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Independent Garage Fixes Tesla for $700 When Tesla Would Have Charged $16,000
Expensive Fix The leasee of an almost-brand new Tesla Model 3 reached out to YouTuber Rich Benoit, from the channel "Rich Rebuilds," after being quoted $16,000 to replace a damaged battery pack by his local Tesla service center. Benoit's connections at the independent EV auto shop Electrified Garage were able to fix the vehicle for just $700, a fraction of what Tesla would have charged. It was ev
5h
Quantum physics helps destroy cancer cells
Cancer cell death is triggered within three days when X-rays are focused on tumor tissue containing iodine-carrying nanoparticles. The iodine releases electrons that break the tumor's DNA, leading to cell death. The findings, by scientists at Kyoto University's Institute for Integrated Cell-Material Sciences (iCeMS) and colleagues in Japan and the US, were published in the journal Scientific Repor
7h
Ride with Juno as it flies past the solar system's biggest moon and Jupiter
On June 7, 2021, NASA's Juno spacecraft flew closer to Jupiter's ice-encrusted moon Ganymede than any spacecraft in more than two decades. Less than a day later, Juno made its 34th flyby of Jupiter, racing over its roiling atmosphere from pole to pole in less than three hours. Using the spacecraft's JunoCam imager, the mission team has put together an animation to provide a "starship captain" poin
49min
Alcohol caused 740,000 cancer cases globally last year – study
Researchers behind estimate say more needs to be done to raise public awareness of link Alcohol is estimated to have caused more than 740,000 cancer cases around the world last year, and experts say more needs to be done to highlight the link. There is strong evidence that alcohol consumption can cause various cancers including those of the breast, liver, colon, rectum, oropharynx, larynx and oes
20h
The Moral Collapse of J. D. Vance
What do we call a man who turns on everything he once claimed to believe? For a practitioner of petty and self-serving duplicity, we use "sellout" or "backstabber." (Sometimes we impugn the animal kingdom and call him a rat, a skunk, or a weasel.) For grand betrayals of weightier loyalties—country and faith—we invoke the more solemn terms of "traitor" or "apostate." But what should we call J. D.
8h
Astronomers train AI to reveal the true shape of galaxies
Japanese astronomers train AI to differentiate between fake and real data from faraway galaxies. The approach helps remove noise from astronomical observations. The new technique will help more accurately reveal the large-scale structure of the universe. A new AI-based tool developed by Japanese astronomers promises to remove unwanted noise in data to generate a cleaner view of the true shape of
18h
Florida Man Shoots Down Police Drone Because It Was "Harassing" Him
Shoot It Down Not everybody is happy with law enforcement's use of surveillance drones. 50-year-old Wendell Goney from Mount Dora, Florida, took matters into his own hands and decided to shoot down a police drone, the property of the local Lake County Sherriff's Office, the Orlando Sentinel reports . The reason? He "thought it was trying to harass him," according to his arrest affidavit, as quote
2h
Biden Is Speaking to an America That Doesn't Exist
Joe Biden is not known as a fiery orator, but the president was riled up yesterday. Biden spoke in Philadelphia about voting rights, calling a current round of state laws and bills, plus rhetoric emanating from Donald Trump and others, "the most significant test of our democracy since the Civil War." The president defended the 2020 election, celebrating the record voter turnout, praising election
4h
Battle for oxygen as coup-hit Myanmar faces its most severe Covid outbreak
Outbreak could not have come at a worse time, after military coup caused hospitals to collapse and threw vaccination campaign into chaos See all our coronavirus coverage Khin Nwe Soe* went in a taxi, from factory to factory across Myanmar's main city of Yangon, desperately searching for oxygen tanks for her 21-year-old son. A home test had shown he had Covid-19. He was in pain, able only to lie d
11h
Crypto Miners Are Buying Up Entire Power Plants
Moving In As the energy demands of cryptocurrency mining garner increased scrutiny, some mining operations are cutting out the middleman and setting up shop inside existing power plants. These companies are in search of what's called "stranded power," which could be an existing power plant or an abandoned facility with access to dormant energy sources, Curbed reports . For example, a crypto minin
1h
WHO warns of 'chaos' if individuals mix Covid vaccines
Chief scientist says organisation is awaiting data on studies combining vaccines but that health agencies can make decision to mix shots See all our coronavirus coverage The World Health Organization's chief scientist has advised individuals against mixing and matching Covid-19 vaccines from different manufacturers, saying such decisions should be left to public health authorities. "It's a little
11h
MIT Prediction of Civilization Collapse Appears to Be on Track
Grim Prophecy Back in 1972, a team of MIT scientists published research predicting the end of our current industrial civilization within the 21st century. While the study was lambasted at the time, new research shows that its predictions have been eerily accurate so far, Motherboard reports . New research published in the Yale Journal of Industrial Ecology looked back at how things have gone sinc
28min
The most surprisingly contentious subject? Toilet roll orientation | Arwa Mahdawi
Under or over is clearly utterly unimportant, yet the choice has inspired an extensive Wikipedia entry, viral videos and record-breaking outcries Behold the very small, very insignificant hill that I am willing to die on: toilet paper should always hang over the top of the roll rather than under it. Whenever I come across a toilet roll that does not conform to this orientation I feel strangely ir
13h
New NASA Spacecraft Will Carry Time Capsule for the Descendants of Humans
Message in a Bottle As NASA prepares to launch Lucy, a spacecraft that will explore the asteroids that share Jupiter's orbit, engineers added an important finishing touch: a little time capsule for the descendants of modern humanity. The spacecraft, slated for an October 16 launch, will travel out to Jupiter to study the Trojan asteroids, which NASA believes contain secrets about the earliest day
2h
The Computer Scientist Training AI to Think With Analogies
The Pulitzer Prize-winning book Gödel, Escher, Bach inspired legions of computer scientists in 1979, but few were as inspired as Melanie Mitchell. After reading the 777-page tome, Mitchell, a high school math teacher in New York, decided she "needed to be" in artificial intelligence. She soon tracked down the book's author, AI researcher Douglas Hofstadter, and talked him into giving her an… So
3h
The Infrastructure Bill Won't Cut It on Climate
Lately, I've struggled to fall asleep. For the past two weeks, I've watched unprecedented climate disasters strike day after day, and I've feared that people would die. On the last Monday in June, Seattle hit 108 degrees Fahrenheit—a new record, way above normal temperatures, usually in the low 70s. In Portland, Oregon, it was even hotter— 116 degrees —causing roads to buckle and streetcar cables
8h
The lurking threat to solar power's growth
A few lonely academics have been warning for years that solar power faces a fundamental challenge that could halt the industry's breakneck growth. Simply put: the more solar you add to the grid, the less valuable it becomes. The problem is that solar panels generate lots of electricity in the middle of sunny days, frequently more than what's required, driving down prices—sometimes even into negat
9h
We Could Have Changed the World
Gregory Halpern / Magnum At the onset of the coronavirus pandemic, it was practically impossible to find hand sanitizer and toilet paper at stores around the United States. The upheaval had a dystopian feel: Some stores even ran out of sympathy cards , a reminder that we were—and still are—living in the valley of the shadow of death. As Americans sheltered in place, rattled by the changes, many p
2h
The Tool That Joe Biden Refuses to Use
For all the passionate words President Joe Biden delivered in defense of voting rights in his speech yesterday, it was the one word he never mentioned that provoked the strongest response from civil-rights advocates: filibuster . Nowhere in his remarks did Biden utter what may go down as the political word of the year. The Senate procedure known as the filibuster now stands as the insuperable obs
3h
The next generation of information processing is through coherent gate operations
Many of us swing through gates every day—points of entry and exit to a space like a garden, park or subway. Electronics have gates too. These control the flow of information from one place to another by means of an electrical signal. Unlike a garden gate, these gates require control of their opening and closing many times faster than the blink of an eye.
