Search Posts

Nyheder2021juli07

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

Scientists Intrigued by Possible Signs of Life on Saturn's Moon
The icy crust enveloping Saturn's moon Enceladus has long fascinated astronomers. Evidence collected by NASA and the European Space Agency's Cassini-Huygens spacecraft suggests the shell could be hiding a massive subsurface ocean made up of briny water underneath it — which, tantalizingly, could potentially harbor life. According to a new study by a team from the University of Arizona and Paris S
1d
New Zealand children falling ill in high numbers due to Covid 'immunity debt'
Doctors say children haven't been exposed to range of bugs due to lockdowns, distancing and sanitiser and their immune systems are suffering New Zealand hospitals are experiencing the payoff of "immunity debt" created by Covid-19 lockdowns, with wards flooded by babies with a potentially-deadly respiratory virus, doctors have warned. Wellington has 46 children currently hospitalised for respirato
16h
Global experts urge Boris Johnson to delay 'dangerous' Covid reopening
More than 100 scientists and doctors say move risks creating a generation with problems due to long Covid Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Lifting the remaining Covid restrictions in England this month is "dangerous and premature", according to international scientists and doctors, who have called on the UK government to pause reopening until more people are vaccinate
23h
Trump's Fantasy Legal World
Just like you, Donald Trump has some big summer plans, though his are probably more grandiose: He's going to be reinstated to the presidency by August , and he's going to sue Facebook, Twitter, Google's YouTube, and their respective CEOs for violating his First Amendment rights. The first of these is impossible. The second, which Trump announced during a press conference this morning, is only mar
1d
How Democrats Lost the Courts
Every political coalition likes to talk about how its opponents are more organized, more ruthless, and better funded. As progressives plot their response to Donald Trump's mostly successful project to remake the federal courts, they are reviewing the times they've been outworked, outfought, and outsmarted on judicial nominations. One not-so-familiar name jumps out: Before Merrick Garland's stint
10h
The solar wind bubble that protects Earth has been mapped for the first time
In 2009, using NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer, also known as IBEX, astronomers spied a strange ribbon-like structure dancing between our solar system and the rest of interstellar space. The discovery of the IBEX Ribbon, which is invisible to both telescopes and the human eye, was one of scientists' first forays into understanding more about our heliosphere—a bubble-like shield made up of s
1d
Neurons Unexpectedly Encode Information in the Timing of Their Firing
For decades, neuroscientists have treated the brain somewhat like a Geiger counter: The rate at which neurons fire is taken as a measure of activity, just as a Geiger counter's click rate indicates the strength of radiation. But new research suggests the brain may be more like a musical instrument. When you play the piano, how often you hit the keys matters, but the precise timing of the notes is
1d
Mathematicians Prove Symmetry of Phase Transitions
For more than 50 years, mathematicians have been searching for a rigorous way to prove that an unusually strong symmetry is universal across physical systems at the mysterious juncture where they're changing from one state into another. The powerful symmetry, known as conformal invariance, is actually a package of three separate symmetries that are all wrapped up within it. Now, in a proof posted
7h
Scientists use artificial intelligence to detect gravitational waves
When gravitational waves were first detected in 2015 by the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), they sent a ripple through the scientific community, as they confirmed another of Einstein's theories and marked the birth of gravitational wave astronomy. Five years later, numerous gravitational wave sources have been detected, including the first observation of two co
1d
Quantum particles: Pulled and compressed
Very recently, researchers led by Markus Aspelmeyer at the University of Vienna and Lukas Novotny at ETH Zurich cooled a glass nanoparticle into the quantum regime for the first time. To do this, the particle is deprived of its kinetic energy with the help of lasers. What remains are movements, so-called quantum fluctuations, which no longer follow the laws of classical physics but those of quantu
1d
Canine faeces reveal more about 17th century working sled dogs
Proteins from frozen canine feces have been successfully extracted for the first time to reveal more about the diets of Arctic sled dogs. Researchers—led by the University of York—say the breakthrough will enable scientists to use palaeofaeces (ancient feces), to reveal more about our ancestors and their animals.
1d
Carbon removal hype is becoming a dangerous distraction
In February, oil giant Shell trumpeted a scenario in which the world pulls global warming back to 1.5 ˚C by 2100, even as natural gas, oil, and coal continue to generate huge shares of the world's energy. Among other things, Shell's pathway involves rapidly installing carbon capture systems on power plants, scaling up nascent machines that can suck carbon dioxide directly out of the air, and plan
11h
Scientists prove Turing patterns manifest at nanoscale
What connection could possibly exist between the stripes on tropical fish and crystal growth? The answer is the way in which order emerges from randomness through Turing patterns, according to what a research team led by Dr. Fuseya of the University of Electro-Communications, Japan, has recently found. After analyzing a mysterious striped pattern, they observed while trying to grow a monoatomic la
6h
Lonely older adults live fewer years and not as well
Lonely older adults are more likely to live shorter lives than their peers and spend less of their remaining life in good health or being active, according to a new study in Singapore and Japan. The study categorically quantifies for the first time the affects of loneliness in old age on life and health expectancy. "We found that lonely older adults can expect to live a shorter life than their pe
1d
'MasSpec Pen' flags pancreatic cancer during surgery
Researchers have tested a diagnostic tool called the MasSpec Pen tool for the first time in pancreatic cancer patients during surgery. They've shown the device can accurately identify tissues and surgical margins directly in patients and differentiate healthy and cancerous tissue from banked pancreas samples. At about 15 seconds per analysis, the method is more than 100 times as fast as the curre
1d
The climate crisis will create two classes: those who can flee, and those who cannot | Peter Gleick
Nearly 700 million people worldwide live in low coastal zones vulnerable to sea-level rise and coastal storms. That number could reach a billion by 2050 A few years ago, after I gave a talk on water and climate change, I had an Arizona rancher come up and ask me if there would be enough water in the future for their livestock or if they should sell out and move north. This week, I received an ema
1d
Delta Is Now The Dominant Coronavirus Variant In The U.S.
The CDC released new estimates showing the highly contagious delta variant now accounts for more than 51% of cases in the U.S. In some parts of the country, the strain is responsible for 80% of cases. (Image credit: Boris Roessler/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty)
1d
Wanna Delay Aging? Get Castrated, Scientists Say
According to new research, there may be a surprisingly effective way for men to increase their lifespans — but it requires a pretty severe alteration to the physical body that may not appeal to everybody. An international team led by researchers from the University of Otago in New Zealand were able to show that castration of male sheep delays the aging of DNA, and the same principles could apply
1d
Places Are Increasingly Getting So Hot That People Just Die
A horrifying new trend is emerging in the face of climate change: more areas are growing so hot and humid that people are simply dying . In fact, these heat and humidity conditions becoming far more common than experts previously assumed, according to research published in the journal Science Advances last May. In the study, scientists identified over 7,000 examples of these deadly "wet bulb cond
1d
Elon Musk Suggests Turning a Starship Into a Giant Space Telescope
Giant Telescope SpaceX's Starship could carry the first astronauts to the surface of the Moon since the Apollo missions, clean up our planet's increasingly littered orbit, and perhaps even help establish a city on Mars . Now, SpaceX CEO Elon Musk is saying that it could also be used to bring astronomical observations into the 21st century. In a Wednesday tweet , Musk suggested that the "ship itse
1d
Adult ADHD Is Linked to a Ton of Serious Diseases
A shocking number of neurological, pulmonary, and musculoskeletal diseases seem to be linked to ADHD in adults, according to a massive new study. ADHD in adults remains critically understudied, especially when it comes to how the psychiatric condition impacts the rest of a patient's overall health. But that could change — researchers have now identified a number of associated conditions and risk
1d
How the BBC let climate deniers walk all over it | George Monbiot
The fossil-fuel multinationals fund 'thinktanks' and 'research institutes'. But it's gullible public service broadcasters that give them credibility Yes, we should rake over the coals. And the oil, and the gas. Democratic accountability means remembering who helped to stoke the climate crisis. We should hold the fossil fuel companies to account. In 1979, an internal study by Exxon concluded that
14h
Maine Has a Dangerous, Small, and Very Itchy Problem
The caterpillar is roughly an inch and a half long with a fuzzy coat, brown but for two white stripes that flank its back and two red-orange dots near its rear. It has a soft visual texture that makes it seem harmless, charming even, tempting enough to stroke. But touch an adult browntail-moth caterpillar at your own peril. "Browntail-moth-caterpillar hairs are barbed and hollow. And inside that
1d
Discovery of new type of supernova explains ancient mystery
Astronomers confirm the existence of the theorized electron-capture supernova. The discovery was based on observing a supernova in 2018. An electron-capture supernova likely explains a mysterious sky event from 1054 AD. Astronomers found evidence for a new type of supernova, confirming a theory from over 40 years ago. The discovery expands our knowledge of the life cycle of stars and may explain
1d
England's reopening plan is a 'dangerous experiment', ministers told
Health experts say ending most Covid rules on 19 July will affect certain groups disproportionately Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson's decision to lift a vast swath of Covid restrictions on 19 July is "a very dangerous experiment" that will disproportionately affect a host of people already susceptible to coronavirus, according to experts involved in an
1d
The Vortex of White Evangelicalism
Esau McCaulley has been caught between multiple identities his whole life. Family legend has it that his grandfather couldn't read, and when it came time to pick a baby name for McCaulley's father, that grandfather opened the Bible and pointed to a word, not realizing it was Esau . It's no accident that there aren't that many baby Esaus crawling around: In the Bible, the "red" and "hairy" Esau is
1d
Human body size shaped by climate, evolutionary study shows
Research combines data from fossils with climate models, revealing the effect of climate on body and brain size A well-known pattern in human evolution is an increase in body and brain size. Our species, Homo sapiens, is part of the Homo genus and emerged about 300,000 years ago. We are much bigger than earlier Homo species and have brains three times larger than humans who lived a million years
7h
World 'must step up preparations for extreme heat'
Rising temperatures may be hitting faster and harder than forecast, say climate scientists in wake of heatwave in US and Canada The world needs to step up preparations for extreme heat, which may be hitting faster and harder than previously forecast, a group of leading climate scientists have warned in the wake of freakishly high temperatures in Canada and the US. Last week's heat dome above Brit
23h
Remember That Stuck Container Ship? It's Finally Leaving the Suez Canal
Sail Again Remember that giant container ship that got stuck in the Suez Canal in Egypt? Well, it's finally on the move. The Ever Given, a 1,310-foot vessel loaded with around 18,300 containers, finally resumed its journey and left the Canal on Wednesday, as Reuters reports — perhaps the perfect analogy for the return of (almost) normal life following the coronavirus pandemic. Free At Last In cas
1d
Lab grown chicken nuggets makes cruelty-free meat possible
A restaurant in Singapore recently served the world's first lab grown chicken nuggets. Grown from animal cells, the nuggets taste like chicken because they are made from real chicken. The lab grown chicken is only available in Singapore, though regulatory agencies in other countries are considering approval. Murder-Free Chicken Nuggets: Real Meat Grown In a Lab www.freethink.com It has never been
1d
Former Official: UFO Report Actually Strengthens "Alien Hypothesis"
To many, the long-awaited UFO report released by the Pentagon late last month came as a disappointment . Months of waiting earned us a nine page report that more or less confirmed what we already suspected: the US government has no idea what a series of strange "Unidentified Aerial Phenomena" (UAPs) could possibly be. Reports of strange sightings made by US military pilots emerged after The New Y
1d
American Alcoholism Is Getting Worse
Americans started to drink a whole lot more during the coronavirus pandemic than they did prior to it, and those numbers still seem to be climbing. Alcohol sales and use tend to spike after stressful events in the United States, Axios reports . Similar trends occurred in the aftermath of 9/11 and Hurricane Katrina, for example. But what could have been a brief surge in heavy drinking as we all na
1d
We Might Have Reached Peak Populism
F eeling optimistic about the state of American politics is hard. The country is deeply polarized. Much of the debate consists of name-calling and demonization. Dissatisfied with a strategy of maximal obstructionism in Congress, Republicans in state houses are trying to make subverting the outcome of the next election easier. But we can't forget how much worse things could be right now—and what a
1d
So happy to see you: our brains respond emotionally to faces we find in inanimate objects, study reveals
University of Sydney researchers find humans detect and react to illusory faces in the same way they do real faces Whether in a cloud, the front of a car, or a $28,000 toasted sandwich supposedly resembling the Virgin Mary, seeing faces in inanimate objects is a common experience. According to new research by the University of Sydney, our brains detect and respond emotionally to these illusory fa
1d
There's Officially Hope for NASA's Broken Hubble Space Telescope
Signs of Life NASA's Hubble Space Telescope encountered a serious problem on June 13. Its payload computer, tasked with controlling and coordinating the telescope's various scientific instruments, failed and forced all astronomical observations by the iconic telescope to a standstill. Ever since, NASA's team back on the ground has been furiously trying to get the Hubble back online. So far, their
3h
Spectators banned from Olympics as Tokyo Covid emergency declared
Japanese prime minister says Tokyo's fourth state of emergency will begin on Monday See all our coronavirus coverage Olympic organisers have banned all spectators from the Tokyo Games after Japan's prime minister declared a state of emergency in the host city. The ban on spectators is the latest blow to the troubled Olympics, delayed by a year because of the pandemic and plagued by a series of se
17h
Critical Race Theory Is Making Both Parties Flip-Flop
A mong the dozens of bills filed by Republicans to restrict how educators teach about race, perhaps none was more carefully written than the one in North Carolina. And therein lies the larger problem with such bills: The downside of even the most cautious efforts likely outweighs their benefits. In numerous other states, legislators purporting to target critical race theory or "divisive concepts"
11h
Haiti and the Trump Illusion
Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET on July 8, 2021. Not in more than 100 years had a Haitian president died by violence. That previous assassination was of a repressive leader who was beaten lifeless by rebels in 1915, a murder that preceded and substantially prompted an American invasion and occupation of Haiti that ultimately lasted until 1934. The murder of President Jovenel Moïse yesterday seems unlikel
10h
Rapid attribution of PNW heatwave
Summary: It was almost impossible for the temperatures seen recently in the Pacific North West heatwave to have occurred without global warming. And only improbable with it. It's been clear for at least a decade that global warming has been in general increasing the intensity of heat waves, with clear trends in observed maximum temperatures that match what climate models have been predicting. For
22h
Space Billionaires, Please Read the Room
Dear billionaires, no one cares whom you beat to space. After Jeff Bezos, the world's richest person, announced that he would join the first crewed flight by his rocket company, Blue Origin, later this month, Richard Branson just couldn't let himself be outdone. * So now Branson, merely the world's 589th richest person , is joining the crew of his next Virgin Galactic flight on Sunday, nine days
23h
Watch a U-Haul Full of Fireworks Explode Spectacularly
Awakening Pele The sky glows pink as the people of a Toledo, Ohio neighborhood gather to watch an impressive but seemingly amateur fireworks show. Suddenly, the camera shakes violently and what sounds like machine gun fire drowns out everything else. In the distance, a seemingly endless technicolor explosion erupts from a U-Haul truck as people flee, occasionally sending projectiles screaming pas
1d
How your mask protects other people – video explainer
Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic , many countries have brought in rules, and even laws, requiring people to wear face masks to help contain the spread of the virus. But as restrictions are being lifted globally, many governments are loosening the rules around mandatory face coverings. With the requirements due to be dropped in England on 19 July , the Guardian's science corresponde
1d
Quantum laser turns energy loss into gain
Scientists at KAIST have fabricated a laser system that generates highly interactive quantum particles at room temperature. Their findings, published in the journal Nature Photonics, could lead to a single microcavity laser system that requires lower threshold energy as its energy loss increases.
