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Long Covid has more than 200 symptoms, study finds
Calls for national screening programme as symptoms revealed range from brain fog to tinnitus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The largest ever international study of people with long Covid has identified more than 200 symptoms and prompted researchers to call for a national screening programme. The study found the myriad symptoms of long Covid – from brain fog and hal
11h
Optical levitation of glass nanosphere enables quantum control
Researchers at ETH Zurich have trapped a tiny sphere measuring a hundred nanometres using laser light and slowed down its motion to the lowest quantum mechanical state. This technique could help researchers to study quantum effects in macroscopic objects and build extremely sensitive sensors.
8h

LATEST

Derbyshire cave house identified as ninth-century home to exiled king
Anchor Church cave is thought to be one of the oldest intact domestic interiors found in the UK A cave house previously thought to be an 18th-century folly has been identified as one of the oldest intact domestic interiors ever found in the UK and was once, archaeologists tantalisingly believe, the home of an exiled Anglo-Saxon king. In the 18th century, Anchor Church cave in south Derbyshire was
21h
Paralyzed man's brain waves turned into sentences on computer in medical first
Study marks important step toward restoring more natural communication for people who can't talk In a medical first, researchers harnessed the brain waves of a paralyzed man unable to speak and turned what he intended to say into sentences on a computer screen. It will take years of additional research but the study, reported Wednesday, marks an important step toward one day restoring more natura
7h
Hollow nano-objects made of DNA could trap viruses and render them harmless
To date, there are no effective antidotes against most viral infections. An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new approach: they engulf and neutralize viruses with nano-capsules tailored from genetic material using the DNA origami method. The strategy has already been tested against hepatitis and adeno-associated viruses in cell culture
6h
Thinking without a brain: Studies in brainless slime molds reveal that they use physical cues to decide where to grow
If you didn't have a brain, could you still figure out where you were and navigate your surroundings? Thanks to new research on slime molds, the answer may be "yes." Scientists from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and the Allen Discovery Center at Tufts University have discovered that a brainless slime mold called Physarum polycephalum uses its body to sense mechanical cues in its surroun
10h
The Creator of Dogecoin Says He Now Believes That All Cryptocurrency Is Horrible
In a scathing — and eye-opening — Twitter thread , the co-creator of popular altcoin Dogecoin, Jackson Palmer, eviscerated the technology and community behind cryptocurrencies in general. It was a blistering takedown. "After years of studying it," Palmer wrote, "I believe that cryptocurrency is an inherently right-wing, hyper-capitalistic technology built primarily to amplify the wealth of its pr
23h
NASA Says It's Figured Out What's Wrong With the Hubble
Isolating the Problem After more than a month of troubleshooting, NASA engineers say they've finally isolated the cause of a computer glitch that forced the Hubble Space Telescope to put its scientific operations on pause. A problem with the telescope's payload computer forced engineers to suspend all operations on June 13. For the next several weeks, engineers tirelessly tried to isolate the iss
1d
The Amazon Rainforest Is Starting to Emit More Carbon Than It Absorbs
Tipping Point Regions of the Amazon rainforest are now releasing more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere than they can absorb. That, experts are warning, could mean that we're nearing a "tipping point" at which the planet's largest region of tropical forests will start to contribute to — rather than save us from — climate change. According to a new study published in the journal Nature , changing
3h
NASA Mars Rover Found Bedrock That Looks Like Flagstones
Rock Bottom After officially kicking off its scientific mission of searching for signs of ancient life on Red Planet last month, NASA's Perseverance Mars Rover has made its next big discovery: a patch of rock that's "probably exposed bedrock" and which the team compared to "garden pavers," which are landscaping rocks similar to flagstones. Perseverance has been cruising through the Jezero Crater,
4h
How Many Numbers Exist? Infinity Proof Moves Math Closer to an Answer.
In October 2018, David Asperó was on holiday in Italy, gazing out a car window as his girlfriend drove them to their bed-and-breakfast, when it came to him: the missing step of what's now a landmark new proof about the sizes of infinity. "It was this flash experience," he said. Asperó, a mathematician at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom, contacted the collaborator with whom he'
5h
The Truth Behind the Amazon Mystery Seeds
Photographs by Ilona Szwarc S id Miller, the Texas agriculture commissioner, sat atop his stallion Smokey and faced the camera. It was Saturday, August 1, 2020. Miller had a message to share. "Good morning, patriots," Miller began , raising the coiled lasso in his right hand by way of greeting. "I don't know about you, but I'm getting tired of all these surprises coming out of China. First it was
9h
Huge study supporting ivermectin as Covid treatment withdrawn over ethical concerns
The preprint endorsing ivermectin as a coronavirus therapy has been widely cited, but independent researchers find glaring discrepancies in the data The efficacy of a drug being promoted by rightwing figures worldwide for treating Covid-19 is in serious doubt after a major study suggesting the treatment is effective against the virus was withdrawn due to "ethical concerns". The preprint study on
2h
Facebook is ditching plans to make an interface that reads the brain
The spring of 2017 may be remembered as the coming-out party for Big Tech's campaign to get inside your head. That was when news broke of Elon Musk's new brain-interface company, Neuralink, which is working on how to stitch thousands of electrodes into people's brains . Days later, Facebook joined the quest when it announced that its secretive skunkworks, named Building 8, was attempting to build
22h
Scientists Create Injectable Swarm of Brain Reading Nanosensors
A team of scientists has developed a new kind of biosensor that can be injected straight into the bloodstream, and will then travel to your brain, where they will — according to the scientists behind the project — monitor your neural activity and even potentially thoughts. The cell-sized nanosensors, aptly named NeuroSWARM3, can cross the blood-brain barrier to the brain, where they convert neura
2h
This Fully Electric Tugboat Will Have Absolutely Massive Battery Packs
Electric Tug Shipbuilder Crowley Maritime Corp announced this week that it's building and operating the first ever all-electric tugboat in the United States. The 82-foot, zero emissions escort tug, called "eWolf," will eventually start serving the port of San Diego some time in mid-2023. Switching tugboats to electric propulsion could have major implications for reducing the planet's carbon footp
6h
Different Cultures Define Happiness Differently
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. E veryone knows where the happiest people in the world live—the United Nations tells us every single year. For the past several years, Finland has been ranked No. 1, sitting atop the pack of Nordic countries, which are all considered very happy. And since they've cracked the happiness code, a
10h
Pfizer wants to give you a booster shot—but experts say it's too soon
Is it time to start thinking about booster shots? Pfizer seems to think so. In a private meeting with top US scientists and regulators on July 12, the firm's representatives argued that the US should move to authorize a third shot. Last week, Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech announced that they had observed waning immunity in people who had been vaccinated and that they planned to seek emer
11h
Podcast: Americans Kept Getting Seeds in the Mail From China Last Year. We Finally Know Why.