3h
Human sickness detection is not dependent on cultural experience
The evolutionary ability to identify sick individuals is crucial to reducing contagion and thereby improving chances of survival. Although most animals have this ability, whether humans have the same behavioral immune system has long been a subject of discussion. Researchers at Karolinska Institutet have now proven that hunter-gatherer groups can, with great certainty, identify the sick from Weste
7h
Discovered: Energetic hot wind from low-luminosity active galactic nucleus
Supermassive black holes in the universe swallow gas around them. The infalling gas is called black hole accretion flow. In a study published in Nature Astronomy, the group led by Prof. YUAN Feng at Shanghai Astronomical Observatory (SHAO) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with the group led by Prof. LI Zhiyuan at Nanjing University, found direct evidence for the existence of an energet
6h
How does the world use emojis? Study finds universal expressions across countries and continents
Before Millennials were over laugh-cry emojis, they were the most used emojis across the world, according to researchers at USC. The emoji was more popular than smiley faces say researchers who categorized millions of tweets across 30 countries and evaluated over 1700 emojis. Their study, "An empirical study of emoji usage on Twitter in linguistic and national contexts" was published in Online Soc
11h
A scattering-type scanning nearfield optical microscope probes materials at the nanoscale
An MIT physicist has built a new instrument of interest to MIT researchers across a wide range of disciplines because it can quickly and relatively inexpensively determine a variety of important characteristics of a material at the nanoscale. It's capable of not only determining internal properties of a material, such as how that material's electrical or optical conductivity changes over exquisite
7h
Outburst of Cepheus X-4 pulsar inspected with AstroSat
Using the AstroSat spacecraft, Indian astronomers have observed the Cepheus X-4 X-ray pulsar during its outburst in 2018. Results of these observations provide important insights into the properties of this outburst and shed more light on the nature of the pulsar. The study was presented in a paper published July 8 on arXiv.org.
6h
Study evaluates biodiversity impacts of alternative energy strategies
Climate change mitigation efforts have led to shifts from fossil-fuel dependence to large-scale renewable energy. However, renewable energy sources require significant land and could come at a cost to ecosystems. A new study led by Ryan McManamay, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental science at Baylor University, evaluates potential conflicts between alternative energy strategies and biodiv
11h
First measurement of isotopes in atmosphere of exoplanet
An international team of astronomers have become the first in the world to detect isotopes in the atmosphere of an exoplanet. It concerns different forms of carbon in the gaseous giant planet TYC 8998-760-1 b at a distance of 300 light years in the constellation Musca. The weak signal was measured with ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile and seems to indicate that the planet is relatively rich in
4h
The Mystery at the Base of One of Biology's Strangest Relationship
For starters, you need to know that a fish tongue is not like a human tongue. Our tongues are flexible, muscular, and magnificently mobile; they help us speak , suck, swallow , whistle, lick, taste , and tease our friends. Fish tongues—properly called basihyals—don't do a lot of those things. They are, in their most basic form, just flat stubs of bone, perhaps topped with a scant pad of soft tiss
3h
New WHO study links moderate alcohol use with higher cancer risk
A new study from the World Health Organization's (WHO) International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), published in the journal Lancet Oncology, has found an association between alcohol and a substantially higher risk of several forms of cancer, including breast, colon, and oral cancers. Increased risk was evident even among light to moderate drinkers (up to two drinks a day), who represented
10h
Compound derived from turmeric essential oil has neuroprotective properties
Researchers have found that a component derived from turmeric essential oil, ar-turmerone, and its derivatives act directly on dopaminergic neurons to exert a neuroprotective effect on tissue cultures of a Parkinson's disease model. The effect appears to be due to the enhancement of cellular antioxidant potency through Nrf2 activation. The researchers believe that the ar-turmerone derivatives iden
2min
Tamarind shells converted into an energy source for vehicles
A team of scientists has found a way to process tamarind shells which are rich in carbon, converting the waste material into carbon nanosheets, which are a key component of supercapacitors – energy storage devices that are used in automobiles, buses, electric vehicles, trains, and elevators.
2min
Hard to swallow: Coral cells seen engulfing algae
Scientists have seen stony coral cells engulf dinoflagellates – single-celled, photosynthetic algae that are crucial for keeping coral alive. The researchers cultured endoderm-like cells from the stony coral, Acropora tenuis. Around 40% of coral cells incorporated the algae in around 30 minutes and remained healthy for one month. The research is a step towards understanding the partnership between
2min
Cash for Kids Comes to the United States
On a weekday evening in early July, Jim Lysen, a retired health-clinic director, and Ed Fallon, a grandfather and veteran, ignored the pouring summer rain as they knocked on the front door of a townhouse in an affordable-housing development on the banks of the Androscoggin River in Lewiston, Maine. "I am a volunteer with the Maine People's Alliance, and we're making sure people know about the chi
22min
The Real Reason Another Space Jam Movie Exists
Crucial to the upcoming family film Space Jam: A New Legacy is the premise that the historic Warner Bros. studios are built atop a supercomputer that algorithmically decides what movies should be made next. That detail is presented as a hilarious bit of sci-fi, but it also comes across as a guilty admission of the truth—that corporate cinema these days isn't so much written as it is generated by
22min
Why England's COVID 'freedom day' alarms researchers
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01938-4 Easing restrictions amid rising infections raises the risk of new variants emerging and risks the health of those are not vaccinated, say researchers around the world.
45min
Virtual schooling exposes digital challenges for Black families, study finds
A new study from the University of Missouri found the unanticipated transitions to virtual schooling due to COVID-19 exposed the lack of digital resources among Black families in the United States, including access to Wi-Fi and technological savviness. As two-thirds of the country's Black children are born into single-parent households, the findings help explain the extensive stress virtual school
49min
Role of subnuclear NSrp70 in immunity-studied at Gwangju Institute of Science & Technology
T cells are components of the body's immune system. The ability of T cells to recognize diverse pathogens and mount a defense against them stems from the way proteins are spliced during their development and maturation. Now, scientists from Korea highlight the importance of a protein called NSrp70, which was previously discovered in T cell subnuclear spaces, in regulating the maturation of these c
51min
Predicting the SARS-CoV-2 effective reproduction number using bulk contact data from mobile phones [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Over the last months, cases of SARS-CoV-2 surged repeatedly in many countries but could often be controlled with nonpharmaceutical interventions including social distancing. We analyzed deidentified Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking data from 1.15 to 1.4 million cell phones in Germany per day between March and November 2020 to identify…
1h
NMR identification of a conserved Drp1 cardiolipin-binding motif essential for stress-induced mitochondrial fission [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Mitochondria form tubular networks that undergo coordinated cycles of fission and fusion. Emerging evidence suggests that a direct yet unresolved interaction of the mechanoenzymatic GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) with mitochondrial outer membrane–localized cardiolipin (CL), externalized under stress conditions including mitophagy, catalyzes essential mitochondrial hyperfragmentation. Here
1h
Mapping partner drug resistance to guide antimalarial combination therapy policies in sub-Saharan Africa [Social Sciences]
Resistance to artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) threatens the global control of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. ACTs combine artemisinin-derived compounds with partner drugs to enable multiple mechanisms of clearance. Although ACTs remain widely effective in sub-Saharan Africa, long-standing circulation of parasite alleles associated with reduced partner drug susceptibility may contrib
1h
An unrecognized inertial force induced by flow curvature in microfluidics [Engineering]
Modern inertial microfluidics routinely employs oscillatory flows around localized solid features or microbubbles for controlled, specific manipulation of particles, droplets, and cells. It is shown that theories of inertial effects that have been state of the art for decades miss major contributions and strongly underestimate forces on small suspended objects…
1h
In vitro affinity maturation of broader and more-potent variants of the HIV-1-neutralizing antibody CAP256-VRC26.25 [Applied Biological Sciences]
Three variable 2 (V2) loops of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) trimer converge at the Env apex to form the epitope of an important classes of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs). These V2-glycan/apex antibodies are exceptionally potent but less broad (∼60 to 75%) than many other bNAbs. Their CDRH3 regions are…
1h
Alternative pathways for the development of lymphoid structures in humans [Cell Biology]
Lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells are critical for inducing the differentiation of most secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) in mice. In humans, JAK3 and γc deficiencies result in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCIDs) characterized by an absence of T cells, natural killer cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), and presumably LTi cells. Some…
1h
Correction for Zhou et al., Scaffold association factor B (SAFB) is required for expression of prenyltransferases and RAS membrane association [Corrections]