1d
Human activity influencing global rainfall, study finds
Anthropogenic warming of climate has been a factor in extreme precipitation events globally, researchers say Human activity such as such as greenhouse gas emissions and land use change were a key factor in extreme precipitation events such as flooding and landslides around the world, a study has found. In recent years, there have been numerous instances of flooding and landslides: extreme precipi
1d
The Pros and Cons of Spiky Genitals
The story of seed-beetle sex has often been told in a very particular way, with the male in the evolutionary driver's seat, his hapless mate taken along for a grudging ride. A quick glance at the insect's penis makes it easy to see why: The appendage is tipped with hundreds of sharp, hard spines that give it the appearance of an elaborate mace. This terrifying surfeit of spikes riddles the female
1d
US Military Document Admits That Risk of Nuclear War Is Growing
Nuclear Escalation A newly-uncovered military document portends a horrifying future, warning that the risk of nuclear warfare is on the rise. The document, which was obtained and shared online by the Federation of American Scientists on Tuesday, is the latest edition of a manual meant to offer updates on the state of military activity around the world and guidance on how the United States militar
1h
Juul Paid a Medical Journal to Run a Bunch of Pro-Vaping Studies
After attracting criticism for marketing its e-cigarette products to minors, Juul is facing tough days ahead. Sales have plummeted by a staggering $500 million, according to The New York Times — and that's just the least of its troubles. The once trendy vaping company has had to make major changes over the last year and a half, and is now facing an uphill battle to convince the Food and Drug Admi
6h
What Euro 2020 Has Revealed About Englishness
After beating Denmark 2–1 last night, the English men's national soccer team is set to return to London's Wembley Stadium for the final of the European Championship against Italy on Sunday. The last time English fans felt this kind of optimism was during the 2018 World Cup, when the team advanced to the semifinal before being knocked out of the competition by Croatia. What's at stake for England
13h
Climate change made the record-shattering Northwest heat wave 150 times more likely
Yes, blame climate change. Human-driven global warming fueled the heat wave that likely killed hundreds of people last week across the US Pacific Northwest and Canada. The massive buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere made the unprecedented weather event 150 times more likely, according to an analysis by World Weather Attribution. The loosely affiliated team of global scientists concluded
23h
Statistical methods designed for cosmology reveal tomb distribution in Sudan
Sudanese Islamic burial sites are distributed according to large-scale environmental factors and small-scale social factors, creating a galaxy-like distribution pattern, according to a study published July 7, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Stefano Costanzo of the University of Naples "L'Orientale" in Italy and colleagues.
1d
Researchers identify ultrastable single atom magnet
Researchers at the IBS Center for Quantum Nanoscience at Ewha Womans University (QNS) have shown that dysprosium atoms resting on a thin insulating layer of magnesium oxide have magnetic stability over days. In a study published in Nature Communications they have proven that these tiny magnets have extreme robustness against fluctuations in magnetic field and temperature and will flip only when th
1d
NASA's Mars Helicopter Sends Back Stunning Color Photos
Stunning Images NASA's groundbreaking Ingenuity Mars Helicopter has sent back stunning photos it took on July 5 while flying over the Red Planet's rocky landscape — and this time, they're in color. The helicopter took off for its ninth flight on Monday, breaking the small four pound rotorcraft's "records for flight duration and cruise speed," according to a July 7 blog update written by Ingenuity
2h
The Guardian view on risking England's health: not everyone can choose to stay safe | Editorial
For too many, Johnson's 'freedom day' will bring fear rather than release "The purpose of the state is freedom," the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza wrote. Its aim is to liberate everyone from fear, he argued, "so that they may live in security so far as is possible, that is, so that they may retain, to the highest possible degree, their right to live and to act without harm to themselves and ot
3h
There's Reportedly Massive Drama Inside Jeff Bezos' Wannabe Space Company
Jeff Bezos' space company, Blue Origin, is reportedly falling out of favor with one of its largest customers. The United Launch Alliance (ULA) is planning to use two of Blue Origin's BE-4 rocket engines to build its Vulcan rocket, a two-stage, heavy-lift launch vehicle that's currently under development. It's an agreement that dates back almost seven years. But the engine is now years behind sche
4h
The Court's Voting-Rights Decision Was Worse Than People Think
The Voting Rights Act regime as we knew it is gone, and it's not coming back. Once thought of as the crown jewel of the Second Reconstruction, the VRA has lost its luster. For the past decade or so, the Supreme Court has systematically reduced the scope and reach of the law. The Court's decision last week in Brnovich v. Democratic National Committee is only the latest case, and certainly will not
10h
Let's recognise that older people get depressed, too – and get them the help they need | Adrian Chiles
Too often the prevailing attitude seems to be: 'They're knackered and lonely – what do you expect?' When I was a kid, I couldn't understand why old people weren't in a constant state of panic. I would look at my grandad, sitting there quietly reading the Birmingham Evening Mail, and wonder how he could stay so calm. How come he wasn't as horrified as I was at the prospect of him dying before too
13h
NASA space lasers map meltwater lakes in Antarctica with striking precision
From above, the Antarctic Ice Sheet might look like a calm, perpetual ice blanket that has covered Antarctica for millions of years. But the ice sheet can be thousands of meters deep at its thickest, and it hides hundreds of meltwater lakes where its base meets the continent's bedrock. Deep below the surface, some of these lakes fill and drain continuously through a system of waterways that eventu
1d
You Can Now Rent a 3D Printed House on Airbnb
3D printing has been increasingly gaining traction over the past couple years as a low-cost way to build comfortable, durable homes. The technology quickly went from a proof of concept (when the first permitted 3D printed home in the US was unveiled at SXSW in 2018) to a proven success, with 3D printed homes either already sold or in the works in New York , Texas , and California . What if you li
1d
Igniting plasmas in liquids
Physicists of Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) have taken spectacular pictures that allow the ignition process of plasma under water to be viewed and tracked in real time. Dr. Katharina Grosse has provided the first data sets with ultra-high temporal resolution, supporting a new hypothesis on the ignition of these plasmas: In the nanosecond range, there is not enough time to form a gas environment. E
1d
Wildlife and livestock a risk factor in future pandemics, say studies
Researchers said risk factors also include human encroachment on wildlife habitats The risk of pathogens spilling over from wildlife trade and farmed animals into humans should be key considerations in efforts to prevent the next pandemic, research suggests. Researchers have been assessing the risks of the different ways that disease-causing organisms jump from animals to humans in an effort to c
1d
A Surprising Factor Influenced How the Framers Voted
Many people understand, at least on some level, that gender and family structure play pervasive roles in American politics. Political scientists have documented, for example, how women tend to vote for more progressive policies and candidates than men do, and how marriage tends to correlate with more conservative preferences among both genders. And of course some family effects go beyond gender,
1d
Suckers for learning: why octopuses are so intelligent
Our last common ancestor with the octopus existed more than 500 million years ago. So why is it that they seem to show such peculiar similarities with humans, while at the same time appearing so alien? Perhaps because despite their tentacles covered with suckers and their lack of bones, their eyes, brains and even their curiosity remind us our own thirst for knowledge.
1d
We tested AI interview tools. Here's what we found.