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Last summer, an unexplained phenomenon gripped nightly newscasts and Facebook groups across America: Unsolicited deliveries of obscurely labeled seed packages, seemingly from China, were being sent to Americans' homes. Recipients reported the packages to local police, news stations, and agriculture departments; searched m
12h
Welcome to the Tokyo Olympics, where public health, money, and politics collide
It's nighttime on the streets of Ibaraki prefecture in Japan when the Olympic torch comes through. A viral video shows the torch bearer's slow jog past spectators lining the road. Then, as the flame passes, a woman in the crowd shoots a water gun. "Extinguish the Olympic flame! Oppose the Tokyo Olympics!" she shouts. Security rushes around her. Such is the backdrop for the upcoming Olympic and Pa
10h
What are the risks of England unlocking on 19 July? – podcast
Nearly all coronavirus restrictions in England are set to be lifted from Monday 19 July. But what are the risks of unlocking when we could be in the middle of a third wave of infections? The Guardian's science editor, Ian Sample, talks to Anand Jagatia about how cases, hospital admissions and deaths are modelled to increase in the coming weeks, as well as the risks from long Covid and new variant
15h
Two Editors Who Showed What Publishing Should Be
A mid the many controversies that have occurred in American book publishing, I still measure the industry by the people who showed me what it could be at its best. For the better part of my 30-plus years as an editor at Alfred A. Knopf, I sat in an office next to Sonny Mehta, the former head of our company. He hired me, and over time we became great friends. When I spoke at his memorial at the Ne
10h
Scientists Are Officially Launching a Wooden Satellite
Plywood Cubesat The world's first satellite primarily made out of wood is set to launch later this year, and it's bringing a selfie stick to mark the occasion, Defense One reports . The WISA Woodsat, a collaboration between Finnish cubesat startup Arctic Astronautics and the European Space Agency, features an outer shell made out of birch-plywood, a material surprisingly resilient to the harsh en
2h
Dinosaurs were doomed even before the asteroid
Many believe that, absent the giant asteroid strike, dinosaurs would still dominate the earth. But, in the natural history of this planet, there have been five mass extinction events, and most did not require extraterrestrial intervention. A new paper argues that dinosaurs were already headed for extinction and that the asteroid impact 66 million years ago was more of a coup de grâce. There's a s
2h
Adding logical qubits to Sycamore quantum computer reduces error rate
The Google Quantum AI team has found that adding logical qubits to the company's quantum computer reduced the logical qubit error rate exponentially. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their work with logical qubits as an error correction technique and outline what they have learned so far.
6h
Researchers confirm we may never know how many species have inhabited the Earth
Professors in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences explored whether or not the scientific community will ever be able to settle on a 'total number' of species of living vertebrates, which could help with species preservation. By knowing what's out there, researchers argue that they can prioritize places and groups on which to concentrate conservation efforts.
7h
Facebook Abandons Plans for Mind-Reading Headset
Abandoning Plans In a Wednesday blog post , Facebook announced that it's abandoning plans to develop a brain-computer interface headset designed to convert neural signals into spoken words. The social media megacorporation is instead focusing its efforts on developing a wrist-based solution that can act as a controller inside virtual reality (VR) environments. "While we still believe in the long-
1h
COVID-19's Effects on Kids Are Even Stranger Than We Thought
The U.S. fell short of its goal of giving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine to 70 percent of adults by July 4, but not by much. About two-thirds of everyone above the age of 18 had gotten a shot when the holiday arrived, with coverage among seniors surpassing even that benchmark. That leaves kids—mostly unvaccinated—as the Americans most exposed to the pandemic this summer, while the Delt
56min
The Atlantic Daily: One Man's Story of Escaping Genocide
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. For a long time, Tahir Hamut Izgil slept with a set of warm clothes and sturdy shoes nearby, in case the police came. If they did, he planned to slip them on. That way, he'd have something to keep
6h
When fawns perceive constant danger, they almost seem to relax
Burnout. It is a syndrome that is said to afflict humans who feel chronic stress. But after conducting a novel study using trail cameras showing the interactions between white-tailed deer fawns and predators, a Penn State researcher suggests that prey animals feel it, too.
8h
Unlocking efficient light-energy conversion with stable coordination nanosheets
Two-dimensional 'nanosheets' made of bonds between metal atoms and organic molecules are attractive candidates for photoelectric conversion, but get corroded easily. In a new study, scientists from Japan and Taiwan present a new nanosheet design using iron and benzene hexathiol that exhibits record stability to air exposure for 60 days, signaling the commercial optoelectronic applications of these
3h
Is 150 years really as long as we can ever live?
While most of us can expect to live to around 80, some people defy expectations and live to be over 100. In places such as Okinawa, Japan and Sardinia, Italy, there are many centenarians . The oldest person in history – a French woman named Jeanne Calment – lived to 122. When she was born in 1875, the average life expectancy was roughly 43. But just how long could a human actually live? It's a qu
3h
US to end large, old-growth timber sales in Alaska forest
The Biden administration said Thursday that it is ending large-scale, old-growth timber sales in the country's largest national forest—the Tongass National Forest in Alaska—and will focus on forest restoration, recreation and other noncommercial uses.
17min
A genome of photosynthetic animals decoded
Some sea slugs take up chloroplasts from the algae that they consume into their cells. These chloroplasts retain their ability to perform photosynthetic activity within the animal cells for several months, and thus provide them with photosynthesis-derived nutrition. Researchers have published the genome of the sea slug, Plakobranchus ocellatus.
27min
Study: Incarcerated people placed in solitary confinement differ significantly from others in prison population
Concern has grown about prison systems' use of extended solitary confinement as a way to manage violent and disruptive incarcerated people. A new study identified groups that are more likely to be placed in extended solitary management (ESM). The study found that individuals sent to ESM differed considerably from the rest of the prison population in terms of mental health, education, language, rac
35min
Brain-Reading Tech Turned a Paralyzed Man's Thoughts Into Words
In an incredible development, scientists have developed a neural implant that was able to read a paralyzed man's thoughts and convert them into written words, granting him a new way to communicate after he lost his ability to speak out loud. "This is farther than we've ever imagined we could go," Oregon Health & Science University neurologist and pediatrician Melanie Fried-Oken, who didn't work o
1h
Guiding principles for work shift duration published by AASM and SRS
The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) and Sleep Research Society (SRS) have published evidence-based guiding principles to help employers determine optimal work shift durations for their workplace. With a process that assesses risks, considers countermeasures, and institutes an informed approach to determine and evaluate shift durations, employers can make shift duration decisions that man
1h
How the Civil War's losers got to write its history
If history is written by the victors, then post-Civil War America is a rare exception to the rule, argues Chara Bohan. Last year, Bohan and her collaborators, including doctoral fellow Wade Morris, analyzed history textbooks published in the decades after Reconstruction and found the "Lost Cause narrative," which advocates a heroic view of the Confederacy , not only predominated in Southern class
1h
Death disruptor: how an Australian funnel-web spider may help human hearts
University of Queensland researchers are investigating if protein in venom of Fraser Island spider can stop cardiac cells dying A protein in the venom of a deadly Australian funnel-web spider may be able to reduce cardiac damage from heart attacks and extend the life of donor hearts used in transplants, according to new research. Venom from the Fraser Island funnel-web, named for the south-east Q
1h
OsPDCD5 negatively regulates plant architecture and grain yield in rice [Agricultural Sciences]
