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There Is No Debate Over Critical Race Theory
The United States is not in the midst of a "culture war" over race and racism. The animating force of our current conflict is not our differing values, beliefs, moral codes, or practices. The American people aren't divided. The American people are being divided. Republican operatives have buried the actual definition of critical race theory: "a way of looking at law's role platforming, facilitati
9h
Cannabis Use Linked to Suicide Attempts in Young Adults
Click here for a list of resources from the Suicide Prevention Resource Center. An alarming new study found that increased cannabis use seems to be linked — at least in some way — with an increased prevalence of suicidal thoughts and attempts among young adults. Interestingly, the correlation persisted even when the teens and young adults didn't experience — or at least didn't report — any major
3h
The Biggest Threat to Democracy Is the GOP Stealing the Next Election
The greatest threat to American democracy today is not a repeat of January 6, but the possibility of a stolen presidential election. Contemporary democracies that die meet their end at the ballot box , through measures that are nominally constitutional. The looming danger is not that the mob will return; it's that mainstream Republicans will "legally" overturn an election. In 2018, when we wrote
4h
Doctors Might Have Been Focusing on the Wrong Asthma Triggers
Nicole Lawson spent the beginning of the pandemic incredibly worried about her daughter, who has asthma. Five-year-old Scarlett's asthma attacks were already landing her in the ER or urgent care every few months. Now a scary new virus was spreading. Respiratory viruses are known triggers of asthma attacks, and doctors also feared at the time that asthma itself could lead to more severe coronaviru
4h
Goldilocks planets 'with a tilt' may develop more complex life
Planets which are tilted on their axis, like Earth, are more capable of evolving complex life. This finding will help scientists refine the search for more advanced life on exoplanets. This NASA-funded research is presented at the Goldschmidt Geochemistry Conference.
21h
Early Earth was bombarded by series of city-sized asteroids
Scientists know that the Earth was bombarded by huge impactors in distant time, but a new analysis suggests that the number of these impacts may have been 10 times higher than previously thought. This translates into a barrage of collisions—similar in scale to that of the asteroid strike that wiped out the dinosaurs—on average every 15 million years between 2.5 and 3.5 billion years ago. Some of t
21h
Dubai Builds "Underwater City"
Deepest Pool Dubai is far from finished pushing the envelope when it comes to its countless tourist attractions. The city has just opened the deepest pool in the world, with a record-breaking depth of 196 feet. The Deep Dive Dubai attraction is housed in a massive 16,000 square foot structure and features an "abandoned" underwater city that divers can explore, CNN reports . It also features an un
3h
The neuroscience behind why your brain may need time to adjust to 'un-social distancing' | Kareem Clark
If the idea of small talk at a crowded happy hour sounds terrifying to you, you're not alone. Nearly half of Americans reported feeling uneasy about returning to in-person interaction regardless of vaccination status With Covid vaccines working and restrictions lifting across the country, it's finally time for those now vaccinated who have been hunkered down at home to ditch the sweatpants and re
9h
You're Being Manipulated
America is in the grips of an epistemic crisis—an assault on reality, a rising inability to distinguish fact from fiction, an effort to shut down free inquiry—that poses an existential threat to liberal democracy. Which is why Jonathan Rauch's new book, The Constitution of Knowledge: A Defense of Truth , is so timely and so essential. It helps us understand this moment better than anything else I
9h
Did a Cuttlefish Write This?
Octopuses and squid are full of cephalopod character. But more scientists are making the case that cuttlefish hold the key to unlocking evolutionary secrets about intelligence.
10h
Blue Origin Is Officially Feuding With Virgin Galactic
Later this month, Blue Origin CEO and Amazon founder Jeff Bezos will be getting on board his space company's New Shepard rocket to travel to an altitude of 62 miles (100 km). That altitude, also known as the Kármán line, is the internationally recognized edge of space. And Blue Origin is arming itself with that fact to lash out at its competitor Virgin Galactic. In an infographic posted to Twitte
39min
Guy Who Built "Green Goblin" Hoverboard Says He's Not a Supervillain
I Need a Hero Unless you're a regular visitor to Times Square — and if so, why? — you may have missed when a mysterious man soared overhead, surfing through the air on a bizarre, hoverboard-like aircraft. It's hard to see the footage of the Times Square flight — or any of the other videos of the aircraft in action — and not draw a comparison to the Spider-Man villain, the Green Goblin. But after
4h
If you're going to put your preschooler in front of a screen, choose a TV. Here's why | Sophie Brickman
Screens aren't all the same. When it comes to cognition, there are big differences between an iPad and a television For her first few years of life, my daughter Ella likely thought the television played a single piece of content: the 1993 version of George Balanchine's Nutcracker , starring as the title role one Macaulay Culkin, who spends the majority of the ballet running around stage and flour
9h
First year of pandemic claimed lives of 25 young people in England
Analysis, showing 4% of 5,830 children hospitalised in 12 months to February entered ICU wards, could inform vaccine policy During the first year of the pandemic 25 children and teenagers died as a direct result of Covid-19 in England and about 6,000 were admitted to hospital, according to the most complete analysis of national data on the age group to date. Children seen to be at greatest risk o
14h
Songbird ancestors evolved a new way to taste sugar
Humans can easily identify sweet-tasting foods—and with pleasure. However, many carnivorous animals lack this ability, and whether birds, descendants of meat-eating dinosaurs, can taste sweet was previously unclear. An international team of researchers led by Maude Baldwin of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology has now shown that songbirds, a group containing over 4.000 species, can sense swe
6h
Cosmonauts Are STILL Hunting Down the Damn Leak on the ISS, Russian Media Reports
Continued Search According to Russian state-owned news agency RIA Novosti , cosmonauts are still trying to identify the source of a leak causing air to escape from the International Space Station's Russian segment. The small air leak was first detected in September 2019. Just over a year later, astronauts were able to pinpoint the leak's location, a process that involved letting loose tea float a
2h
The Tragedy of Black Widow
This story contains spoilers for Black Widow. Black Widow may be billed as a superhero film, but Black Widow is no typical superhero. Natasha Romanoff, the spy turned Avenger played by Scarlett Johansson, is singular when it comes to comic-book heroines: She has no special powers, just a self-reliance and compassion developed from having escaped an oppressive program that tried to turn her into a
7h
Scientists create genetic library for mega-ecosystem in Pacific Ocean
The California Current extends nearly 2,000 miles from Canada's Vancouver Island to the middle of the Baja Peninsula in Mexico. It brings cold water from the North Pacific Ocean to the west coast of North America and is home to numerous and abundant species because of the upwelling of deep nutrient-rich waters.
