stability, and porosity. This combination makes them, in t
2h
How an unfolding protein can induce programmed cell death
The death of cells is well regulated. If it occurs too much, it can cause degenerative diseases. Too little, and cells can become tumors. Mitochondria, the power plants of cells, play a role in this programmed cell death. Scientists from the University of Groningen (the Netherlands) and the University of Pittsburgh (U.S.) have obtained new insights in how mitochondria receive the signal to self-de
2h
Fighting COVID with COVID
What if the COVID-19 virus could be used against itself? Researchers at Penn State have designed a proof-of-concept therapeutic that may be able to do just that. The team designed a synthetic defective SARS-CoV-2 virus that is innocuous but interferes with the real virus's growth, potentially causing the extinction of both the disease-causing virus and the synthetic virus.
2h
Bone marrow-derived fibrin clot as better source for meniscal repair
Researchers analyze bone marrow-derived and peripheral blood-derived fibrin clots showing that the former contains more growth factors. They then show that bone marrow-derived fibrin clots can be used for meniscus suturing, even in the inner-most avascular regions, and with a 2-year post-operative follow-up, they show bone marrow-derived fibrin clots support healing better than their peripheral bl
2h
Research enhances understanding of switchgrass, an important bioenergy crop
Switchgrass, a native prairie species, is championed as a promising bioenergy crop due to its ability to grow across many climates. It is also known to associate with beneficial microbes. To better understand the relationship between switchgrass and soil microbes, researchers at Michigan State University and Washington State University examined soil microbial communities and root traits among 12 s
2h
About half of people living with HIV have coronary artery plaque despite low cardiac risk
Higher levels of plaque in people with HIV can be partly traced to the nontraditional risk factors of increased arterial inflammation and immune system activation. Researchers uncovered two key biomarkers of plaque that will be studied in the next phase of the global REPRIEVE trial to predict coronary plaque progression and major cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks and stroke, and the pot
2h
The Energy Revolution Is Tweaking OPEC Out
Yesterday, the oil-producers cartel OPEC—which is now somewhat cheekily called "OPEC+," because Russia joined in 2016—failed to reach an agreement on increasing oil production. Stick with me for a second, because this may not seem like it has much to do with climate change, but in fact it reveals how decarbonization is already shifting how money is spent and how geopolitical power is exercised. I
2h
A new look at color displays
Researchers at Linköping University have developed a method that may lead to new types of displays based on structural colors. The discovery opens the way to cheap and energy-efficient color displays and electronic labels. The study has been published in the scientific journal Advanced Materials.
2h
How racial wage discrimination of football players ended in England
Increased labor mobility seems to have stopped the racial wage discrimination of Black English football players. A new study in economics from Stockholm university and Université Paris-Saclay used data from the English Premier League to investigate the impact of the so-called "Bosman ruling," and found that racial discrimination against English football players disappeared—but not for non-EU playe
2h
Research suggests demography is the key to managing habitat loss and fragmentation
City sprawl and road development is increasingly fragmenting the habitats that many plant and animal species need to survive. Ecologists have long known than sustainable development requires attention to ecological connectivity—the ability to keep plant and wildlife populations intact and healthy, typically by preserving large tracts of land or creating habitat corridors for animals. New research
2h
Communication: A key tool for citizen participation in science
Researchers from Pompeu Fabra University (Barcelona, Spain) have analyzed the way citizen science is practiced in Spain. The paper, produced by Carolina Llorente and Gema Revuelta, from UPF's Science, Communication and Society Studies Centre (CCS-UPF) and Mar Carrió, from the University's Health Sciences Educational Research Group (GRECS), has been published in the Journal of Science Communication
2h
An 'instruction' to the crocodylian skull
The braincase of crocodylians has a distinctive structure. Unlike evolutionary relatives (birds and squamates), in crocodylians, all braincase bones are rigidly fixed together and form an akinetic structure. In the process of evolution, this made it possible for animals to develop powerful jaws and stronger bite forces, thanks to which crocodylians could gnaw through the hard shell of crayfish and
2h
Work like a dream: new anticholinergic drug keeps PTSD flashbacks and nightmares away
Many people who undergo trauma take a long time to truly heal from the post-traumatic stress disorder, which manifests as flashbacks and nightmares to the traumatic incident. Medical researchers have been trying different therapeutic approaches to reduce these manifestations. A group of Japanese medical researchers report that trihexyphenidyl, a central anticholinergic drug, might just be the answ
2h
NYU Abu Dhabi researchers unlock secrets behind liver regrowth and regenerative medicine
NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) researchers uncovered a code that sets the genome of the liver to account for the remarkable ability for this organ to regenerate. This finding offers new insight into how the specific genes that promote regeneration can be activated when part of the liver is removed. These findings have the potential to inform the development of a new form of regenerative medicine that could
2h
Ultrathin semiconductors electrically connected to superconductors for the first time
For the first time, University of Basel researchers have equipped an ultrathin semiconductor with superconducting contacts. These extremely thin materials with novel electronic and optical properties could pave the way for previously unimagined applications. Combined with superconductors, they are expected to give rise to new quantum phenomena and find use in quantum technology.
2h
Predicting the future of cod
Until now, fisheries have set catch levels a year in advance. Long-term influences such as changes in water temperatures are not taken into account. In an international project, researchers from Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon have now developed a computational model that can estimate the future of cod a full ten years in advance – taking into both account fishing and climate. The fishing industry has a
2h
Why men take more risks than women
Researchers from HSE University and Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have discovered how the theta rhythm of the brain and the gender differences in attitudes to risk are linked. In an article published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience, the researchers addressed which processes can be explained by knowing this connection.
2h
Bitumen surfaces under the microscope
Although the history of bitumen dates back to the third millennium BC, only little is known about its surface structure. Researchers are now shedding light on the nature of the bitumen surface using physicochemical analyses.
2h
New broadly applicable tool provides insight into fungicide resistance
A recent collaboration between scientists in Michigan and Massachusetts as well as South Korea resulted in the development of a novel and broadly applicable molecular assay that used a model fungus to investigate how plant fungal pathogens circumvent the bioactivity of SDHIs. Through this analysis, they were able to successfully validate known mechanisms of fungicide resistance in several agricult
2h
Chestnut leaf molecule disarms staph bacteria
A molecule extracted from European chestnut tree leaves has the power to neutralize dangerous, drug-resistant staph bacteria, a new study shows. Researchers dubbed the molecule Castaneroxy A, after the genus of the European chestnut, Castanea . The use of chestnut leaves in traditional folk remedies in rural Italy inspired the research. "We were able to isolate this molecule, new to science, that
2h
Global climate disruption and regional climate shelters after the Toba supereruption [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The Toba eruption ∼74,000 y ago was the largest volcanic eruption since the start of the Pleistocene and represents an important test case for understanding the effects of large explosive eruptions on climate and ecosystems. However, the magnitude and repercussions of climatic changes driven by the eruption are strongly debated….