After more than a year of the covid-19 pandemic, millions of people are searching for employment in the United States. AI-powered interview software claims to help employers sift through applications to find the best people for the job. Companies specializing in this technology reported a surge in business during the pandemic. But as the demand for these technologies increases, so do questions ab
1d
UK supercomputer Cambridge-1 to hunt for medical breakthroughs
Computer – the most powerful in Britain – will use AI to find new cures and deepen understanding of diseases The UK's most powerful supercomputer, which its creators hope will make the process of preventing, diagnosing and treating disease better, faster and cheaper, is operational. Christened Cambridge-1, the supercomputer represents a $100m investment by US-based computing company Nvidia. The i
1d
University terminates affiliation with researcher who had paper on COVID-19 vaccines retracted as mask study comes under scrutiny
A researcher who co-authored a now-retracted paper claiming that two vaccinated people died of COVID-19 for every three deaths prevented has had an affiliation with a Polish university terminated. Yesterday, Poznan University tweeted about the researcher, Harald Walach: Today, it confirmed the move in a statement: It was with great surprise that the Poznan University … Continue reading
1d
The Link Between Self-Reliance and Well-Being
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. T he 2021 Academy Award for Best Picture—covering the prior year, when many of us were stuck at home—was awarded, ironically, to Nomadland , a film about a woman who has no permanent home. The movie follows Fern (Frances McDormand), a 60-something widow who lives in her van, working itinerant
11h
Kenya in rush to vaccinate 4m children as measles cases surge
WHO reports measles outbreaks in eight African countries amid huge fall-off in jabs during Covid Kenya has restarted its vaccination programme in an effort to tackle the re-emergence of measles, which has surged in the country during the Covid restrictions. A 10-day campaign against highly contagious measles and rubella has begun to target 4 million children aged nine months to five years in 22 o
1d
Oxford drugs firm gains $1.5m Gates grant for Covid-19 therapy
Exclusive: Exscientia to use AI in proposed fast-track development of 'low-cost' pill for Sars viruses Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Exscientia, an Oxford-based firm that uses artificial intelligence to develop medicines, has won a $1.5m grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to create a Covid-19 treatment that also works for new mutations or other Sars vir
16h
New microfluidic device delivers mRNA nanoparticles a hundred times faster
The COVID vaccines currently being deployed were developed with unprecedented speed, but the mRNA technology at work in some of them is an equally impressive success story. Because any desired mRNA sequence can be synthesized in massive quantities, one of the biggest hurdles in a variety of mRNA therapies is the ability to package those sequences into the lipid nanoparticles that deliver them into
1d
Terrawatch: witnessing a 'lava shield' volcano form
Icelanders have been treated to a spectacular geological phenomenon with the Fagradalsfjall eruption Covid has disrupted many forms of entertainment, but for Icelanders the Earth has stepped in and provided a spectacular Covid-safe show. Just over three months ago a volcano burst into action and its fiery fountains – a 45-minute drive south from Reykjavík – have attracted hundreds of spectators e
1d
Dodge Says It's Only Making an Electric Car Because the Performance Is So Good
US carmaker Dodge has teased an all-electric muscle car that's set to be released some time in 2024. The company's upcoming EV will "tear up the streets, not the planet," Dodge CEO Tim Kuniskis said during an announcement today. He also promised that Dodge "will not sell electric cars," but will make "American eMuscle" a thing instead — a perplexing approach to warming the public up to the idea o
1h
Podcast: Want a job? The AI will see you now
In the past, hiring decisions were made by people. Today, some key decisions that lead to whether someone gets a job or not are made by algorithms. The use of AI-based job interviews has increased since the pandemic. As demand increases, so too do questions about whether these algorithms make fair and unbiased hiring decisions, or find the most qualified applicant. In this second episode of a fou
1d
Photos: The Fans of Euro 2020
Today, England and Denmark play their semifinal match to determine who will face Italy in the final of the 2020 UEFA European Football Championship, to be played on July 11. Euro 2020 features 51 matches among 24 national teams playing in 11 different host cities. Last year's tournament was postponed until now, because of the coronavirus pandemic. Host cities and venues still have varying levels
1d
Small amount of lithium production in classical nova
A new study of lithium production in a classical nova found a production rate of only a couple of percent that seen in other examples. This shows that there is a large diversity within classical novae and implies that nova explosions alone cannot explain the amount of lithium seen in the current universe. This is an important result for understanding both the explosion mechanism of classical novae
1d
Inside the FBI, Russia, and Ukraine's failed cybercrime investigation
The American cops took the slower, cheaper train from Kyiv to Donetsk. After repeatedly traveling between Ukraine and the United States, there were more comfortable ways to make this final, 400-mile journey. But the five FBI agents felt like luxury tourists compared to most travelers onboard. They could afford spacious private rooms while locals were sleeping 10 to a cabin. The train moved haltin
10h
Microscopy technique makes finer images of deeper tissue, more quickly
To create high-resolution, 3D images of tissues such as the brain, researchers often use two-photon microscopy, which involves aiming a high-intensity laser at the specimen to induce fluorescence excitation. However, scanning deep within the brain can be difficult because light scatters off of tissues as it goes deeper, making images blurry.
1d
Early origin of sweet perception in the songbird radiation
Early events in the evolutionary history of a clade can shape the sensory systems of descendant lineages. Although the avian ancestor may not have had a sweet receptor, the widespread incidence of nectar-feeding birds suggests multiple acquisitions of sugar detection. In this study, we identify a single early sensory shift of the umami receptor (the T1R1-T1R3 heterodimer) that conferred sweet-sen
4h
When the pain isn't all in your head | Letters
Readers respond to a series on chronic pain with their experiences of either struggling with pain or difficulties in treating patients In regard to your excellent piece ( Sufferers of chronic pain have long been told it's all in their head. We now know that's wrong , 28 June), I am writing to say how glad I was that the mainstream media are bringing attention to the pervasive lack of understandin
1d
Methane in plumes of Saturn's moon Enceladus: Possible signs of life?
A study concludes that known geochemical processes can't explain the levels of methane measured by the Cassini spacecraft on Saturn's icy moon. While the paper by no means suggests that life exists on Enceladus, the results would be consistent with microbial activity similar to that known to occur at hydrothermal vents in Earth's oceans.
1d
Researchers examine properties of supernova SN 2012au
An international team of astronomers has performed photometric, polarimetric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ib supernova SN 2012au. Results of this comprehensive study deliver important information regarding the properties of this cosmic explosion. The research was detailed in a paper published June 30 on the arXiv pre-print server.
1d
The Atlantic Daily: America's Vaccination Campaign Is Not Over
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. America did not meet President Joe Biden's Fourth of July vaccination goal. Just 67 percent of American adults have received at least one shot , falling short of the 70 percent target set by the W
1d
Driverless Car Startup Actually Uses Remote Controls
Technically True A startup called Halo has a bold plan to eradicate the headaches of finding a parking spot — with tech that lets customers drive cars that can then steer themselves back home after the trip is complete. The funny bit, of course, is that its cars are only driverless in the most literal sense. In reality, someone back at the office is actually driving, as if they're playing a (hope
1h
The Story of Songbirds Is a Story of Sugar
Australia's unique forests are the birthplace of birdsong. The plants there are drenched in sunlight and can readily mass-produce sugars through photosynthesis. But with few nutrients in the soil , they struggle to convert those sugars into leaves, seeds, and other tissues. They end up with excess, which they simply give away. Flowers overflow with nectar. Eucalyptus trees exude a sweet substance
3h
The most important boring idea in the universe
Maintaining standards of evidence is the most important and least appreciated idea in science. Modern science was established in the late Renaissance when networks of researchers began working out best practices for linking evidence with conclusions. In the face of science denial and attempts to create a post-truth society, we have to protect the primacy of standards of evidence in science and so
5h
Extra-long spiny male genitalia shows benefit for female seed beetles
A team of researchers from Uppsala University, the University of Cincinnati and the University of Toronto has found that there are benefits for female seed beetles mating with males with extra-long spiny genitalia. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the mating habits of the beetles and what they learned about them.
1d
Darkling beetles have natural lubricant in 'knee' joints
A team of researchers from the University of Kiel in Germany and Aarhus University in Denmark, has found that darkling beetles create a type of lubricant in their legs to prevent their leg joints from wearing away. They describe their research in a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
9h
Prenatal test developed with Chinese military stores gene data of millions of women
More than 8 million women globally have taken the BGI test, which the US sees as a national security threat A prenatal test taken by millions of pregnant women globally was developed by Chinese gene company BGI Group in collaboration with the Chinese military and is being used by the firm to collect genetic data, a Reuters review of publicly available documents has found. The report is the first
18h
Hydrothermal vents may add ancient carbon to ocean waters
Earth's oceans play a pivotal role in the global carbon cycle. As seawater moves and mixes, it stores and transports huge amounts of carbon in the form of dissolved organic and inorganic carbon molecules. However, the various sources and fates of marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are complex, and much remains to be learned about its dynamics—especially as climate change progresses.
1d
How seeds know it's a good time to germinate
Dehydrated plant seeds can lay dormant for long periods—over 1,000 years in some species—before the availability of water can trigger germination. This protects the embryonic plant inside from a variety of environmental stresses until conditions are favorable for growth and survival. However, the mechanism by which the baby plant senses water and reactivates cellular activity has remained a myster
1d
Critique topples Nature paper on belief in gods
A widely-touted 2019 study in Nature which argued that large societies gave rise to belief in fire-and-brimstone gods — and not the other way around — has been retracted by the authors after their reanalysis of the data in the wake of criticism diluted the strength of their conclusions. The article, "Complex societies precede moralizing … Continue reading
1d
Bats' brains predict their next move during flight
More than a thousand species use echolocation, but after billions of years of evolution, bats' brains are especially well optimized for navigation. A new paper released today in Science suggests that as bats fly, special neurons known as place cells—located in their hippocampus, a part of the brain that controls memory—helps them process key navigational information about their position not only
3h
A 'tail' of two RNA regulatory systems
Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) are our cells' intermediaries as genes become proteins. In order for the instructions in our genes to be carried out, first their DNA sequences are copied into mRNA, and then that mRNA is used as a template bto create proteins that do the work of the cell. Early in development, eggs and embryos use mRNA supplied by the mother until the embryo starts making enough mRNA from i
8h
Solving the plastic shortage with a new chemical catalyst
In a year that has already battered manufacturing supply chains, yet another shortage is complicating manufacturers' and consumers' lives: plastics, and the food packaging, automotive components, clothing, medical and lab equipment and countless other items that rely on them.
3h
A peek inside a flying bat's brain uncovers clues to mammalian navigation
When driving up to a busy intersection, you probably pay more attention to where you will be in the near future than where you are at that moment. After all, knowing when you will arrive at the intersection—and whether you need to stop or slow down to avoid a collision with a passing car, pedestrian or cyclist—is usually much more important than knowing your current location.
3h
Scientists propose source of unexplained solar jets
Nothing seems more familiar than the sun in the sky. But mysterious swirls, jets, and flashes of powerful light that scientists cannot explain occur in the sun's outer atmosphere all the time. Now, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have gained insight into these puzzling phenomena.
7h
New radio receiver opens wider window to radio universe
Researchers have used the latest wireless technology to develop a new radio receiver for astronomy. The receiver is capable of capturing radio waves at frequencies over a range several times wider than conventional ones, and can detect radio waves emitted by many types of molecules in space at once. This is expected to enable significant progresses in the study of the evolution of the universe and
6h
New satellite data techniques reveal coastal sea-level rise
For the hundreds of millions of people living in coastal regions around the world, rising seas driven by climate change pose a direct threat. In order for authorities to plan appropriate protection strategies, accurate information on sea-level rise close to the coast is imperative. For various reasons, these measurements are difficult to get from satellites. However, new ESA-funded research demons
1d
Ecologists compare accuracy of lidar technologies for monitoring forest vegetation
Andrew Sánchez Meador led a study recently published in Remote Sensing, "Adjudicating Perspectives on Forest Structure: How Do Airborne, Terrestrial, and Mobile Lidar-Derived Estimates Compare?." The study compared vegetation attributes at multiple scales derived from piloted airborne (ALS), fixed-location terrestrial (TLS) and mobile lidar scanning (MLS) to see how these tools might be used to pr
31min
Dealing with global carbon debt
As atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide continue to rise, we are putting future generations at risk of having to deal with a massive carbon debt. Researchers are calling for immediate action to establish responsibility for carbon debt by implementing carbon removal obligations, for example, during the upcoming revision of the EU Emissions Trading Scheme.
55min
Researchers overcome winking, napping pigs to prove brain test works
If you've ever been to an eye doctor, there's a good chance you've felt the sudden puff of air to the eye that constitutes a traditional test for glaucoma. It's no one's favorite experience, but the puff is non-invasive and harmless. Scientists use a similar method to test learning and memory in animals and humans.
55min
Handwriting beats typing and watching videos for learning to read
Though writing by hand is increasingly being eclipsed by the ease of computers, a new study finds we shouldn't be so quick to throw away the pencils and paper: handwriting helps people learn certain skills surprisingly faster and significantly better than learning the same material through typing or watching videos.
55min
Scientists show how light therapy treats depression in mice model
Light therapy can help improve the mood of people with seasonal affective disorder (SAD) during short winter days, but exactly how this therapy works is not well understood. A new study finds that light therapy's beneficial effects come from activating the circadian clock gene Period1 in a part of the brain involved in mood and sleep-wake cycles.
1h
Meet the open-source software powering NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter
When NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter hovered above the Red Planet April 19 on its maiden voyage, the moment was hailed as the first instance of powered, controlled flight on another planet. Figuring out how to fly on Mars, where the air is thin but gravity is about a third of that on Earth, took years of work. Along with the challenge of developing a craft that was up to the task, the mission nee
1h
The pressure is off and high temperature superconductivity remains
In a critical next step toward room-temperature superconductivity at ambient pressure, Paul Chu, Founding Director and Chief Scientist at the Texas Center for Superconductivity at the University of Houston (TcSUH), Liangzi Deng, research assistant professor of physics at TcSUH, and their colleagues at TcSUH conceived and developed a pressure-quench (PQ) technique that retains the pressure-enhanced
1h
Unlocking radiation-free quantum technology with graphene
"Heavy fermions" are an appealing theoretical way to produce quantum entangled phenomena, but until recently have been observed mostly in dangerously radioactive compounds. A new paper in Physical Review Letters has shown it is possible to make heavy fermions in subtly modified graphene, which is much cheaper and safer.
