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NASA Lucy mission's message to the future
In the 1970s four spacecraft began their one-way trips out of our Solar System. As the first human-built objects to ever venture into interstellar space, NASA chose to place plaques on Pioneer 10 and 11 and golden records on Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft to serve as messages to any alien spacefarers that may someday encounter these spacecraft. Continuing this legacy, NASA's Lucy spacecraft will carry
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LATEST

UK Covid live news: Sage expert warns next peak in cases could last longer than previous ones
Latest updates: Prof Graham Medley, chair of SPI-M, says numbers could lead to 'considerable burden' on NHS Doctors warn of 'devastating consequences' of lifting rules in England From freedom to caution: a week of mixed messages on reopening Which Covid rules will change in England on 19 July? Global coronavirus updates – live 10.49am BST People who are clinically extremely vulnerable (CEV) are t
12h
There's a Word for What Trumpism Is Becoming
"I became worse." That's how double impeachment changed him, Donald Trump told a conservative audience in Dallas last weekend, without a trace of a smile. This was not Trump the insult comic talking. This was the deepest Trump self. And this one time, he told the truth. Something has changed for Trump and his movement since January 2021. You can measure the difference by looking back at the deadl
5h
DMT: the strongest psychedelic you've never heard of
Psychedelic therapy shows promise where other mental health treatments have failed. DMT, an incredibly powerful drug, may be particularly useful in conjunction with therapy. The use of DMT is still highly experimental and possibly dangerous. As psychedelic research returns to the mainstream of medical science, several lesser known drugs are being seen as possible therapies for mental illness. One
3h
The world's biggest ransomware gang just disappeared from the internet
One of the most prolific ransomware gangs in the world suddenly disappeared from the internet on Tuesday morning. The unexplained exodus comes just one day before senior officials from the White House and Russia are scheduled to meet to discuss the global ransomware crisis. The ransomware crew known as REvil has existed for years in the booming cybercrime underground. A whopping 42% of all recent
5h
Astronomers detect ultra-high energy gamma-ray source
Astronomers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and elsewhere report the detection of a new ultra-high energy (UHE) gamma-ray source in the Galactic plane. The newly identified source, designated LHAASO J0341+5258, is extended and emission from it reaches up to 200 TeV. The finding is detailed in a paper published July 5 on arXiv.org.
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Rats prefer to help their own kind—humans may be similarly wired
A decade after scientists discovered that lab rats will rescue a fellow rat in distress, but not a rat they consider an outsider, new UC Berkeley research pinpoints the brain regions that drive rats to prioritize their nearest and dearest in times of crisis. It also suggests humans may share the same neural bias.
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TikTok Censored the Words "Black Lives Matter" But Not "White Supremacy"
TikTok Ban The shortform video and social media app TikTok has once again been caught banning terms or unfairly flagging content in a way that harms already marginalized groups. Most recently, users on the platform found out that the word "Black," when used in phrases such as "Black Lives Matter," "supporting black voices," and "supporting black people" was being flagged as inappropriate content,
4h
Elon Musk Denounces "Those Who Attack Space"
Billionaires are racing to get off this godforsaken planet. A club made up of a number of the richest men in the world are vying to establish their companies as the de facto way to get to space for an exciting, adrenaline-fueled adventure. The promise seems to be tantalizing moments of weightless respite — reserved to the select few who can afford a ticket — from heatwaves, hurricanes, devastatin
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Researchers: Signs of Life on Venus Actually Explosive Volcanoes
Active Venus Scientists were baffled by the discovery of phosphine gas in Venus's atmosphere last year. They hailed the discovery as a slim-but-real sign that microbial life could survive in the clouds high above the planet's blistering surface below — since, back on Earth, the gas can be the result of organic processes. But now, a team of researchers from Cornell University are throwing cold wat
7h
Kristi Noem's National Guard Deployment Is America's Future
The recent decision by South Dakota Governor Kristi Noem to accept private funding from Willis Johnson, a major Republican donor, to send her state's National Guard to the Mexican border has been called unprecedented , a conflict of interest , an abuse of public power for personal political gain , an outsourcing and privatization of national security , an assault on the authority and legitimacy o
9h
UK Covid: Johnson urges people to take unlocking 'as slowly as we can' amid 34,471 new cases – as it happened
This live blog is now closed. For more coronavirus news from around the world, head to our global Covid blog PM urges Covid caution as hospitalisations could hit at least 1,000 a day What Sage says about impact of PM's plan to ease restrictions in England Businesses urged to check people's Covid status as reopening confirmed Whitty says there is no ideal time to lift restrictions Javid confirms r
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Man Vomits During Elon Musk Court Appearance, Which Is Honestly Understandable
Sickly Surprise Tesla CEO Elon Musk is in court this week over a $2.6 billion deal his car company made back in 2016 to acquire SolarCity, a solar energy company that was facing bankruptcy at the time. Musk's court appearance on Monday was filled with confrontations and derisive comments — characteristic behavior to be expected of the CEO at this point. But on Tuesday morning, court proceedings g
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Good grief: how to get over a bone-crushing disappointment
Sorrow and disappointment are a big part of pandemic life – and England football fans are now feeling them keenly. But there are ways to deal with these distressing emotions How do you cope with crushing disappointment? Is it better or worse if everyone's feeling it at the same time? Should you allow yourself those flights of fancy – where your mind disappears into a different outcome – even if y
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NASA Is Already Working on a Bigger, Better Mars Helicopter
Planning Upgrades After the blowout success of its Ingenuity Mars helicopter, NASA already has its sights set on bigger and better, well, Mars helicopters. Coming up next is the "Mars Science Helicopter," Space.com reports , which is a six-rotor aircraft concept currently under development by the existing Ingenuity team. Though the aircraft isn't yet an official NASA mission, the engineers say th
5h
Lawsuit Claims That Common Pesticide Causes Brain Damage in Children
Cleanup Crew Parents in California are suing Dow Chemicals and an affiliated company called Corteva, alleging that the extensive use of the pesticide chlorpyrifos caused neurological damage and developmental disorders in their children. In the decades since its invention, tens of millions of pounds of chlorpyrifos were sprayed by hand and from planes to protect dozens of different crops from pest
2h
An Archivist Sneezes on a Priceless Document. Then What?
A year and a half ago, I found myself in an archive room at the London School of Economics, staring at 150-year-old documents complete with swirly handwriting and a red-wax seal. My mind flicked back to a few weeks earlier, when I'd gotten one of my occasional nosebleeds, and I had a random yet horrifying thought: What if my nose starts bleeding on one of these irreplaceable pages? What would hap
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The Atlantic Daily: Donald Trump Isn't Letting It Go
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. It's July 2021, and former President Donald Trump is still baselessly insisting that he won the 2020 election. Meanwhile, the Republicans who broke with Trump on his voting-fraud claims are still
7h
Why I'm a proud solutionist
Debates about technology and progress are often framed in terms of "optimism" vs. "pessimism." For instance, Steven Pinker, Matt Ridley, Johan Norberg, Max Roser, and the late Hans Rosling have been called the "New Optimists" for their focus on the economic, scientific, and social progress of the last two centuries. Their opponents, such as David Runciman and Jason Hickel , accuse them of being b
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Genetic counselling will be key to help parents navigate changes in prenatal testing | Jonathan Roberts
Parents need time and empathy in deciding how to negotiate the ethical issues raised by advances in gene technology As a genetic counsellor I try to help people make sense of genetics, inheritance and their family history. One important area is having conversations with parents who have an increased risk of having a child born with an inherited condition or disability. While prenatal genetic test
10h
Safe space: the cosmic importance of planetary quarantine
As the pace and ambition of space exploration accelerates, preventing Earth-born organisms from hitching a ride has become more urgent than ever "This, what you're doing today, never happens," Nasa's David Seidel told us. "This is a rare chance," agreed the director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Michael Watkins, welcoming us into the lab's spacecraft assembly facility, located in the hills ou
16h
How to photograph the moon on your phone or camera, and the best settings to use
Guardian Australia picture editor Carly Earl explains the dos and don'ts of taking pictures of the moon and night sky How to see the conjunction of Venus and Mars tonight in Australia When a full moon rises, many people will pull out their mobile phones to try and get an Instagram-worthy photograph, but unfortunately the moon is really challenging to get a great photo of. Two reasons: it is very
18h
Electrons in quantum liquid gain energy from laser pulses
The absorption of energy from laser light by free electrons in a liquid has been demonstrated for the first time. Until now, this process was observed only in the gas phase. The findings, led by Graz University of Technology, open new doors for ultra-fast electron microscopy.