3h
Fossil dermal denticles reveal the preexploitation baseline of a Caribbean coral reef shark community [Ecology]
Preexploitation shark baselines and the history of human impact on coral reef–associated shark communities in the Caribbean are tpoorly understood. We recovered shark dermal denticles from mid-Holocene (∼7 ky ago) and modern reef sediments in Bocas del Toro, Caribbean Panama, to reconstruct an empirical shark baseline before major human impact…
3h
Spiny and soft-rayed fin domains in acanthomorph fish are established through a BMP-gremlin-shh signaling network [Evolution]
With over 18,000 species, the Acanthomorpha, or spiny-rayed fishes, form the largest and arguably most diverse radiation of vertebrates. One of the key novelties that contributed to their evolutionary success are the spiny rays in their fins that serve as a defense mechanism. We investigated the patterning mechanisms underlying the…
3h
Reply to Dushoff et al. and Pifarre i Arolas et al.: Age prioritization for COVID-19 vaccination does save lives and years of life [Social Sciences]
In our PNAS brief report about COVID-19 vaccination priorities (1), we present a demographic analysis of characteristic age-specific schedules of COVID-19 death rates and show, contrary to widespread intuition, that the goals of maximizing lives saved per vaccination and of maximizing years of future life saved per vaccination are not…
3h
Integrated assessment modeling reveals near-channel management as cost-effective to improve water quality in agricultural watersheds [Sustainability Science]
Despite decades of policy that strives to reduce nutrient and sediment export from agricultural fields, surface water quality in intensively managed agricultural landscapes remains highly degraded. Recent analyses show that current conservation efforts are not sufficient to reverse widespread water degradation in Midwestern agricultural systems. Intensifying row crop agriculture and…
3h
Birds use individually consistent temperature cues to time their migration departure [Environmental Sciences]
A fundamental issue in migration biology is how birds decide when to start their journey, given that arriving too early or too late in a variable environment reduces individual fitness. Internal circannual regulation and predictable cues such as photoperiod prepare birds for migration, while variable external cues such as temperature…
3h
A platform utilizing Drosophila ovulation for nonhormonal contraceptive screening [Genetics]
A significant unmet need for new contraceptive options for both women and men remains due to side-effect profiles, medical concerns, and the inconvenience of many currently available contraceptive products. Unfortunately, the development of novel nonsteroidal female contraceptive medicine has been stalled in the last couple of decades due to the…
3h
Sufu negatively regulates both initiations of centrosome duplication and DNA replication [Cell Biology]
Centrosome duplication and DNA replication are two pivotal events that higher eukaryotic cells use to initiate proliferation. While DNA replication is initiated through origin licensing, centrosome duplication starts with cartwheel assembly and is partly controlled by CP110. However, the upstream coordinator for both events has been, until now, a mystery….
3h
An effective and efficient model of the near-field hydrodynamic interactions for active suspensions of bacteria [Applied Physical Sciences]
Near-field hydrodynamic interactions in active fluids are essential to determine many important emergent behaviors observed, but have not been successfully modeled so far. In this work, we propose an effective model capturing the essence of the near-field hydrodynamic interactions through a tensorial coefficient of resistance, validated numerically by a pedagogic…
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Proton-gated coincidence detection is a common feature of GPCR signaling [Pharmacology]
The evolutionary expansion of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has produced a rich diversity of transmembrane sensors for many physical and chemical signals. In humans alone, over 800 GPCRs detect stimuli such as light, hormones, and metabolites to guide cellular decision-making primarily using intracellular G protein signaling networks. This diversity is…
3h
DNAse-dependent, NET-independent pathway of thrombus formation in vivo [Applied Biological Sciences]
The contribution of NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) to thrombus formation has been intensively documented in both arterial and venous thrombosis in mice. We previously demonstrated that adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–activated neutrophils play a key role in initiating the tissue factor–dependent activation of the coagulation cascade, leading to thrombus formation following laser-induced…
3h
A self-powered implantable and bioresorbable electrostimulation device for biofeedback bone fracture healing [Applied Biological Sciences]
Electrostimulation has been recognized as a promising nonpharmacological treatment in orthopedics to promote bone fracture healing. However, clinical applications have been largely limited by the complexity of equipment operation and stimulation implementation. Here, we present a self-powered implantable and bioresorbable bone fracture electrostimulation device, which consists of a triboelectric n
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Thirty-five years later: Long-term effects of the Matlab maternal and child health/family planning program on older women's well-being [Economic Sciences]
Family planning programs are believed to have substantial long-term benefits for women's health and well-being, yet few studies have established either extent or direction of long-term effects. The Matlab, Bangladesh, maternal and child health/family planning (MCH/FP) program afforded a 12-y period of well-documented differential access to services. We evaluate its…
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RIPK1 activates distinct gasdermins in macrophages and neutrophils upon pathogen blockade of innate immune signaling [Immunology and Inflammation]
Injection of effector proteins to block host innate immune signaling is a common strategy used by many pathogenic organisms to establish an infection. For example, pathogenic Yersinia species inject the acetyltransferase YopJ into target cells to inhibit NF-κB and MAPK signaling. To counteract this, detection of YopJ activity in myeloid…
3h
Direct evidence of a prey depletion "halo" surrounding a pelagic predator colony [Ecology]
Colonially breeding birds and mammals form some of the largest gatherings of apex predators in the natural world and have provided model systems for studying mechanisms of population regulation in animals. According to one influential hypothesis, intense competition for food among large numbers of spatially constrained foragers should result in…
3h
Sex-specific ornament evolution is a consistent feature of climatic adaptation across space and time in dragonflies [Evolution]
Adaptation to different climates fuels the origins and maintenance of biodiversity. Detailing how organisms optimize fitness for their local climates is therefore an essential goal in biology. Although we increasingly understand how survival-related traits evolve as organisms adapt to climatic conditions, it is unclear whether organisms also optimize traits that…
3h
Regulation and drug modulation of a voltage-gated sodium channel: Pivotal role of the S4-S5 linker in activation and slow inactivation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels control excitable cell functions. While structural investigations have revealed conformation details of different functional states, the mechanisms of both activation and slow inactivation remain unclear. Here, we identify residue T140 in the S4–S5 linker of the bacterial voltage-gated sodium channel NaChBac as critical for channel activation…
3h
Skin sodium is increased in male patients with multiple sclerosis and related animal models [Neuroscience]
Novel MRI techniques allow a noninvasive quantification of tissue sodium and reveal the skin as a prominent compartment of sodium storage in health and disease. Since multiple sclerosis (MS) immunopathology is initiated in the periphery and increased sodium concentrations induce proinflammatory immune cells, the skin represents a promising compartment linking…
3h
A conserved epitope III on hepatitis C virus E2 protein has alternate conformations facilitating cell binding or virus neutralization [Medical Sciences]
Epitope III, a highly conserved amino acid motif of 524APTYSW529 on the hepatitis C virus (HCV) E2 glycoprotein, resides in the critical loop that binds to the host receptor CD81, thus making it one of the most important antibody targets for blocking HCV infections. Here, we have determined the X-ray…