Plant architecture is an important agronomic trait that affects crop yield. Here, we report that a gene involved in programmed cell death, OsPDCD5, negatively regulates plant architecture and grain yield in rice. We used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to introduce loss-of-function mutations into OsPDCD5 in 11 rice cultivars. Targeted mutagenesis of…
1h
A unified energy-optimality criterion predicts human navigation paths and speeds [Anthropology]
Navigating our physical environment requires changing directions and turning. Despite its ecological importance, we do not have a unified theoretical account of non-straight-line human movement. Here, we present a unified optimality criterion that predicts disparate non-straight-line walking phenomena, with straight-line walking as a special case. We first characterized the metabolic…
1h
Low-Reynolds-number, biflagellated Quincke swimmers with multiple forms of motion [Applied Physical Sciences]
In the limit of zero Reynolds number (Re), swimmers propel themselves exploiting a series of nonreciprocal body motions. For an artificial swimmer, a proper selection of the power source is required to drive its motion, in cooperation with its geometric and mechanical properties. Although various external fields (magnetic, acoustic, optical,…
1h
Orbit topology analyzed from {pi} phase shift of magnetic quantum oscillations in three-dimensional Dirac semimetal [Physics]
With the emergence of Dirac fermion physics in the field of condensed matter, magnetic quantum oscillations (MQOs) have been used to discern the topology of orbits in Dirac materials. However, many previous researchers have relied on the single-orbit Lifshitz–Kosevich (LK) formula, which overlooks the significant effect of degenerate orbits on…
1h
Targeting Axl favors an antitumorigenic microenvironment that enhances immunotherapy responses by decreasing Hif-1{alpha} levels [Systems Biology]
Hypoxia is an important phenomenon in solid tumors that contributes to metastasis, tumor microenvironment (TME) deregulation, and resistance to therapies. The receptor tyrosine kinase AXL is an HIF target, but its roles during hypoxic stress leading to the TME deregulation are not well defined. We report here that the mammary…
1h
Cell contact guidance via sensing anisotropy of network mechanical resistance [Applied Biological Sciences]
Despite the ubiquitous importance of cell contact guidance, the signal-inducing contact guidance of mammalian cells in an aligned fibril network has defied elucidation. This is due to multiple interdependent signals that an aligned fibril network presents to cells, including, at least, anisotropy of adhesion, porosity, and mechanical resistance. By forming…
1h
Methylation of viral mRNA cap structures by PCIF1 attenuates the antiviral activity of interferon-{beta} [Microbiology]
Interferons induce cell-intrinsic responses associated with resistance to viral infection. To overcome the suppressive action of interferons and their effectors, viruses have evolved diverse mechanisms. Using vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), we report that the host cell N6-adenosine messenger RNA (mRNA) cap methylase, phosphorylated C-terminal domain interacting factor 1 (PCIF1), attenuates…
1h
The DME demethylase regulates sporophyte gene expression, cell proliferation, differentiation, and meristem resurrection [Plant Biology]
The flowering plant life cycle consists of alternating haploid (gametophyte) and diploid (sporophyte) generations, where the sporophytic generation begins with fertilization of haploid gametes. In Arabidopsis, genome-wide DNA demethylation is required for normal development, catalyzed by the DEMETER (DME) DNA demethylase in the gamete companion cells of male and female…
1h
Inactivation of the tumor suppressor p53 by long noncoding RNA RMRP [Cell Biology]
p53 inactivation is highly associated with tumorigenesis and drug resistance. Here, we identify a long noncoding RNA, the RNA component of mitochondrial RNA-processing endoribonuclease (RMRP), as an inhibitor of p53. RMRP is overexpressed and associated with an unfavorable prognosis in colorectal cancer. Ectopic RMRP suppresses p53 activity by promoting MDM2-induced…
1h
Neu3 neuraminidase induction triggers intestinal inflammation and colitis in a model of recurrent human food-poisoning [Medical Sciences]
Intestinal inflammation is the underlying basis of colitis and the inflammatory bowel diseases. These syndromes originate from genetic and environmental factors that remain to be fully identified. Infections are possible disease triggers, including recurrent human food-poisoning by the common foodborne pathogen Salmonella enterica Typhimurium (ST), which in laboratory mice causes…
1h
Protistan grazing impacts microbial communities and carbon cycling at deep-sea hydrothermal vents [Environmental Sciences]
Microbial eukaryotes (or protists) in marine ecosystems are a link between primary producers and all higher trophic levels, and the rate at which heterotrophic protistan grazers consume microbial prey is a key mechanism for carbon transport and recycling in microbial food webs. At deep-sea hydrothermal vents, chemosynthetic bacteria and archaea…
1h
Juvenile hormone regulation of microRNAs is mediated by E75 in the Dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti [Developmental Biology]
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play critical roles in controlling posttranscriptional gene regulation and have a profound effect on mosquito reproduction and metabolism. Juvenile hormone (JH) is critical for achieving reproductive competence in the main vector of human arboviral diseases, Aedes aegypti. We report a JH-mediated mechanism governing…
1h
POU4F3 pioneer activity enables ATOH1 to drive diverse mechanoreceptor differentiation through a feed-forward epigenetic mechanism [Developmental Biology]
During embryonic development, hierarchical cascades of transcription factors interact with lineage-specific chromatin structures to control the sequential steps in the differentiation of specialized cell types. While examples of transcription factor cascades have been well documented, the mechanisms underlying developmental changes in accessibility of cell type–specific enhancers remain poorly und
1h
What does the sleeping brain think about?
Using an artificial intelligence approach capable of decoding brain activity during sleep, scientists were able to glimpse what we think about when we are asleep. By combining fMRI and EEG, they provide unprecedented evidence that the work of sorting out the thousands of pieces of information processed during the day takes place during deep sleep. Indeed, the brain can evaluate all of these memori
1h
Kelp for corn? Illinois scientists demystify natural products for crops
Corn growers can choose from a wide array of products to make the most of their crop, but the latest could bring seaweed extract to a field near you. The marine product is just one class in a growing market of crop biostimulants marketed for corn. Biostimulants benefit crops and soil, but the dizzying array of products has farmers confused, according to Fred Below, corn and soybean researcher at t
2h
Among spotted hyenas, social ties are inherited
A massive study of data collected over 27 years has shown, for the first time on such a large scale, that a model hypothesizing that a process of social inheritance determines how offspring relationships are formed and maintained is correct. The study, published today in the journal Science, also elucidates the major role that social rank plays in structuring the spotted hyena clan, and how this a
2h
Accurate protein structure prediction now accessible to all
Protein design researchers have created a freely available method, RoseTTAFold, to provide access to highly accurate protein structure prediction. Scientists around the world are using it to build protein models to accelerate their research. The tool uses deep learning to quickly predict protein structures based on limited information, thereby compressing the time for what would have taken years o
2h
Geneticists outline plan to boost diversity, inclusion in their field
During the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a group of geneticists who study the cellular process of meiosis held a virtual discussion of how to boost inclusion of underrepresented groups in their community. Now, Katherine Billmyre of the Stowers Institute for Medical Research, María Angélica Bravo Núñez of Harvard University, Francesca Cole of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, and coll
2h
A Rare DOUBLE BREACH! | Shark Week
Stream The Spawn Of El Diablo on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/spawnofeldiablo About The Spawn Of El Diablo: In 2012, Michelle Jewell documented one of the largest great white mating scars ever recorded. Recently similar marks have appeared, leading her to believe this is a possible mating ground and that mega-shark El Diablo has returned to South Africa. Subscribe to Discovery: ht
2h
Who was Karl Marx?
Karl Marx was the author of the Communist Manifesto, the creator of Marxist theory, and one of the most influential thinkers ever.