6h
Reality Show Seeks Idiots Who Have Forgotten Their Bitcoin Passwords
Tales from the Crypt The producers of the popular Netflix series "Queer Eye" are working on a new show — and to the crypto crowd, it might hit a little too close to home. A casting call , spotted by New York Times tech reporter Taylor Lorenz, outlines what the show is about. "Have you forgotten your crypto wallet password?" reads the notice, posted to a casting site and LinkedIn . "Have you lost
5h
It's Hard to Make Friends When You Move to a New Town
Each installment of " The Friendship Files " features a conversation between The Atlantic 's Julie Beck and two or more friends, exploring the history and significance of their relationship. This week she talks to two women who struck up a friendship last summer and started walking miles together every day. They discuss the difficulty they had making friends after moving to their town, how meetin
5h
Seeing with radio waves
Scientists from the Division of Physics at the University of Tsukuba used the quantum effect called 'spin-locking' to significantly enhance the resolution when performing radio-frequency imaging of nitrogen-vacancy defects in diamond. This work may lead to faster and more accurate material analysis, as well as a path towards practical quantum computers.
5h
Free speech? Not everybody loves it, this map shows
In green: where people like free speech the most. In red: where free speech is not popular. Despite continued strong support, this recent survey shows approval of free speech declining in the U.S. Free speech helps create prosperity, but if forced to choose, people prefer prosperity over free speech. September 24th, 1933: Communist Member of Parliament Saklatvala Shapurji addresses a crowd at Spe
4h
Spacewatch: Nasa seeks a cure for Hubble's troubles
Team continues to investigate after computer responsible for science instruments malfunctioned Nasa continues its efforts to diagnose the problems on the Hubble space telescope and return the veteran space mission to full operation. Science operations were suspended on 13 June when the computer responsible for the specific instruments began to malfunction. The science instruments themselves were
14h
Evolution in real time
How does unicellular life transition to multicellular life? The research team of Professor Lutz Becks at the Limnological Institute of the University of Konstanz has taken a major step forward in explaining this very complex process. They were able to demonstrate—in collaboration with a colleague from the Alfred Wegner Institute (AWI)—that the unicellular green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, ove
4h
Photos of the Week: Giant Alice, Tiny Cow, Wooden Swimmer
The Cannes Film Festival in France, remote COVID-19 vaccinations in Peru, a slip-and-slide world record in West Virginia, the Big Red Bash in Australia, Euro 2020 action in England, Kupala Night in Ukraine, wildfires in California, a mountain stroll in northern Italy, and much more
15h
AI voice actors sound more human than ever—and they're ready to hire
The company blog post drips with the enthusiasm of a '90s US infomercial. WellSaid Labs describes what clients can expect from its "eight new digital voice actors!" Tobin is "energetic and insightful." Paige is "poised and expressive." Ava is "polished, self-assured, and professional." Each one is based on a real voice actor, whose likeness (with consent) has been preserved using AI. Companies ca
4h
Understanding the molecular underpinnings of a disease affecting corals
Coral reefs are a favorite spot for scuba divers and are among the world's most diverse ecosystems. For example, the Hawaiian coral reefs, known as the 'rainforests of the sea', host over 7,000 species of marine animals, fishes, birds and plants. But coral reefs are facing serious threats, including a number of diseases that have been linked to human activity.
5h
Fireflies found to interact locally through an active network of visual connections
A trio of researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder, has found the secret to fireflies flashing in unison: interacting locally through an active network of visual connections. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Raphael Sarfati, Julie Hayes and Orit Peleg, describe their study of the glowing insects in the Great Smoky Mountains in Tennessee and North Carolina, and w
4h
Some assembly required: How a cellular machine builds itself
As you read this text, the millions of cells that make up your body are hard at work. Within every cell is a flurry of activity keeping you alive, mostly driven by machinery that is made up of proteins. Some of this protein machinery is so important to living things that it has remained unchanged over millions of years of evolution.
6h
China Secretly Developed Autonomous Killer Robot Submarines
Killer Sub The Chinese military recently declassified a decades-old program to develop robotic, uncrewed submarines that can target and fire at targets without human input. The revelation that autonomous killer drones already exist is alarming enough, but most shocking about the secret program is its timeline. The robotic submarines were reportedly built back in the 1990s, the South China Morning
3min
Scientist Invents Toilet That Turns Poop Into Green Energy
Toilet Generator A researcher at a university in South Korea has devised a toilet that turns human waste into power, Reuters reports . As a bonus incentive, each use rewards, uh, poopers with a small amount of digital currency that they can trade in for a coffee or a cup of noodles on campus. The toilet first pumps your excrement into an underground tank, which means it uses less water right off
18min
Molecular underpinnings of a disease affecting corals
To understand the connection between human activity and a type of tumorlike disease called growth anomalies (GAs) researchers have started using an emerging molecular profiling method to identify 18 small molecules that promise to help them better understand the series of molecular reactions that lead to the disease.
21min
Climate change threatens the Arctic's 'Last Ice Area'
Parts of an Arctic region called the Last Ice Area are already showing a decline in summer sea ice, researchers report. In a rapidly changing Arctic, the area might serve as a refuge—a place that could continue to harbor ice-dependent species when conditions in nearby areas become inhospitable. The region is north of Greenland and the islands of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. "Current thinking
24min
The 'hijab effect': Feminist backlash to Muslim immigrants in Germany
Why do some Europeans discriminate against Muslim immigrants, and how can it be reduced? The School of Arts & Sciences' Nicholas Sambanis conducted innovative studies at train stations across Germany involving willing participants, unknowing bystanders and, most recently, bags of lemons. His newest study finds evidence of significant discrimination against Muslim women, but it is eliminated when t
33min
Meänkieli lever i Tornedalen – men har tystnat i undervisningen
I korridorerna och i fikarummen pratar lärare och elever meänkieli, men språket används nästan aldrig i undervisningen. – Ett fenomen jag kallar koloniala klassrum, säger statsvetaren Pär Poromaa Isling. Vilka möjligheter ger den svenska skolan tornedalingar att leva sitt minoritetskap, lära sig minoritetsspråket och få kunskap om tornedalsk kultur? Pär Poromaa Isling, statsvetare vid Umeå univer
37min
Why I'm Supporting England at Euro 2020
I am not from England. I have no family in England. And I have not spent a considerable amount of time on English soil. So my investment in the success of England's soccer team, at face value, doesn't make much sense. I cheer as Raheem Sterling glides past a defender; I smile as Bukayo Saka sends the perfect pass to a teammate; I hold my breath with the anticipation of possibility when Jadon Sanc
46min
How Gossip Girl Got Creepy
The late Janet Malcolm, writing about the Gossip Girl novels for The New Yorker in 2008, delighted in the heartlessness of the teenage characters—their voyeuristic cruelty and the sharp satisfaction they take in the downfall of their peers. What the series understands, Malcolm wrote, is that "children are a pleasure-seeking species, and that adolescence is a delicious last gasp (the light is most
57min
Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone enhances retinal ganglion cell protection induced by macrophages after optic nerve inȷury [Neuroscience]
Optic neuropathies are leading causes of irreversible visual impairment and blindness, currently affecting more than 100 million people worldwide. Glaucoma is a group of optic neuropathies attributed to progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). We have previously demonstrated an increase in survival of RGCs by the activation of macrophages,…
1h
Large age shifts in HIV-1 incidence patterns in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa [Medical Sciences]
Recent declines in adult HIV-1 incidence have followed the large-scale expansion of antiretroviral therapy and primary HIV prevention across high-burden communities of sub-Saharan Africa. Mathematical modeling suggests that HIV risk will decline disproportionately in younger adult age-groups as interventions scale, concentrating new HIV infections in those >age 25 over time….