3h
Rapid diagnosis and tumor margin assessment during pancreatic cancer surgery with the MasSpec Pen technology [Chemistry]
Intraoperative delineation of tumor margins is critical for effective pancreatic cancer surgery. Yet, intraoperative frozen section analysis of tumor margins is a time-consuming and often challenging procedure that can yield confounding results due to histologic heterogeneity and tissue-processing artifacts. We have previously described the development of the MasSpec Pen technology…
3h
Bidirectional flow of the funny current (If) during the pacemaking cycle in murine sinoatrial node myocytes [Physiology]
Sinoatrial node myocytes (SAMs) act as cardiac pacemaker cells by firing spontaneous action potentials (APs) that initiate each heartbeat. The funny current (If) is critical for the generation of these spontaneous APs; however, its precise role during the pacemaking cycle remains unresolved. Here, we used the AP-clamp technique to quantify…
3h
Biotransformation modulates the penetration of metallic nanomaterials across an artificial blood-brain barrier model [Applied Physical Sciences]
Understanding the potential of nanomaterials (NMs) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB), as a function of their physicochemical properties and subsequent behavior, fate, and adverse effect beyond that point, is vital for evaluating the neurological effects arising from their unintentional entry into the brain, which is yet to be fully…
3h
Let-7b-5p in vesicles secreted by human airway cells reduces biofilm formation and increases antibiotic sensitivity of P. aeruginosa [Microbiology]
Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that forms antibiotic-resistant biofilms, which facilitate chronic infections in immunocompromised hosts. We have previously shown that P. aeruginosa secretes outer-membrane vesicles that deliver a small RNA to human airway epithelial cells (AECs), in which it suppresses the innate immune response. Here, we demonstrate that…
3h
Entropic barrier of topologically immobilized DNA in hydrogels [Applied Physical Sciences]
The single most intrinsic property of nonrigid polymer chains is their ability to adopt enormous numbers of chain conformations, resulting in huge conformational entropy. When such macromolecules move in media with restrictive spatial constraints, their trajectories are subjected to reductions in their conformational entropy. The corresponding free energy landscapes are…
3h
Thousands of induced germline mutations affecting immune cells identified by automated meiotic mapping coupled with machine learning [Genetics]
Forward genetic studies use meiotic mapping to adduce evidence that a particular mutation, normally induced by a germline mutagen, is causative of a particular phenotype. Particularly in small pedigrees, cosegregation of multiple mutations, occasional unawareness of mutations, and paucity of homozygotes may lead to erroneous declarations of cause and effect….
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The intersection of DNA replication with antisense 3' RNA processing in Arabidopsis FLC chromatin silencing [Plant Biology]
How noncoding transcription influences chromatin states is still unclear. The Arabidopsis floral repressor gene FLC is quantitatively regulated through an antisense-mediated chromatin silencing mechanism. The FLC antisense transcripts form a cotranscriptional R-loop that is dynamically resolved by RNA 3′ processing factors (FCA and FY), and this is linked to chromatin…
3h
Do positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) of the MOR exert antinociception with reduced side effects under pathological conditions? [Biological Sciences]
Opioid analgesics are efficacious painkillers for treating moderate to severe acute pain, but their long-term use in chronic pain has met with increasing scrutiny due to various on-target detrimental adverse effects, including the development of tolerance, physical or psychological dependence, constipation, and life-threatening respiratory arrest (1, 2). The "holy grail"…
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Still no evidence for transgenerational inheritance or absence of epigenetic reprogramming in the honey bee [Biological Sciences]
In multicellular organisms, cell identity can be maintained through DNA methylation patterns that control gene expression (1). These and other epigenetic marks installed during development require erasure to facilitate zygote totipotency (2). Otherwise, epigenetic information may be transferred, at least transiently, across generations (1, 2). In mammals, epigenetic reprogramming during…
3h
Reply to Soley: DNA methylation marks are stably transferred across generations in honey bees [Biological Sciences]
Soley (1) argues that our study (2) does not prove that "transgenerational [epigenetic] inheritance serv[es] an adaptive role in evolution" in honey bees. This view misrepresents our intent. Our main findings are that in honey bees 1) DNA methylation profiles are much more similar between fathers and daughters than between…
3h
Correction for Gonzales et al., Subregion-specific rules govern the distribution of neuronal immediate-early gene induction [Corrections]
NEUROSCIENCE Correction for "Subregion-specific rules govern the distribution of neuronal immediate-early gene induction," by Ben Jerry Gonzales, Diptendu Mukherjee, Reut Ashwal-Fluss, Yonatan Loewenstein, and Ami Citri, which was first published October 21, 2019; 10.1073/pnas.1913658116 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 117, 23304–23310). The authors note that: "The R analysis for panel…
3h
Prednisolone rescues Duchenne muscular dystrophy phenotypes in human pluripotent stem cell-derived skeletal muscle in vitro [Physiology]
Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating genetic disease leading to degeneration of skeletal muscles and premature death. How dystrophin absence leads to muscle wasting remains unclear. Here, we describe an optimized protocol to differentiate human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) to a late myogenic stage. This allows us to…
3h
Negative effects of nitrogen override positive effects of phosphorus on grassland legumes worldwide [Sustainability Science]
Anthropogenic nutrient enrichment is driving global biodiversity decline and modifying ecosystem functions. Theory suggests that plant functional types that fix atmospheric nitrogen have a competitive advantage in nitrogen-poor soils, but lose this advantage with increasing nitrogen supply. By contrast, the addition of phosphorus, potassium, and other nutrients may benefit such…
3h
Observing the subglacial hydrology network and its dynamics with a dense seismic array [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Subglacial water flow strongly modulates glacier basal motion, which itself strongly influences the contributions of glaciers and ice sheets to sea level rise. However, our understanding of when and where subglacial water flow enhances or impedes glacier flow is limited due to the paucity of direct observations of subglacial drainage…
3h
Shifting gradients of macroscale cortical organization mark the transition from childhood to adolescence [Neuroscience]
The transition from childhood to adolescence is marked by pronounced shifts in brain structure and function that coincide with the development of physical, cognitive, and social abilities. Prior work in adult populations has characterized the topographical organization of the cortex, revealing macroscale functional gradients that extend from unimodal (somatosensory/motor and…
3h
Historic and bioarchaeological evidence supports late onset of post-Columbian epidemics in Native California [Anthropology]
Catastrophic decline of Indigenous populations in the Americas following European contact is one of the most severe demographic events in the history of humanity, but uncertainty persists about the timing and scale of the collapse, which has implications for not only Indigenous history but also the understanding of historical ecology….
3h
Lab analysis finds near-meat and meat not nutritionally equivalent
A Duke University research team's deeper examination of the nutritional content of plant-based meat alternatives, using metabolomics, shows they're as different as plants and animals. Beef contained 22 metabolites that the plant substitute did not. The plant-based substitute contained 31 metabolites that meat did not. The greatest distinctions occurred in amino acids, dipeptides, vitamins, phenols
3h
New species of pseudo-horses living 37 million years ago
Scientists have described two new species of palaeotheriidae mammals that inhabited the subtropical landscape of Zambrana (Álava) about 37 million years ago. Their atypical dental features could point to a difference in environmental conditions between the Iberian and Central European areas.