2h
Generation of ovarian follicles from mouse pluripotent stem cells
Oocytes mature in a specialized fluid-filled sac, the ovarian follicle, which provides signals needed for meiosis and germ cell growth. Methods have been developed to generate functional oocytes from pluripotent stem cell–derived primordial germ cell–like cells (PGCLCs) when placed in culture with embryonic ovarian somatic cells. In this study, we developed culture conditions to recreate the step
2h
A massive rock and ice avalanche caused the 2021 disaster at Chamoli, Indian Himalaya
On 7 February 2021, a catastrophic mass flow descended the Ronti Gad, Rishiganga, and Dhauliganga valleys in Chamoli, Uttarakhand, India, causing widespread devastation and severely damaging two hydropower projects. More than 200 people were killed or are missing. Our analysis of satellite imagery, seismic records, numerical model results, and eyewitness videos reveals that ~27 x 10 6 cubic meter
2h
Chromatin landscape signals differentially dictate the activities of mSWI/SNF family complexes
Mammalian SWI/SNF (mSWI/SNF) adenosine triphosphate–dependent chromatin remodelers modulate genomic architecture and gene expression and are frequently mutated in disease. However, the specific chromatin features that govern their nucleosome binding and remodeling activities remain unknown. We subjected endogenously purified mSWI/SNF complexes and their constituent assembly modules to a diverse l
2h
Self-assembled iron-containing mordenite monolith for carbon dioxide sieving
The development of low-cost, efficient physisorbents is essential for gas adsorption and separation; however, the intrinsic tradeoff between capacity and selectivity, as well as the unavoidable shaping procedures of conventional powder sorbents, greatly limits their practical separation efficiency. Herein, an exceedingly stable iron-containing mordenite zeolite monolith with a pore system of prec
2h
Autonomous self-repair in piezoelectric molecular crystals
Living tissue uses stress-accumulated electrical charge to close wounds. Self-repairing synthetic materials, which are typically soft and amorphous, usually require external stimuli, prolonged physical contact, and long healing times. We overcome many of these limitations in piezoelectric bipyrazole organic crystals, which recombine following mechanical fracture without any external direction, au
2h
Cage effects control the mechanism of methane hydroxylation in zeolites
Catalytic conversion of methane to methanol remains an economically tantalizing but fundamentally challenging goal. Current technologies based on zeolites deactivate too rapidly for practical application. We found that similar active sites hosted in different zeolite lattices can exhibit markedly different reactivity with methane, depending on the size of the zeolite pore apertures. Whereas zeoli
2h
Determinants of crystal structure transformation of ionic nanocrystals in cation exchange reactions
Changes in the crystal system of an ionic nanocrystal during a cation exchange reaction are unusual yet remain to be systematically investigated. In this study, chemical synthesis and computational modeling demonstrated that the height of hexagonal-prism roxbyite (Cu 1.8 S) nanocrystals with a distorted hexagonal close-packed sulfide anion (S 2– ) sublattice determines the final crystal phase of
2h
Wafer-scale heterostructured piezoelectric bio-organic thin films
Piezoelectric biomaterials are intrinsically suitable for coupling mechanical and electrical energy in biological systems to achieve in vivo real-time sensing, actuation, and electricity generation. However, the inability to synthesize and align the piezoelectric phase at a large scale remains a roadblock toward practical applications. We present a wafer-scale approach to creating piezoelectric b
2h
Neural representations of space in the hippocampus of a food-caching bird
Spatial memory in vertebrates requires brain regions homologous to the mammalian hippocampus. Between vertebrate clades, however, these regions are anatomically distinct and appear to produce different spatial patterns of neural activity. We asked whether hippocampal activity is fundamentally different even between distant vertebrates that share a strong dependence on spatial memory. We studied t
2h
Rank-dependent social inheritance determines social network structure in spotted hyenas
The structure of animal social networks influences survival and reproductive success, as well as pathogen and information transmission. However, the general mechanisms determining social structure remain unclear. Using data from 73,767 social interactions among wild spotted hyenas collected over 27 years, we show that the process of social inheritance determines how offspring relationships are fo
2h
Universal phase dynamics in VO2 switches revealed by ultrafast operando diffraction
Understanding the pathways and time scales underlying electrically driven insulator-metal transitions is crucial for uncovering the fundamental limits of device operation. Using stroboscopic electron diffraction, we perform synchronized time-resolved measurements of atomic motions and electronic transport in operating vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ) switches. We discover an electrically triggered, isost
2h
Estimating epidemiologic dynamics from cross-sectional viral load distributions
Estimating an epidemic's trajectory is crucial for developing public health responses to infectious diseases, but case data used for such estimation are confounded by variable testing practices. We show that the population distribution of viral loads observed under random or symptom-based surveillance—in the form of cycle threshold (Ct) values obtained from reverse transcription quantitative poly
2h
Senolytics reduce coronavirus-related mortality in old mice
The COVID-19 pandemic has revealed the pronounced vulnerability of the elderly and chronically ill to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)–induced morbidity and mortality. Cellular senescence contributes to inflammation, multiple chronic diseases, and age-related dysfunction, but effects on responses to viral infection are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that senescent cells
2h
Design and applications of surfaces that control the accretion of matter
Surfaces that provide control over liquid, solid, or vapor accretion provide an evolutionary advantage to numerous plants, insects, and animals. Synthetic surfaces inspired by these natural surfaces can have a substantial impact on diverse commercial applications. Engineered liquid and solid repellent surfaces are often designed to impart control over a single state of matter, phase, or fouling l
2h
Expression of Foxp3 by T follicular helper cells in end-stage germinal centers
Germinal centers (GCs) are the site of immunoglobulin somatic hypermutation and affinity maturation, processes essential to an effective antibody response. The formation of GCs has been studied in detail, but less is known about what leads to their regression and eventual termination, factors that ultimately limit the extent to which antibodies mature within a single reaction. We show that contra
2h
A human apolipoprotein L with detergent-like activity kills intracellular pathogens
Activation of cell-autonomous defense by the immune cytokine interferon- (IFN-) is critical to the control of life-threatening infections in humans. IFN- induces the expression of hundreds of host proteins in all nucleated cells and tissues, yet many of these proteins remain uncharacterized. We screened 19,050 human genes by CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis and identified IFN-–induced apolipoprotein L3 (A
2h
Thinking without a brain
If you didn't have a brain, could you still navigate your surroundings? Thanks to new research on slime molds, the answer may be 'yes.' Scientists discovered that the brainless Physarum polycephalum uses its body to sense mechanical cues in its environment, and decides where to grow based on that information. This finding provides a model for understanding different types of cognition, including o
2h
The FAA May Force SpaceX to Tear Down Its Starship Launch Tower
Demolition Derby Over the past four months, SpaceX has constructed a massive launch tower at its facility in Boca Chica, Texas that serves as a monument to the incredible power of the company's Super Heavy booster and the potential of its Starship spacecraft. But now, pending further review, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) may tell SpaceX to tear it all down, CNBC reports . The launch t
2h
Professional development opportunities do not delay doctorate training or publications
Ph.D.-trained scientists are essential contributors to the workforce in diverse employment sectors that include academia, industry, government, and non-profit organizations. Therefore, best practices for training the future biomedical workforce are of national concern. To complement coursework and laboratory research training, many institutions—including UNC-Chapel Hill—now offer professional trai
2h
Sperm migration in the genital tract: Computer simulations identify factors for success
A research team at the Humboldt University Berlin and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) developed an agent-based computer model to simulate the journey of sperm cells through the female genital tract. Key factors for a successful transit could be identified without the use of animal experiments and were published in the scientific journal PLoS Computational Biology.
2h
'Micro-swimmers' move up steep slopes like mountain climbers
Scientists have uncovered how "micro-swimmers," heavy, motorized objects, climb steep slopes—a newly discovered mechanism that mimics how rock climbers navigate inclines. The findings stem from a series of experiments in which researchers placed motorized objects in liquid and then moved up tilted surfaces. "These 'micro-swimmers' are about 20 times heavier than the fluid they swim in, but they w
3h
Emotion, cooperation and locomotion crucial from an early age
What are the fundamental skills that young children need to develop at the start of school for future academic success? While a large body of research shows strong links between cognitive skills (attention, memory, etc.) and academic skills on the one hand, and emotional skills on the other, in students from primary school to university, few studies have explored these links in children aged 3 to
3h
A Fifty-Year-Old Cancer Drug Doesn't Do What You Think
5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has been around a long time now (over fifty years), and it's a standard oncology drug (particularly in colorectal treatment regimes). But try going around and asking people how it works. If you're talking to a clinician and want to seem up on the lingo, just say "What's 5-FU's MOA?" (mechanism of action). If your interviewees are honest, many of them will say "Actually, I do
3h
Hopkins Med news update
NEWS STORIES IN THIS ISSUE:- COVID-19 News: Can Dietary Supplements Help the Immune System Fight Coronavirus Infection?- Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Develop Physician Training to Prevent Gun Injuries, Deaths- COVID-19 News: Study Says Pandemic Impaired Reporting of Infectious Diseases- Johns Hopkins Medicine Helps Create Treatment Guide for Neurodegenerative Disorders
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Hot Zones: Urban Heat Islands
Urban heat islands are metropolitan places that are hotter than their outlying areas, with the impacts felt most during summer months. About 85% of the U.S. population lives in metropolitan areas. Paved roads, parking lots, and buildings absorb and retain heat during the day and radiate that heat back into the surrounding air. Neighborhoods in a highly-developed city can experience mid-afternoon
4h
Hertzsprung-Russell diagram: the most important graph in astrophysics
The invention of spectroscopy and photography converted astronomy into astrophysics. With these new tools, astrophysicists gathered untold amounts of data on stars. When these stars were plotted on a graph, amazing patterns emerged. Like people, stars are born, live, and then die. But how do scientists know that stars are born and die? Where did that knowledge come from? After all, for most of hu
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Life-saving snake venom
Western University bioengineer Kibret Mequanint and his international collaborators have found a novel use for snake venom: a body tissue 'super glue' that can stop life-threatening bleeding in seconds.