1h
First study of nickelate's magnetism finds a strong kinship with cuprate superconductors
Ever since the 1986 discovery that copper oxide materials, or cuprates, could carry electrical current with no loss at unexpectedly high temperatures, scientists have been looking for other unconventional superconductors that could operate even closer to room temperature. This would allow for a host of everyday applications that could transform society by making energy transmission more efficient,
1h
Engineering seeds to resist drought
Researchers have devised a way to protect seeds from the stress of water shortage during their crucial germination phase, and even provide the plants with extra nutrition. Simple and inexpensive, the process could be deployed in arid regions to facilitate agriculture on drought-stressed land.
1h
The outsized impacts of rudeness in the workplace
Rude behavior is a common form of insensitive and disrespectful conduct that harms employees' performance in the workplace. In a new study, researchers examined the impact of rude behavior on how individuals make critical decisions. The study found that in certain situations, these behaviors can have deadly consequences.
1h
Astronomers map interstellar dust grains in Milky Way
Between the stars in our Milky Way, vast amounts of tiny dust grains are floating aimlessly around. They form the building blocks of new stars and planets. But we still don't know what elements exactly are available to form planets like Earth. A research team at SRON led by Elisa Costantini has now matched observations from X-ray telescopes with data from synchrotron facilities to create a map of
1h
Potential marker for success of immunotherapy in the treatment of lung cancer
Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of all cancers, and treatment options are extremely limited, especially for patients with oncogenic mutations in the KRAS gene. Some patients respond very well to treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors while it is completely ineffective in others. A research group identified a potential marker for the success of immunotherapy in lung cancer patients
2h
The Democrats' New Voting-Rights Obstacle
There is a gnawing anxiety among voting-rights advocates that even if Democrats find a way to roll back the Senate filibuster and pass new federal legislation safeguarding access to the ballot, the Republican-appointed majority on the Supreme Court might still strike it down. Last week's Supreme Court ruling , in which the six Republican-appointed justices outvoted the three appointed by Democrat
2h
Officials Declare Deadly Heatwave as "Mass Casualty Event"
Mass Casualty As time passes and the deadly heatwave that inundated western Canada and the northwest United States begins to ease up, experts are starting to gather a clearer picture of the disaster. Unfortunately, that picture includes a whole lot of death and a grim outlook for the future, Earther reports . The heatwave, which has caused hundreds of deaths , is now a "mass casualty event," acco
2h
These factors raise the risk of nicotine dependence
A new study uses genome-wide association studies for a range of different traits and disorders correlated with nicotine dependence and explains 3.6% of the variation in nicotine dependence. In other words, the finding clarifies why some people casually smoke cigarettes for a while and then stop without a problem, while others develop long-term, several packs-per-day habits. A complex mix of envir
2h
The GAS6-AXL signaling pathway triggers actin remodeling that drives membrane ruffling, macropinocytosis, and cancer-cell invasion [Cell Biology]
AXL, a member of the TAM (TYRO3, AXL, MER) receptor tyrosine kinase family, and its ligand, GAS6, are implicated in oncogenesis and metastasis of many cancer types. However, the exact cellular processes activated by GAS6-AXL remain largely unexplored. Here, we identified an interactome of AXL and revealed its associations with…
3h
Live imaging of remyelination in the adult mouse corpus callosum [Developmental Biology]
Oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) retain the capacity to remyelinate axons in the corpus callosum (CC) upon demyelination. However, the dynamics of OPC activation, mode of cell division, migration, and differentiation on a single-cell level remain poorly understood due to the lack of longitudinal observations of individual cells within the injured…
3h
PIEZO2 mediates ultrasonic hearing via cochlear outer hair cells in mice [Neuroscience]
Ultrasonic hearing and vocalization are the physiological mechanisms controlling echolocation used in hunting and navigation by microbats and bottleneck dolphins and for social communication by mice and rats. The molecular and cellular basis for ultrasonic hearing is as yet unknown. Here, we show that knockout of the mechanosensitive ion channel…
3h
Ciliopathy genes are required for apical secretion of Cochlin, an otolith crystallization factor [Developmental Biology]
Here, we report that important regulators of cilia formation and ciliary compartment–directed protein transport function in secretion polarity. Mutations in cilia genes cep290 and bbs2, involved in human ciliopathies, affect apical secretion of Cochlin, a major otolith component and a determinant of calcium carbonate crystallization form. We show that Cochlin,…
3h
Defensive hypervariable regions confer superinfection exclusion in microviruses [Microbiology]
Single-stranded DNA phages of the family Microviridae have fundamentally different evolutionary origins and dynamics than the more frequently studied double-stranded DNA phages. Despite their small size (around 5 kb), which imposes extreme constraints on genomic innovation, they have adapted to become prominent members of viromes in numerous ecosystems and hold…
3h
Separation of presynaptic Cav2 and Cav1 channel function in synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis by the membrane anchored Ca2+ pump PMCA [Neuroscience]
Synaptic vesicle (SV) release, recycling, and plastic changes of release probability co-occur side by side within nerve terminals and rely on local Ca2+ signals with different temporal and spatial profiles. The mechanisms that guarantee separate regulation of these vital presynaptic functions during action potential (AP)–triggered presynaptic Ca2+ entry remain unclear….
3h
1,2-Difunctionalized bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes: Long-sought-after mimetics for ortho/meta-substituted arenes [Chemistry]
The development of a versatile platform for the synthesis of 1,2-difunctionalized bicyclo[1.1.1]pentanes to potentially mimic ortho/meta-substituted arenes is described. The syntheses of useful building blocks bearing alcohol, amine, and carboxylic acid functional handles have been achieved from a simple common intermediate. Several ortho- and meta-substituted benzene analogs, as well as…
3h
LHAASO's measurement of Crab Nebula brightness yields new UHE gamma-ray standard
The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO) has accurately measured the brightness over 3.5 orders of magnitude of the standard candle in high-energy astronomy, thus calibrating a new standard for ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma-ray sources. The standard candle is the famous Crab Nebula, which evolved from the "guest star" recorded by the imperial astronomers of China's Song Dynasty.
3h
Tooth loss boosts dementia risk, but dentures may help
Tooth loss is a risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia—and with each tooth lost, the risk of cognitive decline grows, according to a new analysis. The risk was not significant among older adults with dentures, however, suggesting that timely treatment with dentures may protect against cognitive decline. About one in six adults aged 65 or older have lost all of their teeth, according to
3h
Do I buy or not?
Psychologists have studied the phenomenon of impulse buying behavior. People who focus on enjoyment act differently than people who play it safe.
3h
This Online Vet Service Will Save You Thousands of Dollars in Bills
We all want the absolute best for our furry loved ones . And why shouldn't we? Other people are cool, but pets are our most loyal companions. Without fail, they comfort us when we're sad, make us laugh when we're bored, and give us unconditional love when the world feels cold and empty. They also lick up food that we drop on the floor (good luck getting your human BFF to do that). Unfortunately,
3h
LHAASO measures Crab Nebula brightness, yields new UHE gamma-ray standard
The Large High Altitude Air Shower Observatory (LHAASO), one of China's key national science and technology infrastructure facilities, has accurately measured the brightness over 3.5 orders of magnitude of the standard candle in high-energy astronomy, thus calibrating a new standard for ultra-high-energy (UHE) gamma-ray sources. The standard candle is the famous Crab Nebula, which evolved from the
3h
'Smart collar' could prevent tapeworms in dogs
Dogs infected with echinococcosis play a major role in spreading tapeworms across human populations around the world. Now, researchers have developed a "smart collar" which gradually delivers a steady dose of a deworming drug to dogs. The collar successfully reduces the animals' risk of echinococcosis, the team reports in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases
3h
To sequester carbon, leave crop leftovers to rot?
Plant materials that lie to rot in soil makes good compost and play a key role in sequestering carbon, research finds. For quite some time, farmers and researchers have been focusing on how to bind carbon to soil. Doing so makes food crops more nutritious and increases yields. However, because carbon is converted into CO 2 when it enters the atmosphere, there is a significant climate benefit to c
3h
Australian supplier of lab animals to close, sparking fresh debate about use of mice and rats in research
Animal Resource Centre decision catches many researchers off guard as others urge Australia to phase out animal research Download the free Guardian app ; Get our morning email briefing A major supplier of laboratory animals to Australian researchers since 1988 will close within the next 18 months due to financial difficulties, renewing debate about the use of animals in medical and scientific res
4h
Gut microbiome heritability is nearly universal but environmentally contingent
Relatives have more similar gut microbiomes than nonrelatives, but the degree to which this similarity results from shared genotypes versus shared environments has been controversial. Here, we leveraged 16,234 gut microbiome profiles, collected over 14 years from 585 wild baboons, to reveal that host genetic effects on the gut microbiome are nearly universal. Controlling for diet, age, and socioe
4h
Elastic ice microfibers
Ice is known to be a rigid and brittle crystal that fractures when deformed. We demonstrate that ice grown as single-crystal ice microfibers (IMFs) with diameters ranging from 10 micrometers to less than 800 nanometers is highly elastic. Under cryotemperature, we could reversibly bend the IMFs up to a maximum strain of 10.9%, which approaches the theoretical elastic limit. We also observed a pres
4h
Cauliflower fractal forms arise from perturbations of floral gene networks
Throughout development, plant meristems regularly produce organs in defined spiral, opposite, or whorl patterns. Cauliflowers present an unusual organ arrangement with a multitude of spirals nested over a wide range of scales. How such a fractal, self-similar organization emerges from developmental mechanisms has remained elusive. Combining experimental analyses in an Arabidopsis thaliana caulifl
4h
Brine-driven destruction of clay minerals in Gale crater, Mars
Mars' sedimentary rock record preserves information on geological (and potential astrobiological) processes that occurred on the planet billions of years ago. The Curiosity rover is exploring the lower reaches of Mount Sharp, in Gale crater on Mars. A traverse from Vera Rubin ridge to Glen Torridon has allowed Curiosity to examine a lateral transect of rock strata laid down in a martian lake ~3.5
4h
The life span of fault-crossing channels
Successive earthquakes can drive landscape evolution. However, the mechanism and pace with which landscapes respond remain poorly understood. Offset channels in the Carrizo Plain, California, capture the fluvial response to lateral slip on the San Andreas Fault on millennial time scales. We developed and tested a model that quantifies competition between fault slip, which elongates channels, and
4h
Flyby reaction trajectories: Chemical dynamics under extrinsic force
Dynamic effects are an important determinant of chemical reactivity and selectivity, but the deliberate manipulation of atomic motions during a chemical transformation is not straightforward. Here, we demonstrate that extrinsic force exerted upon cyclobutanes by stretching pendant polymer chains influences product selectivity through force-imparted nonstatistical dynamic effects on the stepwise r
4h
Magnetic excitations in infinite-layer nickelates
The discovery of superconductivity in infinite-layer nickelates brings us tantalizingly close to a material class that mirrors the cuprate superconductors. We measured the magnetic excitations in these nickelates using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the Ni L 3 -edge. Undoped NdNiO 2 possesses a branch of dispersive excitations with a bandwidth of approximately 200 milli–electron volts, wh
4h
Stable and selective catalysts for propane dehydrogenation operating at thermodynamic limit
Intentional ("on-purpose") propylene production through nonoxidative propane dehydrogenation (PDH) holds great promise for meeting the increasing global demand for propylene. For stable performance, traditional alumina-supported platinum-based catalysts require excess tin and feed dilution with hydrogen; however, this reduces per-pass propylene conversion and thus lowers catalyst productivity. We
4h
Skeletal muscle thermogenesis enables aquatic life in the smallest marine mammal
Basal metabolic rate generally scales with body mass in mammals, and variation from predicted levels indicates adaptive metabolic remodeling. As a thermogenic adaptation for living in cool water, sea otters have a basal metabolic rate approximately three times that of the predicted rate; however, the tissue-level source of this hypermetabolism is unknown. Because skeletal muscle is a major determ
4h
An isoform of Dicer protects mammalian stem cells against multiple RNA viruses
In mammals, early resistance to viruses relies on interferons, which protect differentiated cells but not stem cells from viral replication. Many other organisms rely instead on RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by a specialized Dicer protein that cleaves viral double-stranded RNA. Whether RNAi also contributes to mammalian antiviral immunity remains controversial. We identified an isoform of Dice
4h
Fe-S cofactors in the SARS-CoV-2 RNA-dependent RNA polymerase are potential antiviral targets
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causal agent of COVID-19, uses an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) for the replication of its genome and the transcription of its genes. We found that the catalytic subunit of the RdRp, nsp12, ligates two iron-sulfur metal cofactors in sites that were modeled as zinc centers in the available cryo–electron microscopy structures o
4h
Nonlocal spatiotemporal representation in the hippocampus of freely flying bats
Navigation occurs through a continuum of space and time. The hippocampus is known to encode the immediate position of moving animals. However, active navigation, especially at high speeds, may require representing navigational information beyond the present moment. Using wireless electrophysiological recordings in freely flying bats, we demonstrate that neural activity in area CA1 predominantly e
4h
Manipulating matter by strong coupling to vacuum fields
Over the past decade, there has been a surge of interest in the ability of hybrid light-matter states to control the properties of matter and chemical reactivity. Such hybrid states can be generated by simply placing a material in the spatially confined electromagnetic field of an optical resonator, such as that provided by two parallel mirrors. This occurs even in the dark because it is electrom
4h
Estimating infectiousness throughout SARS-CoV-2 infection course
Two elementary parameters for quantifying viral infection and shedding are viral load and whether samples yield a replicating virus isolate in cell culture. We examined 25,381 cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in Germany, including 6110 from test centers attended by presymptomatic, asymptomatic, and mildly symptomatic (PAMS) subjects, 9519 who were hospitalized
4h
Mapping the cellular origin and early evolution of leukemia in Down syndrome
Children with Down syndrome have a 150-fold increased risk of developing myeloid leukemia, but the mechanism of predisposition is unclear. Because Down syndrome leukemogenesis initiates during fetal development, we characterized the cellular and developmental context of preleukemic initiation and leukemic progression using gene editing in human disomic and trisomic fetal hematopoietic cells and x
4h
Programmable structures from the printer
Researchers at the University of Freiburg and the University of Stuttgart have developed a new process for producing movable, self-adjusting materials systems with standard 3D printers. These systems can undergo complex shape changes, contracting and expanding under the influence of moisture in a pre-programmed manner. The scientists modeled their development based on the movement mechanisms of th
4h
Researchers bring attack-proof quantum communication two steps forward
Quantum key distribution (QKD) is a method for secure communication that uses quantum mechanics to encrypt information. While the security of QKD is unbreakable in principle, if it is incorrectly implemented, vital information could still be stolen by attackers. These are known as side-channel attacks, where the attackers exploit weaknesses in the setup of the information system to eavesdrop on th
4h
An antioxidative stress regulator protects muscle tissue in space
Many kids dream of growing up to be astronauts; but the downside of spending extended amounts of time in low gravity is that astronauts' muscles tend to shrink and weaken through disuse. Now, researchers from Japan have identified a protein that affects how muscles respond to space flight.
