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England's Covid unlocking is threat to world, say 1,200 scientists
International experts say 'unethical experiment' could allow vaccine-resistant variants to develop Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Boris Johnson's plan to lift virtually all of England's pandemic restrictions on Monday is a threat to the world and provides fertile ground for the emergence of vaccine-resistant variants, international experts say. Britain's position as
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Delta Is Driving a Wedge Through Missouri
The summer wasn't meant to be like this. By April, Greene County, in southwestern Missouri, seemed to be past the worst of the pandemic . Intensive-care units that once overflowed had emptied. Vaccinations were rising. Health-care workers who had been fighting the coronavirus for months felt relieved—perhaps even hopeful. Then, in late May, cases started ticking up again. By July, the surge was s
5h
Activity discovered on largest comet ever found
A newly discovered visitor to the outer edges of our solar system has been shown to be the largest known comet ever, thanks to the rapid response telescopes of Las Cumbres Observatory. The object, which is named Comet C/2014 UN271 Bernardinelli-Bernstein after its two discoverers, was first announced on Saturday, June 19th, 2021. C/2014 UN271 was found by reprocessing four years of data from the D
8h
Winner who paid $30m for space flight with Bezos won't go due to 'scheduling conflicts'
Anonymous person will be replaced by 18-year-old recent high school graduate on New Shepard spacecraft The anonymous winner of a ticket to join billionaire Jeff Bezos in space next week will no longer board the New Shepard spacecraft due to "scheduling conflicts", Bezos's Blue Origin company announced on Thursday. The winner, who paid $29.7m to join one of the world's richest men in space, will i
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UK reports over 50,000 daily Covid cases for first time since January
Delta variant spreading rapidly, with one in 95 people in England testing positive for the virus last week Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage More than 50,000 daily cases of coronavirus have been reported in the UK for the first time since January, with an estimated one in 95 people testing positive for the virus in England last week. The daily tally of cases has reache
9h
Australia Covid outbreak: Delta variant cases rise among fully vaccinated people
'Vaccines aren't perfect,' epidemiologist says, but offer lower risk of hospitalisation and prevention against spread of virus Follow our Australia Covid live blog for the latest updates Vic hotspots ; Vic restrictions ; NSW hotspots ; NSW restrictions Vaccine rollout tracker ; get our free news app ; get our morning email Epidemiologists warn of more breakthrough Covid infections as the number o
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Woman Breaks Into Dentist's Office, Extracts 13 Teeth From Anesthetized Patient
Laurel Eich, a 42-year-old woman from Nevada, was arrested on Wednesday for burglary at a Sun Valley dental clinic where she used to work, according to a statement by the local Washoe County Sheriff's Office . In a bewildering twist, Eich also apparently admitted to extracting 13 teeth from an unwilling and anesthetized patient on an earlier date. The wildest part of the story? We have no idea wh
4h
Good News: NASA Says It Managed to Fix the Hubble Space Telescope
Lease on Life After a month-long saga, NASA says that the iconic Hubble Space Telescope is back online. "Hubble is back!" said Tom Brown, the head of the Hubble Space Telescope at the Space Telescope Science Institute, said this morning in an email obtained by Science . Soap Hubble The 31-year-old space telescope went dark in mid-June after its computer control system went down. Initial attempts
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Subway CEO Says Sandwiches Definitely Contain Tuna, Regardless of What That DNA Test Said
Damage Control Popular sandwich chain Subway is in full damage control mode after one test in a New York Times investigation last month found no trace of tuna DNA in the company's tuna. Now, after a strange delay, Subway's PR team is waging a publicity war to convince the public that its tuna is in fact tuna. The company even created a website, subwaytunafacts.com , to enlighten its customer base
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Gazillionaire Gives Away $28 Million Ticket to Space Because of "Scheduling Conflict"
Scheduling Conflicts Oliver Daemon, an 18-year-old from the Netherlands, will be joining Amazon founder Jeff Bezos on a journey of a lifetime next week: a trip to an altitude of 62 miles on board the Bezos-led Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket. The original ticketholder, who shelled out $28 million for the ticket and has asked to remain anonymous, isn't tagging along. Why? Because of "scheduling c
6h
If Covid-19 is a seasonal virus, why is it spreading during the summer? | Francois Balloux
Understanding seasonality can help us to work out when the pandemic is likely to be over There is a paradox at the heart of Sars-Cov-2 transmission that has yet to be fully explored. While it's firmly established that the virus transmits best in winter, in common with most other respiratory viruses, the UK is currently experiencing a summer surge . There have also been major Covid-19 epidemic wav
14h
Biden's Spaghetti-at-the-Wall Vaccine Campaign
What will it take? Eighty-year-old Anthony Fauci is on TikTok trying to reach the young and unvaccinated. Dating apps are steering people toward health clinics. The first lady, Jill Biden, is venturing into red America to coax the unwilling into getting shots. White House aides regularly swap messages on an email chain dubbed "Ideas" that flags inventive ways of persuading people to do their part
13h
Elon Musk Says the Cybertruck Might Flop But He Doesn't Care