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Early intervention in schools needed to address Malta's obesity crisis
A new study by the University of Malta and Staffordshire University highlights an urgent need for change in the curriculum and demonstrates how introducing longer, more frequent and more physically intense PE lessons can significantly improve children's weight and overall health. Malta currently has one of the highest rates of obesity worldwide with 40% of primary and 42.6% of secondary school chi
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Protein blocks tumor cells spreading via bloodstream
A specialized protein appears to help prevent tumor cells from entering the bloodstream and spreading to other parts of the body, researchers report. "We have discovered that this protein, TRPM7, senses the pressure of fluid flowing in the circulation and stops the cells from spreading through the vascular system," says Kaustav Bera, a Johns Hopkins University PhD candidate in chemical and biomol
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Aussie caterpillar's venom has medicinal possibilities
The venom of a caterpillar native to South East Queensland in Australia shows promise for use in medicines and pest control, researchers say. The Doratifera vulnerans is common to large parts of Queensland's southeast and is routinely found in Toohey Forest Park on Brisbane's south side. Andrew Walker, from the Institute for Molecular Bioscience at the University of Queensland, has researched the
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Measuring nitrogen to improve its management
A new paper published in Nature Food offers the first comprehensive comparison of the most advanced international efforts to measure how nitrogen is managed in agriculture. Scientists from ten different research groups across the world, estimated how much nitrogen is added to croplands as fertilizer and manure, how much of the added nitrogen is harvested in crops, and how much is left over as pote
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Sociodemographic characteristics, inequities associated with access to in-person, remote elementary schooling during pandemic in New York State
What The Study Did: Among the few New York state public school districts providing full-time in-person elementary school instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic, most districts served predominately white students, rural/suburban students and children who were not disadvantaged (children who were not from a low-income family, were not English language learners, did not have homelessness, and did
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ED-administered high-dose buprenorphine may enhance opioid use disorder treatment outcomes
High-dose buprenorphine therapy, provided under emergency department care, is safe and well tolerated in people with opioid use disorder experiencing opioid withdrawal symptoms, according to a study supported by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) through the Helping to End Addiction Long-term Initiative, or the NIH HEAL Initiative.
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Glaucoma test 'best yet'
The latest investigations into a promising new genetic test for glaucoma – the leading cause of blindness worldwide – has found it has the ability to identify 15 times more people at high risk of glaucoma than an existing genetic test. The study, just published in JAMA Ophthalmology, builds on a long-running international collaboration between Flinders University and the QIMR Berghofer Medical Res
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Understanding our perception of rhythm
Scientists have long known that while listening to a sequence of sounds, people often perceive a rhythm, even when the sounds are identical and equally spaced. One regularity that was discovered over 100 years ago is the Iambic-Trochaic Law: when every other sound is loud, we tend to hear groups of two sounds with an initial beat. When every other sound is long, we hear groups of two sounds with a
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A new avenue for fighting drug-resistant bacteria
A small regulatory RNA found in many problematic bacteria, including Escherichia coli, appears to be responsible for managing the response of these bacteria to environmental stresses. Professor Charles Dozois from Institut national de la recherche scientifique (INRS) and doctoral student Hicham Bessaiah see a promising avenue for more effective treatment of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Their res
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Examining potential variance in academic research
New research seeks to understand what drives decisions in data analyses and the process through which academics test a hypothesis by comparing the analyses of different researchers who tested the same hypotheses on the same dataset. Analysts reported radically different analyses and dispersed empirical outcomes, including, in some cases, significant effects in opposite directions from each other.
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This Earth-Friendly Ergonomic Chair Is Designed To Move With Your Body
An estimated 60 percent of people are working from home right now. And according to a study from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, as many as 70 percent of them spend a minimum of six or more hours sitting down each day . The reason your back hurts isn't just because you're getting older. It's also because you're using furniture that's not designed properly. Luckily, there's the
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Conventional wisdom says we shouldn't date our friends. It's wrong.
Two-thirds of couples reported dating someone who they knew as a friend first, contrary to cultural expectations. These relationships often existed for years and began with no romantic element. Most relationship research is based on an incorrect model of how romance develops. Think of the typical script our society has for meeting a new romantic partner. It typically involves two people who have
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Nitrogen-producing process of anammox bacterium finally uncovered
After years of research, the molecular structure of the enzyme responsible for a large part of the global nitrate and nitrogen production by bacteria has finally been uncovered. The anammox bacterium and other bacteria use this enzyme to convert toxic nitrite into nitrate. Now that the working of the enzyme has become clear, new possibilities have opened for the improved deployment of the anammox
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Robotic food mindset can boost healthy eating or backfire
Comparing our bodies to machines can encourage healthy eating for some people but backfire for others, according to a new study. Whether it's a pamphlet or a sign in a doctor's office, health education materials often encourage people to take a more conscious, mindful approach toward eating. Many urge consumers to improve their dietary choices by thinking of their bodies as machines that need the
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Man in China Hospitalized After Contracting Bird Flu
A man in China was hospitalized after contracting the H5N6 strain of avian flu, The New York Times reports , a reminder that SARS-CoV-2 isn't the only virus that can pose a threat to human health. The 55-year-old man, from a city in the southwestern province of Sichuan, experienced a fever and tested positive for the avian flu on July 6, according to state-run news agency China Global Television
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Autophagy may be the key to finding treatments for early Huntington's disease
Recent evidence indicates that autophagy plays a central role in synaptic maintenance, and the disruption in autophagy may be at the root of early cognitive changes in Huntington's disease. Understanding this mechanism better may help researchers develop treatments for patients with HD early in their disease progression, report scientists in a review article published in the Journal of Huntington'
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New research at ESMT Berlin shows potential variance in academic research
Same dataset, same research question, 29 different analyses – new research, led by Martin Schweinsberg, assistant professor of organizational behavior at ESMT Berlin, shows wide variance in research results due to different analytical approaches, even though all analysts tested the same hypotheses on the same data. Almost 180 co-authors from all around the world worked together on the project. A c
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Revealing the values in mathematics education through a variety of cultural lenses
The mathematics education can often be associated with only numeracy skills. But viewing the discipline as a cultural product–whose values differ across cultures–reveals its significance beyond numbers crunching. In this June Special Issue for ECNU Review of Education, being released as a tribute to the 14th International Congress on Mathematical Education, Dr. Qiaoping Zhang and Dr. Wee Tiong S
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Taking the brain out for a walk
If you're regularly out in the fresh air, you're doing something good for both your brain and your well-being. This is the conclusion reached by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE). The longitudinal study recently appeared in The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry.
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Data privacy — are you sure you want a cookie?