CELL BIOLOGY Correction for "Scaffold association factor B (SAFB) is required for expression of prenyltransferases and RAS membrane association," by Mo Zhou, Leena Kuruvilla, Xiarong Shi, Stephen Viviano, Ian M. Ahearn, Caroline R. Amendola, Wenjuan Su, Sana Badri, James Mahaffey, Nicole Fehrenbacher, Jane Skok, Joseph Schlessinger, Benjamin E. Turk, David…
1h
New study provides data on protections of ebola vaccines
Lab-based studies are critical to understanding ebola vaccine effectiveness due to the sporadic nature of outbreaks. This study identifies features of the antibody response responsible for survival from 139 immune- and vaccine-related parameters.* Findings will help develop vaccines that produce an antibody response profile which ensures protection and focuses on survival quality
1h
Even on Facebook, COVID-19 polarized members of US Congress
Facebook posts by members of the U.S. Congress reveal the depth of the partisan divide over the COVID-19 pandemic, new research shows.A study of all 12,031 Facebook posts concerning the pandemic by members of Congress between March and October 2020 showed that Democrats generally took a more negative or neutral tone on the issue, while Republicans were more likely to have a positive tone in their
1h
Low-dose radiotherapy combined with immunotherapy eradicates metastatic cancer in mice
More doesn't necessarily mean better – including in cancer treatment. University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and University of Wisconsin-Madison scientists report today in Science Translational Medicine that combining targeted radiopharmaceutical therapy with immunotherapy significantly boosts eradication of metastatic cancer in mice, even when the radiation is given in doses too low to destr
1h
This Stylish High-Tech Clothing Offers EMF Protection From Modern Electronics
Have you ever stopped to think about just how much radiation penetrates your body on a daily basis? If not, you probably should. After all, this is not 1995, when you had one computer with a hard-line Internet connection and a giant cell phone you only used for emergencies. Today we are literally surrounded by smart devices that generate electromagnetic radiation, from our phones, tablets, comput
1h
Origin of potassic postcollisional volcanic rocks in young, shallow, blueschist-rich lithosphere
Potassium-rich volcanism occurring throughout the Alpine-Himalayan belt from Spain to Tibet is characterized by unusually high Th/La ratios, for which several hypotheses have brought no convincing solution. Here, we combine geochemical datasets from potassic postcollisional volcanic rocks and lawsonite blueschists to explain the high Th/La. Source regions of the volcanic melts consist of imbricat
1h
The geographic disparity of historical greenhouse emissions and projected climate change
One challenge in climate change communication is that the causes and impacts of global warming are unrelated at local spatial scales. Using high-resolution datasets of historical anthropogenic greenhouse emissions and an ensemble of 21st century surface temperature projections, we developed a spatially explicit index of local climate disparity. This index identifies positive (low emissions, large
1h
Fully 3D-printed soft robots with integrated fluidic circuitry
The emergence of soft robots has presented new challenges associated with controlling the underlying fluidics of such systems. Here, we introduce a strategy for additively manufacturing unified soft robots comprising fully integrated fluidic circuitry in a single print run via PolyJet three-dimensional (3D) printing. We explore the efficacy of this approach for soft robots designed to leverage no
1h
In situ visualization of long-range defect interactions at the edge of melting
Connecting a bulk material's microscopic defects to its macroscopic properties is an age-old problem in materials science. Long-range interactions between dislocations (line defects) are known to play a key role in how materials deform or melt, but we lack the tools to connect these dynamics to the macroscopic properties. We introduce time-resolved dark-field x-ray microscopy to directly visualiz
1h
IgSF11 homophilic adhesion proteins promote layer-specific synaptic assembly of the cortical interneuron subtype
The most prominent structural hallmark of the mammalian neocortical circuitry is the layer-based organization of specific cell types and synaptic inputs. Accordingly, cortical inhibitory interneurons (INs), which shape local network activity, exhibit subtype-specific laminar specificity of synaptic outputs. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Imm
1h
Activity flow underlying abnormalities in brain activations and cognition in schizophrenia
Cognitive dysfunction is a core feature of many brain disorders, including schizophrenia (SZ), and has been linked to aberrant brain activations. However, it is unclear how these activation abnormalities emerge. We propose that aberrant flow of brain activity across functional connectivity (FC) pathways leads to altered activations that produce cognitive dysfunction in SZ. We tested this hypothes
1h
The interplay between matrix deformation and the coordination of turning events governs directed neutrophil migration in 3D matrices
Neutrophils migrating through extravascular spaces must negotiate narrow matrix pores without losing directional movement. We investigated how chemotaxing neutrophils probe matrices and adjust their migration to collagen concentration ([col]) changes by tracking 20,000 cell trajectories and quantifying cell-generated 3D matrix deformations. In low-[col] matrices, neutrophils exerted large deforma
1h
Cellular remains in a ~3.42-billion-year-old subseafloor hydrothermal environment
Subsurface habitats on Earth host an extensive extant biosphere and likely provided one of Earth's earliest microbial habitats. Although the site of life's emergence continues to be debated, evidence of early life provides insights into its early evolution and metabolic affinity. Here, we present the discovery of exceptionally well-preserved, ~3.42-billion-year-old putative filamentous microfossi
1h
Dynamical consequences of regional heterogeneity in the brains transcriptional landscape
Brain regions vary in their molecular and cellular composition, but how this heterogeneity shapes neuronal dynamics is unclear. Here, we investigate the dynamical consequences of regional heterogeneity using a biophysical model of whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) dynamics in humans. We show that models in which transcriptional variations in excitatory and inhibitory recepto
1h
Snake extract-laden hemostatic bioadhesive gel cross-linked by visible light
Bioadhesives reduce operation time and surgical complications. However, in the presence of blood, adhesion strength is often compromised. Inspired by the blood clotting activity of snake venom, we report a visible light–induced blood-resistant hemostatic adhesive (HAD) containing gelatin methacryloyl and reptilase, which is a hemocoagulase (HC) extracted from Bothrops atrox . HAD leads to the act
1h
The mechanism of gap creation by a multifunctional nuclease during base excision repair
During base excision repair, a transient single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) gap is produced at the apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Exonuclease III, capable of performing both AP endonuclease and exonuclease activity, are responsible for gap creation in bacteria. We used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to examine the mechanism of gap creation. We found an AP site anchor-based mech
1h
Meaningful messaging: Sentiment in elite social media communication with the public on the COVID-19 pandemic
Elite messaging plays a crucial role in shaping public debate and spreading information. We examine elite political communication during an emergent international crisis to investigate the role of tone in messaging, information spread, and public reaction. By measuring tone in social media messages from members of the U.S. Congress related to the COVID-19 pandemic, we find clear partisan differen
1h
{alpha}{beta}/{gamma}{delta} T cell lineage outcome is regulated by intrathymic cell localization and environmental signals
αβ and T cells are two distinct sublineages that develop in the vertebrate thymus. Thus far, their differentiation from a common progenitor is mostly understood to be regulated by intrinsic mechanisms. However, the proportion of αβ/ T cells varies in different vertebrate taxa. How this process is regulated in species that tend to produce a high frequency of T cells is unstudied. Using an in vivo
1h
The H3K36me2 writer-reader dependency in H3K27M-DIPG
Histone H3K27M is a driving mutation in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), a deadly pediatric brain tumor. H3K27M reshapes the epigenome through a global inhibition of PRC2 catalytic activity and displacement of H3K27me2/3, promoting oncogenesis of DIPG. As a consequence, a histone modification H3K36me2, antagonistic to H3K27me2/3, is aberrantly elevated. Here, we investigate the role of H3
1h
Printable elastomeric electrodes with sweat-enhanced conductivity for wearables
We rationally synthesized the thermoplastic and hydrophilic poly(urethane-acrylate) (HPUA) binder for a type of printable and stretchable Ag flakes–HPUA (Ag-HPUA) electrodes in which the conductivity can be enhanced by human sweat. In the presence of human sweat, the synergistic effect of Cl – and lactic acid enables the partial removal of insulating surfactant on silver flakes and facilitates si
1h
Systematic evaluation of the association between hemoglobin levels and metabolic profile implicates beneficial effects of hypoxia
Activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway reprograms energy metabolism. Hemoglobin (Hb) is the main carrier of oxygen. Using its normal variation as a surrogate measure for hypoxia, we explored whether lower Hb levels could lead to healthier metabolic profiles in mice and humans ( n = 7175) and used Mendelian randomization (MR) to evaluate potential causality ( n = 173,480). The re
1h
Teasing out the impact of Airbnb listings on neighborhood crime
A new study on the effects of Airbnb listings on Boston neighborhoods suggests that the prevalence of listings may hamper local social dynamics that prevent crime. However, tourists themselves do not appear to generate or attract higher levels of crime. Babak Heydari, Daniel T. O'Brien, and Laiyang Ke of Northeastern University in Boston, MA, U.S. present these findings in the open-access journal
1h
Dogs may not return their owners' good deeds
Domestic dogs show many adaptations to living closely with humans, but they do not seem to reciprocate food-giving according to a study, publishing July 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE, led by Jim McGetrick and colleagues at the University of Veterinary Medicine in Vienna, Austria.