4h
Head of Russian Space Program Criticizes "Billionaire Oligarchs"
Unusual Compliment Dmitry Rogozin, the leader of Russia's space agency Roscosmos, congratulated Virgin Galactic CEO Richard Branson after his successful flight to 50 miles on Sunday . On Twitter, Rogozin called Branson's flight a landmark achievement in space travel. He even went as far as decrying Russia's "billionaire oligarchs" in a followup tweet , saying they'd rather spend money on yachts t
2h
The 2021 Audubon Photography Awards
The winners of this year's annual Audubon Photography Awards competition were recently announced. Photographers entered images in four categories: professional, amateur, youth, and plants for birds. More than 8,700 images depicting birdlife from all 50 states and 10 Canadian provinces and territories were judged. The National Audubon Society was once more kind enough to share some of this year's
3h
Post-Vaccination Infections Come in Two Different Flavors
Updated at 1:21 p.m. ET on July 13, 2021. The first thing to know about the COVID-19 vaccines is that they're doing exactly what they were designed and authorized to do. Since the shots first started their rollout late last year, rates of COVID-19 disease have taken an unprecedented plunge among the immunized. We are, as a nation, awash in a glut of spectacularly effective vaccines that can, acro
6h
Here's what we know about kids and long covid
When it comes to covid, kids have largely been spared. They can get infected and spread the virus, but they have little risk of becoming seriously ill or dying. Yet, just like adults, they can have symptoms that persist well beyond the initial infection. This condition, officially known as post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC), is often referred to as "long" covid. It needs to be tak
12h
Optical singularities could be used for a wide range of applications from super resolution imaging to optical trapping
When we think about singularities, we tend to think of massive black holes in faraway galaxies or a distant future with runaway AI, but singularities are all around us. Singularities are simply a place where certain parameters are undefined. The North and South Pole, for example, are what's known as coordinate singularities because they don't have a defined longitude.
14h
Welcome to TikTok's endless cycle of censorship and mistakes
Ziggi Tyler is part of TikTok's Creator Marketplace, a private platform where brands can connect with the app's top creators. And last week, he noticed something pretty disturbing about how the creator bios there were being automatically moderated. When he tried to enter certain phrases in his bio, some of them—"Black lives matter," "supporting black people," "supporting black voices," and "suppo
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How to see the conjunction of Venus and Mars tonight in Australia
On Tuesday, the dazzling star pairs up with the red planet – and just above will be the waxing crescent moon Venus has returned to our evening skies and is looking lovely in the north-west after sunset. On Tuesday 13 July, it will pair up with the red planet Mars and just above the two planets will be the waxing crescent moon. Wherever you are in Australia, find a location that has a good view of
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Oldest known cosmetics found in ceramic bottles on Balkan Peninsula
A trio of researchers from Slovenia's Institute for the Protection of Cultural Heritage of Slovenia at the Centre for Preventive Archaeology and Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, in Germany, has found evidence of the oldest known use of cosmetics at a dig site in the Balkans. In their paper published in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, Bine Kramberger, Christoph Berthold and Cynt
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Microbiome signatures of progression toward celiac disease onset in at-risk children in a longitudinal prospective cohort study [Medical Sciences]
Other than exposure to gluten and genetic compatibility, the gut microbiome has been suggested to be involved in celiac disease (CD) pathogenesis by mediating interactions between gluten/environmental factors and the host immune system. However, to establish disease progression markers, it is essential to assess alterations in the gut microbiota before…
4h
What Infrastructure Really Means
O n March 31, President Joe Biden unveiled a $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan that he lauded as "a once-in-a-generation investment." The package recalled the construction of the interstate highway system in the 1950s and the public investments in the space race in the '60s. However, this program is distinguished from those earlier ones not only by its price tag but in its unprecedented scope . O
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Video Appears to Show UFO Drifting Behind Space Station, But It's Actually Something Hilariously Boring
UFO Sighting? Footage taken from the International Space Station's live feeds and widely shared on Reddit showed some unusual groupings of mysterious lights, seemingly floating by the orbital outpost like something out of a science fiction movie. "Can someone please explain what I just saw on the ISS YouTube live feed?" Redditor tyrannosnorlax asked on the forum . But as it turns out, the UFO hyp
3h
NASA's Mars helicopter reveals intriguing terrain for rover team
Images snapped on July 5 by NASA's Ingenuity Mars Helicopter on its ambitious ninth flight have offered scientists and engineers working with the agency's Perseverance Mars rover an unprecedented opportunity to scout out the road ahead. Ingenuity provided new insight into where different rock layers begin and end, each layer serving as a time capsule for how conditions in the ancient climate chang
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India's Covid vaccine rollout hit by hesitancy and supply snags
Pledge to inoculate entire population by December in doubt as states report shortages of vaccine stocks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage India's Covid vaccination rollout has continued to falter due to supply shortages and vaccine hesitancy, casting doubt on the government's pledge to vaccinate the entire population by December. A number of states, including the capit
13h
Animal altruism: nature isn't as cruel as the Discovery Channel says
Primates practice altruism all the time and demonstrate a basic morality. These actions appear to be unmotivated by a hidden desire for self-interest. Indeed, altruism is necessary for the survival of social animals. It is rather common to think of nature as an endless competition between animals for survival. Idioms like "survival of the fittest" or "it's a jungle out there" remind us that the s
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Synthesis of one of the most abundant organic lipids elucidates its structure
Crenarchaeol is a large, closed-loop lipid that is present in the membranes of ammonium-oxidizing archaea, a unicellular life form that exists ubiquitously in the oceans. In comparison to other archaeal membrane lipids, crenarchaeol is very complex and, so far, attempts to confirm its structure by synthesizing the entire molecule have been unsuccessful. Organic chemists from the University of Gron
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More complex than we thought: The body's reaction to contact allergens
Many people react to contact allergens, but some patients develop rashes and itching much faster than others. Previously the scientists were unable to explain why, but now researchers have outlined an entire new subgroup of allergic reactions which explains these early skin reactions. The new knowledge is vital to understanding the disease mechanisms in contact allergy.