Don't Give a Truck Tesla enthusiasts have been waiting for years to get their hands on a Cybertruck, the company's upcoming electric pickup — and the wait may soon be over, if the Elon Musk-led company hits its targets this year . But not everybody will be that excited about the brutalist, stainless steel vehicle. In fact, it wouldn't surprise Musk if his company's latest offering kinda bombs. "T
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We'll soon know more about our bodies than ever before – but are we ready? | Daniel M Davis
Tests could show the probability of illnesses occurring in five, 10 or 20 years, with huge moral and ethical implications We're soon going to have to make our own choices about social distancing, wearing masks and travel. When the legal enforcement of rules is lifted, the way in which each of us deals with the risk of Covid-19 will be down to personal judgment. But how well equipped are we to mak
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Ford Announces Petrol Fragrance to Appease Nostalgic EV Owners
Mach-Eau Ford has launched a new petrol-scented fragrance called "Mach-Eau," designed to appease nostalgic owners of the upcoming Mach-E GT, a sporty variant of its first first fully electric Mustang. And, no, this isn't an extremely late "Voltswagen"-level disaster of an April Fool's joke. The "premium fragrance" is "for those who crave the performance of the new all-electric Mustang Mach-E GT y
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Why are billionaires obsessed with going to space? | Thomas Moynihan
If civilisation perishes on planet Earth, Musk, Bezos and Branson seem to think humans have a backup elsewhere Branson, Bezos, Musk: why are these billionaires, with all their worldly riches, fixated on space travel? The Tesla founder, Elon Musk, argues that in becoming "multiplanetary", humans might gain "failsafe" protection from the risks of extinction or planetary collapse, while Amazon's Jef
7h
New Anthony Bourdain Documentary Used AI to Recreate His Voice
Roadrunner Documentary filmmaker Morgan Neville's latest documentary is about the life of the legendary author and TV personality Anthony Bourdain, who tragically died by suicide back in 2018. To fill in some of the gaps, The New Yorker reports , Neville used artificial intelligence to recreate Bourdain's voice for three different quotes in his documentary, "Roadrunner: A Film About Anthony Bourd
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Sport science body to track female athletes' hormonal changes linked to menstruation
English Institute of Sport to roll out saliva tests tracking hormones that may drive fluctuation in women's performance Highs and lows are a feature of any athlete's career, but for some female contestants, these peaks and troughs in performance may come more regularly – driven by hormonal changes associated with their menstrual cycles. Now, the English Institute of Sport (EIS) is seeking to leve
9h
The Richest Babysitter in the World
D uring the interview, I realized almost immediately that the woman was pregnant—I guessed she was about halfway along—but she didn't remark on it, and of course neither did I. Over the phone, we'd discussed only her 3-year-old daughter. The woman, whose name was Diane, was looking for a babysitter for the girl, whose name was Sophie, two mornings a week from 9 a.m. to noon, for $10 an hour. This
12h
The Rise of Must-Read TV
Illustrations by Vanessa Saba If you want a preview of next year's Emmy Awards, just take a walk past your local bookstore. According to data drawn from Publishers Marketplace, the industry's clearinghouse for news and self-reported book deals, literary adaptations to television have been on a steady climb. The site has listed nearly 4,000 film and television deals since it launched in 2000, and
12h
Unconventional superconductor acts the part of a promising quantum computing platform
Scientists on the hunt for an unconventional kind of superconductor have produced the most compelling evidence to date that they've found one. In a pair of papers, researchers at the University of Maryland's (UMD) Quantum Materials Center (QMC) and colleagues have shown that uranium ditelluride (or UTe2 for short) displays many of the hallmarks of a topological superconductor—a material that may u
14h
Jeff Bezos Has Picked an Unusual Space Crew
Jeff Bezos has finalized the manifest for his company's first passenger flight to space, and it's a rather unusual bunch. There's Bezos himself, the richest person in the world, who sold some of his Amazon stock to fund his space venture, Blue Origin. His brother, Mark, with whom he wanted to share the experience. Wally Funk, an 82-year-old American pilot who in the early 1960s passed the same tr
21h
'A tale of woe': UK butterfly numbers hit by cold, wet spring
Public urged to join world's biggest butterfly count to help collect data on impacts of climate crisis Butterflies across the UK have been hit hard by unseasonably cold and wet spring weather, conservationists have warned. April was the sunniest on record but it also had a record number of frosts followed by the wettest May for England in 54 years . Native butterflies such as the small tortoisesh
23h
The Guardian view on Boris Johnson's Covid experts: sadly on tap, not on top | Editorial
Scientists cannot shield the prime minister from the fallout of an unethical policy that will see rising deaths This week Boris Johnson presented the UK with his plan to lift all of England's Covid restrictions on Monday. He was flanked by Chris Whitty, the chief medical officer, and Sir Patrick Vallance, the government's chief scientific adviser. Both men were there to show that Mr Johnson is fo
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A noninvasive test to detect cancer cells and pinpoint their location
Most of the tests that doctors use to diagnose cancer—such as mammography, colonoscopy, and CT scans—are based on imaging. More recently, researchers have also developed molecular diagnostics that can detect specific cancer-associated molecules that circulate in bodily fluids like blood or urine.