1h
New study puts disparities of climate change on the map
New research, led by the Monterey Bay Aquarium, illustrates the disparity between the narrow origins and far-reaching impacts of greenhouse emissions responsible for disrupting the global climate system. Published in Science Advances today, the study was built upon the most comprehensive accounting of global emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. It reveals that the regions generating the mos
1h
Liquid metal sensors and AI could help prosthetic hands to 'feel'
Prosthetics currently lack the sensation of 'touch.' To enable a more natural feeling prosthetic hand interface, researchers are the first to incorporate stretchable tactile sensors using liquid metal and machine learning. This hierarchical multi-finger tactile sensation integration could provide a higher level of intelligence for artificial hands by improving control, providing haptic feedback an
1h
Business travel may boost obesity risks
Busy and stressful travel schedules may increase the risks of obesity, body fat percentage, and belly fat in business travelers, researchers report. These risks can can lead to other conditions such as heart disease and diabetes. The study in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine is the first evaluating the association of business travel with all three body composition measures o
1h
Hand and contact surface hygiene is still essential to keep Covid-19 at bay | Letter
Though it is primarily an airborne pathogen, we still need an integrated approach to hygiene, says Sally F Bloomfield While Covid-19 is primarily an airborne pathogen ( Hygiene theatre: how excessive cleaning gives us a false sense of security , 12 July), transmission via hands in combination with surfaces recently and frequently touched by other people remains a secondary but real danger, as the
2h
Smart technology (probably) isn't making you dumber
A new paper in Nature Human Behaviour states that technology is not making us dumber. The authors believe smart technology changes how we engage our biological cognitive abilities. While fears are likely overblown, technology addiction and memory problems still need to be addressed. It seems that every major scientific or technological advancement is immediately labeled "dangerous" by critics. Th
2h
Vietnam's Richest Person Aims To Challenge Tesla In North America, Europe
Vinfast—the automotive unit of billionaire Pham Nhat Vuong's VinGroup—is rolling out its latest electric vehicle models across showrooms in North America and Europe by March next year, challenging Tesla globally. The company said it has been recruiting senior executives from major car manufacturers such as Tesla, BMW, Porsche, Toyota, and Nissan in pursuit of its goal of becoming a global smart e
2h
Warming, deforestation turn Amazon into source of carbon dioxide
Climate change and deforestation have flipped a large swathe of the Amazon basin from absorbing to emitting planet-warming CO2, a transformation that could turn humanity's greatest natural ally in the fight against global warming into a foe, researchers reported on Wednesday.
2h
A new sensitive tool for the efficient quantification of plant disease susceptibility
While several biology techniques have undergone significant technical advances that have allowed their high-throughput implementation, assessing the resistance levels of plant varieties to microbial pathogens remains an arduous and time-consuming task. In response to this, Pujara and collaborators took advantage of the naturally occurring luminescence of a deep-sea shrimp to engineer a light-produ
2h
AI teaches a robot how to learn to walk
Artificial intelligence has done more than teach a robot to walk. It taught a robot to learn to walk, researchers report. The distinction is key. A major hurdle to deploying legged robots, whether with two, four, or even more legs, is figuring out how the robot will respond to changing conditions. Humans can adapt as they walk over rocks, mud, sand, slippery ice, and uneven surfaces. They adjust
2h
Male beetles' spiny genitalia both harmful and beneficial to females
Male seed beetles with genital structures that injure females may have greater reproductive success. As new research from Uppsala University shows, females that mate with such males benefit, in the sense that their offspring are healthier. This new piece of the puzzle will help scientists to understand how complex mating interactions between males and females have developedevolved. The study is pu
2h
Melanoma of the eye: Preclinical tests show path toward treatment
A preclinical study offers hope for treatment of uveal melanoma, a rare and deadly cancer of the eye. A small molecule inhibitor has been identified that dampens the potent drivers of this tumor. In mouse models, the inhibitor strongly limited primary disease in the eye and metastatic tumor dissemination to the liver, and animals survived longer, without overt side effects.
2h
Why Are Women and Men So Different in Autoimmune Disease?
That last post on vaccine reactions mentioned autotimmune disease several times, and that brings up a question that's been outstanding for many decades now. If you look at the distribution of most autoimmune syndromes in the population, you find many obvious differences between male and female incidence rates. Guillain-Barré (discussed yesterday) is less common in women (about 35/65 overall) part
2h
Genome studies do not always reveal useful information with larger sample sizes
What the fruit fly is to zoologists, the thale cress is to botanists. The widespread herb with the botanical name Arabidopsis thaliana serves them as a model organism from which knowledge can be gained for other plants. It is therefore extremely well researched—also genetically. For example, it is now known that the genetic material of Arabidopsis thaliana (its genome) comprises around 125 million
2h
Sweet spot for membrane thickness offers sustainable separations
Super-thin carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes may not be best for separating industrially important chemical mixtures. However, ensuring the CMS film thickness is just right could enable more energy-efficient purification of chemical products, KAUST researchers have shown.
2h
Scientists develop a new tool for measuring radio waves in fusion plasmas
Scientists seeking to bring to Earth the fusion energy that drives the sun and stars use radio frequency (RF) waves—the same waves that bring radio and television into homes—to heat and drive current in the plasma that fuels fusion reactions. Scientists now have developed a path-setting way to measure the waves that could be used to validate predictions of their impact, setting the stage for enhan
2h
Floating into summer with more buoyant, liquid-proof life jackets and swimsuits
Summertime is here, and that often means long, lazy days at the beach, water skiing and swimming. Life jackets and swimsuits are essential gear for these activities, but if not dried thoroughly, they can develop a gross, musty smell. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a one-step method to create a buoyant cotton fabric for these applications that is als
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Image: Antarctica welcomes the return of sunlight
A fortnight after the 21 June winter solstice in Antarctica, the crew at Concordia Research Station are slowly welcoming the return of sunlight. This photo was taken by ESA-sponsored medical doctor Nick Smith on 1 July at noon.
2h
Off-cycle elections result in less-representative local governments
Americans tend to be far more consumed with national politics than with local politics. As places like Utah, Arizona, Michigan and Maryland gear up to hold local elections this summer and fall, history predicts that they will see an average of 29-37% fewer voters than they would were their elections held "on cycle," in tandem with state and federal elections.