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Covid origins: Australia's role in the feedback loop promoting the Wuhan lab leak theory
Blanket reporting in News Corp papers has been denigrated for relying on dubious sources – yet the theory itself has taken on new life "BAT MAN" screeched the headline in Sydney's Daily Telegraph on 28 April 2020. "Chinese scientists linked to virus probe worked in Australia." "An exclusive investigation can reveal the Five Eyes intelligence agencies of Australia, Canada, NZ, UK and US, are under
3h
Microcrystal electron diffraction supports a new drug development pipeline
Solving structures of potential therapeutics using X-ray diffraction (XRD) is usually a pivotal step in drug development. But XRD generally requires large, well-ordered crystals. Advancements in automated data collection and processing have increased interest in electron diffraction as an XRD alternative. Electron diffraction uses a beam of electrons rather than X-rays to obtain structures. Here r
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Galactic gamma ray bursts predicted last year show up right on schedule
Astronomers see many periodic emissions from space, typically caused by rotation of stars and often very regular. UC Berkeley astrophysicists noticed a unique periodicity in the soft gamma ray emissions from a magnetar located in our galaxy. The soft gamma repeater SGR1935+2154 appears to emit bursts only within regularly spaced windows, and is inactive in between. Based on their analysis, they pr
41min
Financial barriers fell for some cancer survivors after Affordable Care Act
Cancer survivors ages 18 to 64 faced fewer financial barriers to health care after the Affordable Care Act was implemented than they did before the landmark law took effect, University of Michigan researchers found.In fact, they believe the ACA helped the financial burden (problems related to the cost of medical care) for younger cancer survivors fall to its lowest estimated levels in 20 years.
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Spectral-volumetric compressed ultrafast photography simultaneously captures 5D data in a single snapshot
Information-rich optical imaging can provide multidimensional information to enable observation and analysis of a detected target, contributing insights into mysterious and unknown worlds. With its ability to capture dynamic scenes on picosecond—and even femtosecond—timescales, ultrafast multidimensional optical imaging has important applications in the detection of the ultrafast phenomena in phys
1h
Developing lactose-free milk with graphene oxide based nano filtration membranes
Over the past years, graphene oxide membranes have been mainly studied for water desalination and dye separation. However, membranes have a wide range of applications, such as within the food industry. A research group led by Aaron Morelos-Gomez of Shinshu University's Global Aqua Innovation Center investigated the application of graphene oxide membranes for milk, which typically creates dense fou
1h
Electric delivery vehicle emissions depend on charging
A study shows that when, where, and how electric delivery fleet vehicles are charged can greatly affect their potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The transportation sector is the largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, and a lot of attention has been devoted to electric passenger vehicles and their potential to help reduce those emissions. But with the rise
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Systematic mining of fungal chimeric terpene synthases using an efficient precursor-providing yeast chassis [Biochemistry]
Chimeric terpene synthases, which consist of C-terminal prenyltransferase (PT) and N-terminal class I terpene synthase (TS) domains (termed PTTSs here), is unique to fungi and produces structurally diverse di- and sesterterpenes. Prior to this study, 20 PTTSs had been functionally characterized. Our understanding of the origin and functional evolution of…
2h
Enzymatic depolymerization of highly crystalline polyethylene terephthalate enabled in moist-solid reaction mixtures [Chemistry]
Less than 9% of the plastic produced is recycled after use, contributing to the global plastic pollution problem. While polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is one of the most common plastics, its thermomechanical recycling generates a material of lesser quality. Enzymes are highly selective, renewable catalysts active at mild temperatures; however, they…
2h
Combining CD47 blockade with trastuzumab eliminates HER2-positive breast cancer cells and overcomes trastuzumab tolerance [Medical Sciences]
Trastuzumab, a targeted anti-human epidermal-growth-factor receptor-2 (HER2) monoclonal antibody, represents a mainstay in the treatment of HER2-positive (HER2+) breast cancer. Although trastuzumab treatment is highly efficacious for early-stage HER2+ breast cancer, the majority of advanced-stage HER2+ breast cancer patients who initially respond to trastuzumab acquire resistance to treatment and
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Synthesizing evidence in sustainability science through harmonized experiments: Community monitoring in common pool resources [Social Sciences]
Over 30 y ago, Elinor Ostrom published Governing the Commons (1), a demonstration by counterexample that the successful management of common pool resources requires neither individual private property rights nor central government control. Her contribution and subsequent research identify more than a dozen institutional features, or "design principles," purported to…
2h
Company in Hot Water for Making Real Guns Look Like Lego Toys
"SUPER FUN" A Utah gun shop called Culper Precision horrified gun safety advocates last week when it started to sell the "BLOCK19," a handgun customization kit that lets people coat their later-generation Glock 19s in Lego bricks, making the dangerous weapon look exactly like a child's toy. The goal was to counter gun control advocates and "draw attention to the fact that the shooting sports are
2h
The Green New Deal Does Not, Strictly Speaking, Exist
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . Since its ascension in 2018, the Green New Deal has defined the terms of the global climate debate. Perhaps no other climate policy in history has been a
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Air pollution exposure linked to poor academics in childhood
Children exposed to elevated levels of air pollution may be more likely to have poor inhibitory control during late childhood and poor academic skills in early adolescence, including spelling, reading comprehension, and math skills. Difficulty with inhibition in late childhood was found to be a precursor to later air pollution-related academic problems. Interventions that target inhibitory control
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Allocating COVID vaccines based on health and socioeconomic factors could cut mortality
An estimated 43 percent of variability in U.S. COVID-19 mortality is linked with county-level socioeconomic indicators and health vulnerabilities, with the strongest association seen in the proportions of people living with chronic kidney disease and living in nursing homes. The study by Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health researchers suggests that allocating vaccines based on thes
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Allocating COVID-19 vaccines based on health and socioeconomics could reduce mortality
COVID-19 vaccination strategies in the United States are informed by individual characteristics such as age and occupation. A study published in the open access journal PLOS Medicine by Sasikiran Kandula and Jeffrey Shaman of Columbia University, New York, United States suggests that including socioeconomic indicators as prioritization criteria for vaccination may help minimize severe outcomes, pa
3h
Video: Artificial cells
What is life? The most basic and smallest form of life we know is a single cell. Trying to create living cells from scratch is therefore the ultimate goal for Alexander Mason. However, as a cell consists of lots of parts and has many different functions this is a big challenge. In this video lecture Alexander Mason explains how he uses non-living materials like proteins and polymers as building bl
3h
Farm marketing success linked to natural, cultural assets
Direct farm marketing efforts, such as farmers markets and roadside stands, are more successful in communities with more nonprofits, social enterprises and creative industries, according to a team including Cornell University researchers, who created a nationwide database of assets to help municipalities craft community-specific development plans.