Data privacy is an important topic in the digitalised economy. Recent policy changes have aimed to strengthen users' control over their own data. Yet new research from Copenhagen Business School finds designers of cookie banners can affect users' privacy choices by manipulating the choice architecture and with simple changes can increase absolute consent by 17%.
6h
New COVID-19 vaccine candidate provides effective option for low- to mid-income countries
Combining yeast-expression technology and a novel adjuvant formulation to produce a COVID-19 vaccine candidate is effective against SARS-COV-2 and promises to be easy to produce at large scale and cost-effective, important aspects for vaccinating people worldwide, especially in low- to middle-income countries. Results from the study, which applied lessons learned from the hepatitis b vaccine platf
6h
How public transit agencies can advance equity
Access to high-quality public transportation can make communities more equitable by increasing access to critical opportunities such as employment, health care and healthy food, particularly for low-income individuals and people of color. A new paper published today in the Transportation Research Record identifies six broad categories of equity-advancing practices that reach beyond existing guidel
6h
Chloroplast acquisition without gene transfer in photosynthetic sea slugs
Plants, algae and some bacteria are able to perform photosynthesis, which is the process of transforming sunlight energy into sugar. Animals are generally unable to use this process to acquire energy, but there are a few known exceptions to this. Some sea slugs take up chloroplasts from the algae that they consume into their cells. These chloroplasts retain their ability to perform photosynthetic
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Repairs using light signals
Repairing complex electrical appliances is time consuming and rarely cost-effective. The working group led by Prof. Dr. Karl Mandel, Professorship of Inorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), has now developed a smart microparticle that enables defective components in these appliances to be identified more quickly and easily by using light signals. In the long
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More Americans get opioid addiction treatment, but racial gaps remain
Substantially more people in the United States with opioid use disorder are receiving evidence-based treatment for the disease, but there are still considerable gaps in care along racial lines, a new study shows. The results, the largest analysis to date of opioid use disorder among Medicaid recipients, provide insights that policymakers and medical providers can act on to improve access to quali
6h
New study reveals the ingredients of major forest fires
Research co-led by the Center for Research on Desertification (CIDE, CSIC-UV-GVA) describes the mechanisms that make major forest fires possible. Climate emerges as one of the main triggers by fostering the flammability of the fuel, along with drought conditions and the effectiveness of ignitions.
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Amazon Just Patented a New Delivery System That Could Have Your Block Crawling With Robots
Amazon's taking over the world. Or, at least, the US. Even as Jeff Bezos steps down as CEO and hands the reins over to former AWS head Andy Jassy (and Bezos himself gets ready to go to space), the e-commerce giant is projected to account for more than 40 percent of all online sales in the country by the end of this year. Not surprisingly, the company is continuously exploring new ways to streamli
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ComCor study on SARS-CoV-2: where are French people catching the virus?
The Institut Pasteur, in partnership with the French National Health Insurance Fund (CNAM), Santé publique France and the Ipsos Social Research Institute, recently presented the results of the ComCor epidemiological study on circumstances and places of infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The aim of the study was to identify the socio-demographic factors, places visited and behaviors associated wi
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Tracking COVID-19 across Europe
According to the World Health Organization, a third wave of COVID infections is now all but inevitable in Europe. A COVID tracker developed by IIASA researcher Asjad Naqvi, aims to identify, collect, and collate various official regional datasets for European countries, while also combining and homogenizing the data to help researchers and policymakers explore how the virus spreads.
6h
Racism in sports: Why it comes to the surface when teams lose
In the penalty shoot-out that saw Italy defeat England in the UEFA Euro 2020 final, the skill of the goalkeepers was overshadowed by the perceived failure of the English players who missed their shots. Three young players—Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho and Bukayo Saka—were subjected to torrents of anti-black racist abuse.
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The virus trap
To date, there are no effective antidotes against most virus infections. An interdisciplinary research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a new approach: they engulf and neutralize viruses with nano-capsules tailored from genetic material using the DNA origami method. The strategy has already been tested against hepatitis and adeno-associated viruses in cell culture
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Report outlines how public transit agencies can advance equity
Access to high-quality public transportation can make communities more equitable by increasing access to critical opportunities such as employment, health care and healthy food, particularly for low-income individuals and people of color. A new paper published today in the Transportation Research Record identifies six broad categories of equity-advancing practices that reach beyond existing guidel
6h
The cells combating a deadly lung disease
Single-cell RNA sequencing has revealed a subset of cells that could provide protection from a rare, but severely debilitating and fatal, lung disease. The findings were published by Nagoya University researchers and colleagues in the European Respiratory Journal. Further research could lead to new therapeutic strategies for the disease, called idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).
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Feeding both fish and pond yields more protein with lower quality feed
Feeding both the fish and the pond yields more animal protein using a lower quality feed for the fish. The feed not only targets the fish but also the pond organisms that help break down waste and produce natural feed for the fish. This results in a higher fish production. These results were revealed in a study in which Wageningen University & Research participated contribute to poverty alleviatio
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Divers Surrounded by Swarm of Huge Tiger Sharks | Shark Week
Stream Mothersharker on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/mothersharker About Mothersharker: It's a great mystery where tiger sharks give birth. One team of scientists deploys an arsenal of new technology to find out, but they need to meet some of Bahamas' biggest tiger shark mothers face-to-face for it to work. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikT
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Airlines, hospitality firms still bad at reporting risks around climate and pandemics
Many UK companies will have to make statements about the risks of climate change to their businesses under new proposals being put forward by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA). So-called "premium-listed" companies that follow the highest regulatory standards are already having to make such statements in their financial reports as of this year, but the FCA now wants to roll it out to most other
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Improving low-loss dielectric measurement technique
Scientists from NPL have developed improvements to a technique for measuring dielectric permittivity and loss of materials at MHz frequencies. The method used is named after two NPL scientists who developed in the 1930, Hartshorn and Ward. The findings are presented in the team's paper, "Low loss dielectric measurements in the frequency range 1—70MHz by using a Vector Network Analyser," recently p
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Melting High Mountain Asia glaciers are revealed as a potential source of greenhouse gases
For the first time, researchers have measured the flux variations of greenhouse gases (CO2 and CH4) in typical glacial basins in High Mountain Asia. They have discovered that rapid cryospheric retreat has made the basins strong sources of carbon with positive methane and CO2 fluxes. While this is partially offset by proglacial river runoff, the findings suggest that these variations should be cons
7h
Biomolecular bonsai: Controlling the pruning and strengthening of neuron branches
How neuronal circuits remodel themselves over time, especially during early development, is a major question in neurobiology. Using mice, researchers from Kyushu University have uncovered a biomolecular mechanism behind the strengthening of connections from neurons called mitral cells. The team found that the protein BMPR-2 is a key regulator of selective stabilization of neuron branching and that
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Study finds adolescent girls and young women in Africa will use HIV prevention products
Adolescent girls and young women can and will use HIV prevention products with consistency, according to interim results of a study being conducted in Africa of two different methods: daily use of the antiretroviral (ARV) tablet Truvada® as oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and the monthly dapivirine vaginal ring, a new HIV prevention product currently under regulatory review in several countri
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Study shows strong association between perceived risk, availability and past-year cannabis use
Combined perceptions of the risk and availability of cannabis influence the risk of cannabis use more than perceived risk and perceived availability alone, according to a new Columbia study. Researchers observed that those who perceived cannabis as low-risk and available were more likely to report using the drug in the past year and almost daily compared to those individuals who perceived cannabis
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Researchers use laser 'tweezers' to study structure and dynamics of chromatin
Each one of the cells in our body contains DNA, which provides the instructions required for our development and function. Astoundingly, a total of two meters of DNA is packaged in each cell's nucleus, just tens of microns in size, a feat accomplished by packaging the DNA into a compact structure called chromatin. Its basic organization level is provided by wrapping the DNA around proteins called
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Researcher creates cell lines to treat mitochondrial diseases in children
The mitochondrion has garnered quite the reputation for its role as the "powerhouse of the cell." These tiny, but mighty organelles play various life-sustaining roles, from powering our own cells and organs to fueling chemical and biological processes. But when they aren't working properly, a number of rare diseases can occur.