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New mechanism of superconductivity discovered in graphene
Superconductivity is a physical phenomenon where the electrical resistance of a material drops to zero under a certain critical temperature. Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory is a well-established explanation that describes superconductivity in most materials. It states that Cooper pairs of electrons are formed in the lattice under sufficiently low temperature and that BCS superconductivity a
2h
Mean tweets and Wall Street: How Twitter changes supply chain considerations
In 2017, Twitter was abuzz over the incident of United Express Flight 3411, where video footage showed a passenger being forcibly removed from an overbooked flight to Louisville International Airport. Later research would show that while a typical instance of overbooking would cause damages of around $1,000, the financial impact of the negative response—largely on social media—would cost United $8
2h
Pack rat nests offer first look at ancient insect DNA
For many years, scientists have been extracting DNA from the bones of ancient humans, humanoids and animals to paint a picture of evolution and species movement. Despite what's been portrayed in the movie "Jurassic Park"—in which dinosaurs are resurrected based on preserved ancient DNA (aDNA) – scientists have had little success extracting genetic material from the preserved remains of insects.
3h
Volcano research leads to better understanding of their deep structure
The deep structure of volcanoes has proven difficult for geoscientists to understand due to the inherent difficulty of seeing below the Earth's surface. To get a more holistic understanding of volcanoes and their subsurface structure, a team of researchers from multiple disciplines, including Jonathan Delph of Purdue University's Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, combined t
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Childhood lead exposure may affect personality later
Lead exposure in childhood may lead to less mature and less healthy personalities in adulthood, according to new research. The study sampled more than 1.5 million people in 269 US counties and 37 European nations. The findings showed that those who grew up in areas with higher levels of atmospheric lead had less adaptive personalities in adulthood—lower levels of conscientiousness and agreeablene
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How customers react to chatbots
More and more companies are using chatbots in customer services. Due to advances in artificial intelligence and natural language processing, chatbots are often indistinguishable from humans when it comes to communication. But should companies let their customers know that they are communicating with machines and not with humans? Researchers at the University of Göttingen investigated. Their resear
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How climate change and fires are shaping the forests of the future
Forest fires are already a global threat. "But considering how climate change is progressing, we are probably only at the beginning of a future that will see more and bigger forest fires," explains Rupert Seidl, Professor of Ecosystem Dynamics and Forest Management in Mountain Landscapes at TUM.
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Deep discounts: The nemesis of bargain hunters
Researchers at St. Edward's University have found that frugal individuals are more likely than their spendthrift counterparts to give in to the allure of deep discounts, whether it is Tax-free weekend, Amazon Prime Day, a Groupon Deal or some other offer.
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Searching for the Missing Great Whites of South Africa | Shark Week
Stream Great White Comeback on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/greatwhitecomeback About Great White Comeback: In 2017 one of the strangest ocean mysteries occurred in South Africa when an entire great white population disappeared overnight. Alison Towner and her team head out on an epic investigation to find the missing Great Whites of Seal Island. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.
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Integration of social care into health care: Our collective path ahead
Drs. Alicia Cohen and Emilia De Marchis provide commentary on three articles in this issue of Annals of Family Medicine, specifically Greenwood-Ericksen et al's research on Michigan's Federally Qualified Health Centers; Hoeft et al's special report about translating lessons learned from behavioral health integration into the social care realm; and Fessler et al's narrative about how they as medica
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Floating into summer with more buoyant, liquid-proof life jackets, swimsuits (video)
Summertime is here, and that often means long, lazy days at the beach, water skiing and swimming. Life jackets and swimsuits are essential gear for these activities, but if not dried thoroughly, they can develop a gross, musty smell. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces have developed a one-step method to create a buoyant cotton fabric for these applications that is als
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MD Anderson research highlights for July 14, 2021
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center's Research Highlights provides a glimpse into recently published studies in basic, translational and clinical cancer research from MD Anderson experts. Current advances include a promising combination therapy for acute myeloid leukemia, understanding mechanisms driving resistance to PARP inhibitors, a therapeutic neoantigen vaccine to treat lung ca
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Trust me, I'm a chatbot
More and more companies are using chatbots in customer services. Due to advances in artificial intelligence and natural language processing, chatbots are often indistinguishable from humans when it comes to communication. But should companies tell customers they are communicating with machines and not with humans? Researchers at the Göttingen University investigated. Their research found that cons
3h
A Cache of Ancient Bitcoin, Possibly Mined by Satoshi, Just Awakened
Satoshi on the Move? Over $21 million worth of Bitcoin were just moved out of a dormant wallet — which, intriguingly, was opened shortly after the pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto created the cryptocurrency over a decade ago. Blockchain trackers at Whale Alert noticed the dormant address coming alive again . The mysterious Bitcoin wallet spent some time mining crypto back in 2011 and 2012, but has b
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Solar radio signals could be used to monitor melting ice sheets
The sun provides a daunting source of electromagnetic disarray—chaotic, random energy emitted by the massive ball of gas arrives to Earth in a wide spectrum of radio frequencies. But in that randomness, Stanford researchers have discovered the makings of a powerful tool for monitoring ice and polar changes on Earth and across the solar system.
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Approaching the Heisenberg limit
A football is not a quantum particle. There are crucial differences between the things we know from everyday life and tiny quantum objects. Quantum phenomena are usually very fragile. To study them, one normally uses only a small number of particles, well shielded from the environment, at the lowest possible temperatures.
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How idea sharing increases online-learner engagement
Sharing ideas in an online learning environment has a distinct advantage over sharing personal details in driving learner engagement in massive open online courses, more commonly known as MOOCs, says new research co-written by a University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign expert who studies the intersection of marketing and digital environments.
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A framework for businesses using avatars
An associate professor of marketing at The University of Texas at Arlington says digital avatars can replace a sales force and customer service employees at a fraction of the cost.
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Improving lab constraint on exotic spin interaction
Prof. Du Jiangfeng, Prof. Rong Xing, and their colleagues from the Key Laboratory of Micromagnetic Resonance, University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have set the most stringent laboratory constraint on the exotic spin- and velocity-dependent interaction at the micrometer scale. This study was published in Physical Review Letters.
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Examining mRNA transcription difficulties
The corona pandemic has ensured that the term "mRNA" is now also known to a large public beyond laboratories and lecture halls. However, the molecule is much more than an important component of a successful vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. "mRNAs are a central component of all living things on our planet. Without them life as we know it would not function," says Elmar Wolf.
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Improving deep optical microscope imaging of biological tissues
A team of researchers affiliated with UNIST has succeeded in developing a new optical microscope technology, capable of deeper imaging beyond the biological tissues. This breakthrough has been led by Professor Jung-Hoon Park and his research team in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at UNIST.
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Virtual care: Choosing the right tool, at the right time
Kumara Raja Sundar, MD, a family physician at Kaiser Permanente of Washington, uses two media synchronicity theory principles – conveyance and convergence – as a framework for choosing the right medium of care for his patients. In this essay, Sundar discusses how operating within this framework changed his own practice and decision making during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly with the use of
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DNA from 1,600-year-old Iranian sheep mummy brings history to life
A team of geneticists and archaeologists has sequenced the DNA from a 1,600-year-old sheep mummy from an ancient Iranian salt mine, Chehrabad. This remarkable specimen has revealed sheep husbandry practices of the ancient Near East, as well as underlining how natural mummification can affect DNA degradation.
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Business use of avatars
An associate professor of marketing says digital avatars can replace a sales force and customer service employees at a fraction of the cost.
3h
New study links moderate alcohol use with higher cancer risk
A new study has found an association between alcohol and a substantially higher risk of several forms of cancer, including breast, colon, and oral cancers. Increased risk was evident even among light to moderate drinkers (up to two drinks a day), who represented 1 in 7 of all new cancers in 2020 and more than 100,000 cases worldwide.
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Short chain fatty acids: An 'ace in the hole' against SARS-CoV-2 infection
SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic, is highly transmissible, with nasal passages being the target of original infection. The nasal passage also shows the highest expression of ACE2, a protein that has been widely linked with increased susceptibility to COVID-19. Now, scientists from Japan have found that nasal inflammation can influence susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2. They a
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Putting a strain on semiconductors for next-gen chips
Skoltech researchers and their colleagues from the U.S. and Singapore have created a neural network that can help tweak semiconductor crystals in a controlled fashion to achieve superior properties for electronics. This enables a new direction of development of next-generation chips and solar cells by exploiting a controllable deformation that may change the properties of a material on the fly.