1h
Temporal compartmentalization of viral infection in bacterial cells [Microbiology]
Virus infection causes major rearrangements in the subcellular architecture of eukaryotes, but its impact in prokaryotic cells was much less characterized. Here, we show that infection of the bacterium Bacillus subtilis by bacteriophage SPP1 leads to a hijacking of host replication proteins to assemble hybrid viral–bacterial replisomes for SPP1 genome…
1h
p53 deficiency induces MTHFD2 transcription to promote cell proliferation and restrain DNA damage [Cell Biology]
Cancer cells acquire metabolic reprogramming to satisfy their high biogenetic demands, but little is known about how metabolic remodeling enables cancer cells to survive stress associated with genomic instability. Here, we show that the mitochondrial methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (MTHFD2) is transcriptionally suppressed by p53, and its up-regulation by p53 inactivation leads…
1h
HIPK2 phosphorylates HDAC3 for NF-{kappa}B acetylation to ameliorate colitis-associated colorectal carcinoma and sepsis [Immunology and Inflammation]
Although inflammation is critical for the clearance of pathogens, uncontrolled inflammation also contributes to the development of multiple diseases such as cancer and sepsis. Since NF-κB–mediated transactivation in the nucleus is pivotal downstream of various stimuli to induce inflammation, searching the nuclear-localized targets specifically regulating NF-κB activation will provide important…
1h
Hypoimmune induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cell therapeutics treat cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases in immunocompetent allogeneic mice [Immunology and Inflammation]
The emerging field of regenerative cell therapy is still limited by the few cell types that can reliably be differentiated from pluripotent stem cells and by the immune hurdle of commercially scalable allogeneic cell therapeutics. Here, we show that gene-edited, immune-evasive cell grafts can survive and successfully treat diseases in…
1h
Quantification and demonstration of the collective constriction-by-ratchet mechanism in the dynamin molecular motor [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Dynamin oligomerizes into helical filaments on tubular membrane templates and, through constriction, cleaves them in a GTPase-driven way. Structural observations of GTP-dependent cross-bridges between neighboring filament turns have led to the suggestion that dynamin operates as a molecular ratchet motor. However, the proof of such mechanism remains absent. Particularly, it…
1h
Landscape of innate lymphoid cells in human head and neck cancer reveals divergent NK cell states in the tumor microenvironment [Immunology and Inflammation]
Natural killer (NK) cells comprise one subset of the innate lymphoid cell (ILC) family. Despite reported antitumor functions of NK cells, their tangible contribution to tumor control in humans remains controversial. This is due to incomplete understanding of the NK cell states within the tumor microenvironment (TME). Here, we demonstrate…
1h
Identification of simple arylfluorosulfates as potent agents against resistant bacteria [Microbiology]
Sulfur fluoride exchange (SuFEx), a next generation of click chemistry, opens an avenue for drug discovery. We report here the discovery and structure–activity relationship studies of a series of arylfluorosulfates, synthesized via SuFEx, as antibacterial agents. Arylfluorosulfates 3, 81, and 101 showed potency to overcome multidrug resistance and were not…
1h
Minute-scale detection of SARS-CoV-2 using a low-cost biosensor composed of pencil graphite electrodes [Chemistry]
COVID-19 has led to over 3.47 million deaths worldwide and continues to devastate primarily middle- and low-income countries. High-frequency testing has been proposed as a potential solution to prevent outbreaks. However, current tests are not sufficiently low-cost, rapid, or scalable to enable broad COVID-19 testing. Here, we describe LEAD (Low-cost…
1h
Computer-assisted biology: Decoding noisy data to predict cell growth
Researchers used artificial intelligence to obtain a more objective understanding of cell growth and division without preconceived assumptions. Using a deep-learning neural network, they were able to more accurately model the complex processes that affect cell size over time. This work may lead to advances in microbiology and industrial production of microorganisms.
1h
Human cells: To splice or not to splice. ..