9h
The Awful Secret of Wealth Privilege
In the first episode of HBO's new miniseries The White Lotus , Shane (played by Jake Lacy) and his new wife, Rachel (Alexandra Daddario), arrive on their honeymoon, on an unspecified Hawaiian island, with bagfuls of silk resort-wear and books by Malcolm Gladwell. Alone in their suite, Jake moves in to kiss Rachel, but he's suddenly gripped by a suspicion that all might not be entirely copacetic.
6h
The Atlantic Daily: Ohio Is a Bellwether of Trumpism
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Certain elections balloon beyond their candidates, embodying the central tensions of the political moment. Right now, that race is the Republican primary for an Ohio Senate seat. As they say, it's
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Lewis Hamilton is right about diversity. But the issue goes way beyond motorsport | Chi Onwurah
I was part of the F1 champion's commission. As a Black female engineer, I've seen the lack of minorities in science and technology I was delighted to receive an email from Lewis Hamilton last year, asking that I join his newly created commission on diversity in British motorsport. I accepted because Hamilton has become a champion for social change through the platform sport gives him. After 10 mo
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Watching the ultrafast dance moves of a laser plasma
Great leaps in science and technology have been propelled by recent advances in seeing fast evolving physical phenomena, as they happen. Femtosecond lasers from the infrared to the X-ray region have enabled us to 'watch', in real time, atoms dance in molecules and solids on femtosecond and picosecond timescales. Watching such fascinating motions not just in real time, but at the spatial locations
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How to mend your broken pandemic brain
Orgies are back. Or at least that's what advertisers want you to believe. One commercial for chewing gum —whose sales tanked during 2020 because who cares what your breath smells like when you're wearing a mask—depicts the end of the pandemic as a raucous free-for-all with people embracing in the streets and making out in parks. The reality is a little different. Americans are slowly coming out o
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A Video Tour of the Standard Model
Recently, Quanta has explored the collaboration between physics and mathematics on one of the most important ideas in science: quantum field theory. The basic objects of a quantum field theory are quantum fields, which spread across the universe and, through their fluctuations, give rise to the most fundamental phenomena in the physical world. We've emphasized the unfinished business in both… S
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The space race is back on – but who will win?
Alliances are shifting as states led by China and Russia compete with the US and tech entrepreneurs Liu Boming took in the dizzy view. Around him lay the inky vastness of space. Below was the Earth. "Wow," he said, laughing. "It's too beautiful out here." Over the next seven hours Liu and his colleague Tang Hongbo carried out China's second spacewalk, helped along by a giant robotic arm. Mission
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Scientists turn methane into methanol at room temperature
A team of researchers from Stanford University and the University of Leuven in Belgium has further elucidated an intriguing process that could be an important step toward a methanol fuel economy with abundant methane as the feedstock, an advance that could fundamentally change how the world uses natural gas.
14h
Producing memory from speckle patterns
A team of researchers has developed a way to significantly increase the memory of speckle patterns, the very complex patterns that result from shining a laser light onto an opaque sheet, such as paper, biological tissue, or fog.
12h
Why WeWork Didn't Work
We talk to the authors of a new book about the notorious coworking startup and its charismatic cofounder, Adam Neumann.