4h
Scientists observe a new type of topological defect in chiral magnets for the first time
'Topological defects' are formed when the symmetry of a magnetic material is disrupted. Domain walls (DWs) are a type of topological defect that separates regions of different magnetic orientations. A widely studied phenomenon, the manipulation of these defects has potential applications in high-performance memory storage devices, energy processing devices, and quantum computing.
4h
Third Pole faces major changes in water flows
Snow cover and glaciers at the Third Pole are disappearing fast as a result of global warming. A joint research team modeled the Third Pole water cycling to see what the future has in store for the region.
4h
How air pollution changed during COVID-19 in Park City, Utah
As luck would have it, the air quality sensors that University of Utah researcher Daniel Mendoza and his colleagues installed in Park City, Utah in September 2019, hoping to observe how pollution rose and fell through the ski season and the Sundance Film Festival, captured a far more impactful natural experiment: the COVID-19 pandemic.
4h
The impact of climate change in dry and hot periods in the Pyrenees
A team of the University of Barcelona has analyzed for the first time what the dry and hot periods could be like in the area of the Pyrenees depending on different greenhouse emission scenarios. The results, published in the journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences, show that under an intermediate scenario, where these emissions that accelerate the climate change could be limited, there w
4h
How fishing communities are responding to climate change
What happens when climate change affects the abundance and distribution of fish? Fishers and fishing communities in the Northeast United States have adapted to those changes in three specific ways, according to new research published in Frontiers in Marine Science.
4h
Seismic monitoring of permafrost uncovers trend likely related to warming
Seismic waves passing through the ground near Longyearbyen in the Adventdalen valley, Svalbard, Norway have been slowing down steadily over the past three years, most likely due to permafrost warming in the Arctic valley.The trend, reported in a new study published in Seismological Research Letters, demonstrates how seismic monitoring can be used to track permafrost stability under global climate
4h
UCF study finds smaller turtles are nesting on Florida beaches
A new University of Central Florida study indicates that smaller loggerhead and green sea turtles are nesting on Florida beaches than in the past; however, researchers aren't sure why. The findings, published this month in the journal Ecosphere, give clues to the status of the turtles, which is important to researchers who are monitoring the population health of the threatened species.
4h
There's Something Fishy About the Teletubbies' Vaccination Cards
The Teletubbies — the nightmare half-baby-half-television creatures from your childhood — are all vaxxed up and ready for a wild s ummer, according to a bizarre tweet from the TV show's brand account. "We're all vaxxed!" the tweet reads. "Just in time for a Tubby hot summer. Who's ready to come out and play." It's eyebrow-raising, if not mildly off-putting, that beloved children's television char
5h
Genetic analysis technique finds missing link between thyroid function and lipid profile
Thyroid dysfunction is known to be connected with the development of cardiovascular diseases. While thyroid hormone-mimicking drugs help treat lipid-related diseases, the definitive causal association between thyroid function and serum lipid level remains unclear. Now, in a study published in Chinese Medical Journal, researchers from China have established the missing link between the two. The res
5h
New crab is first ever with male and female reproductive parts
Mabui calculus , a new genus and species of xanthid crab is unique among the 7,800 species of known crabs in having strongly asymmetrical male and female reproductive structures, researchers report. "Male crabs have a pair of reproductive parts called gonopods while females have a pair of vulvae. All crabs mate in the "missionary position," so the gonopods pump sperm into females for internal fer
5h
Tiger Sharks Feast on a Cow Carcass | Shark Week
Stream Return to Headstone Hell on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/return-to-headstone-hell-us About Return to Headstone Hell: Dr. Riley Elliott returns to Australia's Norfolk Island with underwater cinematographer Kina Scollay to see what happens when the island's tiger sharks go head-to-head with migrating great whites over an unusual food source: cow carcasses. Subscribe to Dis
5h
Artificial intelligence provides faster diagnosis for debilitating blistering disease
Scientists at the University of Groningen have trained an Artificial Intelligence system to recognize a specific pattern in skin biopsies of patients with the blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. The pattern is characteristic of a specific variant of the disease which can cause scarring of the skin and mucous membranes, and may lead to blindness. The new system is easy to use and is
5h
UB team analyzes the impact of climate change in dry and hot periods in the Pyrenees
A team of the University of Barcelona has analysed for the first time what the dry and hot periods could be like in the area of the Pyrenees. Under an intermediate scenario, there would not be a rise in long-lasting dry episodes, but temperatures would rise during these periods. Also, summer no-rain periods would last an average of five more, and they would go with a rise of temperatures 6ºC over
5h
Team find brain mechanism that automatically links objects in our minds
When people see a toothbrush, a car, a tree — any individual object — their brain automatically associates it with other things it naturally occurs with, allowing humans to build context for their surroundings and set expectations for the world. By using machine-learning and brain imaging, researchers measured the extent of the "co-occurrence" phenomenon and identified the brain region involved.
5h
You Can Own an Artifact From the a Manhattan Project for Under $40
The Manhattan Project was the United States' World War II research and development project that produced the world's first atomic bomb. It is without question one of the most ambitious, historically significant scientific undertakings in the history of mankind. And now, thanks to the folks at Mini Museum, who have obtained incredible specimens of Manhattan Project Shield Windows , you can actuall
5h
Carbon Capture Pioneers Say Carbon Capture Tech Won't Save Us
Ooh, Shiny! Carbon capture has, for years, been the darling of climate change experts who argue that we can use the technology to engineer ourselves out of our current dire predicament . But even the scientists who helped pioneer the concept of direct air capture — facilities that can suck greenhouse gases out of the atmosphere and safely sequester the carbon — are now turning on their own creati
5h
New Type of Stellar Explosion Could Explain the Mystery of the Milky Way's Elements
Until recently it was thought neutron star mergers were the only way heavy elements (heavier than zinc) could be produced. These mergers involve the mashup of the remnants of two massive stars in a binary system. But we know heavy elements were first produced not long after the Big Bang, when the universe was really young. Back then, not enough time had passed for neutron star mergers to have eve
5h
An Update on Anti-Androgen Therapy for the Coronavirus
I blogged earlier this year about some interesting androgen antagonist results in coronavirus therapy. The idea is that the TMPRSS serine protease needs to be present at the cell membrane for the entire cell-entry pathway of the virus to work, and that androgen antagonists decrease its expression sharply. As the references in that earlier post show, that's not a crazy idea per se , and it had got
5h
Advocacy for a digital oral health that leaves no one behind
The health, social and economic consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic have already had a dramatic impact on the prevailing oral health care model and will continue to do so. The paper "Advocacy for a Digital Oral Health That Leaves No One Behind," published in the JDR Clinical & Translational Research (JDR CTR), promotes the use of digital tools to offer opportunities to improve healthy behavior,
5h
Digital government needs to better take women's digital needs into account
Amsterdam, July 8, 2021 – While the literature on the digital divide has widely addressed the digital gender gap, its potential implications for electronic government (e-government) / digital government research and practice have hardly been studied. In this Special Issue of Information Polity experts characterize the current state of understanding of the issues surrounding digital government and
5h
A novel neurological disorder associated with the Polycomb complex identified
A multi-institutional study has discovered spontaneous mutations in RNF2 (RING2) gene as the underlying cause of a novel neurological disorder. This Undiagnosed Diseases Network (UDN) study was led by Dr. Shinya Yamamoto, investigator at the Jan and Dan Duncan Neurological Research Institute (NRI) at Texas Children's Hospital and assistant professor at Baylor College of Medicine, and Dr. Vandana S
5h
Continental pirouettes
The plates of the Earth's crust perform complicated movements that can be attributed to quite simple mechanisms. That is the short version of the explanation of a rift that began to tear the world apart over a length of several thousand kilometers 105 million years ago. The scientific explanation appears in Nature Geoscience.
5h
Scientists find liver drug candidates among pesticides
Russian and Ukrainian scientists have discovered fairly unlikely drug candidates for treating liver fibrosis and other pathologies — among pest control chemicals. In addition, the team looked at modifications of the medication called hymecromone, deeming them promising for anti-fibrotic drugs, too. Published in Glycobiology, the study also sheds light on the possible mechanism of action of the in
5h
Soft polymer shell keeps 3D-printed ceramics from cracking
A thin shell of soft polymer can help keep knotty ceramic structures from shattering, researchers report. Ceramics made with 3D printers crack under stress like any plate or bowl. But covered in a soft polymer cured under ultraviolet light, the same materials stand a far better chance of keeping their structural integrity, much like a car windshield's treated glass is less likely to shatter. The
6h
Multimodal analgesia: The new 'standard of care' for pain control after total joint replacement
Until relatively recently, opioids were a mainstay of treatment for pain following total hip or knee replacement. Today, a growing body of evidence supports the use of multimodal analgesia – combinations of different techniques and medications to optimize pain management while reducing the use and risks of opioids, according to a paper in The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is publish
6h
Repurposed drugs present new strategy for treating COVID-19
Researchers have identified repurposed drugs for COVID-19 treatment through virtual screening and cell-based assays. The team suggested the strategy for virtual screening with greatly reduced false positives by incorporating pre-docking filtering based on shape similarity and post-docking filtering based on interaction similarity. This strategy will help develop therapeutic medications for COVID-1
6h
Key left turn bans can unclog traffic jams
When traffic is clogged at a downtown intersection, there may be a way to reduce some of the congestion: Eliminate a few left turns. According to Vikash Gayah, associate professor of civil engineering at Penn State, well-placed left-turn restrictions in certain busy intersections could loosen many of the bottlenecks that hamper traffic efficiency. He recently created a new method that could help
6h
Record-breaking simulations of turbulence's smallest structures
When you pour cream into a cup of coffee, the viscous liquid seems to lazily disperse throughout the cup. Take a mixing spoon or straw to the cup, though, and the cream and coffee seem to quickly and seamlessly combine into a lighter color and, at least for some, a more enjoyable beverage.