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Experts advocate for 'employment first, employment for all' for workers with disabilities
The Journal of Vocational Rehabilitation (JVR) announces publication of an openly available special issue that provides free access to key presentations from the 2020 Virtual Conference of the Association of People Supporting Employment First (APSE). These contributions advocate for and help facilitate the full inclusion of people with disabilities in the workplace and community.
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Marines Are Testing Tiny Drones That Carry Explosive Grenades
Special Delivery As prominent militaries around the world try to develop sophisticated killer robots , the US Marines are taking a simpler yet still brutal approach: sticking a grenade onto a tiny drone and steering it to blow up their enemies. The device, named a "Drone 40" modular quadcopter in reference to the 40mm grenade launcher, provides soldiers with a way to lob explosives to targets tha
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In Atlantic City, rising seas threaten an already struggling industry
By Joe Martucci , Press of Atlantic City and Victoria Bouloubasis , Climate Central A sign marks the height of the flooding inside Atlantic City's Vagabond Kitchen + Tap House during 2012's Superstorm Sandy. Vagabon and many restaurants on the Atlantic City coastline are facing increasing flooding risks. Edward Lea, Staff Photographer ATLANTIC CITY — Whether it's a nor'easter, tropical system or
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The Atlantic Daily: This Year's Eclectic Emmy Nominations
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The chaotic year many Americans spent on the couch is culminating in an equally chaotic list of Emmy nominees. "The pandemic," our Culture writer Shirley Li told me, "blurred the lines for everyth
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Medication or exercise? What works best for seniors with mild to moderate depression?
Depression is the most frequently diagnosed psychiatric disorder among older adults, with 8% to 16% of older patients presenting with clinically significant depressive symptoms. Researchers in Spain conducted a randomized clinical trial of 347 older adults with mild to moderate depression, comparing the effectiveness of physical exercise and antidepressants as treatment methods.
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When corals meet algae: First stages of symbiosis seen for the first time
The physical interactions between coral and algal cells as they join together in symbiosis have been observed for the first time. Within minutes of being introduced, the coral cells had started to engulf the algae, either digesting them or protecting them within a 'bubble' inside the cell. This new study will form the basis of further research that will expand our understanding of their symbiotic
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Symptoms of depression, anxiety among women experiencing homelessness/unstable housing during pandemic
What The Study Did: About half the women experiencing homelessness and unstable housing who were surveyed experienced symptoms of depression or anxiety or both during the pandemic and, in addition to unmet subsistence needs and social isolation, these symptoms were associated with increased challenges accessing non-COVID-19 care and managing symptoms for chronic medical conditions.
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Newfound human brain cell type helps center people in mental maps
A previously unknown kind of human brain cell appears to help people center themselves in their personal maps of the world, according to a new study from neuroscientists at Columbia Engineering. This discovery shed light on the cellular mechanisms underlying navigation and memory in humans, as well as what parts of the brain might get disrupted during the kinds of memory impairments common in neur
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Researchers identify signaling molecule that may help prevent Alzheimer's disease
The main driver of Alzheimer's disease is excessive inflammation in the brain that is triggered by cells called astrocytes and microglia in response to high levels of amyloid beta deposits and tau tangles. New research reveals that a subset of astrocytes releases a molecule called interleukin-3 that instructs microglia to adopt a protective response and clear away amyloid beta deposits and tau tan
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Fungi that live in the gut influence health and disease
Bacteria's role in gut health has received attention in recent years. But new research publishing in Nature shows that fungi–another microorganism that lives within us–may be equally important in health and disease. Fungi thrive in the healthy gut, but when interactions with the immune system are off-balance, they cause intestinal damage that may contribute to gastrointestinal disease. Additiona
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How evolution shifts from unicellular to multicellular life
A new study examined the evolution of a unicellular algae species over 500 generations, roughly six months. The researchers subjected one of the two algae groups to a predator. The results showed that the algae exposed to a predator were far more likely to acquire adaptations toward multicellularity. The transition from unicellular to multicellular life was one of the most momentous events in the
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How deadly heat waves expose historic racism
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01948-2 Why heat waves disproportionately impact minorities in US cities, and the researcher that critiqued his whole career on Twitter.
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The 13CO-rich atmosphere of a young accreting super-Jupiter
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03616-x Observations of 13CO in the atmosphere of a young, accreting super-Jupiter indicate a 13C-rich atmosphere, which is attributed to the accretion of carbon from ices enriched in 13C through fractionation.
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Adaptive immunity induces mutualism between commensal eukaryotes
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03722-w Studies of mouse and human IgA responses against Candida albicans and other common fungal species show that host adaptive immunity selects for fungal effectors that promote commensalism and prevent intestinal disease.
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Acetate differentially regulates IgA reactivity to commensal bacteria
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03727-5 Acetate—a major gut microbial metabolite—increases the production of IgA in the colon, alters the capacity of the IgA pool to bind to specific microorganisms and alters the localization of these bacteria within the colon.
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Designing the next generation of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03482-7 This Perspective reviews the recent technical developments in the components of the fuel cell stack in proton-exchange membrane fuel cell vehicles and outlines the road towards large-scale commercialization of such vehicles.
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Amazonia as a carbon source linked to deforestation and climate change
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03629-6 Aircraft observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and monoxide concentrations in Brazil show higher carbon emissions in eastern Amazonia than in the western part, which are linked to increased ecosystem stress and fire occurrence.
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Food cue regulation of AGRP hunger neurons guides learning
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03729-3 In response to food cues, a hypothalamic circuit in the mouse brain transiently inhibits neurons expressing agouti-related peptide, and this promotes learning of cue-initiated food-seeking tasks.
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Deciphering metabolism, one microbe at a time
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01774-6 Small molecules produced and modified by gut microorganisms can influence human physiology. An atlas of metabolic outputs of diverse gut microbes offers new ways to decipher the microbial mechanisms behind their production.
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Southeast Amazonia is no longer a carbon sink
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01871-6 Atmospheric measurements show that deforestation and rapid local warming have reduced or eliminated the capacity of the eastern Amazonian forest to absorb carbon dioxide — with worrying implications for future global warming.
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The missing 96 percent of the universe | Claire Malone
We've misplaced the building blocks of the cosmos — and particle physicists like Claire Malone are on a mission to find them. Despite scientists hitting a "major snag" in uncovering what exactly makes up dark matter and dark energy, she explains how questioning our fundamental understanding of nature itself invites a different, more meaningful perspective universally.
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Hydrogel composite developed to help protective gear rapidly degrade toxic nerve agents
Scientists at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois have developed a hydrogel integrated with zirconium-based robust metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that rapidly degrades organophosphate-based nerve agents used in chemical warfare. Unlike existing powdered MOF adsorbents, this hydrogel composite does not require added water and may be easily scaled up for use in protective masks or clothin
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Swarm of autonomous tiny drones can localize gas leaks
When there is a gas leak in a large building or at an industrial site, human firefighters currently need to go in with gas sensing instruments. Finding the gas leak may take considerable time, while they are risking their lives. Researchers from TU Delft (the Netherlands), University of Barcelona, and Harvard University have now developed the first swarm of tiny – and hence very safe – drones that
5h
Lean and mean: Building a multifunctional pressure sensor with 3D printing technology
Pressure sensors are important tools for accurate sensing of applied forces. However, they can mostly sense forces along only a single direction. In a new study, scientists from South Korea take things to the next level with a multi-directional pressure sensor fabricated using 3D-printed conductive polymer composites and paired with a temperature sensor for resistance calibration. The low cost of
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At This Automated Pizzeria, Robots Do It All: Assemble, Bake, Slice, and Serve
Four years ago in Mountain View, California, a team of robots was cranking out pizzas on a production line that was almost fully automated. The first robot pressed a ball of dough into a flat circle, a second squirted tomato sauce onto it, and a third spread the sauce over the whole crust. Then a human stepped in to add the toppings, but a fourth robot put the pizzas in the oven and a fifth slice
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UTA researcher publishes study showing economic impacts of combating sea-level rise
Sea-level rise threatens to produce more frequent and severe flooding in coastal regions and is expected to cause trillions of dollars in damages globally if no action is taken to mitigate the issue. However, communities trying to fight sea-level rise could inadvertently make flooding worse for their neighbors, according to a new study from researchers at UT Arlington and the Stanford Natural Capi
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Why your puppy 'gets you' but a wolf pup won't
New research comparing dog puppies to human-reared wolf pups offers some clues to how dogs got so good at reading people. You know your dog gets your gist when you point and say "go find the ball" and he scampers right to it. This knack for understanding human gestures may seem unremarkable, but it's a complex cognitive ability that is rare in the animal kingdom. Our closest relatives, the chimpa
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How to make biomedical research data able to interact?