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On vaccine equality, the UK has failed to show the leadership the world needs | Mohamed Adow and Tasneem Essop
Britain has broken the promises Boris Johnson made before the G7 – a change of tack is necessary to make Cop26 a success Covid and the climate crisis are the two defining global crises of our time and Britain has a crucial role to play in addressing them both. As the Cop26 host, it will be responsible for overseeing a successful outcome at the UN climate talks in Glasgow in November. Only a few w
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GSK plans £400m life sciences campus in Stevenage
Pharmaceuticals firm thinks creating cluster of companies at its site could result in up to 5,000 jobs GlaxoSmithKline is seeking to create a £400m campus in Stevenage for new life sciences companies that it believes could result in up to 5,000 jobs over the next decade. The pharmaceuticals company has kicked off a process to find a private sector developer to transform a third of its existing 37
12h
A simplified method for calibrating optical tweezers
Measurements of biomechanical properties inside living cells require minimally-invasive methods. Optical tweezers are particularly attractive as a tool. They use the momentum of light to trap and manipulate micro- or nanoscale particles. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Cornelia Denz from the University of Münster (Germany) has now developed a simplified method to perform the necessary calib
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James Webb Space Telescope testing progress continues
Engineers have made considerable progress in checking off NASA's James Webb Space Telescope's final series of tests. Three big milestones have recently been completed, bringing the world's most complex and powerful space science telescope ever built much closer to being fully prepared for its million-mile journey to orbit. These three testing milestones are outlined below:
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Diver Evades a Huge Tiger Shark! | Shark Week
Stream Tiger Queen on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/tigerqueen About Tiger Queen: The shark population in Turks and Caicos has a sizable concentration of female tiger sharks, leaving scientists wondering where all the males are hiding. Shark enthusiast Kinga Philipps joins Dr. Austin Gallagher to help solve this puzzling mystery. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDisco
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Galactic fireworks: New ESO images reveal stunning features of nearby galaxies
A team of astronomers has released new observations of nearby galaxies that resemble colourful cosmic fireworks. The images, obtained with the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (ESO's VLT), show different components of the galaxies in distinct colours, allowing astronomers to pinpoint the locations of young stars and the gas they warm up around them.
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Body mass index as a risk factor for diabetes varies throughout the world
There are substantial differences among low- and middle-income countries in the association between BMI and diabetes risk. Individual countries can optimize diabetes screening by tailoring guidelines to their specific population's risk threshold for BMI, age and gender. In some parts of the world, diabetes risk is greater at lower BMI thresholds and in younger ages than reflected in currently used
1h
Dapagliflozin found effective and safe in adults with advanced kidney disease
The sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor dapagliflozin reduced kidney, cardiovascular, and mortality risks in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease, similar to benefits seen in individuals with normal or moderately impaired kidney function. Rates of serious side effects were similar in patients with advanced chronic kidney disease who received dapagliflozin or placebo.
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New score measures health-related quality of life in patients with kidney failure
The results of a new study support the validity of a score that considers various patient-reported outcome measures and preferences for assessing health-related quality of life in individuals with kidney failure. The score is calculated from assessments of cognitive function, depression, fatigue, pain interference, physical functioning, sleep disturbance, and ability to participate in social roles
1h
Oregon wildfire forms 'fire clouds' that pose danger below
Smoke and heat from a massive wildfire in southeastern Oregon are creating giant "fire clouds" over the blaze—dangerous columns of smoke and ash that can reach up to 6 miles (10 kilometers) in the sky and are visible from more than 100 miles (160 kilometers) away.
1h
Trade in Your Annoying Cords for a Stylish High-End Wireless Charger
There's nothing worse than desperately trying to charge your wireless device when you have to sift through a messy pile of wires. Instead of dealing with the mess and stress of wired charging, what if there was an attractive way to wirelessly charge your devices that blended seamlessly into your design aesthetic. That way, you could say goodbye to all the wires that hang from the sides of sofas a
2h
Enabling the 'imagination' of artificial intelligence
Despite advances in deep neural networks, computers still struggle with the very human skill of 'imagination.' Now, a research team has developed an AI that uses human-like capabilities to imagine a never-before-seen object with different attributes.
3h
Air-powered computer memory helps soft robot control movements
Engineers made a pneumatic RAM chip using microfluidic valves instead of electronic transistors. The valves remain sealed against a pressure differential even when disconnected from an air supply line, creating trapped pressure differentials that function as memories and maintain the states of a robot's actuators. Dense arrays of these valves can perform advanced operations and reduce the expensiv
3h
Kids with sleep apnea risk high blood pressure as teens
Children with obstructive sleep apnea are nearly three times more likely to develop high blood pressure when they become teenagers than children who never experience sleep apnea, according to a new study. Children whose sleep apnea improves as they grow into adolescence, however, don't show an increased chance of having high blood pressure. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for heart dis
3h
News media accidentally boosted Russian disinformation tweets
Many legacy media outlets played an unwitting role in the growth of the four most successful fake Twitter accounts the Russian Internet Research Agency created to spread disinformation during the 2016 US presidential campaign, according to a study. In roughly two years beginning in late 2015, these accounts went from obscurity to microcelebrity status, growing from about 100 to more than 100,000
3h
Role of deep-sea microbial predators at hydrothermal vents examined
The hydrothermal vent fluids from the Gorda Ridge spreading center in the northeast Pacific Ocean create a biological hub of activity in the deep sea. There, in the dark ocean, a unique food web thrives not on photosynthesis but rather on chemical energy from the venting fluids. Among the creatures having a field day feasting at the Gorda Ridge vents is a diverse assortment of microbial eukaryotes
3h
US corn and soybean maladapted to climate variations
U.S. corn and soybean varieties have become increasingly heat and drought resistant as agricultural production adapts to a changing climate. But the focus on developing crops for extreme conditions has negatively affected performance under normal weather patterns, a new study shows.