6h
Hybrid enzyme catalysts synthesized by a de novo approach for expanding biocatalysis
The two major challenges in industrial enzymatic catalysis are the limited number of chemical reaction types that are catalyzed by enzymes and the instability of enzymes under harsh conditions in industrial catalysis. Both expanding enzyme catalysis to a larger substrate scope and greater variety of chemical reactions and tuning the microenvironment surrounding enzyme molecules to achieve high enz
6h
Understanding bias in leadership assessments of women
A new study conducted before COVID-19 busted open the leaky pipeline for women in leadership underscores the bias that men are naturally presumed to have leadership potential and women are not and highlights the increased efforts needed by organizations to address the incorrect stereotype post-pandemic.
6h
Of the same stripe: Turing patterns link tropical fish and bismuth crystal growth
What connection could possibly exist between the stripes on tropical fish and crystal growth? The answer is the way in which order emerges from randomness through Turing patterns, according to what a research team led by Dr. Fuseya of the University of Electro-Communications, Japan, has recently found. After analyzing a mysterious striped pattern, they observed while trying to grow a monoatomic la
6h
'Tumor avatars' predict patients' response to immunotherapy
Tumor fragments in the lab are able to predict whether the corresponding real-life patients will benefit from immunotherapy. "We've solved a major problem many scientists had been facing: preserving a tumors original composition and structure outside of the patient in the lab", says cancer researcher Daniela Thommen from the Netherlands Cancer Institute. On 8 July, the results of her study are pub
6h
Large genomic analysis highlights COVID-19 risk factors
A global consortium of scientists investigated which genetic factors influence severity of COVID-19. They found 13 locations in the human genome that are strongly associated with infection or severe COVID-19. They also identified causal factors such as smoking and high BMI. This study, one of the largest GWASs ever performed, includes nearly 50,000 COVID-19 patients and two million uninfected cont
6h
Arab participation in global genomic study could lead to new therapies for COVID patients
Researchers from Qatar, alongside researchers from 24 other countries, contributed to the COVID-19 Host Genetics Initiative large analysis identifying genetic markers for COVID risks, published today in Nature. The results of the analysis will enable genetic tests to predict the course of the disease, potential targeted therapies and drug repurposing to treat new infections and "long COVID". It is
6h
Researchers propose a scheme that treats carbon emissions like financial debt
The recent extreme heat in the Western United States and Canada may seem remarkable now, but events like these are made more likely, and more severe, under climate change. The consequences are likely to be far-reaching, with overwhelmingly negative impacts on land and ocean ecosystems, biodiversity, food production and the built environment.
6h
Heat can harm your body and your mind
Summer is upon us and things are heating up, literally. That's worrisome given the effect that heat has on human health, both on the body and the mind. The first major heat wave of the season scorched the western United States in recent weeks, with temperatures climbing to 114 degrees Fahrenheit in Las Vegas, and to a record-breaking 118 degrees in Phoenix. The Pacific Northwest shattered previou
6h
Highly fit teenagers coped better with COVID-19 later in life
Of the Swedish men in their late teens who performed well in the physical fitness tests for military conscription, a relatively high proportion were able to avoid hospital care when they became infected with COVID-19 during the pandemic up to 50 years later. This has been shown by University of Gothenburg researchers in a register study, with results now published in the BMJ Open.
6h
NUS researchers bring attack-proof quantum communication two steps forward
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have come up with two new ways to protect quantum communications from attacks – the first is an ultra-secure cryptography protocol, and the other is a first-of-its-kind quantum power limiter device. These two approaches hold promise to ensure information systems used for critical services, such as banking and healthcare, can hold up any potenti
6h
Could a pill that lowers our body temperature make us live longer?
"Efficiencies of scale" apply both to economic and biological systems. Scaling effects cause larger organisms to come with a 25 percent energy "discount." Theoretical physicist Geoffrey West describes how an understanding of this phenomenon could help us live longer. Why do big creatures live longer? | Geoffrey West | Big Think www.youtube.com It's one of the most fascinating aspects of the natur
6h
Study finds toddlers with ASD do not differ in progress made in comparison of two treatment types
A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that the type of one-on-one treatment plans delivered to toddlers, aged 12-30 months, diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) did not lead to any significantly different outcomes. Neither the type of evidence-based intervention provided, nor the number of hours of therapy were shown to have an
7h
2D:4D ratio is not related to sex-determined finger size differences in men and women
The ratios between the lengths of the second and fourth fingers, known as the 2D:4D ratio, are different in males and females, which is often explained by levels of androgens and oestrogens. However, an alternative theory states that men have bigger body parts, including fingers, which impacts the 2D:4D ratio. A research team including HSE University scholars refuted this hypothesis by collecting
7h
Climate changed the size of our bodies and, to some extent, our brains
The average body size of humans has fluctuated significantly over the last million years and is strongly linked to temperature. Colder, harsher climates drove the evolution of larger body sizes, while warmer climates led to smaller bodies. Brain size also changed dramatically but did not evolve in tandem with body size.
7h
Novel study of high-potency cannabis shows some memory effects
Researchers observed participants over Zoom as they used high-potency cannabis they purchased themselves from dispensaries in Washington state, where recreational cannabis is legal. After administering cognitive tests, researchers found no impact on users' performance on decision-making tests in comparison to a sober group but did find memory impairments related to free recall, source memory and f
7h
Protein's 'silent code' affects how cells move
Two forms of the ubiquitous protein actin differ by only four amino acids but are dissimilar in 13% of their nucleotide coding sequences due to silent substitutions. A new study reveals that these supposedly 'silent' differences have an impact on how fast actin mRNA gets translated into protein and subsequently on the protein's function in propelling cell movement.
7h
Därför ger punktligare tåg mindre växthusgasutsläpp
Att öka punktligheten i trafiken är det absolut bästa sättet att få fler transporter med tåg, visar forskning. Och på så sätt minska utsläppen från transportsektorn. Inrikes transporter står för en ökande andel av utsläppen av växthusgaser i Sverige. För att minska transportsektorns utsläpp behöver mer transporter ske på järnväg. Aktuell forskning vid K2 och Lunds universitet visar att järnvägstr
7h
Anknytningen kan påverka tillit till välfärdssystemet
Människor med en otrygg anknytning har mindre tillit till välfärdssystemet. Det visar en avhandling från Stockholms universitet. I en avhandling från Stockholms universitet lyfts frågan om människors tillit till välfärdssystemet kan förklaras utifrån anknytningsmönster – och om vårt välfärdssystem kan utgöra en trygghet för människor på samma sätt som religion. Resultaten visar att anknytningsmön
7h
More ancestral enzyme
First determination of crystal structures of aconitase X by X-ray crystallographic analysisEvidence of a common ancestor of aconitase superfamily, appearing before the previously proposed oneEvolutional insight of requirement of complicated metabolic pathways in primordial cell
7h
Stroke treatment may backfire when kidneys don't work well
A common treatment for acute intracerebral hemorrhage is to quickly and drastically lower blood pressure. However, the effectiveness of this treatment might change depending on kidney function. Researchers at the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center in Japan examined the data from a large clinical trial and found that when patients were treated this way for acute intracerebral hemorrhage, t
7h
The Atlantic Daily: Trump's Real Legal Battle
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. New York is charging the Trump Organization and one of its top executives. So Donald Trump is suing Facebook—and Facebook's CEO, and Twitter, and Twitter's CEO, and Google-owned YouTube, and Googl
7h
Reduced traffic during lockdown did not improve air quality in urban areas as much as expected
Two studies led by María Morales Suárez Varela, group leader of the CIBERESP at the University of Valencia and professor of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at the academic institution, have evaluated the impact of mobility restrictions on air quality and polluting emissions, in Valencia and in three Italian cities. "The lockdown measures improved air quality in urban areas,
7h
Experts recommend a varied and moderate consumption of sushi limiting quantities of tuna
The consumption of sushi has increased significantly since the start of the 21st century, as has the number of restaurants offering it throughout the region. Although eating fish is recommended because of its high nutritional value, it can also lead to exposure to contaminants, such as heavy metals. Likewise, rice is a food that provides many nutrients and fibre and is low in fat, but it too can b
7h
Use UV-C Light To Keep Your Toothbrush Clean With This Sanitizer
While the future of dentistry features teeth that heal themselves and robot dentists , right now brushing and flossing regularly is the best way to keep your teeth clean. Yet when you're sick, or if you're dealing with a dental infection, keeping your toothbrush clean can be a challenge. The Germ Shield UV Toothbrush Sanitizer will help keep your brush, and your mouth, clean. It's currently nearl
7h
Video: European Robotic Arm ready for space
The European Robotic Arm (ERA) will be launched to the International Space Station together with the Russian Multipurpose Laboratory Module, called 'Nauka'. ERA is the first robot able to 'walk' around the Russian segment of the Space Station. It has the ability to anchor itself to the Station and move back and forward by itself, hand-over-hand between fixed base-points. This 11-metre intelligent
8h
Creating a lab mangrove helps to identify new bacteria
A pioneering cultivation strategy that recreates a mangrove environment in the lab has enabled identification of novel bacteria residing in Red Sea mangroves and will help improve understanding of mangrove ecosystem stability, resilience and sustainability.
8h
The molecular evolution of the aconitase superfamily
The aconitase superfamily currently contains four functional enzymes including the archetypical aconitase (referred to as "other aconitase enzymes"), and one hypothetical aconitase X (AcnX). The aconitase enzymes catalyze the homologous stereospecific isomerization, and their three-dimensional structures and catalytic mechanisms including the [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster are very similar each othe
8h
Darker-winged birds have better flight performance
Many seabirds evolved dark wings, independent from each other. New research shows that these darker wings heat up more and that this heating up increases the efficiency of flight in birds. Furthermore, the study confirmed that darker wings are mostly present in seabirds that are already efficient at flight.
8h
Total-body PET imaging exceeds industry standards
A performance evaluation of the uEXPLORER total-body PET/CT scanner showed that it exhibits ultra-high sensitivity that supports excellent spatial resolution and image quality. Given the long axial field of view (AFOV) of the uEXPLORER, study authors have proposed new, extended measurements for phantoms to characterize total-body PET imaging more appropriately. This research was published in the J
8h
How plants compensate symbiotic microbes
Combining economics, psychology and studies of fertilizer application, researchers find that plants nearly follow an 'equal pay for equal work' rule when giving resources to partner microbes – except when those microbes under-perform.
8h
When taste and healthfulness compete, taste has a hidden advantage
You dash into a convenience store for a quick snack, spot an apple and reach for a candy bar instead. Poor self-control may not be the only factor behind your choice, new research suggests. That's because our brains process taste information first, before factoring in health information, according to new research.
8h
Mystical experiences on demand? Welcome to spirit tech
Spiritual or mystical experiences have particular "neural signatures." Technology like transcranial stimulation can lead people toward these experiences. The technology appears safe and offers "authentic" experiences, but there are clear dangers. What do you get when you mix transcendental meditation with EEG-guided neurofeedback? What does ultrasound brain stimulation have to teach us about equa
8h
Scientists: Methane in Enceladus Geysers Could Come From Alien Life
Saturn's moon Enceladus doesn't get as much attention as Europa, but it too has an internal liquid water ocean. It may also be more active than Europa with frequent geysers erupting from the surface. Years back, when NASA's Cassini-Huygens probe explored the Saturnian system, scientists were fascinated to see how much methane was present in Enceladus' geysers. At the time, it seemed feasible the
9h
Fossil deposit full of juveniles is like a 'paleonursery'
A newly discovered fossil deposit contains a very well preserved trove of early vertebrates and other rare, soft-bodied organisms, more than half of which are in the larval and juvenile stages of development. All life on Earth 500 million years ago lived in the oceans, but scientists know little about how these animals and algae developed. A newly discovered fossil deposit near Kunming, China, ca
9h
Are Hydroponics Coming?