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Yukon fossils reveal 120 million years of evolution and O2
Expeditions to a remote area of Yukon, Canada, have uncovered a 120-million-year-long geological record of a time when land plants and complex animals first evolved and ocean oxygen levels began to approach those in the modern world. Hundreds of millions of years ago, in the middle of what would eventually become Canada's Yukon Territory, an ocean swirled with armored trilobites, clam-like brachi
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How to recognize and counter vaccine apathy
There's a lot of talk about vaccine hesitancy, but less about vaccine apathy. Here's what that means and how to reach people in that frame of mind. Vaccine apathy isn't hesitancy because this group isn't weighing the decision whether they feel the vaccine is safe—for the apathetic, the decision isn't even on the radar. https://news.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/E36-Stacy_Wood-v2.mp3 Read a
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One small step for three men could be a giant leap for mankind | Brief letters
Socialist specialists | Winifred Nowottny | University lectures | Branson, Bezos and Musk | Middle name confusion Zoe Williams' preference for a socialist dentist ( What 22 years of terrible gum disease has taught me about pain, shame and politics , 12 July) reminded me of the time I chose to have my keys cut in a shop in Victoria because a sign in the window read: "Why not have your keys cut by
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The FDA Is a Melting Iceberg
The byzantine world of pharmaceutical regulation has recently broken into the public consciousness, causing a bit of a panic. Aducanumab—the first new Alzheimer's treatment in nearly two decades—was approved by the Food and Drug Administration on June 7 despite scant evidence of benefit, and against the nearly unanimous advice of the agency's expert advisers. Op-eds called the decision, which cou
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This Service Makes Online Couples Counseling Easy, Effective, and Affordable
As a BetterHelp affiliate, we may receive compensation from BetterHelp if you purchase products or services through the links provided. A lot of books, movies, and TV shows make love look so easy. They perpetuate this childish notion that, once you fall head over heels for somebody, the two of you just live happily ever after. Unfortunately, that's not actually how love works. In real life, every
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William Shatner Overcomes His Fear of Sharks | Shark Week
Stream Expedition Unknown: Shark Trek on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/expedition-unknown-shark-trek-us About Expedition Unknown: Shark Trek: Josh Gates links up with his childhood hero, William Shatner, to boldly go where Shark Week has never gone before. The mission: enter shark-infested waters to understand the nature of fear and come face to face with an apex predator. This
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Citizen monitoring promotes informed and inclusive forest governance in Liberia [Sustainability Science]
Global forest loss depends on decisions made in the rural, often poor communities living beside the Earth's remaining forests. Governance problems in these forest-edge communities contribute to rapid deforestation and household vulnerability. In coordination with experimental studies in 5 other countries, we evaluate a program that recruits, trains, and deploys…
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Satellite-based deforestation alerts with training and incentives for patrolling facilitate community monitoring in the Peruvian Amazon [Sustainability Science]
Despite substantial investments in high-frequency, remote-sensed forest monitoring in the Amazon, early deforestation alerts generated by these systems rarely reach the most directly affected populations in time to deter deforestation. We study a community monitoring program that facilitated transfer of early deforestation alerts from the Global Forest Watch network to…
4h
Can community monitoring save the commons? Evidence on forest use and displacement [Sustainability Science]
Rapid deforestation is a major driver of greenhouse-gas emissions (1). One proposed policy tool to halt deforestation is community forest management. Even though communities manage an increasing proportion of the world's forests, we lack good evidence of successful approaches to community forest management. Prior studies suggest that successful approaches require…
4h
Understanding uptake of community groundwater monitoring in rural Brazil [Political Sciences]
Resource monitoring is often cited as important for effective common pool resources management. In practice, not all monitoring interventions are successful, particularly when the resource, such as groundwater, is challenging to monitor and measure. We conducted a field experiment on groundwater monitoring in Ceará, Brazil, where communities are increasingly reliant…
4h
Citizen monitoring of waterways decreases pollution in China by supporting government action and oversight [Sustainability Science]
Water pollution is a persistent problem in China, in part, because local governments fail to implement water quality standards set by national and provincial authorities. These higher authorities often lack regular information about the immediate and long-term achievement of remediation targets. Accordingly, central authorities have encouraged nongovernmental organizations to monitor…
4h
Community-based monitoring to facilitate water management by local institutions in Costa Rica [Sustainability Science]
Water scarcity is a global problem that can be compounded by inefficient water management, including underinvestment in infrastructure, underpricing of water use, and underenforcement of user rules. Here, we explore whether these inefficiencies can be reduced in rural Costa Rica via an externally driven community monitoring program (i.e., a program…
4h
Adoption of community monitoring improves common pool resource management across contexts [Social Sciences]
Pervasive overuse and degradation of common pool resources (CPRs) is a global concern. To sustainably manage CPRs, effective governance institutions are essential. A large literature has developed to describe the institutional design features employed by communities that successfully manage their CPRs. Yet, these designs remain far from universally adopted. We…
4h
The impact of childhood lead exposure on adult personality: Evidence from the United States, Europe, and a large-scale natural experiment [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Childhood lead exposure has devastating lifelong consequences, as even low-level exposure stunts intelligence and leads to delinquent behavior. However, these consequences may be more extensive than previously thought because childhood lead exposure may adversely affect normal-range personality traits. Personality influences nearly every aspect of human functioning, from well-being to career…
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DNA barcoding identifies cryptic animal tool materials [Ecology]
Some animals fashion tools or constructions out of plant materials to aid foraging, reproduction, self-maintenance, or protection. Their choice of raw materials can affect the structure and properties of the resulting artifacts, with considerable fitness consequences. Documenting animals' material preferences is challenging, however, as manufacture behavior is often difficult to…
4h
Volcanically extruded phosphides as an abiotic source of Venusian phosphine [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
We hypothesize that trace amounts of phosphides formed in the mantle are a plausible abiotic source of the Venusian phosphine observed by Greaves et al. [Nat. Astron., https://doi.org/10.1038/s41550-020-1174-4 (2020)]. In this hypothesis, small amounts of phosphides (P3− bound in metals such as iron), sourced from a deep mantle, are brought…
4h
On design-based empirical research and its interpretation and ethics in sustainability science [Social Sciences]
Generating credible answers to key policy questions is crucial but difficult in most coupled human and natural systems because complex feedback mechanisms can confound identification of the causal mechanisms behind observed phenomena. By using explicit research designs intended to isolate the causal effects of specific interventions on community monitoring of…
4h
A call for structured ethics appendices in social science papers [Social Sciences]
Ethics in social science experimentation and data collection are often discussed but rarely articulated in writing as part of research outputs. Although papers typically reference human subjects research approvals from relevant institutional review boards, most recognize that such boards do not carry out comprehensive ethical assessments. We propose a structured…
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Telomere dysfunction instigates inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease [Immunology and Inflammation]
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic inflammatory condition driven by diverse genetic and nongenetic programs that converge to disrupt immune homeostasis in the intestine. We have reported that, in murine intestinal epithelium with telomere dysfunction, DNA damage-induced activation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) results in ATM-mediated phosphorylation and activation of…
4h
Dopamine controls whether new declarative information updates reactivated memories through reconsolidation [Neuroscience]
Consolidation and reconsolidation are independent memory processes. Consolidation stabilizes new memories, whereas reconsolidation restabilizes memories destabilized when reactivated during recall. However, the biological role of the destabilization/reconsolidation cycle is still unknown. It has been hypothesized that reconsolidation links new information with reactivated memories, but some report
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Socioeconomic development predicts a weaker contraceptive effect of breastfeeding [Anthropology]
The contraceptive effect of breastfeeding remains essential to controlling fertility in many developing regions of the world. The extent to which this negative effect of breastfeeding on ovarian activity is sensitive to ecological conditions, notably maternal energetic status, has remained controversial. We assess the relationship between breastfeeding duration and postpartum…
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Economic evaluation of sea-level rise adaptation strongly influenced by hydrodynamic feedbacks [Environmental Sciences]
Coastal communities rely on levees and seawalls as critical protection against sea-level rise; in the United States alone, $300 billion in shoreline armoring costs are forecast by 2100. However, despite the local flood risk reduction benefits, these structures can exacerbate flooding and associated damages along other parts of the shoreline—particularly…
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Immunotherapy-based targeting of MSLN+ activated portal fibroblasts is a strategy for treatment of cholestatic liver fibrosis [Medical Sciences]
We investigated the role of mesothelin (Msln) and thymocyte differentiation antigen 1 (Thy1) in the activation of fibroblasts across multiple organs and demonstrated that Msln−/− mice are protected from cholestatic fibrosis caused by Mdr2 (multidrug resistance gene 2) deficiency, bleomycin-induced lung fibrosis, and UUO (unilateral urinary obstruction)-induced kidney fibrosis. On…
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Role of Dot1L and H3K79 methylation in regulating somatic hypermutation of immunoglobulin genes [Immunology and Inflammation]
Somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of the immunoglobulin (Ig) genes allow B cells to make antibodies that protect us against a wide variety of pathogens. SHM is mediated by activation-induced deaminase (AID), occurs at a million times higher frequency than other mutations in the mammalian genome, and is…
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Correction for Ostkamp et al., Sunlight exposure exerts immunomodulatory effects to reduce multiple sclerosis severity [Corrections]
IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for "Sunlight exposure exerts immunomodulatory effects to reduce multiple sclerosis severity," by Patrick Ostkamp, Anke Salmen, Béatrice Pignolet, Dennis Görlich, Till F. M. Andlauer, Andreas Schulte-Mecklenbeck, Gabriel Gonzalez-Escamilla, Florence Bucciarelli, Isabelle Gennero, Johanna Breuer, Gisela Antony, Tilman Schneider-Hohendorf, Nadine Mykicki, Anton
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Correction to Supporting Information for Stachl et al., Predicting personality from patterns of behavior collected with smartphones [SI Correction]
PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for "Predicting personality from patterns of behavior collected with smartphones," by Clemens Stachl, Quay Au, Ramona Schoedel, Samuel D. Gosling, Gabriella M. Harari, Daniel Buschek, Sarah Theres Völkel, Tobias Schuwerk, Michelle Oldemeier, Theresa Ullmann, Heinrich Hussmann, Bernd Bischl, and Markus Bühner, which…
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Identifying the spark of desire in fruit flies
Fruit flies have evolved an elaborate courtship ritual. Upon recognizing a suitable mate in his vicinity, a male fruit fly transforms into a dogged suitor, sometimes chasing the female for more than 26 yards, or nine miles in human terms, singing to her all the while by vibrating his wings.