3h
When mad AIOLOS drags IKAROS down: A novel pathogenic mechanism
Researchers have described a novel primary immunodeficiency due to a mutation in AIOLOS. This acts through a novel pathogenic mechanism termed 'heterodimeric interference', whereby when two different proteins bind together in a heterodimer, the mutant protein hijacks the function of the normal protein. In a mouse model, they were able to restore some of the lost functions by interfering with the m
3h
New discoveries and insights into the glass transition
When a liquid is cooled rapidly, it gains viscosity and eventually becomes a rigid solid glass. The point at which it does so is known as the glass transition. A collaborative research group has furthered our understanding of this phenomenon through the use of high entropy metallic glasses.
3h
How micro-circuits in the brain regulate fear
The brain mechanisms underlying the suppression of fear responses have attracted a lot of attention as they are relevant for therapy of human anxiety disorders. Despite our broad understanding of the different brain regions activated during the experience of fear, how fear responses can be suppressed remains largely elusive. Researchers have now discovered that the activation of identified central
3h
Study finds vaccine hesitancy lower in poorer countries
New research published in Nature Medicine reveals willingness to get a COVID-19 vaccine was considerably higher in developing countries (80% of respondents) than in the United States (65%) and Russia (30%). The study provides one of the first insights into vaccine acceptance and hesitancy in a broad selection of low- and-middle income countries (LMIC), covering over 20,000 survey respondents and b
3h
Add fatty acid to taste
A recently developed method by Institute for Systems Biology (ISB) and University of California, Riverside provides new insights into cancer biology by allowing researchers to show how fatty acids are absorbed by single cells.
3h
Deactivation blocks proton pathways in the mitochondrial complex I [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cellular respiration is powered by membrane-bound redox enzymes that convert chemical energy into an electrochemical proton gradient and drive the energy metabolism. By combining large-scale classical and quantum mechanical simulations with cryo-electron microscopy data, we resolve here molecular details of conformational changes linked to proton pumping in the mammalian complex…
4h
CD8 coreceptor-mediated focusing can reorder the agonist hierarchy of peptide ligands recognized via the T cell receptor [Immunology and Inflammation]
CD8+ T cells are inherently cross-reactive and recognize numerous peptide antigens in the context of a given major histocompatibility complex class I (MHCI) molecule via the clonotypically expressed T cell receptor (TCR). The lineally expressed coreceptor CD8 interacts coordinately with MHCI at a distinct and largely invariant site to slow…
4h
MK2 degradation as a sensor of signal intensity that controls stress-induced cell fate [Biochemistry]
Cell survival in response to stress is determined by the coordination of various signaling pathways. The kinase p38α is activated by many stresses, but the intensity and duration of the signal depends on the stimuli. How different p38α-activation dynamics may impact cell life/death decisions is unclear. Here, we show that…
4h
Vocal learning and flexible rhythm pattern perception are linked: evidence from songbirds [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Rhythm perception is fundamental to speech and music. Humans readily recognize a rhythmic pattern, such as that of a familiar song, independently of the tempo at which it occurs. This shows that our perception of auditory rhythms is flexible, relying on global relational patterns more than on the absolute durations…
4h
Computing the Riemannian curvature of image patch and single-cell RNA sequencing data manifolds using extrinsic differential geometry [Applied Mathematics]
Most high-dimensional datasets are thought to be inherently low-dimensional—that is, data points are constrained to lie on a low-dimensional manifold embedded in a high-dimensional ambient space. Here, we study the viability of two approaches from differential geometry to estimate the Riemannian curvature of these low-dimensional manifolds. The intrinsic approach relates…
4h
Overriding native cell coordination enhances external programming of collective cell migration [Applied Biological Sciences]
As collective cell migration is essential in biological processes spanning development, healing, and cancer progression, methods to externally program cell migration are of great value. However, problems can arise if the external commands compete with strong, preexisting collective behaviors in the tissue or system. We investigate this problem by applying…