Scientists investigated the efficiency of splicing across different human cell types. The results were surprising in that the splicing process appears to be quite inefficient, leaving most intronic sequences untouched as the transcripts are being synthesized. The study also reports variable patterns between the different introns within a gene and across cell lines, and it further highlights the co
1h
5 million deaths a year caused by global climate related abnormal temps
The world's largest study of global climate related mortality found deaths related to hot temperatures increased in all regions from 2000 to 2019, indicating that global warming due to climate change will make this mortality figure worse in the future. The international research team looked at mortality and temperature data across the world from 2000 to 2019, a period when global temperatures rose
1h
Humans Are One Mixed-Up Ape – Facts So Romantic
If you look at every ape protein, they have every bone we have, every muscle we have, the same type of hair, and on and on. They're just better adapted to their tropical rainforest environment. Illustration by BRO.vector / Shutterstock Recent fossilized bone discoveries in China and Israel support the exciting possibility of new, previously unknown species of archaic humans that wandered the plan
1h
Elon Musk Slams Bitcoin's Underlying Technology
Shots Fired Once again, Elon Musk is singing the praises of the cryptocurrency Dogecoin, which seems to still be his digital currency of choice . The longtime crypto advocate, who earlier this year said that he would take a salary in Bitcoin , has more recently turned into one of the cryptocurrency's most prominent critics . Today he went even further, arguing that Bitcoin and Ethereum are too sl
1h
COVID-19 pandemic linked to reduced access to gender-affirming care in 76 countries
A survey offered to transgender and nonbinary people across six continents and in thirteen languages shows that during the first months of the COVID-19 pandemic, many faced reduced access to gender-affirming resources, and this reduction was linked to poorer mental health. Brooke Jarrett of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, and colleagues present the finding
1h
FDA-approved drugs may slow, reverse Alzheimer's damage
Researchers have identified potential new treatment targets for Alzheimer's disease, as well as existing drugs that have therapeutic potential against these targets. The potential targets are defective proteins that lead to the buildup of amyloid in the brain, contributing to the onset of problems with memory and thinking that are the hallmark of Alzheimer's. The 15 existing drugs the researchers
1h
Why the grid is ready for fleets of electric trucks
Whether you call them semis, tractor-trailers, or 18-wheelers, heavy-duty trucks keep the economy (literally) moving. And at least some of them might be ready to go electric. These workhorses have an outsize climate impact. Globally, heavy-duty vehicles, including trucks and buses, make up about 10% of all motor vehicles but produce around half of all carbon dioxide emissions and over 70% of part
1h
Light, strong, and stable nanoporous aluminum with native oxide shell
Aluminum (Al) metal is highly reactive but has excellent corrosion resistance because of the formation of a self-healing passive oxide layer on the surface. Here, we report that this native aluminum oxide shell can also stabilize and strengthen porous Al when the ligament (strut) size is decreased to the submicron or nanometer scale. The nanoporous Al with native oxide shell, which is a nanoporou
1h
Isoflavone diet ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through modulation of gut bacteria depleted in patients with multiple sclerosis
The gut microbiota is a potential environmental factor that influences the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). We and others have demonstrated that patients with MS and healthy individuals have distinct gut microbiomes. However, the pathogenic relevance of these differences remains unclear. Previously, we showed that bacteria that metabolize isoflavones are less abundant in patients with MS,
1h
Warming and elevated ozone induce tradeoffs between fine roots and mycorrhizal fungi and stimulate organic carbon decomposition
Climate warming and elevated ozone (eO 3 ) are important climate change components that can affect plant growth and plant-microbe interactions. However, the resulting impact on soil carbon (C) dynamics, as well as the underlying mechanisms, remains unclear. Here, we show that warming, eO 3 , and their combination induce tradeoffs between roots and their symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF
1h
Revealing the source of Jupiters x-ray auroral flares
Jupiter's rapidly rotating, strong magnetic field provides a natural laboratory that is key to understanding the dynamics of high-energy plasmas. Spectacular auroral x-ray flares are diagnostic of the most energetic processes governing magnetospheres but seemingly unique to Jupiter. Since their discovery 40 years ago, the processes that produce Jupiter's x-ray flares have remained unknown. Here,
1h
Tumbling and anomalous alignment of optically levitated anisotropic microparticles in chiral hollow-core photonic crystal fiber
The complex tumbling motion of spinning nonspherical objects is a topic of enduring interest, both in popular culture and in advanced scientific research. Here, we report all-optical control of the spin, precession, and nutation of vaterite microparticles levitated by counterpropagating circularly polarized laser beams guided in chiral hollow-core fiber. The circularly polarized light causes the
1h
Survival of presolar p-nuclide carriers in the nebula revealed by stepwise leaching of Allende refractory inclusions
The 87 Rb- 87 Sr radiochronometer provides key insights into the timing of volatile element depletion in planetary bodies, yet the unknown nucleosynthetic origin of Sr anomalies in Ca-Al–rich inclusions (CAIs, the oldest dated solar system solids) challenges the reliability of resulting chronological interpretations. To identify the nature of these Sr anomalies, we performed step-leaching experim
1h
Role of warm subduction in the seismological properties of the forearc mantle: An example from southwest Japan
A warm slab thermal structure plays an important role in controlling seismic properties of the slab and mantle wedge. Among warm subduction zones, most notably in southwest Japan, the spatial distribution of large S -wave delay times and deep nonvolcanic tremors in the forearc mantle indicate the presence of a serpentinite layer along the slab interface. However, the conditions under which such a
1h
Organic carbon burial is paced by a ~173-ka obliquity cycle in the middle to high latitudes
Earth's climate system is complex and inherently nonlinear, which can induce some extraneous cycles in paleoclimatic proxies at orbital time scales. The paleoenvironmental consequences of these extraneous cycles are debated owing to their complex origin. Here, we compile high-resolution datasets of total organic carbon (TOC) and stable carbon isotope ( 13 C org ) datasets to investigate organic c
1h
Loss of UCHL1 rescues the defects related to Parkinsons disease by suppressing glycolysis
The role of ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 ( UCHL1 ; also called PARK5 ) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been controversial. Here, we find that the loss of UCHL1 destabilizes pyruvate kinase (PKM) and mitigates the PD-related phenotypes induced by PTEN-induced kinase 1 ( PINK1 ) or Parkin loss-of-function mutations in Drosophila and mammalian cells. In UCHL1 knockout
1h
Optogenetic control of the guard cell membrane potential and stomatal movement by the light-gated anion channel GtACR1
Guard cells control the aperture of plant stomata, which are crucial for global fluxes of CO 2 and water. In turn, guard cell anion channels are seen as key players for stomatal closure, but is activation of these channels sufficient to limit plant water loss? To answer this open question, we used an optogenetic approach based on the light-gated anion channelrhodopsin 1 ( Gt ACR1). In tobacco gua
1h
Mechanical forces regulate endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and atherosclerosis via an Alk5-Shc mechanotransduction pathway
The response of endothelial cells to mechanical forces is a critical determinant of vascular health. Vascular pathologies, such as atherosclerosis, characterized by abnormal mechanical forces are frequently accompanied by endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT). However, how forces affect the mechanotransduction pathways controlling cellular plasticity, inflammation, and, ultimately, vessel
1h
Atomic mapping of periodic dipole waves in ferroelectric oxide
A dipole wave is composed of head-to-tail connected electric dipoles in the form of sine function. Potential applications in information carrying, transporting, and processing are expected, and logic circuits based on nonlinear wave interaction are promising for dipole waves. Although similar spin waves are well known in ferromagnetic materials for their roles in some physical essence, electric d
1h
Global homogenization of the structure and function in the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces
The structure and function of the soil microbiome of urban greenspaces remain largely undetermined. We conducted a global field survey in urban greenspaces and neighboring natural ecosystems across 56 cities from six continents, and found that urban soils are important hotspots for soil bacterial, protist and functional gene diversity, but support highly homogenized microbial communities worldwid
1h
Instant, multiscale dry transfer printing by atomic diffusion control at heterogeneous interfaces
Transfer printing is a technique that integrates heterogeneous materials by readily retrieving functional elements from a grown substrate and subsequently printing them onto a specific target site. These strategies are broadly exploited to construct heterogeneously integrated electronic devices. A typical wet transfer printing method exhibits limitations related to unwanted displacement and shape
1h
The fluid shear stress sensor TRPM7 regulates tumor cell intravasation
Tumor cell intravasation preferentially occurs in regions of low fluid shear because high shear is detrimental to tumor cells. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism by which cells avoid high shear during intravasation. The transition from migration to intravasation was modeled using a microfluidic device where cells migrating inside longitudinal tissue-like microchannels encounter an orthogonal
1h
Bubbles in superfluid helium containing six and eight electrons: Soft, quantum nanomaterial
The role of quantum fluctuations in the self-assembly of soft materials is relatively unexplored, which could be important in the development of next-generation quantum materials. Here, we report two species of nanometer-sized bubbles in liquid helium-4 that contain six and eight electrons, forming a versatile, platform to study self-assembly at the intersection of classical and quantum worlds. T
1h
Remote control for plants
Plants have microscopically small pores on the surface of their leaves called stomata. These help plants regulate the influx of carbon dioxide for photosynthesis. They also prevent the loss of too much water and withering away during drought.