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Mosquito-resistant clothing prevents bites in trials
North Carolina State University researchers have created insecticide-free, mosquito-resistant clothing using textile materials they confirmed to be bite-proof in experiments with live mosquitoes. They developed the materials using a computational model of their own design, which describes the biting behavior of Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that carries viruses that cause human diseases like Zika, D
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Two-dome superconductivity in a kagome superconductor discovered under high pressure
Recently, a research team led by Prof. Yang Zhaorong from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with researchers from the Anhui University and other institutions, discovered pressure-induced two-dome superconductivity in the quasi-two-dimensional topological kagome superconductor CsV3Sb5. This work was published in Physical Revi
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Molecules in collective ecstasy
"What we see here is energy transfer that is much faster than in any semiconductor," says Jakob Heier. The physicist works in Empa's Functional Polymers lab, and the discovery he has made with his team could cause a stir in many areas—such as sensor technology, optical data transmission or the fabrication of organic solar cells. We are talking about islands of dye molecules with a perfect, interna
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Less is more: the efficient brain structural and dynamic organization
Metabolic and building costs put strong constraints on the structures and functions of neural circuits. Neurophysiology experiments demonstrated that mammal brain networks are remarkably cost-efficient in both structure and dynamics, while the fundamental underlying physical mechanism is not clear. Understanding this mechanism is important not only in neuroscience, but also for developing brain-in
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Tree rings show record of newly identified extreme solar activity event
The sun constantly emits a stream of energetic particles, some of which reach Earth. The density and energy of this stream form the basis of space weather, which can interfere with the operation of satellites and other spacecraft. A key unresolved question in the field is the frequency with which the sun emits bursts of energetic particles strong enough to disable or destroy space-based electronic
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How well do consumers understand their dairy purchases?
Consumers may have less trust in food processes that they don't understand, and animal-based foods may be subject to more uninformed scrutiny than other foods due to consumers' perception of higher risk. Dairy producers can benefit from understanding how consumers interpret unfamiliar terms and claims on dairy product labels. In a new study appearing in the Journal of Dairy Science, scientists fro
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Are silver nanoparticles a silver bullet against microbes?
Antimicrobials are used to kill or slow the growth of bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms. They can be in the form of antibiotics, used to treat bodily infections, or as an additive or coating on commercial products used to keep germs at bay. These life-saving tools are essential to preventing and treating infections in humans, animals and plants, but they also pose a global threat to publi
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New aspects related to plant processing in a Neolithic settlement in Turkey
A study conducted by researchers from the UPF Culture and Socio-Ecological Dynamics research group (CaSEs) and the University of Leicester (UK) has provided a highly dynamic image surrounding the use and importance of hitherto unknown wild plant resources at the Neolithic site of Çatalhöyük (Anatolia, Turkey). The researchers carried out their work combining the analysis of microbotanical remains
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Project Air View maps ultrafine particles, soot and other substances in Amsterdam air
Over the past two years, the municipality of Amsterdam, Utrecht University and Google have collaborated on Project Air View, in which the Amsterdam air quality was measured by two Street View cars with special measuring equipment. These maps have now been shared with the world for the first time. They show that motorized traffic can increase the concentration of ultrafine particles, soot and nitro
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Simulating microswimmers in nematic fluids
Artificial microswimmers have received much attention in recent years. By mimicking microbes which convert their surrounding energy into swimming motions, these particles could soon be exploited for many important applications. Yet before this can happen, researchers must develop methods to better control the trajectories of individual microswimmers in complex environments. In a new study publishe
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Poor and minority communities suffer more from extreme heat in US cities
Low-income neighborhoods and communities with higher Black, Hispanic and Asian populations experience significantly more urban heat than wealthier and predominantly white neighborhoods within a vast majority of populous U.S. counties, according new research from the University of California San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy.
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Near-infrared synergy therapy for cancer nanoclusters
As a minimally-invasive method for cancer therapy at precise locations, NIR-induced photothermal therapy (PTT) has drawn extensively attention. The therapeutic mechanism is the use of photothermal agents (PTAs) in the treatment of tumors,and its therapeutic effect happens only at the tumor site where both light-absorbent and localized laser radiation coexist.
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Restless nights: Shelter-housed dogs need days to adapt to new surroundings
Every year, thousands of dogs end up in a shelter in the Netherlands. Experts expect an increase in this number in the upcoming period, when people go back to the office after working from home during the corona crisis. Despite the good care of staff and volunteers, the shelter can be a turbulent experience for dogs. Researchers at Utrecht University investigated if dogs can adapt to their new env
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Data science technique helps measure atomic positions more precisely
Sometimes, a material's property, such as magnetism and catalysis, can change drastically owing to nothing more than minute changes in the separation between its atoms, commonly referred to as 'local strains' in the parlance of materials science. A precise measurement of such local strains is, therefore, important to materials scientists.
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What do police actions do to community health?