4h
Global biogeography of chemosynthetic symbionts reveals both localized and globally distributed symbiont groups [Microbiology]
In the ocean, most hosts acquire their symbionts from the environment. Due to the immense spatial scales involved, our understanding of the biogeography of hosts and symbionts in marine systems is patchy, although this knowledge is essential for understanding fundamental aspects of symbiosis such as host–symbiont specificity and evolution. Lucinidae…
4h
Divergence among rice cultivars reveals roles for transposition and epimutation in ongoing evolution of genomic imprinting [Plant Biology]
Parent-of-origin–dependent gene expression in mammals and flowering plants results from differing chromatin imprints (genomic imprinting) between maternally and paternally inherited alleles. Imprinted gene expression in the endosperm of seeds is associated with localized hypomethylation of maternally but not paternally inherited DNA, with certain small RNAs also displaying parent-of-origin–specifi
4h
Structural basis for potassium transport in prokaryotes by KdpFABC [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
KdpFABC is an oligomeric K+ transport complex in prokaryotes that maintains ionic homeostasis under stress conditions. The complex comprises a channel-like subunit (KdpA) from the superfamily of K+ transporters and a pump-like subunit (KdpB) from the superfamily of P-type ATPases. Recent structural work has defined the architecture and generated contradictory…
4h
Previously unaccounted atmospheric mercury deposition in a midlatitude deciduous forest [Environmental Sciences]
Mercury is toxic to wildlife and humans, and forests are thought to be a globally important sink for gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) deposition from the atmosphere. Yet there are currently no annual GEM deposition measurements over rural forests. Here we present measurements of ecosystem–atmosphere GEM exchange using tower-based micrometeorological methods…
4h
Sorting of cadherin-catenin-associated proteins into individual clusters [Cell Biology]
The cytoplasmic tails of classical cadherins form a multiprotein cadherin–catenin complex (CCC) that constitutes the major structural unit of adherens junctions (AJs). The CCC in AJs forms junctional clusters, "E clusters," driven by cis and trans interactions in the cadherin ectodomain and stabilized by α-catenin–actin interactions. Additional proteins are known…
4h
The Type I interferon antiviral gene program is impaired by lockdown and preserved by caregiving [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
Previous research has linked perceived social isolation (loneliness) to reduced antiviral immunity, but the immunologic effects of the objective social isolation imposed by pandemic "shelter in place" (SIP) policies is unknown. We assessed the immunologic impact of SIP by relocating 21 adult male rhesus macaques from 2,000-m2 field cage communities…
4h
Carotenoid biomarkers in Namibian shelf sediments: Anoxygenic photosynthesis during sulfide eruptions in the Benguela Upwelling System [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Aromatic carotenoid-derived hydrocarbon biomarkers are ubiquitous in ancient sediments and oils and are typically attributed to anoxygenic phototrophic green sulfur bacteria (GSB) and purple sulfur bacteria (PSB). These biomarkers serve as proxies for the environmental growth requirements of PSB and GSB, namely euxinic waters extending into the photic zone. Until…
4h
Invention: The Storywrangler
Scientists have invented a first-of-its-kind instrument to peer deeply into billions of Twitter posts–providing an unprecedented, minute-by-minute view of popularity, from rising political movements, to K-pop, to emerging diseases. The tool–called the Storywrangler–gathers phrases across 150 different languages, analyzing the rise and fall of ideas and stories, each day, among people around the
4h
From genes to memes: Algorithm may help scientists demystify complex networks
A team of researchers has developed a new algorithm that can serve as a more effective way to analyze models of biological systems, which in turn allows a new path to understanding the decision-making circuits that make up these systems. The researchers add that the algorithm will help scientists study how relatively simple actions lead to complex behaviors, such as cancer growth and voting patter
4h
Future information technologies: Topological materials for ultrafast spintronics
Using time- and spin-resolved methods at BESSY II, the physicists explored how, after optical excitation, the complex interplay in the behavior of excited electrons in the bulk and on the surface results in unusual spin dynamics. The work is an important step on the way to spintronic devices based on topological materials for ultrafast information processing.