3h
Rescue Operations Continue in Japanese Town Struck by Mudslide
On Saturday, following heavy rains, a massive mudslide struck the seaside resort town of Atami, Japan, about 60 miles southwest of Tokyo, destroying more than 120 structures and killing at least seven people—with more than two dozen others still listed as missing. Search-and-rescue operations are underway, as workers and sniffer dogs slog through thick piles of mud and debris.
3h
Is climate change making allergy season longer?
Researchers have found that changes in temperature and rainfall have lengthened allergy season in the Bay Area in California. Climate change has lengthened the local pollen and mold season by eight to nine weeks per year during the past two decades, according to a new study. The study, based on allergen data collected starting in 2002 in Los Altos Hills, California, found that local temperature i
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New risk model may improve the prediction of preterm birth
The health outcomes of preterm babies can be significantly improved by timely and appropriate interventions in women presenting with preterm labor. However, the non-specific nature of presenting signs and symptoms of preterm labor make it challenging to diagnose, and unnecessary overtreatment is both common and costly. A study published in PLOS Medicine by Sarah Stock at the University of Edinburg
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Fungal enzyme tells molecules to face left or right
A small fungal enzyme could play a significant role in simplifying the development and manufacturing of drugs, report scientists. The Rice University lab of chemical and biomolecular engineer Xue Sherry Gao and collaborators isolated a biocatalyst known as CtdE after identifying it as the natural mechanism that controls the chirality —the left- or right-handedness—of compounds that the native fun
3h
COVID-19 vaccines likely activate strong, lasting immunity
Researchers have found evidence that the immune response to vaccines like the first two for COVID-19 is both strong and potentially long-lasting. The vaccines used a technology that had never before been used in Food and Drug Administration-approved vaccines. Both vaccines performed well in clinical trials, and both have been widely credited with reducing disease, but concerns remain over how lon
3h
After defeating de Soto, Chickasaws retooled metal objects
After routing Hernando de Soto and his men, resident Chickasaws repurposed metal objects the Spaniards left behind. Archaeologists unearthed the rare trove of more than 80 metal objects in Mississippi, and believe them to be from de Soto's 16th-century expedition through the Southeast. The Chickasaws used and adapted the objects as household tools and ornaments, an unusual practice at a time when
3h
Mystery of heavy elements in galactic cosmic rays
Scientists have used data from the Southwest Research Institute-led Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission to explain the presence of energetic heavy elements in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). GCRs are composed of fast-moving energetic particles, mostly hydrogen ions called protons, the lightest and most abundant elements in the universe. Scientists have long debated how trace amounts of heavy ions
4h
In hotter climates, male dragonflies lose their trademark style
Male dragonflies lose their wing pigmentation in hotter climates, researchers report. Less pigmentation keeps them cool, but could make it difficult to find a mate, according to their new study. "Our study shows that the wing pigmentation of dragonfly males evolves so consistently in response to the climate that it's among the most predictable evolutionary responses ever observed for a mating-rel
4h
Aryl radical formation by aryl halide bond cleavage by a N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst
Aryl halides with a benzene ring directly bonded to a halogen atom are readily available and chemically stable, so they are used as a source of benzene rings in organic synthesis. For example, a chemical reaction that generates a highly reactive aryl radical from an aryl halide using a toxic tin compound has long been known as a method for supplying a benzene ring. In recent years, chemical reacti
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Study reveals source of remarkable memory of "superagers"
"Superagers" who performed a challenging memory task in an MRI scanner were able to learn and recall new information as well as 25-year-old participants. Neurons in the visual cortex of brains of superaging older adults retain their selective and efficient ability to process visual stimuli and create a distinct memory of the images. In the future, interventions to train specific areas of the brain
4h
How to avoid harm to New Zealand's diverse native plants and animals
New Zealand's indigenous biodiversity is unique and complex, and it is declining and threatened. People and companies are often uncertain about what they should or should not do to help maintain it. A new paper in the New Zealand Journal of Ecology sets out some comprehensive and concise criteria to provide guidance on what biodiversity is the most important to safeguard from further degradation.
4h
Researchers statistically analyze small-scale magnetic reconnections
Dr. Xue Zhike's group from Yunnan Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences statistically studied six small-scale magnetic reconnections for the first time using the high-resolution data obtained by the 1-meter New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) at the Fuxian Solar Observatory of Yunnan Observatories. The findings were published in The Astrophysical Journal.
5h
Relationship between chromosomal instability and senescence revealed in the fly Drosophila
Researchers at IRB Barcelona's Development and Growth Control lab have revealed the mechanisms by which cells enter senescence because of an imbalance in the number of chromosomes. Chromosomal instability is a common trait in most solid tumours, such as carcinoma, and fully understanding its relationship with cancer can help identify new therapeutic targets. The results have been published in the
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Doctors warn against off-label use of new Alzheimer's drug for cerebral amyloid angiopathy
There is no clinical evidence that the monoclonal antibody aducanumab is beneficial to patients with cerebral amyloid angiopathy, according to a Massachusetts General Hospital neurologist and other officers with the International Cerebral Amyloid Angiography Association. In a letter in The Lancet Neurology, the group cited concerns over safety and efficacy in recommending that aducanumab not be pr
5h
High risk of divorce after TBI? Not necessarily, study suggests
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has a major impact on the lives of affected patients and families. But it doesn't necessarily lead to an increased risk of marital instability, as two-thirds of patients with TBI are still married to the same partner 10 years after their injury, reports a study in the July/August issue of the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation (JHTR). The official journal of the Bra
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"All the lonely people": The impact of loneliness in old age on life and health expectancy
Lonely older adults live at least three fewer years and with poorer health, and being less active, than peers, say experts in ageing research in Singapore and Japan. The first to quantify the impact of loneliness on longevity and quality of life among seniors, the study highlights the problem of loneliness as populations age around the world and COVID-19 measures potentially exacerbate it.
5h
Interscalene brachial plexus block in arthroscopic shoulder surgery
Announcing a new article publication for BIO Integration journal. In this article the authors Daowei Lin, Zhixiao Han, Yanni Fu, Xiaoqiu Zhu, Jin Li, Hui Xu, Jing Wen, Fei Wang and Mingyan Guo from Sun Yat-sen University, Guangdong, China, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, Henan, China and University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA discuss how interscalene bra
5h
Dolphin species that live together, do not necessarily compete for food
A new molecular method reveals how different species of toothed whales compete for prey and which food they choose in each other's company. According to previous research, the rough-toothed dolphin Steno bredanensis was supposed to be the absolute top predator of a particular area. Amino acid isotope research shows its trophic level is indeed significantly lower than previously determined.
5h
COVID gets quantum treatment for drug discovery
Since the first known case of COVID-19 in December 2019, the disease has infected over 180 million people and killed nearly four million. A successful group of vaccines that target the coronavirus's spike protein has started to drive down global infection. Supercomputers are now speeding up the process of finding new potential drug candidates that are safe, effective, and can complement vaccines.