1h
Tagging the Elusive Thresher Shark | Shark Week
Stream Shark Week on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/channel/shark-week About Ninja Sharks 2: In the icy waters of Alaska, off populated beaches of New York and lurking in ghostly shipwrecks off the coast of North Carolina, scientists have discovered three sharks that have developed unique and deadly ninja skills. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on Ti
1h
In Maine's 'City of Ships,' climate change's coastal threat is already here
By Lori Valigra and John Upton The city of Bath, nestled on the western banks of the Kennebec River, is especially endangered by climate change and rising sea levels. Credit: Troy R. Bennett / BDN BATH, Maine — Peter Gerard had never seen so much water. This segment and story were produced through a partnership between Climate Central and Bangor Daily News. A torrential rain storm in late Septemb
1h
Non-Covid respiratory illnesses on rise in UK, medical experts say
Increase in cases of bronchitis and common colds attributed to people mixing after easing of lockdown Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Non-Covid respiratory illnesses and other conditions that were suppressed over the winter by lockdown are slowly "marching upwards" again, albeit at a level below what doctors expect for this time of year. The increase in conditions su
2h
Seeing some cosmic X-ray emitters might be a matter of perspective
It's hard to miss a flashlight beam pointed straight at you. But that beam viewed from the side appears significantly dimmer. The same holds true for some cosmic objects: Like a flashlight, they radiate primarily in one direction, and they look dramatically different depending on whether the beam points away from Earth (and nearby space telescopes) or straight at it.
2h
Psilocybin and depression: "magic mushroom" drug could regrow lost brain connections
Stressed out mice have damaged neurons in their brains, and magic mushrooms can help them grow back. Neuronal damage, specifically a lack of dendritic spines, also has been observed in cases of depression in humans. So far, the findings are limited to mice, but the results hold promise for humans. Psychedelics, long demonized as substances used only by quacks and hippies, have been enjoying a ren
2h
Mindfulness training gets kids to sleep better
At-risk children gained more than an hour of sleep per night after participating in a mindfulness curriculum at their elementary schools, according to a new study. The research, published in the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine , is the first to use polysomnography techniques, which measure brain activity, to assess how school-based mindfulness training changes children's sleep. The curriculum
3h
Demand for wind energy workers outpacing supply in Iowa
By John Upton (Climate Central), Amber Alexander This segment and story were produced through a partnership between Climate Central and NBC Who13 Des Moines. Derek Gruis didn't miss a day of work because of shutdowns during the pandemic, nor has he feared for his financial future amid the economic tumult it has unleashed. The 29-year-old lead technician at the Beaver Creek Wind Farm manages a tea
3h
The future of wind energy is floating turbines on the ocean
By Clarisa Diaz, Quartz and John Upton Towering wind turbines already speckle seas across Europe and Asia and a boom in construction is expected to bring an economic bonanza to the US East Coast. But even this climate-friendly technology could soon evolve into something bigger and better. Almost all the offshore wind turbines operating right now stand atop towers driven into sea beds. As the indu
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The Atlantic Daily: Another Coronavirus Bump Might Be Inevitable
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Coronavirus cases in the United States remain blissfully low, but the country is no longer setting new floors every week. Yesterday, the seven-day average of cases was more than a third higher tha
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Dying cells protect their neighbors to maintain tissue integrity
To enable tissue renewal, human tissues constantly eliminate millions of cells, without jeopardizing tissue integrity, form and connectivity. The mechanisms involved in maintaining this integrity remain unknown. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS today revealed a new process which allows eliminated cells to temporarily protect their neighbors from cell death, thereby maintaining tis
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'Wearable' patch monitors plants for disease and stress
Researchers have developed a new patch that plants can "wear" to continuously monitors for diseases or other stresses, such as crop damage or extreme heat. "We've created a wearable sensor that monitors plant stress and disease in a noninvasive way by measuring the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted by plants," says Qingshan Wei, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering
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Sensitivity of the Delta variant to sera from convalescent and vaccinated individuals
Scientists from the Institut Pasteur (CNRS joint unit), in collaboration with Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (AP-HP), Orleans Regional Hospital and Strasbourg University Hospital, demonstrated that the Delta variant is less sensitive to neutralizing antibodies than the Alpha variant.Sera from people vaccinated with two doses of mRNA vaccine effectively neutralized the Delta variant. Sera from i
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Neonatal meningitis: the immaturity of microbiota and epithelial barriers implicated
In a mouse model, scientists from the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with Inserm, Université de Paris and Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital (AP-HP) demonstrated that the immaturity of both the gut microbiota and epithelial barriers such as the gut and choroid plexus play a role in the susceptibility of newborn infants to bacterial meningitis caused by group B streptococcus (GBS). The findings we
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Biosynthesis pathway of a new DNA nucleobase elucidated
DNA is composed of nucleobases represented by the letters A, T, G and C. They form the basis of the genetic code and are present in all living beings. But in a bacteriophage, another base, represented by the letter Z, exists. This exception, the only one observed to date, has long remained a mystery. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and the CNRS, in collaboration with the CEA, have now elucida
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The Books Briefing: The Best Books to Get Lost in This Summer
Whether you're in the mood to read outdoors or curl up on a couch this summer, The Atlantic 's writers and editors have reading recommendations to match. In today's newsletter, you'll find a selection of books filled with excitement, wherever you find yourself. ( You can browse the Culture team's full summer reading list here. ) ​ Every Friday in the Books Briefing , we thread together Atlantic s
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Major revamp of SNAP could eliminate food insecurity in the U.S.