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Climate change is fueling record-high heat, drought, wildfires in Western U.S.
Western parts of the U.S. are feeling the effects of climate change this summer as areas suffer from record-high temperatures, drought condition, and wildfires. Adam Coates, an expert in forest fire ecology and management at Virginia Tech, says there are many intricacies of climate change that lead to these extreme weather patterns, including how temperature and precipitation are being altered.
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Thruster research to help propel spacecraft
Faster space maneuvers and safer, more sustainable, propellants may soon be possible thanks to a new three-year partnership between The Australian National University and French propulsion company ThrustMe.
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The public make snap judgments about new technologies
An investigation recently published in the Public Understanding of Science journal by researchers from Massey University and the University of Southampton, United Kingdom, shows people stick to fast intuitive judgements about unfamiliar scientific technologies, and that taking more time to form these judgements doesn't change the outcome.
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Early use of antibiotics may change brain development
Antibiotic exposure early in life could alter human brain development in areas responsible for cognitive and emotional functions, according to a new study with mice. The laboratory study, published in the journal iScience , suggests that penicillin changes the microbiome —the trillions of beneficial microorganisms that live in and on our bodies—as well as gene expression, which allows cells to re
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Study: Wraparound services boost outcomes for drug court clients
An evidence-based wraparound service model that reduces barriers to care was shown to enhance drug treatment courts' effectiveness in improving criminal justice and behavioral health outcomes among participants with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, according to a pilot study led by UMass Medical School researchers.
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Do we all understand coronavirus news coverage?
Since COVID-19 emerged as a global crisis, the news has been dominated by graphs and terms like "R numbers" and "exponential growth," referring to the rate of spread of the disease. To what extent does the average adult understand the quantitative information appearing in the news? The results of a new study paint a gloomy picture: When asked about "math in the news" items presented to them, even
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Stakeholders' sentiment can make or break a new CEO
When a CEO steps down or is dismissed, the attention of the board is on how to choose the right executive to succeed that CEO. However, Bocconi University professor Dovev Lavie claims that managing the process of introducing the new CEO and choking the negative sentiment that can arise among stakeholders in a moment of uncertainty could be a more critical task, especially when the new CEO comes fr
7h
Sharks in Costa Brava: evidence of an ongoing decline
Some shark species, such as the basing shark and the spiny dogfish, are in populational decline in the Costa Brava, and even blackspotted smooth-hounds can have disappeared due to the fishing pressure of this marine region in the Catalan coasts. The coincidence of fishing areas with the distributional natural habitat of the sharks worsens the risk of bycatches of sharks by the fisheries.
7h
Astronomers Successfully Measure the Motion of 66 Nearby Galaxies
The heavens appear to move throughout the year, but that's just because Earth is moving. The real or "proper motion" of stars and galaxies was beyond our ability to measure until fairly recently, but bigger, more powerful telescopes have helped paint a picture of an evolving universe. The European Space Agency's Gaia space telescope has been particularly valuable in tracking the motion of stars i
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Muskrats signal future trouble for freshwater deltas
The long-term drying out of one of the world's largest freshwater deltas makes it harder for muskrats to recover from massive die-offs, research finds. It's a sign of threats to come for many other species. The muskrat, a stocky brown rodent the size of a Chihuahua—with a tail like a mouse, teeth like a beaver , and an exceptional ability to bounce back from rapid die-offs—has lived for thousands
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Study shows diet causes 84% drop in troublesome menopausal symptoms–without drugs
A new study, published by the North American Menopause Society in the journal Menopause, found a plant-based diet rich in soy reduces moderate-to-severe hot flashes by 84%, from nearly five per day to fewer than one per day. During the 12-week study, nearly 60% of women became totally free of moderate-to-severe hot flashes. Overall hot flashes (including mild ones) decreased by 79%.
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Conductive biopolymers using recycled food industry byproducts
Advanced Materials recently published the findings of Technion researchers who created conductors relevant to solar energy generation, biomedical engineering, and more using by-products of the food industry that would otherwise be discarded as waste. The technology demonstrated in the article allows for the simple, fast, cost effective, and environmentally friendly production of biopolymers, which
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Researchers estimate extraordinary carbon emissions from El Nino-induced biomass burning
Equatorial Asia, which includes Indonesia, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, and surrounding areas, experienced devastating biomass burning in 2015 due to the severe drought condition induced by the extreme El Niño and a positive anomaly of the Indian Ocean dipole. This biomass burning emitted a significant amount of carbon, mainly in the form of carbon dioxide (CO2), into the atmosphere.
8h
Methane in Enceladus Plumes
Enceladus is the 6th largest moon of Saturn, about 500 km in diameter. It is completely covered with mostly fresh ice, making it highly reflective (in fact, it is the object in the solar system with the highest albedo, reflecting almost 100% of the light that hits it). Given its small size, astronomers assumed it was likely frozen solid. This small chunk of ice, however, became significantly more
8h
Paper from company claiming phototherapy could treat COVID-19 is retracted
A study that touted phototherapy as a way to combat the COVID-19 pandemic has been retracted after Elisabeth Bik noted a litany of concerns about the article, from duplications in the figures to the authors' failure to disclose conflicts of interest. The article, "Methylene blue photochemical treatment as a reliable SARS-CoV-2 plasma virus inactivation method … Continue reading
9h
Polarization-transparent silicon photonic add-drop multiplexer with wideband hitless tuneability
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24640-5 Reconfigurable wavelength-selective devices are essential components of flexible optical networks. Here the authors show a silicon-photonic add-drop multiplexer meeting the strict requirements of telecom systems in terms of broadband operation range, hitless tunability and polarization transparency.
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Large parental differences in chromatin organization in pancreatic beta cell line explaining diabetes susceptibility effects
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24635-2 A SNP distant from the human insulin (INS) gene near the KRTAP5-6 gene confers increased susceptibility to type 2 diabetes when present on the paternal allele while decreased susceptibility when on the maternal allele. Here the authors show that long-range contacts between the INS locus and the KRTAP5-6 gene loc
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Fast holographic scattering compensation for deep tissue biological imaging
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24666-9 Wavefront shaping is used to overcome scattering in biological tissues during imaging, but determining the compensation is slow. Here, the authors use holographic phase stepping interferometry, where new phase information is updated after each measurement, enabling fast improvement of the wavefront correction.
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The active sites of Cu–ZnO catalysts for water gas shift and CO hydrogenation reactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24621-8 Identification of active sites of a catalyst is the Holy Grail in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, the authors successfully identify the CuCu(100)- hydroxylated ZnO ensemble and CuCu(611)Zn alloy as the active sites of Cu-ZnO catalysts for water gas shift and CO hydrogenation reactions, respectively.
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Pure spin photocurrent in non-centrosymmetric crystals: bulk spin photovoltaic effect
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24541-7 Light offers a fast and non-invasive way to generate spin-currents in materials, however, this typically requires special ingredients such as magnetic materials, or circularly polarised light. In this theory work, the authors show how the nonlinear optical effect can generate a spin current, with the only requir
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Lanthanum(III) triggers AtrbohD- and jasmonic acid-dependent systemic endocytosis in plants
Nature Communications, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24379-z Rare earth elements are widely used in agriculture to promote plant growth. Here the authors show that aerial application of a rare earth element to the leaves triggers a graft-transmissible, RbohD- and jasmonic acid-dependent systemic signal that triggers endocytosis and mineral nutrient uptake in roots.