5h
A new approach to school transition
The change from early years services into formal educational settings has long been considered an integral transition point for young people. Now research from Flinders University asks 'Is service integration actually important to the children?'
5h
Neanderthal artists? Bones decorated over 50,000 years ago
Since the discovery of the first fossil remains, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to fashion tools and weapons. But could they also make jewellery or even art? Researchers analyzed a new find from the Unicorn Cave in the Harz Mountains in Germany and conclude that Neanderthals had remarkable cognitive ab
5h
Less than 10% of transplanted cycads survive long-term in foreign soil
A 15-year reciprocal transplant study on Guam's native cycad tree, Cycas micronesica, by the Plant Physiology Laboratory at the University of Guam's Western Pacific Tropical Research Center has revealed that acute adaptation to local soil conditions occurs among the tree population and is important in the survival rate of transplanted cycads. The results show that 70% to 100% of cycads that were t
5h
Genetic immune response of Florida corals to rapidly-spreading disease
A new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is the first to document what coral genes are doing in response to a disease that is rapidly killing corals throughout Florida and the Caribbean. The findings can help to better understand coral immune system as new diseases emerge as the ocean warm.
5h
High-throughput metabolic profiling of single cells
Scientists from the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) and the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have presented a new method for generating metabolic profiles of individual cells. The method, which combines fluorescence microscopy and a specific form of mass spectroscopy, can analyze over a hundred metabolites and lipids from more than a thousand individual cells per hour. Researchers
5h
New game-changing zeolite catalysts synthesized
A research team at POSTECH has uncovered a promising new zeolite, anticipated to be a turning point for the oil refining and petrochemical industries. This research was published in the journal Science on July 2, 2021.
5h
A new understanding of patterns in fluid flow
Scientists have explored, for the first time, the viscous fingering (VF, one of classical interfacial hydrodynamics) of an annular ring, where 'fingers' in a fluid of finite volume grow radially, through a combination of experiment and numerical simulation. They demonstrate that the VF of an annular ring is a persistent phenomenon.
5h
Gulf Coast ready to develop carbon storage hub
The stage is set for a new carbon storage economy to emerge along the Gulf Coast, according to a study led by The University of Texas at Austin, with the region offering ample opportunities to capture and store carbon, and recent state and federal incentives giving an added push to get started.
5h
Converting carbon dioxide into butanol using phosphorous-rich copper cathodes
Human activities like the burning of coal and fossil fuels have caused CO2 to accumulate in the atmosphere, which has significantly affected the Earth's climate. As a result, several scientists are looking for ways to convert CO2 into other valuable organic products, such as 1-butanol, which has shown promise as an alternative fuel for vehicles. This could help reduce our dependence on fossil fuel
5h
Ultra-strong squeezing of light demonstrated for ultrafast optical signal processing
A train carrying cargo has finite space. The amount of cargo that can be carried onboard is limited by the size of the cargo and the capacity of the train. Analogously, the amount of time taken up by an optical signal limits the amount of data that can be carried. Temporally shorter signals allow more data to be squeezed into a given time duration, in a method called optical time division multiple
5h
Aboveground biomass and the spatial distribution pattern of herbaceous marsh vegetation
Wetland, forest, and ocean are the three largest ecosystems in the world. Although the area of wetland ecosystem accounts for only 4-6% of the total land area, the carbon reserves of wetland ecosystem accounts for 12-24% of the global land carbon reserves. Under the background of global climate change, research on carbon sequestration of wetland has become an important subject of global carbon cyc
5h
Lipidomics research provides clues for drug resistance in schizophrenia
Researchers from Skoltech and the Mental Health Research Center have found 22 lipids in the blood plasma of people with schizophrenia that were associated with lower symptom improvement over time during treatment. The results show that different levels of symptom improvement are associated with different alterations in lipid levels. These can help track resistance to medication that affects over a
5h
Sixth Joint Science Conference of the Western Balkans Process
Participants at the 6th Joint Science Conference of the Western Balkans Process have developed a "10 Point Plan" to control the coronavirus pandemic in the Western Balkans. They also discussed priorities for the time after the pandemic in the Western Balkans and South East Europe. These include a decent healthcare system, climate neutrality, reduction of air and water pollution, and the digitaliza
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Study is first to show that air pollutants increase risk of painful periods for women
Dysmenorrhea, painful and severe periods, is a common gynecological disorder with major impacts on quality of life and economic productivity. A new epidemiological study by the open access publisher Frontiers is the first to show that the risk of developing dysmenorrhea increases by more than 30 times for women and girls who are exposed long-term to air pollutants such as carbon and nitrogen oxide
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Danish invention to make computer servers worldwide more climate friendly
An elegant new algorithm developed by Danish researchers can significantly reduce the resource consumption of the world's computer servers. Computer servers are as taxing on the climate as global air traffic combined, thereby making the green transition in IT an urgent matter. The researchers, from the University of Copenhagen, expect major IT companies to deploy the algorithm immediately.
5h
Cracking the bitumen puzzle
While atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy have provided information on the morphology of bitumen surfaces in the past, it was not known whether surface and chemical composition correlate with each other. However, the chemical composition of the surface is of particular interest because oxidation processes take place there, triggered by oxygen-containing molecules in the air su
5h
Falling in line: The simple design and control of MOF electric flow
Metal-organic frameworks (MOF) are crystalline porous organic-inorganic hybrid materials which, by filling their pores with guest molecules, can create functionalities through interactions between the organic-inorganic based frameworks of the MOF (host) and its guest molecules. This host-guest chemistry has the potential to bring 'designable' electrical properties, allowing for a material to be or
5h
New warning on teen sleep
Sleep deprivation – from lifestyle choices, pandemic stress, or late-night computer study – can quickly lead to loss of energy and function during the day and even feelings of anger and depression, an Australian sleep institute study has shown.The study, led by Flinders University, asked 34 health teenagers (20 males) aged between 15 and 17 to spent 10 days and nine nights in a specially designed
5h
Tiny tweaks to sparkle: Editing light-emitting organic molecules via surface modification
Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) are an emerging class of polymers with a plethora of potential applications thanks to their crystallinity, stability, and porosity. In a recent study, researchers from the National University of Singapore and Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology report a strategy to tune the emission properties of COFs by introducing atoms or small molecular groups
5h
Aryl radical formation by aryl halide bond cleavage by N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst
We have developed a groundbreaking chemical reaction using an N-heterocyclic carbene catalyst that has a low environmental impact to cleave the bond between the benzene ring of an aryl halide and a halogen atom to generate an aryl radical. Since aryl radicals can thus be easily generated from aryl halides that are widely used in organic synthesis, this is expected to be a powerful technology for p
5h
More and more older people suffer a traumatic brain injury due to falls
About 270,000 people suffer a traumatic brain injury in Germany every year. The over-65s are increasingly affected. This is the result of a study conducted by researchers from the BG Kliniken chain of hospitals under the direction of the Neurological Clinic of the Ruhr Universität Bochum (RUB) of the BG University Hospital Bergmannsheil. Falls are often the cause. The researchers advise more preve
5h
Why does Mercury have a big iron core?