Interoperability describes the ability of different systems to communicate. With the SPHN, scientists (UNIGE/HUG/SIB/CHUV) have developed the strategy for a national infrastructure adopted by Swiss university hospitals and academic institutions. With its pragmatic approach, this strategy is based on the development of a common semantic framework that does not aim to replace existing standards, but
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Putting a load on: Load stimulates bone formation via expression of osteocrin
Researchers from the National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Research Institute have found that physical load stimulates expression of the peptide osteocrin (OSTN) to make bone. They found that OSTN expression was high in bones such as the tibia, radius, and ulna, and was increased via stimulation by load and decreased when load was reduced. These results will be useful for promoting bone main
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Autoimmune disease
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01833-y When the body becomes the target of its own defensive arsenal, medicine must step in.
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Alopecia areata: why the battle isn't over
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01838-7 Molecular geneticist Angela Christiano explains why one treatment is not enough for this neglected autoimmune disease that causes hair loss.
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Research round-up: autoimmune disease
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01834-x Links between COVID-19 and autoimmunity, a better model of coeliac disease, and other highlights from clinical trials and laboratory studies.
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Cracking the genetic code of autoimmune disease
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01839-6 Genomic analysis is helping reserachers to understand the causes of autoimmunity, but it will not be easy to translate this into treatments.
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Cities must protect people from extreme heat
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01903-1 The North American heatwave highlights the need for urban planners to target extreme heat when designing climate-adaptation strategies.
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How stem cells could fix type 1 diabetes
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01842-x Trials to replace the pancreatic β cells that are destroyed by this autoimmune disease are raising hopes of a cure.
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Froghoppers able to suck with enough force to draw up liquid in a vertical straw 100m long
A trio of researchers at the University of British Columbia has found that froghoppers are capable of sucking with enough force to draw up liquid in a vertical straw 100 meters long. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Elisabeth Bergman, Emma Green and Philip Matthews, describe their study of the unique insects and what they learned about their ability to generate extre
6h
New spray could someday help heal damage after a heart attack
Heart attack, or myocardial infarction, is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Although modern surgical techniques, diagnostics and medications have greatly improved early survival from these events, many patients struggle with the long-term effects of permanently damaged tissue, and the 5-year mortality rate remains high. Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a minimally
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Ariane 6 targets new missions with Astris kick stage
ESA will enhance the versatility of Europe's Ariane 6 rocket with a kick stage called Astris in a €90 m development contract with prime contractor, ArianeGroup. This is part of ESA's strategy to extend Ariane 6's capabilities to serve a wider range of space transportation requirements.
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Science historian discusses U.S. government report on UFOs
Tucked in the $2.3 trillion COVID-19 relief package that passed in December was a stipulation initially overlooked by many. As part of the Intelligence Authorization Act, the government was required to publicly release the findings of its investigations of unidentified aerial phenomena (UAP), commonly referred to as unidentified flying objects (UFOs).
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Digital learning vs real-world learning: Blended on-campus and online study is best
Social distancing and lockdowns have disrupted university study for the past 18 months. Students are understandably stressed as shown by a dramatic drop in student satisfaction across Australia reported in the annual Student Experience Survey. Federal Education Minister Alan Tudge has drawn attention to this in calling for a "return" to on-campus study.
6h
Every 27 minutes, there's an X-ray aurora on Jupiter. Here's why.
For 50 years, astronomers have known that Jupiter has frequent auroral displays, but not why. The bursts are a combination of visible and invisible light. The presence of NASA's Juno spacecraft around Jupiter allowed scientists to solve the mystery. Here on Earth, an aurora borealis is a wondrous natural event that too few of us ever get a chance to see. Their occurrence remains unpredictable eno
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Keep Your Data Safe and Protect Your Online Privacy with CyberGhost VPN
Internet security (or lack thereof) is constantly making headlines. However, cybercrime is not just a sensational news topic – it's a very real problem. In fact, this criminal industry is estimated to be worth a staggering $4.2 billion. The most common scams are phishing and ransomware , and the aftermath of such crimes can be disastrous, ranging from theft of personal information to emptying ban
6h
Pesticide-free clothing prevents 100% of mosquito bites
New insecticide-free, mosquito-resistant clothing is made from materials researchers have confirmed to be bite-proof in experiments with live mosquitoes. The researchers developed the materials using a computational model of their own design, which describes the biting behavior of Aedes aegypti , the mosquito that carries viruses that cause human diseases like Zika, Dengue fever, and yellow fever
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Some Alpine plants have north–south genetic structure along elevational gap between 30°N and 31°N
Acanthocalyx is a small herbaceous genus in the Caprifoliaceae that is endemic to the high-altitude regions in the Himalaya–Hengduan Mountain (HHM) region. It is considered as an ideal group to study how geomorphological features of the HHM region affect the pattern of distribution and genetic differentiation of alpine plants, especially the influence of the north–south floristic boundary in the H
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High performance polarization sensitive photodetectors on 2D semiconductor
Polarization-sensitive photodetectors (PSPDs) have significant applications in both military and civil areas. However, the current commercial PSPDs require the aid of optical devices such as polarizers and phase retarders to pick up the polarization information of light. It is still an arduous task for realizing filter-free PSPDs. Scientists from China and South Korea prepare the stable layered β-
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You Can Now Pre-Order a $17,500 3D Holographic Monitor, Not That You Should
The screens you look at all day are probably good old 2D panels. TVs and phones had a brief flirtation with 3D some years back, but the benefits were outweighed by the cost and other drawbacks. 3D still exists in certain niches, though. A company called Looking Glass Factory has just unveiled its second-generation holographic displays . They aren't cheap, but the technology is mature enough that
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Climate change could increase costs of reproduction in plants, study finds
A new study from the University of Georgia sheds light on how plants respond to stressful environmental conditions presented by climate change. In a paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, researchers showed that plants grown in drier conditions simulating the effects of climate change exhibited higher costs of reproduction than those grown under current conditions. The findings off
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Higher-order topological superconductivity in monolayer iron-based superconductor
In particle physics, a Majorana fermion is charge neutral and its antiparticle is just itself. In condensed matter physics, a Majorana zero mode (MZM) is a quasi-particle excitation that appears in the surfaces or edges of topological superconductors. Unlike the ordinary particles or quasi-particles that obey boson or fermion statistics, MZM obeys non-abelian statistics, a key property that makes
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Targeted ads isolate and divide us even when they're not political – new research
Five years since the Brexit vote and three since the Cambridge Analytica scandal, we're now familiar with the role that targeted political advertising can play in fomenting polarization. It was revealed in 2018 that Cambridge Analytica had used data harvested from 87 million Facebook profiles, without users' consent, to help Donald Trump's 2016 election campaign target key voters with online adver
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Get The Right Photo Every Time With This Selfie Drone
Drones are increasingly part of everyday life, to the point where they're becoming personal transportation . And as the tech gets smaller, faster, and more effective, new uses are coming to the fore. A great example is the AIR PIX , a personal photography drone that fits in your pocket and lets you ditch the selfie stick and tripod while getting great snaps. To start with, it packs a great camera
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Dr.David Sinclair working on a new metric for determining the true age of a person
Lately I've been reading Dr.Sinclair's book : Lifespan and the research work on epigenomics is really fascinating I do suggest people to look into it.His group mainly focuses on ageing and how its mechanism works.He recently put out a newsletter which I think is a new method to truly find a person's age. Probably some exciting news from his genomics company that is going to be revealed.I've put a
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Boosting photoelectrochemical efficiency by near-infrared-active lattice-matched morphological heterojunctions
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24569-9 The solar conversion efficiencies of photoelectrochemical catalysis are hindered by the light harvesting range. Here, the authors use near-infrared-active photoanodes that feature lattice-matched morphological hetero-nanostructures to realize efficient photoelectrochemical hydrogen production.