4h
An ancestral recombination graph of human, Neanderthal, and Denisovan genomes
Many humans carry genes from Neanderthals, a legacy of past admixture. Existing methods detect this archaic hominin ancestry within human genomes using patterns of linkage disequilibrium or direct comparison to Neanderthal genomes. Each of these methods is limited in sensitivity and scalability. We describe a new ancestral recombination graph inference algorithm that scales to large genome-wide d
4h
Storywrangler: A massive exploratorium for sociolinguistic, cultural, socioeconomic, and political timelines using Twitter
In real time, Twitter strongly imprints world events, popular culture, and the day-to-day, recording an ever-growing compendium of language change. Vitally, and absent from many standard corpora such as books and news archives, Twitter also encodes popularity and spreading through retweets. Here, we describe Storywrangler, an ongoing curation of over 100 billion tweets containing 1 trillion 1-gra
4h
FOXC2 controls adult lymphatic endothelial specialization, function, and gut lymphatic barrier preventing multiorgan failure
The mechanisms maintaining adult lymphatic vascular specialization throughout life and their role in coordinating inter-organ communication to sustain homeostasis remain elusive. We report that inactivation of the mechanosensitive transcription factor Foxc2 in adult lymphatic endothelium leads to a stepwise intestine-to-lung systemic failure. Foxc2 loss compromised the gut epithelial barrier, pro
4h
Circuit mechanisms for the chemical modulation of cortex-wide network interactions and behavioral variability
Influential theories postulate distinct roles of catecholamines and acetylcholine in cognition and behavior. However, previous physiological work reported similar effects of these neuromodulators on the response properties (specifically, the gain) of individual cortical neurons. Here, we show a double dissociation between the effects of catecholamines and acetylcholine at the level of large-scale
4h
Parity and time reversal elucidate both decision-making in empirical models and attractor scaling in critical Boolean networks
We present new applications of parity inversion and time reversal to the emergence of complex behavior from simple dynamical rules in stochastic discrete models. Our parity-based encoding of causal relationships and time-reversal construction efficiently reveal discrete analogs of stable and unstable manifolds. We demonstrate their predictive power by studying decision-making in systems biology a
4h
Noninvasive quantitative assessment of collagen degradation in parchments by polarization-resolved SHG microscopy
Nondestructive and noninvasive investigation techniques are highly sought-after to establish the degradation state of historical parchments, which is up to now assessed by thermal techniques that are invasive and destructive. We show that advanced nonlinear optical (NLO) microscopy enables quantitative in situ mapping of parchment degradation at the micrometer scale. We introduce two parameters t
4h
Polycomb-group recruitment to a Drosophila target gene is the default state that is inhibited by a transcriptional activator
Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators that maintain the transcriptional repression of target genes following their initial repression by transcription factors. PcG target genes are repressed in some cells, but active in others. Therefore, a mechanism must exist by which PcG proteins distinguish between the repressed and active states and only assemble repressive chromatin enviro
4h
Large-scale whole-genome resequencing unravels the domestication history of Cannabis sativa
Cannabis sativa has long been an important source of fiber extracted from hemp and both medicinal and recreational drugs based on cannabinoid compounds. Here, we investigated its poorly known domestication history using whole-genome resequencing of 110 accessions from worldwide origins. We show that C. sativa was first domesticated in early Neolithic times in East Asia and that all current hemp a
4h
Structural insights into the mechanism of human NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptake
Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) protein plays a central role in the intestinal cholesterol absorption and is the target of a drug, ezetimibe, which inhibits NPC1L1 to reduce cholesterol absorption. Here, we present cryo–electron microscopy structures of human NPC1L1 in apo state, cholesterol-enriched state, and ezetimibe-bound state to reveal molecular details of NPC1L1-mediated cholesterol uptak
4h
Observation of triplet superconductivity in CoSi2/TiSi2 heterostructures
Unconventional superconductivity and, in particular, triplet superconductivity have been front and center of topological materials and quantum technology research. Here, we report our observation of triplet pairing in nonmagnetic CoSi 2 /TiSi 2 heterostructures on silicon. CoSi 2 undergoes a sharp superconducting transition at a critical temperature T c ~= 1.5 K, while TiSi 2 is a normal metal. W
4h
Plasmid hypermutation using a targeted artificial DNA replisome
Extensive exploration of a protein's sequence space for improved or new molecular functions requires in vivo evolution with large populations. But disentangling the evolution of a target protein from the rest of the proteome is challenging. Here, we designed a protein complex of a targeted artificial DNA replisome (TADR) that operates in live cells to processively replicate one strand of a plasmi
4h
Analog memristive synapse based on topotactic phase transition for high-performance neuromorphic computing and neural network pruning
Inspired by the human brain, nonvolatile memories (NVMs)–based neuromorphic computing emerges as a promising paradigm to build power-efficient computing hardware for artificial intelligence. However, existing NVMs still suffer from physically imperfect device characteristics. In this work, a topotactic phase transition random-access memory (TPT-RAM) with a unique diffusive nonvolatile dual mode b
4h
Rampant prophage movement among transient competitors drives rapid adaptation during infection
Interactions between bacteria, their close competitors, and viral parasites are common in infections, but understanding of these eco-evolutionary dynamics is limited. Most examples of adaptations caused by phage lysogeny are through the acquisition of new genes. However, integrated prophages can also insert into functional genes and impart a fitness benefit by disrupting their expression, a proce
4h