Scientists from Tohoku University and the University of Maryland have pinpointed the strong magnetic field of the early sun as the reason behind the radial variation of rock and metal in rocky planets' cores. This magnetic field, which pulled small iron grains inward, explains Mercury's big iron core and why Mars has so little iron in its core.
5h
Wallonia as an international reference for the timeline
In 2016, researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) proposed a new definition of the geological boundary between the Devonian and Carboniferous periods (359 million years). This new definition has been tested by hundreds of researchers around the world and the results are now compiled in a special issue of the journal Palaeodiversity & Palaeoenvironments.
5h
Sodium solid electrolyte combining high conductivity with electrochemical stability
Toyohashi University of Technology developed a chlorine (Cl) substituted Na3SbS4 solid electrolyte for use in all-solid-state sodium (Na) ion batteries. The ionic conductivity of the Na3SbS4 solid electrolyte where sulfur (S) was partially substituted with Cl improved by up to three times. The team also demonstrated that the Cl-substituted Na3SbS4 has a crystal structure framework that allows Na i
5h
Muscles retain positional memory from fetal life
Muscles and the resident stem cells (satellite cells) responsible for muscle regeneration retain memory of their location in the body. This positional memory was found to be based on the expression pattern of the homeobox (Hox) gene cluster, which is responsible for shaping the body during fetal life. These findings are expected to provide clues to elucidate the pathogenesis of muscle diseases lik
5h
New approach to school transition
The change from early years services into formal educational settings has long been considered an integral transition point for young people. New research from Flinders University now asks, "Is service integration actually important to the children?"
6h
Microwave radiation features and lunar regolith parameters inversion of the Rümker region
Chang'e-5 (CE-5), the first sample return satellite of China, is expected to land and sample in the Rümker region, north of the Oceanus Procellarum. To select optimal sampling points, researchers analyzed the microwave radiation features in this mare unit, and retrieved the dielectric constant and thickness of lunar regolith based on Chang'e lunar microwave sounder (CELMS) data.
6h
Study shows the mechanism how loss of de-N-glycosylation enzyme causes ill effect
Loss-of-mutations in NGLY1, an enzyme that removes sugar chains, cause a multisystem developmental disorder called NGLY1 deficiency. Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science (TMiMS), Kyoto University, RIKEN, and T-CiRA in Japan have elucidated the pathogenesis of NGLY1 deficiency. They found that when NGLY1 is deficient, an overwhelming amount of glycoproteins, ubiquitinate
6h
MasSpec Pen shows promise in pancreatic cancer surgery
A diagnostic tool called the MasSpec Pen has been tested for the first time in pancreatic cancer patients during surgery. The device is shown to accurately identify tissues and surgical margins directly in patients and differentiate healthy and cancerous tissue from banked pancreas samples. At about 15 seconds per analysis, the method is more than 100 times as fast as the current gold standard dia
6h
Researchers use multivalent gold nanoparticles to develop efficient molecular probe
Cells play a precise game of telephone, sending messages to each other that trigger actions further on. With clear signaling, the cells achieve their goals. In disease, however, the signals break up and result in confused messaging and unintended consequences. To help parse out these signals and how they function in health — and go awry in disease — scientists tag proteins with labels they can f
6h
Past coronavirus 'memories' may explain mild COVID
New research hints that people with COVID-19 may experience milder symptoms if certain cells of their immune systems "remember" previous encounters with seasonal coronaviruses—the ones that cause about a quarter of the common colds kids get. These immune cells are better equipped to mobilize quickly against SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus responsible for COVID-19, if they've already met its gentler c
6h
Chemo upsets gut health in cancer patients
New research has shown myelosuppressive chemotherapy destabilises gut microbiome in patients with solid organ cancers. The study from SAHMRI and Flinders University assessed the gut health of men and women who underwent conventional chemotherapy on cancers, such as breast and lung cancer, without exposure to antibiotics.
6h
Dignity support at end of life
At the end of life, people may have to rely on others for help with showering, dressing and going to the toilet. This loss of privacy and independence can be confronting and difficult. Now Australian occupational therapy (OT) researchers have interviewed 18 people receiving palliative care about how they feel about losing independence with self-care, specifically their intimate hygiene, as functio
6h
The twinkle and the brain
In defining periods of development, the brain re-organizes connections between its neurons more freely than in its adult form. Researchers around Sandra Siegert at the Institute of Science and Technology (IST) Austria have now discovered two methods to reopen such plasticity: repeated ketamine anesthesia and non-invasive 60 hertz light flickering. The journal Cell Reports now published their findi
6h
New signaling pathway could shed light on damage repair during brain injury
* This is a peer-reviewed observational study conducted using Drosophila fruit flies.* The study has uncovered a signalling pathway that causes neural cells to enter divisions after damage. * It is important because the signalling kinases are also seen activated in human Alzheimer's brain neurons post mortem. * The next step is to identify whether the pathway happens in the same way in human neuro
6h
Researchers discover way to improve immune response
Melbourne researchers have identified a way to improve the immune response in the face of severe viral infections. It is widely known that severe viral infections and cancer cause impairments to the immune system, including to T cells, a process called immune 'exhaustion'. Overcoming immune exhaustion is a major goal for the development of new therapies for cancer or severe viral infections.
6h
The brain's wiring technicians
Research in mice reveals how a subset of highly specialized immune cells modulate brain wiring by precision-targeting inhibitory synapses.The work deepens understanding of the versatile repertoire of microglia, the brain's immune cells and resident garbage collectors.The results set the stage for the development of therapies for neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions marked by defects in sy
6h
'Zombie cells' hold clues to spinal cord injury repair
A research team led by Leonor Saude, group leader at Instituto de Medicina Molecular have shown that the administration of drugs that target specific cellular components of a scar upon a spinal cord injury, improves functional recovery. The results now published in the scientific journal Cell Reports set the basis for a new promising therapeutic strategy not only for spinal cord injuries, but pote
6h
Structuring the cerebral neocortex
The neocortex is a layered structure of the brain in which neurons are arranged parallel to each other. This organization is critical for healthy brain function. A team of researchers from Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered two key processes that direct this organization. Reporting in Science Advances*, the researchers identify one crucial factor which ensures the timely movement
6h
Study finds genes role in immune response of Florida corals to rapidly spreading disease
MIAMI–A new study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science is the first to document what coral genes are doing in response to a disease that is rapidly killing corals throughout Florida and the Caribbean. The findings can help to better understand coral immune system as new diseases emerge as the ocean warm.