Food insecurity is a major problem in the U.S., and it worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides some relief, but millions of Americans still lack adequate access to healthy food. A new study from the University of Illinois proposes a potential solution.
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You could inhale new COVID-19 vaccine
Researchers are developing new vaccine strategies for COVID-19, including an inhalable COVID-19 vaccine. Their new project produced two vaccine strategies. Both are scalable and adaptable and can be transported and stored at room temperature. One strategy uses modified bacteriophage particles that can be inhaled to deliver protection via the lungs to the immune system. The other delivers injectab
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The giant panda's mystery revealed
Although the giant panda is in practice a herbivore, its masticatory system functions differently from the other herbivores. Through the processes of natural selection, the giant panda's dietary preference has strongly impacted the evolution of its teeth and jaws. Researchers have solved the mystery of how the giant panda's special stomatognathic system functions.
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Iceland's 4-Day Work Week Trial Was a Smashing Success. Will It Start a New Trend?
Prior to the Covid-19 pandemic, the idea of working from home was unthinkable to a lot of people. Between time-wasting (and calorie-increasing) temptations like the fridge, couch, or TV, distractions from one's family or roommates, and the lack of office resources and camaraderie, home was a place for leisure, not labor. But with the trial-by-fire that was the last year and a half, we discovered
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Efficient genetic engineering platform established in methylotrophic yeast
Pichia pastoris (syn. Komagataella phaffii), a model methylotrophic yeast, can easily achieve high density fermentation, and thus is considered as a promising chassis cell for efficient methanol biotransformation. However, inefficient gene editing and a lack of synthetic biology tools hinder its metabolic engineering toward industrial application.
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Tracking a record-breaking heat wave
An unprecedented heat wave that started around June 26 smashed numerous all-time temperature records in the Pacific Northwest and western Canada. NASA's Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured the progression of this slow-moving heat dome across the region from June 21 to 30. An animation of some of the AIRS data show surface air temperature anomalies—values above
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The evolution of the giant panda's temporomandibular joint and premolar teeth enabled adaptation to bamboo diet
Although the giant panda is in practice a herbivore, its masticatory system functions differently from the other herbivores. Through the processes of natural selection, the giant panda's dietary preference has strongly impacted the evolution of its teeth and jaws. Researchers from the Institute of Dentistry at the University of Turku and the Biodiversity unit of the University of Turku together wi
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A mitochondrial self-preservation mechanism
Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, convert sustenance into energy, fueling the cell's activities. In addition to power, mitochondria also produce reactive oxygen species, byproduct molecules primed to help facilitate communication among the other units in the cells. But when produced too abundantly, they damage DNA and render some cellular components dysfunctional. Now, an international res
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The Greenest Way to Grill
It's summer, and summer means grilling, and grilling means arguing about grilling. Among the dads (and the dads at heart) crewing their outdoor firepits, fuel is a popular subject of debate. Gas grills, fired from natural-gas lines or propane tanks, offer convenience. But many outdoor-cooking purists insist that wood or charcoal is the only respectable way to sear—and the only way to barbecue. (I
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Scientists explore seamounts in Phoenix Islands Archipelago, gain insights into deep water diversity
Marine scientists aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor have identified likely new marine species and deep sea organisms on nine seamounts that were explored for the first time in the remote Phoenix Islands Archipelago. In a 34-day expedition that ended today, scientists also conducted high-resolution seafloor mapping of more than 30,000 square kilometers and video exploration of
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Collecting more than just seismic data along the Cascadia Fault
Down in the main lab of the R/V Marcus Langseth, you'll find an array of monitors—46, to be exact!—all displaying information about the data we're collecting. While many of the screens are dedicated to monitoring the seismic data and the instrumentation related to collecting the seismic data, there are two screens that display data related to the multibeam echo sounder. A multibeam echo sounder is
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4 wildfire smoke health problems and how to deal with them
Warnings of another severe wildfire season abound, as do efforts to reduce the risk of ignition. Yet few people take precautions against wildfire smoke, experts say. On the heels of the worst wildfire season in California history, an extended megadrought is priming the state for more destructive blazes in 2021. Given the severity of last year's fires, many Bay Area communities are facing the immi
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Peatland fires reduce future methane production in peat soils
Climatic changes are increasingly giving rise to major fires on peatlands in the northern hemisphere, which release massive quantities of carbon dioxide. However, the biomass of the peatland is not entirely consumed by fire, some turns to charcoal in the absence of air. Now, Dr. Tianran Sun and Professor Lars Angenent from Environmental Biotechnology at the University of Tübingen in cooperation wi
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After street lights in an entire county were swapped to LEDs, light pollution got worse
"The best laid plans of mice and men often go awry"—this famous paraphrase of Scottish poet Robert Burns sometimes sums up human ingenuity. That is exactly what happened when a county in Washington State decided to replace all of its county-owned streetlights with LEDs, at least partially in an effort to combat light pollution. New research shows that they actually made the light pollution worse.
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New method to measure loss of signal in far-infrared instruments
After carefully observing dim objects in the night sky, you don't want to waste any precious signal on its way from the telescope dish to the detector. But in the case of far-infrared astronomy, it's not as easy as it sounds to transport the signal efficiently. In fact, it's even an endeavor to measure the exact amount of signal that gets lost. Scientists from SRON and TU Delft have now found a ne
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Social norms influence willingness to protect the climate
People contribute only very little to climate protection, because they underestimate the willingness of others to contribute. This is the central result of a new study by the behavioral economists Peter Andre, Teodora Boneva, Felix Chopra and Armin Falk, members of the Cluster of Excellence ECONtribute at the Universities of Bonn and Cologne, published as an ECONtribute Discussion Paper.
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Researchers have taught a drone to recognize and hunt down meteorites autonomously
Planetary scientists estimate that each year, about 500 meteorites survive the fiery trip through Earth's atmosphere and fall to our planet's surface. Most are quite small, and less than 2% of them are ever recovered. While the majority of rocks from space may not be recoverable due to ending up in oceans or remote, inaccessible areas, other meteorite falls are just not witnessed or known about.