I have been hearing about hydroponics – the growing of plants in water without the use of soil – for my whole life. Epcot showcased them decades ago as the farming of the future. Hydroponic farming exists. I can buy hydroponic lettuce at the supermarket. But despite the hype, it remains a small percentage of global agriculture. Hydroponics appears to be experiencing some rapid growth, however. In
9h
How does Covid-19 affect chronic pain? (part two) – podcast
Fibromyalgia sufferer Vicky Naylor was successfully managing her condition – until she developed Covid-19. In the second part of our exploration of chronic pain, the Guardian science correspondent Linda Geddes tells Anand Jagatia what we know about the connection between chronic pain, Covid and mental health, and why it affects women more than men Continue reading…
10h
How does Covid-19 affect chronic pain? (part two)
Fibromyalgia sufferer Vicky Naylor was successfully managing her condition – until she developed Covid-19. In the second part of our exploration of chronic pain, the Guardian science correspondent Linda Geddes tells Anand Jagatia what we know about the connection between chronic pain, Covid and mental health, and why it affects women more than men. Help support our independent journalism at thegua
10h
Researchers identify missing 'switch' that controls essential genes
Proteins known as transcription factors act as switches that regulate the expression of nearby genes, but the identity of some of these genetic levers has so far remained mysterious. Now, researchers from the Schübeler group have pinpointed a new switch that regulates essential genes in the mouse and the human genome. Identifying missing gene switches and their function is critical to fully unders
10h
Tiny but mighty precipitates toughen a structural alloy
Scientists at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, have found a way to simultaneously increase the strength and ductility of an alloy by introducing tiny precipitates into its matrix and tuning their size and spacing. The precipitates are solids that separate from the metal mixture as the alloy cools. The results, published in the jou
10h
Daily briefing: The evidence for reopening schools safely
Nature, Published online: 07 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01874-3 Evidence is growing that schools can be safely opened, but the rise of fast-spreading variants adds uncertainty. Plus, a bone carving reveals Neanderthals' artistic side, and why we need research managers.
10h
Researchers forfeit $10,000 award when paper's findings can't be replicated
The authors of a prizewinning paper on how large financial institutions hedge risk have retracted their article and have returned the award after another researcher could not replicate the findings. The paper, "Risk Management in Financial Institutions," was published in 2019 in the Journal of Finance by a group from Duke University, in Durham, N.C., … Continue reading
10h
Different environmental variables predict body and brain size evolution in Homo
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24290-7 Increasing body and brain size constitutes a key pattern in human evolution, but the mechanisms driving these changes remain debated. Using a large fossil dataset combined with global paleoclimatic reconstructions, the authors show that different environmental variables influenced the evolution of brain and body
11h
Stenålderskost minskade vissa blodfetter
Stenålderskost, det vill säga mat utan raffinerat socker, spannmål och mejeriprodukter, kan minska nivån av triglycerider hos personer med typ 2-diabetes. Höga nivåer innebär en risk för åderförkalkning och hjärt-kärlsjukdomar. I studien från Umeå universitet undersöktes överviktiga personer med typ 2-diabetes. Deras kroppsvikt minskade kraftigt efter tolv veckor med paleolitisk kost (stenåldersk
12h
Hi, I need some help
I've been a stressor all my life, so you can imagine how hard it's been coping with issues like climate change. I've been addicted to reading about it ,despite that, I'm rather uneducated on it, as in I don't know what will happen, what will change and what the biggest problems are gonna be because of it. It's been really hard keeping my head up since I keep seeing people on the internet saying w
12h
Meta-analysis finds that omega-3 fatty acids improved cardiovascular outcomes
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and elsewhere conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of 38 randomized controlled trials of omega-3 fatty acids. Overall, they found that omega-3 fatty acids improved cardiovascular outcomes. Results, now published in eClinical Medicine, showed a significantly greater reduction in cardiovascular risk in studies of EPA alone rather than EPA+DH
12h
Discrimination, stress linked to poorer heart health in transgender, gender diverse adults
Higher levels of heart disease among transgender and gender diverse (TGD) people are linked to the stress of experiencing discrimination and transphobia at personal and societal levels.Additional training is recommended for clinicians and health care professionals in addressing the full diversity of gender in health care settings and in the recognition of health disparities faced by TGD people to
12h
Will COVID become a disease of the young?
Nature, Published online: 08 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01862-7 A growing share of infections among unvaccinated youths in countries with high vaccination rates is putting the spotlight on the role of young people in the pandemic.
13h
Podcast: America Has a Drinking Problem
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts From the Pilgrims' arrival at Plymouth Rock to the rise of the pandemic "quarantini," alcohol has been a foundation of American society and culture. The Atlantic 's Kate Julian explores how this tool for cohesion and cooperation eventually became a means of coping, and what history can teach us about improving our drinkin
13h
Ethiopia's controversial mega-dam
Ethiopia's construction of a massive dam on a tributary of the Nile River, which the UN Security Council meets about on Thursday, is raising regional tensions notably with Egypt, which depends on the Nile for 97 percent of its water supply.
13h
UK pandemic hammered minorities, self-employed: study
Ethnic minorities, the self-employed and low-income families in Britain suffered greater deprivation levels during the coronavirus pandemic despite "surprisingly positive" living standards figures, a report published on Thursday found.
14h
Chinese rogue elephant herd's breakaway male sent home
A lone elephant who broke away from a herd marching through southern China has been captured and returned to a nature reserve, officials said, in the latest twist for a journey that has caused chaos but captivated Chinese social media.
14h
Drought, heat, fire force fishing ban on Colorado River
Colorado wildlife officials on Wednesday urged anglers to avoid fishing along a stretch of the Colorado River because low flows during a historic drought in the U.S. West, critically warm water temperatures and sediment runoff from wildfire burn scars are all starving trout of oxygen.
14h
More EVs could reduce CO2 emissions in Hawaii by 93% in less than 30 years
By 2050, faster adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) and faster generation of renewable energy will result in 99% less fossil fuel consumed and 93% less CO2 emissions from passenger and freight vehicles on Oʻahu. That's under the most ambitious scenario in an article published in World Electric Vehicle Journal, by University of Hawaii at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST
14h
Has the COVID-19 pandemic lessened bullying at school?
Students reported far higher rates of bullying at school before the COVID-19 pandemic than during the pandemic across all forms of bullying—general, physical, verbal, and social—except for cyber bullying, where differences in rates were less pronounced. The findings come from a study published in Aggressive Behavior.
14h
How can counselors address social justice amid climate change?
We're currently living in what many scientists are calling the Anthropocene, the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment. An article published in the Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development discusses how counselors can promote environmental justice during this time.
14h
Improving transparency of integrated assessment models related to climate change
Integrated Assessment Models (IAMs) connect trends in future socio-economic and technological development with impacts on the environment, such as global climate change. Critics have taken issue with the transparency of IAM methods and assumptions as well as the transparency of assessments of IAMs by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the United Nations body for assessing the sc
14h
Adhd hos vuxna kopplat till en rad sjukdomar
Vuxna med adhd löper ökad risk att drabbas av ett stort antal fysiska åkommor, bland annat sjukdomar i nervsystemet och luftvägarna samt muskuloskeletala och metabola sjukdomar. Den registerbaserad studie omfattar över fyra miljoner individer. – Identifiering av samtidigt förekommande fysiska sjukdomar kan få betydelse för behandling av vuxna med adhd och gynna patienternas långsiktiga hälsa och
15h
Always Have Your Covid Vaccine Records Handy With This Bracelet
Vaccines work . It's that simple. And as the COVID-19 pandemic eases and we return to public life, there are going to be situations where you need to have your vaccine records handy, whether to solve an external issue or just for your own peace of mind. The ImmunaBand makes those records available safely and securely, while also making them easy to bring up, and it's on sale for just $17.95. Feat
17h
Newborn screening for epilepsy in sight through the discovery of novel disease biomarkers
The door has finally opened on screening newborn babies for pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy (PDE), a severe inherited metabolic disorder. This screening promises to enable better and earlier treatment of the disease. To identify new biomarkers that can be used in the newborn screening protocol, also known as the neonatal heel prick, researchers at the Radboud University Medical Center joined forces
17h
Does methane in gas plumes on Saturn's moon signal life?
An unknown methane-producing process is likely at work in the hidden ocean beneath the icy shell of Saturn's moon Enceladus, a new study suggests. Giant water plumes erupting from Enceladus have long fascinated scientists and the public alike, inspiring research and speculation about the vast ocean that is believed to be sandwiched between the moon's rocky core and its icy shell. "…we can't disca
17h
Ny teknologi kan koncentrere øl – uden tab af smag og duft
På et nyt testcenter hos Alfa Laval kan europæiske bryggerier nu få testet deres bryg på en helt ny og patenteret teknologi, som trækker vandet ud af øllen og tilsætter det igen uden, det går ud over alkoholprocenten, aroma- eller smagsoplevelsen. Spørgsmålet er, hvordan kunderne reagerer.
18h
Energycane produces more biodiesel than soybean at a lower cost
Bioenergy from crops is a sustainable alternative to fossil fuels. New crops such as energycane can produce several times more fuel per acre than soybeans. Yet, challenges remain in processing the crops to extract fuel efficiently. Four new studies explore chemical-free pretreatment methods, development of high-throughput phenotyping methods, and commercial-scale techno-economic feasibility of pro
19h
Cutting through noise for better solar cells
Physicists used cross-correlation noise spectroscopy to measure miniscule fluctuations in electrical current flowing between materials inside silicon solar cells. The researchers identified crucial electrical noise signals that are completely invisible to conventional noise-measuring methods. They were also able to pinpoint the likely physical processes causing the noise, which often results in a
19h
Nova explosions alone cannot explain amount of lithium in current universe
A new study of lithium production in a classical nova found a production rate of only a couple of percent that seen in other examples. This shows that there is a large diversity within classical novae and implies that nova explosions alone cannot explain the amount of lithium seen in the current Universe. This is an important result for understanding both the explosion mechanism of classical novae
19h
The Planets with the Giant Diamonds Inside – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
On the dark night of March 13, 1781, William Herschel settled down in his garden observatory in Bath, England, for a routine night of observing stars, when he noticed something out of place in the heavens. Through the eyepiece of his homemade 7-foot telescope, he spied an interloper in the constellation Gemini: "a curious, either nebulous star or perhaps a comet," as he recorded it. For weeks, he
19h
Psychedelics Open a New Window on the Mechanisms of Perception – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
Everything became imbued with a sense of vitality and life and vividness. If I picked up a pebble from the beach, it would move. It would glisten and gleam and sparkle and be absolutely captivating," says neuroscientist Anil Seth. "Somebody looking at me would see me staring at a stone for hours." Or what seemed like hours to Seth. A researcher at the United Kingdom's University of Sussex, he stu
19h
T. Rex Was a Slacker – Issue 102: Hidden Truths
In our evolving understanding of dinosaurs, Tyrannosaurus rex has acquired a new persona in recent decades. It's always been the imperious, curiously agile two-ton gargantua, personified as a gaunt, grizzle-faced gunfighter at the dark end of the bar, a soulless creature that lived to 30 and possessed a keen sense of smell, good eyesight, surprisingly pliable skin and banana-sized teeth. Add a ta
19h
Quantum laser turns energy loss into gain?
Scientists have fabricated a laser system that generates highly interactive quantum particles at room temperature. Their findings could lead to a single microcavity laser system that requires lower threshold energy as its energy loss increases.
20h
Mucus and mucins may become the medicine of the future
The body is filled with mucus that keeps track of the bacteria. Now, researchers present a method for producing artificial mucus. They hope that the artificial mucus, which consists of sugary molecules, may help to develop completely new, medical treatments.
22h
Changes in Earth's orbit enabled the emergence of complex life
'Snowball Earth' is the most extreme climate event in Earth's history, when it was completely engulfed in ice. The theory of its existence has faced two challenges – how life survived and variations in rock formations from the time implying changes to the climate cycle. New study shows that changes to Earth's orbit caused the ice sheets to advance and retreat, providing ice-free 'oases' for animal
1d
Making computer servers worldwide more climate friendly
An elegant new algorithm can significantly reduce the resource consumption of the world's computer servers. Computer servers are as taxing on the climate as global air traffic combined, thereby making the green transition in IT an urgent matter. The researchers expect major IT companies to deploy the algorithm immediately.
1d
Scientists show the importance of contact with nature in the city during the lockdown
The measures taken during the COVID-19 pandemic limited the access of citizens to natural objects. It is still unexplored, what consequences this had for the residents and what conclusions should be drawn for more effective urban planning. RUDN University scientists with colleagues from Australia and Germany studied how the restrictions associated with COVID-19 affected the use of blue and green i
1d
New Research: There's Enough Meth in Some Rivers to Get Fish Addicted
Researchers dumped 60 brown trout in a water tank that contained low levels of methamphetamine to see if they would get addicted, like humans. After eight weeks, the fish started preferring waters with concentrations of the illicit drug over waters without it, suggesting they were starting to get hooked. While it sounds a little crass, the levels of meth used in the experiment actually mimicked t
1d
Source of remarkable memory of 'superagers' revealed
'Superagers' who performed a challenging memory task in an MRI scanner were able to learn and recall new information as well as 25-year-old participants. Neurons in the visual cortex of brains of superaging older adults retain their selective and efficient ability to process visual stimuli and create a distinct memory of the images. In the future, interventions to train specific areas of the brain
1d
Reducing the melting of the Greenland ice cap using solar geoengineering?