6h
From waste to wealth: Converting CO2 into butanol using phosphorous-rich copper cathodes
Researchers today are looking for ways to convert CO2, which is rapidly accumulating in the atmosphere, into other valuable organic products. Now, scientists from the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea have proposed a reaction for the highly selective production of 1-butanol, a valuable alternative fuel, by electro-chemical reduction using copper phosphide electrodes. Their
6h
Neanderthal artists? Our ancestors decorated bones over 50,000 years ago
Since the discovery of the first fossil remains, the image of the Neanderthal has been one of a primitive hominin. People have known for a long time that Neanderthals were able to fashion tools and weapons. But could they also make jewellery or even art? Researchers from Göttingen University and the Lower Saxony State Office for Heritage analysed a new find from the Unicorn Cave in the Harz Mounta
6h
Researchers shed light on memory effects in multi-step evolution of open quantum system
In a study published in Physical Review Letters, academician GUO Guangcan's team from University of Science and Technology of China of the Chinese Academy of Sciences made progress in the open quantum system research. This team, collaborating with Austrian theoretical physicist Philip Taranto, demonstrated the non-Markovianity in the multi-step evolution of the open quantum system, and proved the
7h
Comprehensive genetic study of cleft lip and palate
Cleft lip and palate is one of the most common congenital malformations. Its causes are mainly genetic. However, it is still largely unknown exactly which genes are affected. A new international study led by the University of Bonn now provides new insights. The results are published in the journal Human Genetics and Genomics Advances, but are already available online.
7h
The bitumen puzzle
Although the history of bitumen dates back to the third millennium BC, only little is known about its surface structure. Researchers from TU Wien are now shedding light on the nature of the bitumen surface using physicochemical analyses.
7h
SwRI-led team addresses mystery of heavy elements in galactic cosmic rays
Scientists have used data from the Southwest Research Institute-led Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission to explain the presence of energetic heavy elements in galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). GCRs are composed of fast-moving energetic particles, mostly hydrogen ions called protons, the lightest and most abundant elements in the universe. Scientists have long debated how trace amounts of heavy ions
7h
Modelling COVID-19 cases in Africa
An international team including Lancaster University researchers has created a strategy for understanding the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic throughout the African continent. Their COVID-19 surveillance strategy will improve the ability of African countries to interpret the complex data available to them during the pandemic.
7h
Snap, crackle, pop: Bone marrow-derived fibrin clot as better source for meniscal repair
Researchers analyze bone marrow-derived and peripheral blood-derived fibrin clots showing that the former contains more growth factors. They then show that bone marrow-derived fibrin clots can be used for meniscus suturing, even in the inner-most avascular regions, and with a 2-year post-operative follow-up, they show bone marrow-derived fibrin clots support healing better than their peripheral bl
7h
Study of T cells from COVID-19 convalescents guides vaccine strategies?
A KAIST immunology research team found that most convalescent patients of COVID-19 develop and maintain T cell memory for over 10 months regardless of the severity of their symptoms. In addition, memory T cells proliferate rapidly after encountering their cognate antigen and accomplish their multifunctional roles. This study provides new insights for effective vaccine strategies against COVID-19,
7h
Aboveground biomass and its spatial distribution pattern of herbaceous marsh vegetation in China
Based on field survey data of aboveground biomass of herbaceous marsh and the distribution data set of marsh wetland in China, a study led by Prof. JIANG Ming from the Northeast the Institute of Geography and Agroecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences analyzed for the first time the aboveground biomass and its spatial distribution pattern of herbaceous marsh in China. The result was published on Sci
7h
How cancer cells patch lethal damage to survive
New research shows a completely new way in which cancer cells repair the damage that can otherwise kill them. In both normal cells and cancer cells, the cell membrane acts as the skin of the cells. And damage to the membrane can be life threatening. The interior of cells is fluid, and if a hole is made in the membrane, the cell simply floats out and dies—a bit like a hole in a water balloon. Ther
7h
An innovative method for producing complex molecules
A team of researchers at the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy at Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has successfully solved the problem of finding a straightforward, cost-effective process for producing hexaarylbenzene molecules with six different aromatic rings. These molecules are important functional materials. The results were published in the journal Angewandte Chemie.
7h
A transformative metasurface based on a zerogap embedded template
A research team, led by Professor Dai-Sik Kim in the Department of Physics at UNIST has developed a new technique of predefining the crack pattern on a flexible substrate by a sequential deposition of metallic layers which leads to a formation of a'"zero-nanometer gap', or a 'zerogap,' between the adjacent lateral patterns.
7h
In-situ diagnostic of femtosecond laser probe pulses for ultrafast imaging applications
Ultrafast imaging plays an important role in physics and chemistry to investigate the femtosecond dynamics of nonuniform samples. The method is based on understanding phenomena induced by an ultrashort laser pump pulse using an ultrashort probe pulse thereafter. The emergence of very successful ultrafast imaging techniques with an extremely high frame-rate is based on wavelength or spatial frequen
7h
New advice on arthritis drugs
New research evaluating the drugs commonly used by rheumatoid arthritis patients suggests two combinations could reduce the risk of heart attack and strokes. The new publication in Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine has found that anti-rheumatic drug regimens that include either tumour necrosis factor inhibitors or hydroxychloroquine might significantly protect the endothelium in rheumatoid arth
7h
Mars: A New Era of Exploration
Was there ever life on Mars? Could life exist there? The latest of nearly 50 missions, NASA's Mars Perseverance Rover is the opening shot of an ambitious plan to find answers. In this eBook, we… — Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Identifying sources of dirt for criminal investigations
Scientists have taken the first steps in developing a new method of identifying the movements of criminals using chemical analysis of soil and dust found on equipment, clothing and cars. The locating system allows police or security services to match soil remnants found on personal items to regional soil samples, to either implicate or eliminate presence at a crime scene. The work is presented as
7h
Some urban commuters have no choice but to take their car
An EPFL study shows that suburban commuters do not necessarily take environmental concerns into account when deciding whether to use their car. Many car commuters—especially those with hectic schedules—feel they have no other choice. That's especially true when it comes to working mothers.
7h
'Magic mushroom' drug may repair neural links depression cuts
Giving mice a single dose of the psychedelic drug psilocybin prompted an immediate and long-lasting increase in connections between neurons, researchers report. Psilocybin, a naturally occurring compound found in some mushrooms, has been studied as a potential treatment for depression for years. But exactly how it works in the brain and how long beneficial results might last is still unclear. The
8h
SARS-CoV-2 encoded miRNA is a biomarker for stratification of severe patients
The multi-centre study identified a microRNA-like small RNA encoded by SARS-CoV-2 in the serum of COVID-19 patients, which can be developed as a non-invasive biomarker for stratification of severe patients from mild/moderate ones and for identification of high-risk individuals before clinical manifestation of severe symptoms. This biomarker ensures proper allocation of patients to different levels
8h
Innovative method for producing complex molecules
A team of researchers at the Department of Chemistry and Pharmacy at Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) has successfully solved the problem of finding a straightforward, cost-effective process for producing hexaarylbenzene molecules with six different aromatic rings. These molecules are important functional materials. The results were published in the reputable journal 'Angewan
8h
Castration delays DNA aging
It's no secret that women live longer than men. But fellas, if we told you there was one thing that may increase your lifespan, would you do it? New Zealand researchers, in collaboration with Allen Distinguished Investigator Steve Horvath from UCLA, have demonstrated that castration of male sheep delays aging of DNA compared to intact males, and that it also drives feminine characteristics of DNA
8h
57% of U.S. structures lie within a natural "hazard hotspot"
To create the hazard maps, the study combined development data from Zillow with natural disaster risk models. The hazard hotspots describe areas of the U.S. where the likelihood of a natural disaster falls in the top 10 percent. The researchers hope better data will help policymakers make better plans for the future. Natural hazards like hurricanes and wildfires may pose increasing threats to the
8h
Mercury pollution significantly higher in Victoria
"Historically lax" regulations around pollution control have led to much higher levels of mercury emission from coal-fired power stations in Victoria, according to a new study from The Australian National University (ANU).