10h
Removing the lead hazard from perovskite solar cells
Although a very promising solution for capturing solar energy, perovskite solar cells contain lead, which is toxic to the environment and a serious health hazard. EPFL scientists have now found a very elegant and efficient solution by adding a transparent phosphate salt that doesn't interfere with light-conversion efficiency while preventing lead from seeping into the soil in cases of solar panel
11h
The science behind a 1 minute exercise that improves brain health.
We are Nurosene, a health and wellness company building solutions backed by science that empower you to take control of your mental wellness for a brighter future! One of the avenues we strive to do this is through our Nuro app (free to download on iOS and Android). Why does this matter for you, you might be thinking? Well, we need your help! The Nuro app provides adaptable activities focused on
12h
Fires threaten Indigenous lands in desiccated Northwest
Karuk tribal citizen Troy Hockaday Sr. watched helplessly last fall as a raging wildfire leveled the homes of five of his family members, swallowed acres of forest where his people hunt deer, elk and black bear, and killed a longtime friend.
13h
Nye materialer: Tøjet holder dig kølig i sommervarmen
Tekstilmaterialer bestående af titaniumoxid, teflon og en særlig plasttype har vist sig effektiv til køle og holde kropstemperaturen nede ved at blokere og sprede ultraviolet og synligt lys, ligesom kroppens infrarøde stråling transporteres væk. Tidligere forsøg med kølende tøj har dog ikke vist …
13h
Where do you think the limits of science and technology are?
Recently I read the Three-body Problem trilogy by Liu Cixin and was very entertained by his imagined future technology. In the books, travel at the speed of light is possible, nearly indestructible materials can be crafted by manipulating the strong nuclear force, and the fabric of space-time can be altered, changing its number of dimensions. My reflex was to be sad that I would not live to see s
13h
What are the risks of England unlocking on 19 July?
Nearly all coronavirus restrictions in England are set to be lifted from Monday 19 July. But what are the risks of unlocking when we could be in the middle of a third wave of infections? The Guardian's science editor, Ian Sample, talks to Anand Jagatia about how cases, hospital admissions and deaths are modelled to increase in the coming weeks, as well as the risks from long Covid and new variants
15h
Extraordinary carbon emissions from El Nino-induced biomass burning estimated using Japanese aircraft and shipboard observations in Equatorial Asia
In 2015, massive biomass burning events occurred in Equatorial Asia which released a large amount of carbon into the atmosphere, whose signals were captured by in-situ high-precision measurements onboard commercial passenger aircraft and a cargo ship. A simulation-based analysis with those observations estimated the fire-induced carbon emissions to be 273 Tg C for September – October 2015.
16h
Evaluating peers' food choices may improve healthy eating habits among young adolescents
A new study conducted in the United Arab Emirates investigates whether asking early adolescents to evaluate the food choices of peers triggers deliberative thinking that improves their own food selection, even when the peers' food choices are unhealthy. The findings suggest that incorporating evaluations of the healthiness of others' food choices can be a tool to fight unhealthy eating lifestyles.
16h
Teens with secure family relationships "pay it forward" with empathy for friends
A new study tested whether teens' secure, supportive family relationships at age 14 related to their ability to provide their friends with empathic support across adolescence and into early adulthood. Findings indicate that secure attachment (reflecting on close relationships in an emotionally balanced, coherent, and valuing way) predicts teens' ability to provide empathic support to their close f
16h
COVID-19 is Deadlier for Children Than the Flu
It is natural the for people to compare COVID-19 to other contagious diseases, namely influenza. Journalists, politicians, and some doctors often compare the two diseases, particularly in children. Most who make this comparison claim the impact of the diseases is similar, and thus the reaction to COVID-19, at least for children, has been overwrought. There are two ways to compare the diseases: […
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Here's the Right Story for Vaccine Holdouts – Issue 103: Healthy Communication
Blaise Pascal was a renowned French polymath of the 17th century, scientist, philosopher, mathematician, inventor, and later in life a theologian. Among his many contributions was an attempt to prove by logical means the existence of God, which came to be known as Pascal's Wager. Stated simply, Pascal reasoned that not believing in God, if there was one, would damn you to eternal suffering. Conve
18h
How to Unlearn a Disease – Issue 103: Healthy Communication
My father, a neurologist, once had a patient who was tormented, in the most visceral sense, by a poem. Philip was 12 years old and a student at a prestigious boarding school in Princeton, New Jersey. One of his assignments was to recite Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven . By the day of the presentation, he had rehearsed the poem dozens of times and could recall it with ease. But this time, as he stood
18h
Galileo the Science Publicist – Issue 103: Healthy Communication
There's an old belief that truth will always overcome error. Alas, history tells us something different. Without someone to fight for it, to put error on the defensive, truth may languish. It may even be lost, at least for some time. No one understood this better than the renowned Italian scientist Galileo Galilei. It is easy to imagine the man who for a while almost single-handedly founded the m
18h
How to Outwit Evolution – Issue 103: Healthy Communication
There's a silent epidemic slowly brewing around the globe. It hasn't claimed as many lives as COVID-19, but if it gets out of control, it will likely prove even deadlier. It's caused not by a single virus, but by a number of different bacterial species that have been slowly evolving defenses against our once potent antibiotics. Think of it as a sea slowly swelling with superbugs. Currently, someo
18h
Talking Pop Science with Physicist Sabine Hossenfelder – Facts So Romantic
As abstract as it is, physics enriches your life. Image via Sabine Hossenfelder / YouTube Science without the gobbledygook." That's the name, and promise, of Sabine Hossenfelder's YouTube show. The German theoretical physicist, whose main gig is as a Research Fellow at the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, has attracted over 300,000 subscribers. Her videos—some of which are amusing music
18h
Signaling molecule may help prevent Alzheimer's disease
The main driver of Alzheimer's disease is excessive inflammation in the brain that is triggered by cells called astrocytes and microglia in response to high levels of amyloid beta deposits and tau tangles. New research reveals that a subset of astrocytes releases a molecule called interleukin-3 that instructs microglia to adopt a protective response and clear away amyloid beta deposits and tau tan
22h
[Academic] Our lab is conducting cognitive and developmental research, and WE NEED PARTICIPANTS!
The Budding Minds Memory and Development Lab at the University of Toronto is seeking healthy child and adult participants aged 6-9 and 18-35 to participate in a behavioural study examining the relationship between memory development and cognition. You (or your siblings/children) will complete a variety of fun, non-invasive learning and memory games online through the video-calling platform Zoom .
23h
Watching subsurface defects as they move
A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory scientist and collaborators have demonstrated the first-ever "defect microscope" that can track how populations of defects deep inside macroscopic materials move collectively.
1d
Brad Paisley Plays His Music Underwater For Sharks | Shark Week
Stream Brad Paisley's Shark Country on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/bradpaisley About Brad Paisley's Shark Country: Country star Brad Paisley and comedian JB Smoove meet in the Bahamas to attract new fans, Sharks! With Dr. Austin Gallagher's help, they put Brad's musical talents to the test in shark-infested waters to see how sound can attract or repel sharks. Subscribe to Discove
1d
Protecting spotted owls cost fewer timber jobs that predicted
A new study finds that protection of the northern spotted owl in the Pacific Northwest led to as many as 32,000 timber job losses, compared to the 130,000 jobs the industry predicted. Last month, the Biden administration indicated it would reverse changes to the Endangered Species Act made by President Trump, which had opened up a large chunk of the threatened northern spotted owl's habitat in th
1d
Math explains black hole light bending visual trick
A new study pins down a phenomenon that allows light to curve around black holes to present an observer with multiple views of the same background galaxy. In the vicinity of a black hole, space curves so much that light rays are deflected, and very nearby light can be deflected so much that it travels several times around the black hole. Therefore, when we observe a distant galaxy (or some other
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