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Online library helps advance nanomaterial development
NMs have made their way into our lives and are helping to improve—even revolutionize—many industries. In the cosmetics industry, mineral nanoparticles help create sunscreens that provide improved protection from the sun's harmful rays. In sports, carbon nanotubes make for lighter and better baseball bats. Benefits for healthcare include more effective drug delivery to affected areas of the body. T
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Eating disorder hospitalizations spiked during pandemic
The number of adolescents admitted to the hospital for severe illness from eating disorders increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic, new research suggests. At one center, the number of hospital admissions among adolescents with eating disorders more than doubled during the first 12 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the study. The 125 hospitalizations among patients ages 1
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Deforestation in Brazil will be hard to stop, no matter who's in charge
Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon made global headlines in 2019, thanks to massive wildfires and the election of anti-environmentalist president Jair Bolsonaro. Brazilians took to the streets against it, and retailers and consumers threatened to boycott Brazilian products. But while the pandemic has dominated the headlines in 2020 and 2021, deforestation continues to rise.
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Making bendable ice by growing single-crystal microfibers
A team of researchers working at Zhejiang University in China has developed a way to grow water ice that is elastic and bendable. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they grew their single-crystal microfibers and suggest possible uses for them. Erland Schulson with Dartmouth College, has published a Perspective piece in the same journal issue outlining the work
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A new theory of superconductivity
A scientist from the Division of Quantum Condensed Matter Physics at the University of Tsukuba has formulated a new theory of superconductivity. Based on the calculation of the 'Berry connection', this model helps explain new experimental results better than the current theory. The work may allow future electrical grids to send energy without losses.
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Examining the efficiency of splicing across different human cell types
In an article published in the journal RNA, Karan Bedi, a bioinformatician in Mats Ljungman's lab, Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Michigan Medical School, investigated the efficiency of splicing across different human cell types. The results were surprising in that the splicing process appears to be quite inefficient, leaving most intronic sequences untouched as the transcri
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NIST uses method to understand the molecular underpinnings of a disease affecting corals
To understand the connection between human activity and a type of tumorlike disease called growth anomalies (GAs), researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have collaborated with the U.S Geological Survey (USGS) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to use an emerging molecular profiling method to identify 18 small molecules that promise to
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Turn off the blue light!
Researchers from University of Tsukuba have found that exposure to specific types of light before sleep can have variable effects on energy metabolism during sleep. Specifically, participants who went to sleep after exposure to organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), which emit polychromatic white light that contains less blue light than light-emitting diodes (LEDs), exhibited significantly decreas
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How to Upscale Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
I've written a number of articles about Deep Space Nine and my efforts to improve and upscale it over the past 16 months, but this is the long-promised tutorial — the explanation of how to do what I've done, in more detail than I've shared it before. If you've been waiting for the step-by-step explanation, this is what you've been waiting for. PAL and NTSC are both covered in this guide. Why I Do
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Powerhouse of the cell has self-preservation mechanism
Mitochondria, the powerhouse of the cell, convert sustenance into energy, fueling the cell's activities. In addition to power, mitochondria also produce reactive oxygen species, byproduct molecules primed to help facilitate communication among the other units in the cells. But when produced too abundantly, they damage DNA and render some cellular components dysfunctional. Now, an international res
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New guidance for mental health
In spite of many clinical options, people with mental health problems including eating disorders often do not access professional help within the crucial first 12 months – in part because of lack of information in the community about accessing targeted services. Anxiety and depression are normal reactions to situations such as pandemic lockdowns but arming yourself with some useful strategies can
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Corona gets us tired
How a pandemic progresses in a country is largely determined by social, political and psychological processes. Predicting these socio-dynamics seems hardly possible until today; thus making it impossible to foresee the course the pandemic takes. This is where a new simulation study carried out by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Hereon comes into play, which is now published in the journal Scientific Reports
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Using mice to open the way to prevent blocked arteries
Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) have identified important parts of the pathway by which a high-fat diet affects the body's immune response, leading eventually to atherosclerosis. Working with mouse models, they clarified how histone H3 citrullination activates neutrophils with serum CXCL1 elevation. Identifying these steps could lead to new diagnostic tools and treatmen
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A super new theory
A researcher from the University of Tsukuba has introduced a new theory for superconductivity that can better explain the results of recent experiments with high-temperature superconductors. By focusing on the "Berry connection," this work may lead to energy distribution with much less electrical resistance.
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Never Before Seen Porbeagle Shark's POV Footage Recovered | Shark Week
Stream Return to Shark Vortex on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/return-to-shark-vortex-us About Return to Shark Vortex: As the Shark Vortex retreats in the fall, sharks battle it out for dominance in New England's icy waters. Experts brave rough oceans and fierce predators to capture new footage and insight of the phantom shark and reveal which shark reigns supreme. Subscribe to
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New study: Lack of consideration of sex and gender in COVID-19 clinical studies
Although COVID-19 affects men and women differently, the large majority of current clinical studies of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 makes no mention of sex/gender. Indeed, only a fraction, 4 percent, explicitly plan to address sex and gender in their analysis, concludes a new analysis of nearly 4,500 studies. 21 percent only take this variable into account when selecting participants while 5.4 % go as
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My Python & OpenCV course just crossed 1m views on Youtube!
Hey everyone! I just wanted to announce that a Python & OpenCV course I created in November last year has just crossed a viewership of 1m! I am quite ecstatic about its exponential growth over the past year as well as the support I received from the programming community 😀 To be brief, this course will teach you everything you need to know to get started with OpenCV in Python — from the very ba
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To splice or not to splice…
University of Michigan Center for RNA Biomedicine scientists investigated the efficiency of splicing across different human cell types. The results were surprising in that the splicing process appears to be quite inefficient, leaving most intronic sequences untouched as the transcripts are being synthesized. The study also reports variable patterns between the different introns within a gene and a
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Nudibranchs: psychedelic body snatchers of the deep
Nudibranchs are tiny sea slugs that often stand out for their incredible color and peculiar sizes. Some species of nudibranch have a superpower-like ability to absorb other organisms' attributes and repurpose them for their own needs. Nudibranchs can survive with only their head and sometimes will jettison their bodies to be regrown later. It's thought that studying them might give us a clue to u
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Daily briefing: How COVID damages the brain
Nature, Published online: 08 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01900-4 The coronavirus's damaging effects on the brain, the month's most spectacular science images and whether COVID will become a disease of the young.