9h
Take The Fuss Out of Skin Care With Geologie, Specially Formulated For Men
If you think about skincare, what might come to the front of your mind might be lavish ads of beautiful celebrities targeting their skincare products at women. But women aren't the only people who need to look after their skin: men and women both go through many of the same factors that contribute to aging, skin damage, and wrinkles. It just seems like the market is much more opaque to men intere
9h
The Grandmother Neuron
People are really good at recognizing faces. One of my lecture bits is to show a picture of a famous person for a fraction of a second (as fast as I can make the picture cycle in Powerpoint). The vast majority of the audience has no problem placing this face in their memory from just a quick glance. How does the brain accomplish this feat? That is something that neuroscientists are still working
9h
Five shifts to decolonise ecological science – or any field of knowledge
The COVID-19 pandemic will change a lot about the way knowledge is produced, especially in the fields of science, technology, engineering and medicine. Social movements such as Black Lives Matter have also increased awareness of significant economic inequalities along racial and geopolitical lines. People have new tools and new ways of working, many of which have heightened awareness of systemic i
9h
Beware performative reproducibility
Nature, Published online: 06 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01824-z Well-meant changes to improve science could become empty gestures unless underlying values change.
10h
Vältränade tonåringar klarade covid bättre senare i livet
De män som var vältränade i sena tonåren har inte lika ofta behövt sjukhusvård för covid-19. Det visar forskning från Göteborgs universitet. Män som gjorde bra ifrån sig på mönstringens fysiska test i sena tonåren har i högre grad kunnat undvika sjukhusvård när de under pandemin fått covid-19, uppemot 50 år senare. Studien från Göteborgs universitet är baserad på det svenska värnpliktsregistret,
11h
Understanding chronic pain (part one)
Chronic pain affects about 40% of the UK population. While there is growing recognition that pain can be an illness in and of itself, there is still a lot we don't know. Anand Jagatia hears from fibromyalgia sufferer Vicky Naylor on what it's like to live with chronic pain, and the Guardian's science correspondent Linda Geddes about the causes for these sometimes debilitating conditions. Help supp
11h
Strukturer i hjärnan kan hjälpa till att bekämpa hjärntumörer
Att behandla hjärntumörer är svårt på grund av de barriärer som finns runt hjärnan. Nu har forskare gjort en upptäckt som kan ändra på det. Gliom är en dödlig hjärntumör med mycket dålig prognos. En anledning till att det är så svårt att behandla hjärntumörer är att immunsystemet, som är designat för att hitta och förstöra främmande celler, inklusive cancerceller, har svårt att komma åt tumören p
11h
Heatwaves and Drought Are Killing Trees at an Alarming Rate
In Arizona, a long-running drought and resulting water stress has contributed to the die-off of as many as 30 percent of the native junipers, even though they are accustomed to a dry climate. Over the last decade, more than 129 million trees died because of drought. Here's what's happening inside their veins.
11h
Solar energy and regional coordination as a feasible alternative to large hydropower in Southeast Asia
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24437-6 Hydropower dams in the Lower Mekong basin have profound impact on the riverine ecosystems. Here the authors use strategic dam planning and power system modelling to show that there are economically and technically feasible alternatives to these dams with solar energy and power trading.
12h
Reward biases spontaneous neural reactivation during sleep
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24357-5 Sleep is known to promote memory consolidation, but the extent to which this is dependent on the memory's relevance remains unclear. Here, the authors use a brain decoding approach to show that neural representations of rewarded experiences undergo a privileged reactivation during sleep, favouring their consolid
12h
Lactate sensing mechanisms in arterial chemoreceptor cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24444-7 Lactate levels in blood change during hypoxia or exercise, however whether this variable is sensed to evoke adaptive responses is unknown. Here the authors show that oxygen-sensing carotid body cells stimulated by hypoxia are also activated by lactate to potentiate a compensatory ventilatory response.
12h
Joint disease-specificity at the regulatory base-pair level
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24345-9 While many genetic loci have been found to be associated with disease, not many have had their causal variants and mechanisms investigated. Here, the authors experimentally dissect two loci near GDF5 which are associated with two different joint disorders and which map to independent regulatory elements.
12h
A membrane-free flow electrolyzer operating at high current density using earth-abundant catalysts for water splitting
Nature Communications, Published online: 06 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24284-5 Seawater electrolysis is promising for grid-scale H2 production without freshwater reliance, but high energy costs and detrimental Cl chemistry reduce its practical potential. Here, authors developed an energy-saving hybrid seawater electrolyzer for chlorine-free H2 production and N2H4 degradation.
12h
Så kan textilier rena avloppsvatten
Reningsprocessen för avloppsvatten är ofta komplicerad, dyr och ineffektiv. Textilier kan vara lösningen på problemet visar forskning från Borås universitet. Hushåll, industrier och jordbruk världen över producerar dagligen tonvis av giftigt avloppsvatten. Trots omfattningen av problemet har vi i decennier hållit fast vid konventionella biologiska metoder för rening av avloppsvattnet, metoder som
12h
Wildlife, air quality at risk as Great Salt Lake nears low
The silvery blue waters of the Great Salt Lake sprawl across the Utah desert, having covered an area nearly the size of Delaware for much of history. For years, though, the largest natural lake west of the Mississippi River has been shrinking. And a drought gripping the American West could make this year the worst yet.
14h
Okända höjdväxlingar hos flyttfåglar
Extrema skillnader i flyghöjd mellan dag och natt kan vara ett, tills nu, oupptäckt mönster bland flyttfåglar. Den reflexionen gör forskare vid Lunds universitet i en studie på dubbelbeckasiner där de även uppmätt nytt höjdrekord för flyttfåglar på 8700 meter. Dubbelbeckasiner är en vadarfågel som häckar i bland annat Sverige och tillbringar vintern i områden vid ekvatorn i Afrika. Från tidigare
14h
I am the senior research scientist at AGI Laboratory and along with Kyrtin, another researcher, are working on collective intelligence systems for e-governance/voting and the N-Scale Graph Database. Ask Us Anything.
AGI Laboratory's long-term goal is to make it easier to build AGI and move towards AGI and Superintelligent systems. Given where we are at from a research standpoint this is in implementing cooperative collective superintelligence systems such as Uplift, as well as e-governance voting, and in infrastructure such as the N-Scale database designed to grow on the fly without human interventions. This
22h
New method to identify dirt on criminals can lead to prosecution
Scientists have taken the first steps in developing a new method of identifying the movements of criminals using chemical analysis of soil and dust found on equipment, clothing and cars. The locating system allows police or security services to match soil remnants found on personal items to regional soil samples, to either implicate or eliminate presence at a crime scene. The work is presented as
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