A new conceptual model depicts the complex relationship between policing and population health. A specific police action, an arrest or a shooting, has an immediate and direct effect on the individuals involved, but how far and wide do the reverberations of that action spread through the community? What are the health consequences for a specific, though not necessarily geographically defined, popu
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High performance polarization sensitive photodetectors on 2D β-InSe
Polarization-sensitive photodetectors (PSPDs) exhibit significant application in both military and civil areas. However, the current commercial PSPDs require the aid of optical devices such as polarizers and phase retarders to pick up the polarization information of light. It is still an arduous task for realizing filter-free PSPDs. Scientists from China and South Korea prepare the stable layered
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Photorhabdus Virulence Cassette as a causative agent in Photorhabdus asymbiotica
PVC effectors Pdp1 (a new family of widespread dNTP pyrophosphatase effector in eCIS) and Pnf (a deamidase effector) are loaded inside the inner tube lumen in a "Peas in the Pod" mode. Moreover, Pdp1 and Pnf can be directly injected into J774A.1 murine macrophage and kill target cells by disrupting dNTP pools and actin cytoskeleton formation, respectively. The results provide direct evidence of ho
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Higher-order topological superconductivity in monolayer Fe(Te,Se)
Majorana zero modes have attracted tremendous attention due to their critical role in topological quantum computation. Current major experimental efforts focus on the hetero-structure approach, which is challenging due to the complexity of the interface. Recently, the discovery of topological properties in high-Tc iron-based superconductors provides an ideal Majorana platform. An international tea
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COVID-causing coronavirus following predictable mutational footsteps
New research from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has shown that the mutations arising in the COVID-19-causing SARS-CoV-2 virus seem to run in the family — or at least the genus of coronaviruses most dangerous to humans. After comparing the early evolution of SARS-CoV-2 against that of its closest relatives, the betacoronaviruses, the Nebraska team found that SARS-CoV-2 mutations are occurring
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More on Vaccine Side Effects
Back last summer, I was writing blog posts about possible side effects of mass vaccination. For readers who've shown up more recently and might have me filed as Defender of Vaccines, that might seem surprising, but remember, I've been in drug discovery for a long time now. All drugs, all therapies have side effects. It's just a question of the risks and severity of those versus the benefits, and
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Aerin Medical announces results of randomized controlled trial supporting VivAer® for treatment of nasal airway obstruction with nasal valve collapse
Aerin Medical Inc. today announced that the International Forum of Allergy and Rhinology has published three-month results online from the VATRAC trial, confirming the safety and efficacy of VivAer® for the treatment of nasal airway obstruction (NAO) caused by nasal valve collapse (NVC). In the study, those treated with VivAer showed significant improvement in nasal obstruction symptoms compared t
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Experts address the challenges of health disparity in the care of patients with cerebral palsy
Amsterdam, July 13, 2021 – Cerebral palsy (CP) is one of the most common developmental movement disorders in children. It is associated with complex healthcare needs and impacts development and function. In this special issue of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Approach Throughout the Lifespan (JPRM), experts review disparities of care and limitations of acces
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Blood test can track the evolution of coronavirus infection
A blood test that quantifies the protein ACE2, the cellular protein which allows entry of the coronavirus into cells, as well as ACE2 fragments, produced as a result of interaction with the virus, could be a simple and effective method for monitoring SARS-CoV-2 infection, according to a study led by Javier Sáez-Valero, from the UMH-CSIC Neurosciences Institute in Alicante, published in FASEB Journ
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Infection prevention organizations say COVID-19 vaccines should be required for healthcare personnel
Hospitals and other healthcare facilities should require employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19, according to a consensus statement by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) and six other leading organizations representing medical professionals working in infectious diseases, infection prevention, pharmacy, pediatrics, and long-term care. The paper specifies exemption for t
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'Dragon Man' may be a missing link in human evolution
The "Dragon Man" skull provides clues as to what humans looked like some 140,000 years ago, a period in East Asia in which there has been a gap in the human fossil record. Every so often, the fossilized discovery of a previously unknown human ancestor sends ripples around the world, as anthropologists and the public are mesmerized by a new window into the story of us. Will we learn more about how
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Fermented food diet boost microbiome and cut inflammation
A diet rich in fermented foods boosts the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation, according to new research. In a clinical trial, 36 healthy adults were randomly assigned to a 10-week diet that included either fermented or high-fiber foods. The two diets resulted in different effects on the gut microbiome and the immune system. Eating foods such as yogurt, kefir,
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Keeping the world up to date on irritable bowel syndrome research in China
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is prevalent in China, where much research has been conducted on this condition. However, most of these studies are published in Chinese, and their findings remain inaccessible to western scientists. To address this problem, a pair of researchers have published a review article on the Chinese Medical Journal condensing Chinese IBS studies carried out over the past de
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The impact of COVID-19 on food-shopping behavior for food-insecure populations
While grocery stores remained open as an essential business and thrived financially throughout the pandemic, researchers shows people went to the grocery store less frequently and spent more per trip during the pandemic. New research found that like food-secure individuals, food-insecure individuals made fewer grocery shopping trips due to concerns about contracting COVID-19. But, unlike food-secu
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Mechanical stimuli significantly influence organ growth
In addition to chemical factors, mechanical influences play an important role in the natural growth of human organs such as kidneys, lungs and mammary glands – but also in the development of tumors. Now a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has investigated the process in detail using organoids, three-dimensional model systems of such organs which are produced in the laborato
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CNIO researchers discover a new pathway to tackle follicular lymphoma
The team led by Alejo Efeyan, head of the Metabolism and Cell Signalling Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), has discovered that genetic inhibition of the RagC protein blocks the activation of B lymphocytes and delays the onset of follicular lymphomas without side effects. The study, which was carried out in animal models, was published this week in the journal Cell Report
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Calling all couch potatoes: This finger wrap can let you power electronics while you sleep
A new wearable device turns the touch of a finger into a source of power for small electronics and sensors. Engineers at the University of California San Diego developed a thin, flexible strip that can be worn on a fingertip and generate small amounts of electricity when a person's finger sweats or presses on it. What's special about this sweat-fueled device is that it generates power even while t
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Electric signals between individual cardiac cells regulate heartbeat
In Biophysics Reviews, researchers provide an update on how electrical impulses in the heart travel from cell to cell. The connections between cells forming the low resistance pathway and facilitating the current flow are called gap junctions. Each consists of many channels, which are formed when specific proteins from one cell dock and fuse to the proteins from another cell. The scientists delve
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3 ways to create a menopause-friendly work culture | Andrea Berchowitz
Hot flashes, joint pain, anxiety, depression, difficulty sleeping — these unforgiving menopause symptoms directly impact work but often go overlooked and under-discussed as a taboo topic, says entrepreneur Andrea Berchowitz. She gives practical advice on how to create a menopause-friendly work culture that supports gender equity and diversity retention in the workplace.
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Ny SSI-vaccine vil lade myg dræbe malaria-parasitter
Vaccination af allerede smittede skal få bugt med malariaparasitten ved at lade myggen suge antistoffer ud af vaccinerede personer. »Kan stoppe smittespredning og dermed sygdom og død i de ramte afrikanske befolkninger,« siger forskningsleder bag vaccinen.