10h
Tumor-killing nanoreactors fueled by tumor debris can enhance radiofrequency ablation therapy and boost antitumor immune responses
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24604-9 Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive tumor ablation method, however incomplete ablation and the induction of an immunosuppressive microenvironment limit its efficacy in the clinic. Here the authors design a pH-responsive lipoxidase-loaded nanoreactor, that by triggering ferroptosis and anti-tumo
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Coordination of biradial-to-radial symmetry and tissue polarity by HD-ZIP II proteins
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24550-6 The apical style in Arabidopsis is formed following a bilateral-to-radial symmetry transition in the gynoecium. Here the authors show that the final step in style radialization is coordinated by the adaxial regulators HAT3 and ATHB4, which are induced by the SPT and HEC transcription factors.
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NiFeOx decorated Ge-hematite/perovskite for an efficient water splitting system
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24428-7 Germanium (Ge) has potential as a dopant suitable for the hematite-based photoelectrochemical water splitting system. Here, the authors report the fabrication of Ge doped porous hematite and demonstrate an efficient tandem system of Ge doped porous hematite and the perovskite solar cell.
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Ultrafast olivine-ringwoodite transformation during shock compression
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24633-4 Meteorites from space often include denser polymorphs of their minerals, providing records of past hypervelocity collisions. An olivine mineral crystal was shock-compressed by a high-power laser, and its transformation into denser ringwoodite was time-resolved using an X-ray free electron laser.
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Extensive standing genetic variation from a small number of founders enables rapid adaptation in Daphnia
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24581-z Standing genetic variation allows natural populations to evolve rapidly. Genome sequences of a resurrected Daphnia population show that genetic variation carried by only five founding individuals from the regional genotype pool is enough to fuel rapid evolution in response to strong selection pressures with no e
10h
High-yield parallel fabrication of quantum-dot monolayer single-electron devices displaying Coulomb staircase, contacted by graphene
Nature Communications, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24233-2 The integration of nano-molecules into microelectronic circuitry is challenging. Here, the authors provide a scalable method for contacting a self-assembled monolayer of nanoparticles with a single layer of graphene that produces single-electron effects, in the form of a Coulomb staircase, with a yield of at lea
10h
Court Affirms Health Workers' Rights to Speak up on Safety
Media policies barring health care workers from publicly speaking or posting about safety issues have been a bitter source of conflict over the past year as workers have been fired for calling out inadequate Covid-19 safety precautions. But in May, a federal court affirmed that such policies are illegal.
10h
Embrace and celebrate diverse names in science
Nature, Published online: 14 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01831-0 Learning to pronounce others' names doesn't have to be awkward, as long as it comes from a place of mutual respect, says Ilinca Ioana Ciubotariu.
10h
Like priming a pump, cells damaged by chronic lung disease can result in severe COVID
The results of a study by an international scientific team co-led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), an affiliate of City of Hope, suggest that — like pouring water atop a wellhead before pumping — the airway cells of patients with chronic lung diseases are "primed" for infection by the COVID-19 virus, resulting in more severe symptoms, poorer outcomes and a greater likelih
10h
Student, Meet Bus
What led to retraction of the Sensei RNA paper by Arati Ramesh in Bangalore: the "factually inaccurate, anonymous, and unverified" version, which "quite frankly, can be termed slander". And a guest post by "Paul Jones" at the end!
14h
How does the world use emojis?
Before Millennials were over laugh-cry emojis, they were the most used emojis across the world, according to researchers at USC. The emoji was more popular than smiley faces say researchers who categorized millions of tweets across 30 countries and evaluated over 1700 emojis. Their study, "An empirical study of emoji usage on Twitter in linguistic and national contexts" was published in Online Soc
15h
NucMM Dataset: 3D Neuronal Nuclei Instance Segmentation at Sub-Cubic Millimeter Scale
Segmenting 3D cell nuclei from microscopy image volumes is critical for biological and clinical analysis, enabling the study of cellular expression patterns and cell lineages. However, current datasets for neuronal nuclei usually contain volumes smaller than $10^{\text{-}3}\ mm^3$ with fewer than 500 instances per volume, unable to reveal the complexity in large brain regions and restrict the inve
17h
Gay and bi women are more likely to smoke menthols
Bisexual and lesbian/gay female smokers are particularly likely to go for menthol cigarettes, research finds. Compared with heterosexual smokers, menthol cigarette smoking is higher among lesbian, gay, and bisexual cigarette smokers, according to the study. The research, which appears in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research , examines national data from 2015 to 2019 of individuals ages 18 year
17h
Add A Second Screen To Any Laptop Without Sacrificing Portability
Laptops need more screen real estate, and while seven screens may be slightly overdoing it for some of us , a second screen provides all the extra real estate most of us need. Yet they can also be frustrating to use, especially if you're packing up and taking your laptop multiple places in a day. The Ofiyaa gives you all the productivity of a second screen, while keeping your laptop portable. If
17h
Shape-memory alloys could cut airplane landing noise
Researchers have conducted a computational study that validates using a shape-memory alloy to reduce the unpleasant airplane noise produced during landing. They note that these materials could be inserted as passive, seamless fillers within airplane wings that automatically deploy themselves into the perfect position during descent. "When landing, aircraft engines are throttled way back, and so t
19h
Supercomputer predicts cell-membrane permeability of cyclic peptides
Scientists have developed a computational method based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to predict the cell-membrane permeability of cyclic peptides using a supercomputer. Their protocol has exhibited promising accuracy and may become a useful tool for the design and discovery of cyclic peptide drugs, which could help us reach new therapeutic targets inside cells beyond the capabiliti
20h
Lizards Took 'This Is Fine' Way Too Literally
On the scruffy shrublands of the Iberian Peninsula, where the summers are parched and sweltering, it doesn't take much for a spark to catch. The wildfires burn hot and fast, stripping the soil of its characteristic brush like a close shave. What's left behind is withered and black, and the air stays stifling for weeks. It's all a bit bleak, but the Algerian sand racer, a burrowing, long-tailed li
20h
"The Shark Is Biting My Cage!" | Shark Week
Stream Jaws Awakens: Phred vs Slash on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/jawsawakens About Jaws Awakens: Phred vs Slash: Rumor has it that two of the largest sharks in existence have been recently roaming New Zealand waters, but nobody knows which one is the largest. Brandon McMillan and Dickie Chivell are heading out to see which one takes the cake — Phred or Slash? Subscribe to Disc
21h
Global study reveals effectiveness of protected forests
Scientists have published a global study on the effectiveness of protected areas in preventing deforestation. The study explored the success of country-level protected areas at reducing forest loss, and used machine learning to uncover some of the factors that contribute to differences in effectiveness.
21h
Reducing data-transfer error in radiation therapy
As the complexity of radiation therapy has grown, so too has the amount of data that goes into treatment machines. With more data comes more opportunity for errors in data transfer. A medical physics researcher is working to make those errors less likely.
22h
Baylor study evaluates biodiversity impacts of alternative energy strategies
Climate change mitigation efforts have led to shifts from fossil-fuel dependence to large-scale renewable energy. However, renewable energy sources require significant land and could come at a cost to ecosystems. A new study led by Ryan McManamay, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental science at Baylor University, evaluates potential conflicts between alternative energy strategies and biodiv
22h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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