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'Return to normal' travel and research may bring hazards to northern, Indigenous communities
Throughout the pandemic, many have longed for a "return to normal." When the threat of COVID-19 subsides, we look forward to resuming our research and travel schedules, and reclaiming the elements of our lives that were disrupted over a year ago. However, for southern-based researchers and travelers, returning to northern, Indigenous communities either for leisure or research fieldwork in summer 2
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The North American Heatwave
It has become a mantra of climate scientists that global warming is just what it says – global. It is a statistical average over time. It cannot be tied to any specific weather event, even if it predicts that statistically such events are more likely. However, the current heat wave in the North American Northwest is so statistically extreme, that climate scientists are discussing it in very diffe
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Windows 11 Will Support Rolling Back to Windows 10, but Not for Long
Microsoft took the wraps off Windows 11 recently, and we expect the new OS to arrive later this year. Upgrading to a new version of Windows is often a painful process, and in the past, you were stuck even if the new software ruined your workflow. It's different this time: Microsoft says you'll be able to go back to Windows 10 if you don't like Windows 11 . You'll only have 10 days to decide, thou
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Command And Control Every Database With This Complete SQL Master Class
If you've ever used a plug-in to browse a database , you've probably used SQL. Short for Structured Query Language, SQL has changed how we access data, sped up how quickly we can make use of it, and laid the groundwork for managing vast data sets and drawing patterns from their depths. If you work with databases in any way, a knowledge of SQL will be increasingly important, and The Complete 2021
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Magnetkamera hindrar överdiagnostik av prostatacancer
Magnetkameraundersökning i stället för traditionella PSA-test vid screening för prostatacancer, skulle minska problemen med överdiagnostik, överbehandling av lågrisktumörer och onödiga cancerbesked, visar en studie från Karolinska institutet. Nationell screening för prostatacancer har inte införts i Sverige eftersom dagens metoder medför överdiagnostik som leder till att många vävnadsprover tas i
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Peta-bit-per-second optical communications system using a standard cladding diameter 15-mode fiber
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24409-w Space division multiplexing solutions are one way to increase future fiber information capacity. Here, the authors show peta-bit/s transmission in a standard-diameter, multimode fiber enabled by combining several practical multiplexing technologies.
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Practical iridium-catalyzed direct α-arylation of N-heteroarenes with (hetero)arylboronic acids by H2O-mediated H2 evolution
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24468-z 2-(hetero)aryl N-heteroarenes are ubiquitously applied in numerous fields of science and useful for the development of bioactive molecules and drugs, but there is a lack of general methods for their synthesis. Here, the authors report an iridium(III)-catalyzed method for direct α-arylation of N-heteroarenes with
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Ultrafast imaging of spontaneous symmetry breaking in a photoionized molecular system
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24309-z The Jahn-Teller effect is the spontaneous symmetry breaking of the molecular structure caused by the coupling of electrons and nuclei. Here the authors use ultrafast Coulomb explosion imaging to map the evolution of the fundamental symmetry lowering process in photoionized methane within around 20fs.
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Detection of high-valent iron species in alloyed oxidic cobaltates for catalysing the oxygen evolution reaction
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24453-6 The capturing of high valent iron in a catalytic reaction is important but difficult task. Here, the authors report identification of a high-valent Fe(IV)-species with different spectroscopic tools such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy during the course of an oxygen evolving reaction.
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Common irrigation drivers of freshwater salinisation in river basins worldwide
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24281-8 Freshwater salinisation is a growing water quality problem, but impacts and drivers across regional to global scales have been lacking. A new assessment of inter-regional freshwater salinisation demonstrates the importance of irrigation as a driver of salinisation.
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Thermohaline structure and circulation beneath the Langhovde Glacier ice shelf in East Antarctica
Nature Communications, Published online: 09 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23534-w Basal melting of ice shelves is the principal driver of recent ice mass loss in Antarctica. The study reports comprehensive structures of temperature, salinity and current under an ice shelf in East Antarctica obtained by borehole measurements.
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Book Review: The History of Animal-Based Medicine in China
In "Mao's Bestiary," Liz P.Y. Chee explores the use of wild animals in traditional Chinese medicine, which is more closely linked to politics and profit than to ancient culture. Rather, Chee shows that the industry existing today was purposefully developed, expanded, and promoted over the last century.
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Orsaker till otrygghet hos äldre kartlagda
Oro för att bli utsatt för brott, det sociala klimatet i grannskapet och rädsla för att till exempel ramla är några anledningar till otrygghet hos äldre. Men majoriteten, 80 procent, känner sig trygga. Över 600 äldre i Örebro kommun deltog i studien där de fick svara på frågor om trygghet. Deltagarna, som var mellan 64 och 106 år gamla, fick bland annat skatta sin oro för olika sorters brott, sin
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MRI can cut overdiagnoses in prostate-cancer screening by half
Most countries have not introduced nationwide prostate-cancer screening, as current methods result in overdiagnoses and excessive and unnecessary biopsies. A new study by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden, which is published in The New England Journal of Medicine, indicates that screening by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and targeted biopsies could potentially cut overdiagnoses by
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Schneider Shorts 9.07.2021: Eunuchs and Eugenics
Schneider Shorts of 9.07.2021: Academic violence in China, teleportation in Elsevier, some confused glyphosate shills, a life-extension recipe (gentlemen only), English middle-class eugenics and other privileges, Berkeley uncovering a giant conspiracy, and finally, if only IHU Marseille went for COVID-19 stool transplants instead of that other brown s***.
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Passing the ball: Shifting responsibility for care coordination from patient to provider
A new study from U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Regenstrief Institute, IUPUI and Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai researchers reports that primary care physicians recognize the need for better coordination and welcome health information exchange (HIE) event notifications as a means of improving the flow of information to enable provision of better patient care.
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Our genes shape our gut bacteria
Researchers discovered that most bacteria in the gut microbiome are heritable after looking at more than 16,000 gut microbiome profiles collected over 14 years from a long-studied population of baboons in Kenya's Amboseli National Park.
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Smaller turtles are nesting on Florida beaches
A new study indicates that smaller loggerhead and green sea turtles are nesting on Florida beaches than in the past; however, researchers aren't sure why. The findings give clues to the status of the turtles, which is important to researchers who are monitoring the population health of the threatened species.
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Should we delay COVID-19 vaccination in children?
The net benefit of vaccinating children is unclear, and vulnerable people worldwide should be prioritised instead, say experts in The BMJ today. But others argue that covid-19 vaccines have been approved for some children and that children should not be disadvantaged because of policy choices that impede global vaccination.
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Could ketogenic diet be helpful with brain cancer?
A modified ketogenic diet may be worth exploring for people with brain tumors, according to a new study. The small study found that the diet was safe and feasible for people with brain tumors called astrocytomas. The study was not designed to determine whether the diet could slow down tumor growth or improve survival.
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Authors of widely panned study of masks in children respond to critics
The authors of a paper claiming that children's masks trap concentrations of carbon dioxide higher than allowable standards in Germany have responded to critics who said the study was plagued with poor methods and unreasonable conclusions. As we reported earlier this week, the corresponding author of the paper, Harald Walach, had his affiliation with Poznan … Continue reading
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