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Farm robots are the future; let's start preparing now, researcher argues
No longer science fiction, farm robots are already here—and they have created two possible extremes for the future of agriculture and its impacts on the environment, argues agricultural economist Thomas Daum in a Science & Society article published July 13 in the journal Trends in Ecology & Evolution. One is a utopia, where fleets of small, intelligent robots farm in harmony with nature to produce
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This device harvests power from your sweaty fingertips while you sleep
Feeling extra sweaty from a summer heat wave? Don't worry—not all your perspiration has to go to waste. In a paper publishing July 13 in the journal Joule, researchers have developed a new device that harvests energy from the sweat on—of all places—your fingertips. To date, the device is the most efficient on-body energy harvester ever invented, producing 300 millijoules (mJ) of energy per square
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Supermarket model to guide safer shopping amid pandemic
Skoltech team has developed a model for assessing infection risks for supermarket customers. The researchers believe that their model will help formulate scientifically backed rules for safe shopping during the pandemic. Curiously enough, the team discovered that increasing customer density has only a slight positive effect on sales, so filling the store to the limit makes little sense not just ep
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Preventing lung cancer's unwelcome return
Approximately 15% of lung cancer tumors are caused by a mutation in a growth receptor called EGFR. An effective drug can kill most of the cancer cells, but the tumor eventually grows back. CSHL Visiting Scientist Raffaella Sordella and her team investigated the molecular mechanisms behind this relapse. They discovered that some of the cells were resistant to the EGFR treatment; they survived using
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James Morrow obituary
My friend James Morrow, who has died aged 74 from lung cancer, was an assistant editor at the Guardian in the 1980s, a psychotherapist and a motorcycle adventurer. Born in Oxford, James was the son of Ian Morrow , a management consultant knighted for his work with Rolls-Royce, and his wife, Elizabeth (nee Thackray). He attended Rugby school in Warwickshire and, after studies at a technical colleg
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NASA mission will search for volcanoes on 'hellish' Venus
While much about Venus remains a mystery, a recently announced mission will search for active volcanoes and tectonic plate movements on Earth's closest planetary neighbor. Toward the end of this decade, a NASA spacecraft orbiting Venus is slated to begin sending radar signals through the planet's thick, yellowish shroud of corrosive sulfuric acid clouds to measure the rise and fall of the planet'
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An archaeological study reveals new aspects related to plant processing in a Neolithic settlement in Turkey
Researchers from Pompeu Fabra University and the University of Leicester have discovered at the site of Çatalhöyük (Anatolia, Turkey) a wide variety of hitherto unknown wild resources. The study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, has used an innovative approach, based on the analysis of microscopic plant remains extracted from grinding implements from different domestic contexts.
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Global study reveals effectiveness of protected areas
Scientists have published a global study on the effectiveness of protected areas in preventing deforestation. The study, published 29 June 2021 in Environmental Research Letters, explored the success of country-level protected areas at reducing forest loss, and used machine learning to uncover some of the factors that contribute to differences in effectiveness.
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Individual privacy and big data uses in public health
In the United States, massive volumes of individual-level data, called "big data," are used for a variety of reasons, including marketing, intelligence gathering and political campaigns. Big data are also vital to public health efforts, such as improving population health, informing personalized medicine and transforming biomedical research. However, it can be challenging to use big data for healt
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In the world capital of vanilla production, nearly three out of four farmers say they don't have enough to eat
Madagascar, famous for its lemurs, is home to almost 26 million people. Despite the cultural and natural riches, Madagascar is one of the poorest countries in the world. Over 70% of Malagasy people are farmers, and food security is a constant challenge. Rice is the most important food crop, but lately an internationally-prized crop has taken center stage: vanilla. Most of the world's best quality
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Treating the Brain Through the Stomach: Tweaking the Gut Microbiome Slowed ALS in Mice
Ask any neuroscientist 20 years ago if gut bug excrement could slow down an untreatable brain disease, and they'd brush off the idea without a second thought. Yet the gut-brain connection has emerged as one of the most tantalizing advances in neuroscience, a true "paradigm shift," said Dr. Eran Blacher at Stanford University, who recently published a provocative and award-winning essay in Science
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Lactose-free milk with graphene oxide based nano filtration membranes
Over the past years, graphene oxide membranes have been mainly studied for water desalination and dye separation. However, membranes have a wide range of applications such as the food industry. A research group led by Aaron Morelos-Gomez of Shinshu University's Global Aqua Innovation Center investigated the application of graphene oxide membranes for milk which typically creates dense foulant laye
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Bats and behemoths: How large mammals may help bat diversity in the world's oldest desert
Theresa Laverty had a lot of flexibility in deciding what she would study for her doctoral dissertation when she arrived at Colorado State University, thanks to a graduate research fellowship from the National Science Foundation. After many conversations with her advisor, Professor Joel Berger, she decided to look at the effects of herbivores—or animals that eat plants—on other levels of the food
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DNA reveals the evolutionary history of museum specimens
Museum specimens held in natural history collections around the world represent a wealth of underutilized genetic information due to the poor state of preservation of the DNA, which often makes it difficult to sequence. An international team has optimized a method developed for analyzing ancient DNA to identify the relationships between species on a deep evolutionary scale.
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Restless nights: Shelter housed dogs need days to adapt to new surroundings
Every year, thousands of dogs end up in a shelter in the Netherlands. Experts expect an increase in this number in the upcoming period, when people go back to the office after working from home during the corona crisis. Despite the good care of staff and volunteers, the shelter can be a turbulent experience for dogs. Researchers investigated if dogs can adapt to their new environment based on thei
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A Record Shattering Shark Breach! | Shark Week
Stream Air Jaws: Going For Gold on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/air-jaws-going-for-gold-us About Air Jaws: Going For Gold: The Air Jaws team returns to Seal Rock to capture the highest breach ever recorded. Rocket Shark holds the record at a 15-feet. Will he return to jump even higher, or will a new shark take the World's Highest Flying Great White Shark title? Subscribe to Dis
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Teaching sound topological tricks
Topological properties of artificial materials have attracted tremendous attention. However, few efforts were devoted to the exploration of novel topological states for wave manipulation applications. Recently, a collaboration of two groups, respectively led by Dr. Guancong Ma from Hong Kong Baptist University and Dr. Ying Wu from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology respectively, ha
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Genetic study in giant evergreens reveals clues to pest resistance
Recent research into a group of giant evergreens is helping scientists better understand why some trees are able to survive in the face of insect pests, and could help foresters breed trees with the resistance necessary to survive in the face of new and emerging challenges to forest health.
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A new approach to metastatic melanoma discovered
Combining chemotherapy with a BRAF oncogene inhibitor proves effective at treating this disease in a mouse model. This alternative paves the way toward a new approach for patients affected by this type of tumor, which has no cure in the most advanced stages or cases of relapse.
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Soybean expansion in South America doubled over past 20 years
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S., Brazil and Argentina has found that land dedicated to growing soybeans in South America has doubled over the past 20 years. In their paper published in the journal Nature Sustainability, the group describes their approach to measuring soy growing areas in South America and what they learned about its impact on land use on the
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Working from home increases desire for green living
What everyone already suspected has now also been proven: the coronavirus pandemic is changing people's housing preferences, and therefore also the future housing market. TU Delft student Marjolein Bons' graduation project demonstrates this: the housing preferences of 17.8 percent of the home seekers surveyed were changed by the coronavirus pandemic. Working from home increases the need for peace
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Onion genome finally reveals its secrets
Wageningen research enables faster development of new resilient varieties. Researchers from Wageningen University & Research (WUR) have unraveled the onion genome. This will speed up the ability of plant breeders to develop new onion varieties that are resistant to conditions such as drought, and meet the world's growing demand for onions. "Assembling the pieces was a considerable puzzle," says pl
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Particle physicists study 'little bangs' at the ATLAS experiment
A new result from the ATLAS Collaboration at CERN studies the interactions of photons—particles of light—with lead nuclei at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Using new data collection techniques, physicists revealed an unexpected similarity to the experimental signatures of the quark–gluon plasma.
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TSUBAME supercomputer predicts cell-membrane permeability of cyclic peptides
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a computational method based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to predict the cell-membrane permeability of cyclic peptides using a supercomputer. Their protocol has exhibited promising accuracy and may become a useful tool for the design and discovery of cyclic peptide drugs, which could help us reach new therapeutic targets i
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2,000-year-old mystery of a havoc-wreaking worm
Humans have known for over 2,000 years that shipworms, a worm-like mollusk, are responsible for damage to wooden boats, docks, dikes and piers. Yet new research from the University of Massachusetts Amherst published in Frontiers in Microbiology reveals that we still don't know the most basic thing about them: how they eat.