Injecting sulfur into the stratosphere to reduce solar radiation and stop the Greenland ice cap from melting. It's an interesting scenario, but not without risks. Climatologists from the University of Liège have looked into the matter and have tested one of the scenarios put forward using the MAR climate model developed at the University of Liège. The results are mixed and have been published in t
1d
Human-driven habitat change leads to physical and behavioral change in mosquitofish
Bahamian mosquitofish in habitats fragmented by human activity are more willing to explore their environment, more stressed by change and have smaller brain regions associated with fear response than mosquitofish from unaffected habitats. The new study from North Carolina State University shows that these fish have adapted quickly in specific ways to human-driven change, and cautions that environm
1d
Supercharged killer cells may work against melanoma
Preclinical studies in mice and human cells show cell-based immunotherapy could be effective against solid tumors, starting with melanoma. Immunotherapy based on supercharging the immune system's natural killer cells has been effective in treating patients with recurrent leukemia and other difficult to treat blood cancers. In recent years, an immunotherapy called immune checkpoint inhibitors has
1d
For neuroscientists and researchers in general, a checklist for eliminating gender bias
In a new paper in Neuron, 45 neuroscientists review the extensive literature on gender bias in academia — the forms it takes and suggested remedies — and compile a comprehensive checklist of interventions that can help eliminate bias. Some are straightforward, but the overall message is that there are many steps individuals, PIs, universities and research institutes, funding agencies and journal
1d
Cat DNA alters response to life-saving heart meds
A cat's DNA alters how it responds to a life-saving medication used to treat hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, researchers report. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heart disease that affects 1 in 7 cats. "Just as we can't expect every human to respond to medication in the same way, we can't expect all cats to respond the same way either." HCM causes a cat's heart muscle to thicken . As the condi
1d
What are invasive species?
An invasive species is a type of animal, plant, fungus or any other living thing that has arrived in a new environment and can harm other species there.
1d
Tiny tools: Controlling individual water droplets as biochemical reactors
Miniaturization is rapidly reshaping the field of biochemistry, with emerging technologies such as microfluidics and "lab-on-a-chip" devices taking the world by storm. Chemical reactions that were normally conducted in flasks and tubes can now be carried out within tiny water droplets not larger than a few millionths of a liter. Particularly, in droplet-array sandwiching techniques, such tiny drop
1d
Drugs repurposed for COVID-19 by virtual screening of 6,218 drugs and cell-based assay [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 is an unprecedentedly significant health threat, prompting the need for rapidly developing antiviral drugs for the treatment. Drug repurposing is currently one of the most tangible options for rapidly developing drugs for emerging and reemerging viruses. In general, drug repurposing starts with virtual screening…
1d
Design and proof of concept for targeted phage-based COVID-19 vaccination strategies with a streamlined cold-free supply chain [Microbiology]
Development of effective vaccines against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a global imperative. Rapid immunization of the entire human population against a widespread, continually evolving, and highly pathogenic virus is an unprecedented challenge, and different vaccine approaches are being pursued. Engineered filamentous bacteriophage (phage) particles have unique potential in vaccine…
1d
Tensor-tensor algebra for optimal representation and compression of multiway data [Applied Mathematics]
With the advent of machine learning and its overarching pervasiveness it is imperative to devise ways to represent large datasets efficiently while distilling intrinsic features necessary for subsequent analysis. The primary workhorse used in data dimensionality reduction and feature extraction has been the matrix singular value decomposition (SVD), which presupposes…
1d
Clock proteins regulate spatiotemporal organization of clock genes to control circadian rhythms [Neuroscience]
Circadian clocks regulate ∼24-h oscillations in gene expression, behavior, and physiology. While the genetic and molecular mechanisms of circadian rhythms are well characterized, what remains poorly understood are the intracellular dynamics of circadian clock components and how they affect circadian rhythms. Here, we elucidate how spatiotemporal organization and dynamics of…
1d
Modeling links softening of myelin and spectrin scaffolds of axons after a concussion to increased vulnerability to repeated injuries [Engineering]
Damage to the microtubule lattice, which serves as a rigid cytoskeletal backbone for the axon, is a hallmark mechanical initiator of pathophysiology after concussion. Understanding the mechanical stress transfer from the brain tissue to the axonal cytoskeleton is essential to determine the microtubule lattice's vulnerability to mechanical injury. Here, we…
1d
Heterogeneous selection on exploration behavior within and among West European populations of a passerine bird [Ecology]
Heterogeneous selection is often proposed as a key mechanism maintaining repeatable behavioral variation ("animal personality") in wild populations. Previous studies largely focused on temporal variation in selection within single populations. The relative importance of spatial versus temporal variation remains unexplored, despite these processes having distinct effects on local adaptation. Using.
1d
Pain and itch processing by subpopulations of molecularly diverse spinal and trigeminal projection neurons [Neuroscience]
A remarkable molecular and functional heterogeneity of the primary sensory neurons and dorsal horn interneurons transmits pain- and or itch-relevant information, but the molecular signature of the projection neurons that convey the messages to the brain is unclear. Here, using retro-TRAP (translating ribosome affinity purification) and RNA sequencing, we reveal…
1d
Pressure-induced high-temperature superconductivity retained without pressure in FeSe single crystals [Physics]
To raise the superconducting-transition temperature (Tc) has been the driving force for the long-sustained effort in superconductivity research. Recent progress in hydrides with Tcs up to 287 K under pressure of 267 GPa has heralded a new era of room temperature superconductivity (RTS) with immense technological promise. Indeed, RTS will…
1d
Triple-negative breast cancer metastases in lungs contain more diverse cells than those in liver
Metastatic tumors originating from notoriously aggressive triple-negative breast cancer that emerge in the lungs contain a more diverse array of cancer cells than those that arise in the liver, according to a new study in mice and organs from deceased cancer patients. The study also identified a set of genes that distinguish lung and liver metastases; together, the
1d
Ancient Islamic tombs cluster like galaxies
Sudanese Islamic burial sites are distributed according to large-scale environmental factors and small-scale social factors, creating a galaxy-like distribution pattern, according to a study published July 7, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Stefano Costanzo of the University of Naples "L'Orientale" in Italy and colleagues.
1d
New model aims to promote better-adapted bladder cancer treatment in the future
Uppsala University scientists have designed a new mouse model that facilitates study of factors contributing to the progression of human bladder cancer and of immune-system activation when the tumour is growing. Using this model, they have been able to study how proteins change before, while and after a tumour develops in the bladder wall. The study has now been published in the scientific journal
1d
Your reusable coffee cup might not be so green after all
Many sustainability-minded consumers likely assume that reusable products have fewer environmental impacts, but just how green are they? A new study uncovers some surprising and counterintuitive results. These consumers are moving away from single-use plastic products and turning to reusable alternatives. In the kitchen, trendy alternatives include bamboo drinking straws and beeswax sandwich wrap
1d
De-scattering with Excitation Patterning enables rapid wide-field imaging through scattering media
Nonlinear optical microscopy has enabled in vivo deep tissue imaging on the millimeter scale. A key unmet challenge is its limited throughput especially compared to rapid wide-field modalities that are used ubiquitously in thin specimens. Wide-field imaging methods in tissue specimens have found successes in optically cleared tissues and at shallower depths, but the scattering of emission photons
1d
Piezo1 channels restrain regulatory T cells but are dispensable for effector CD4+ T cell responses
T lymphocytes encounter complex mechanical cues during an immune response. The mechanosensitive ion channel, Piezo1, drives inflammatory responses to bacterial infections, wound healing, and cancer; however, its role in helper T cell function remains unclear. In an animal model for multiple sclerosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), we found that mice with genetic deletion of Pie
1d
Self-organization in natural swarms of Photinus carolinus synchronous fireflies
Fireflies flashing in unison is a mesmerizing manifestation of animal collective behavior and an archetype of biological synchrony. To elucidate synchronization mechanisms and inform theoretical models, we recorded the collective display of thousands of Photinus carolinus fireflies in natural swarms, and provide the first spatiotemporal description of the onset of synchronization. At low firefly
1d
Generative hypergraph clustering: From blockmodels to modularity
Hypergraphs are a natural modeling paradigm for networked systems with multiway interactions. A standard task in network analysis is the identification of closely related or densely interconnected nodes. We propose a probabilistic generative model of clustered hypergraphs with heterogeneous node degrees and edge sizes. Approximate maximum likelihood inference in this model leads to a clustering o
1d
Experimental method to quantify the ring size distribution in silicate glasses and simulation validation thereof
Silicate glasses have no long-range order and exhibit a short-range order that is often fairly similar to that of their crystalline counterparts. Hence, the out-of-equilibrium nature of glasses is largely encoded in their medium-range order. However, the ring size distribution—the key feature of silicate glasses' medium-range structure—remains invisible to conventional experiments and, hence, is
1d
Bionic microenvironment-inspired synergistic effect of anisotropic micro-nanocomposite topology and biology cues on peripheral nerve regeneration
Anisotropic topographies and biological cues can simulate the regenerative microenvironment of nerve from physical and biological aspects, which show promising application in nerve regeneration. However, their synergetic influence on injured peripheral nerve is rarely reported. In the present study, we constructed a bionic microenvironment-inspired scaffold integrated with both anisotropic micro-
1d
Damage-tolerant 3D-printed ceramics via conformal coating
Ceramic materials, despite their high strength and modulus, are limited in many structural applications due to inherent brittleness and low toughness. Nevertheless, ceramic-based structures, in nature, overcome this limitation using bottom-up complex hierarchical assembly of hard ceramic and soft polymer, where ceramics are packaged with tiny fraction of polymers in an internalized fashion. Here,
1d
Imaging the coherent propagation of collective modes in the excitonic insulator Ta2NiSe5 at room temperature
Excitonic insulators host a condensate of electron-hole pairs at equilibrium, giving rise to collective many-body effects. Although several materials have emerged as excitonic insulator candidates, evidence of long-range coherence is lacking and the origin of the ordered phase in these systems remains controversial. Here, using ultrafast pump-probe microscopy, we investigate the possible excitoni
1d
Changing atmospheric acidity as a modulator of nutrient deposition and ocean biogeochemistry
Anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere have increased the flux of nutrients, especially nitrogen, to the ocean, but they have also altered the acidity of aerosol, cloud water, and precipitation over much of the marine atmosphere. For nitrogen, acidity-driven changes in chemical speciation result in altered partitioning between the gas and particulate phases that subsequently affect long-range
1d
Levitation of fizzy drops
As first described by Leidenfrost, liquid droplets levitate over their own vapor when placed on a sufficiently hot substrate. The Leidenfrost effect not only confers remarkable properties such as mechanical and thermal insulation, zero adhesion, and extreme mobility but also requires a high energetic thermal cost. We describe here a previously unexplored approach using active liquids able to sust
1d
A long-term record of early to mid-Paleozoic marine redox change
The extent to which Paleozoic oceans differed from Neoproterozoic oceans and the causal relationship between biological evolution and changing environmental conditions are heavily debated. Here, we report a nearly continuous record of seafloor redox change from the deep-water upper Cambrian to Middle Devonian Road River Group of Yukon, Canada. Bottom waters were largely anoxic in the Richardson t
1d
The site of breast cancer metastases dictates their clonal composition and reversible transcriptomic profile
Intratumoral heterogeneity is a driver of breast cancer progression, but the nature of the clonal interactive network involved in this process remains unclear. Here, we optimized the use of optical barcoding to visualize and characterize 31 cancer subclones in vivo. By mapping the clonal composition of thousands of metastases in two clinically relevant sites, the lungs and liver, we found that me
1d
Scale of oceanic eddy killing by wind from global satellite observations
Wind is the primary driver of the oceanic general circulation, yet the length scales at which this energy transfer occurs are unknown. Using satellite data and a recent method to disentangle multiscale processes, we find that wind deposits kinetic energy into the geostrophic ocean flow only at scales larger than 260 km, on a global average. We show that wind removes energy from scales smaller tha
1d
Efficient and stable inverted perovskite solar cells with very high fill factors via incorporation of star-shaped polymer
Stabilizing high-efficiency perovskite solar cells (PSCs) at operating conditions remains an unresolved issue hampering its large-scale commercial deployment. Here, we report a star-shaped polymer to improve charge transport and inhibit ion migration at the perovskite interface. The incorporation of multiple chemical anchor sites in the star-shaped polymer branches strongly controls the crystalli
1d