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A little dishonesty can make cooperation happen
Overstating the true level of cooperation in a society can increase cooperative behavior overall, research finds. Remember Napster? The peer-to-peer file sharing company, popular in the late 1990s and early 2000s, depended on users sharing their music files. To promote cooperation, such software "could mislead its users," says Bryce Morsky, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylva
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Leading cardiovascular organizations issue joint opinion on improving clinician well-being worldwide
Clinician well-being is imperative to providing high-quality patient care, yet clinician burnout continues to increase, especially over the last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Four leading cardiovascular organizations – the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the European Society of Cardiology and the World Heart Federation – are calling for global action to improve
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An Earth-Like Axial Tilt Might Be Necessary for Complex Life to Arise
Earth has numerous properties that make it an ideal home for life as we know it, including a robust magnetic field that deflects radiation, a temperate climate with liquid water, a large moon that stabilizes the planet's rotation, and a modest axial tilt. That last item may be more important than we previously thought, according to a new study funded by NASA. The study suggests that a tilted axis
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Dogs Understand Humans
Regardless of whether or not you are a cat person or a dog person (I have both as pets, as well as a reptile, and have had birds and fish), there is no denying that dogs are excellent human companions. No other animal known is capable of the same relationship with people. Researchers have been trying to understand the origin of this special relationship, with some interesting results. First let m
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Covid-19: do we need to reframe the way we think about restrictions?
Before Downing Street urged ' extreme caution' around the lifting of restrictions on so-called 'freedom day', Shivani Dave spoke to Prof Stephen Reicher about how mixed messages surrounding restrictions can affect our behaviour Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
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'In hindsight the mistake was quite stupid': Authors retract paper on stroke
File this under "doing the right thing:" A group of stroke researchers in Germany have retracted a paper they published earlier this year after finding an error in their work shortly after publication that doomed the findings. Julian Klingbeil, of the Department of Neurology at the University of Leipzig Medical Center, and his colleagues had … Continue reading
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Why wildfire smoke is especially bad for your health
Coloradans woke up to hazy skies Monday morning, as smoke from the Morgan Creek wildfire near Steamboat Springs prompted air quality health advisories from Routt to Summit counties, and smoke from fires in California cast an eerie glow across the Front Range. As recently as 12 years ago, researchers had little understanding of how such smoke impacts human health—if at all, says Colleen Reid, an as
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Build Your Own Flux Capacitor With This LEGO Brick Project
It remains an open question if we'll ever achieve time travel, although some scientists think we may have cracked it . Yet there's no reason you can't at least pretend you're Marty and Doc Brown with this flux capacitor building project that combines STEM, '80s nostalgia, and family fun. Playing with blocks and using them to build new objects is widely considered one of the best kinds of family f
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A more efficient method for modeling electrons in materials
One of the most significant challenges in the global R&D effort towards better energy technologies—efficient and accurate material simulation—may be one step closer to being solved, based on new techniques released by UK-based quantum software startup Phasecraft.
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Study finds disparity in pay for female ophthalmologists in Ontario, Canada
A team led by researchers and clinicians from the Donald K. Johnson Eye Institute, part of the Krembil Research Institute at University Health Network (UHN), studied 22,389 Ontario physicians across three decades and found a significant payment gap between female and male ophthalmologists even after accounting for age, and some practice differences. This disparity was more pronounced among ophthal
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Evidence for one-dimensional chiral edge states in a magnetic Weyl semimetal Co3Sn2S2
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24561-3 Magnetic Weyl semimetals in the 2D limit may behave like 2D Chern insulators and host the quantum anomalous Hall effect at high temperatures. Here, the authors report the observation of linearly dispersing topological states confined to the edges of the kagome Co3Sn terraces in the magnetic Weyl system Co3Sn2S2.
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Germanium-lead perovskite light-emitting diodes
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24616-5 Lead toxicity poses a big hurdle for the commercialization of perovskite optoelectronics, hence reducing the environmental impact holds the answer for its future application. To tackle this challenge, the authors utilize germanium to reduce the lead content, enabling highly luminescent eco-friendly compound for
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Astral hydrogels mimic tissue mechanics by aster-aster interpenetration
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24663-y The development of tissue-like materials which replicate the mechanical properties of tissue is of interest for a range of applications. Here, the authors report on the development of radial asters that form a gel network to stiffen in compression and soften in extension, resembling tissue mechanics.
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Single-molecule analysis of processive double-stranded RNA cleavage by Drosophila Dicer-2
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24555-1 Fly Dicer-2 is thought to use two distinct – processive or distributive – modes of cleavage by distinguishing the terminal structures of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates with the help of its cofactor LoquaciousPD (Loqs-PD). Here the authors show by single-molecule imaging that dsRNA terminal structures and
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Sensing leg movement enhances wearable monitoring of energy expenditure
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24173-x Current methods to estimate energy expenditure are either infeasible for everyday use or associated with significant errors. Here the authors present a Wearable System using inertial measurement units worn on the shank and thigh that estimates metabolic energy expenditure in real-time during common steady-state
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A chalcogenide-cluster-based semiconducting nanotube array with oriented photoconductive behavior
Nature Communications, Published online: 13 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24510-0 Interesting properties of carbon nanotubes prompt a search for diverse inorganic nanotubes. Here, the authors report a supertetrahedral chalcogenide cluster-based semiconducting nanotube array that exhibits high electric conductivity and oriented photoconductive behavior.
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Researchers use prenatal editing in preclinical model to correct lysosomal storage disease
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have used DNA base editing in a prenatal mouse model to correct a lysosomal storage disease known as Hurler syndrome. Using an adenine base editor delivered in an adeno-associated viral vector, the researchers corrected the single base mutation responsible for the condition, which begins before birth and affects multiple organs, with the po
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Teens knowing results of their cardiomyopathy genetic tests may improve family function
Sharing results of genetic testing for cardiomyopathy in adolescents does not appear to have a significant negative emotional impact on patients or their families, according to a survey of parents and their children after the children were tested for cardiomyopathy.A majority of adolescents involved in this small U.S. study believed that they should be equally involved in the process of receiving
11h
Senfølgepatienter kan give vigtig indsigt i smerter
PLUS. Flere nye forskningsprojekter vil bruge de mange senfølgepatienter der har været ramt af covid-19 til at forbedre og målrette smertebehandling. Corona-krisen er en unik situation for at undersøge smertemekanismer, fordi en kæmpe population har haft samme sygdom, men reagerer forskelligt, lyder de…
14h
Misogyny in Medicine
Misogyny persists in clinical and academic medicine. We need to be aware of subtle micro aggressions and report abuses, but we mustn't get carried away into paranoia and conspiracy theories. We should be guided by common sense and moderation in all things. The post first appeared on Science-Based Medicine .
14h
AxonEM Dataset: 3D Axon Instance Segmentation of Brain Cortical Regions
Electron microscopy (EM) enables the reconstruction of neural circuits at the level of individual synapses, which has been transformative for scientific discoveries. However, due to the complex morphology, an accurate reconstruction of cortical axons has become a major challenge. Worse still, there is no publicly available large-scale EM dataset from the cortex that provides dense ground truth seg
16h
New study supports medical safety of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT)
Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a medically safe mental health intervention, according to a new study led by CAMH researcher Dr. Tyler Kaster as part of his doctoral studies at ICES and the University of Toronto. The study was published today in the journal The Lancet Psychiatry, and is among the largest and most comprehensive to compare the safety of ECT with standard treatment amongst individ
22h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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