Vitrification of octonary perylene mixtures with ultralow fragility
Strong glass formers with a low fragility are highly sought-after because of the technological importance of vitrification. In the case of organic molecules and polymers, the lowest fragility values have been reported for single-component materials. Here, we establish that mixing of organic molecules can result in a marked reduction in fragility. Individual bay-substituted perylene derivatives di
4h
Team finds 'footprint' of coronavirus outbreak from 20K years ago
A coronavirus epidemic broke out in the East Asia region more than 20,000 years ago, researchers report. Traces of the outbreak are evident in the genetic makeup of people from that area, they've found. The researchers analyzed the genomes of more than 2,500 modern humans from 26 worldwide populations, to better understand how humans have adapted to historical coronavirus outbreaks. The team used
4h
Build A Better Website Faster With This UI/UX Design Tool
As internet access becomes easier to get and even the most staid industries hire web designers, web design has become a key job skill not just for IT professionals, but office workers, leaders, and entrepreneurs. Yet even the simplest website is far more complex, and needs to be carefully designed with the end-user in mind. The Venus Design System makes it easier to engineer and launch any websit
4h
Busting the Easter Island myth: there was no civilization collapse
Easter Island, whose native name is Rapa Nui, is a remote island in the Pacific Ocean about 2,300 miles west of Chile. Researchers have proposed that deforestation and climatic changes led to societal collapse on the island, prior to European contact. The results of a new study suggest that, despite these factors, the Rapa Nui people managed to adapt and sustain a stable society. In the popular i
5h
Study examines the role of deep-sea microbial predators at hydrothermal vents
The hydrothermal vent fluids from the Gorda Ridge spreading center in the northeast Pacific Ocean create a biological hub of activity in the deep sea. There, in the dark ocean, a unique food web thrives not on photosynthesis but rather on chemical energy from the venting fluids. Among the creatures having a field day feasting at the Gorda Ridge vents is a diverse assortment of microbial eukaryotes
5h
How a butterfly tree becomes a web
Evolution is often portrayed as a tree, with new species branching off from existing lineages, never again to meet. The truth however is often much messier. In the case of adaptive radiation, in which species diversify rapidly to fill different ecological niches, it can be difficult to resolve relationships, and the phylogeny (i.e. evolutionary tree) may look more like a bush than a tree. This is
5h
SUV39H2: A direct genetic link to autism spectrum disorders
New research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) in Japan has identified a direct link between the SUV39h2 gene and the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A human variant of the SUV39H2 gene led researchers to examine its absence in mice. Published in Molecular Psychiatry, the study found that when absent, adult mice exhibited cognitive inflexibility similar to what occurs i
5h
From birth control to mammograms, many women missed out on preventive care for all of 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic knocked many women off schedule for important health appointments, a new study finds, and many didn't get back on schedule even after clinics reopened. The effect may have been greatest in areas where such care is already likely falling behind. The study looks at screenings for breast cancer, cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STI), as well as two types of b
5h
Study finds legacy media boosted fake Russian Twitter accounts in 2016
Many legacy media outlets played an unwitting role in the growth of the four most successful fake Twitter accounts hosted by the Russian Internet Research Agency (IRA) that were created to spread disinformation during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, according to a study led by a University at Buffalo communication researcher.
5h
Scientists get to the bottom of deep Pacific ventilation
Recent findings, with important implications for ocean biogeochemistry and climate science, have been published by Nature Communications in a paper by Associate Professor Mark Holzer from UNSW Science's School of Mathematics & Statistics, with co-authors Tim DeVries (UCSB) and Casimir de Lavergne (LOCEAN).
5h
New research finds that reforesting Europe would increase rainfall, fighting a drying trend
"Plant more trees" is often the first idea that comes to mind when we think about how to prevent further climate change or at least adapt to its impacts. There are good reasons for this. Multiple studies have shown that as well as trees being a fantastic way to store carbon dioxide, they offer other benefits, such as a cooling effect in cities , the ability to reduce flood risk and boost biodiver
5h
Private-public partnership helps to evaluate satellite observations of atmospheric CO2 over oceans
Satellite observations of XCO2 show greater biases apparently over oceans than over the land surface. However, no effective ways to evaluate space-time XCO2 variations over wide geographical areas exist. Observations on commercial ship tracks and aircraft routes, together with atmospehric model calculations, provide a new reference XCO2 dataset for the otherwise inaccesible areas of the world. Hig
5h
JAMA journal retracts paper on masks for children
JAMA Pediatrics has retracted a paper claiming that children's masks trap too-high concentrations of carbon dioxide a little more than two weeks after publishing it. The paper, by Harald Walach and colleagues, came under fire immediately after it was published on June 30, and quickly earned an editor's note. Walach had another paper — which … Continue reading
5h
NIH-funded study finds gene therapy may restore missing enzyme in rare disease
A new study published in Nature Communications suggests that gene therapy delivered into the brain may be safe and effective in treating aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency. AADC deficiency is a rare neurological disorder that develops in infancy and leads to near absent levels of certain brain chemicals, serotonin and dopamine, that are critical for movement, behavior, and sleep
6h
New Sinai Health research finds common denominator linking all cancers
All cancers fall into just two categories, according to new research from scientists at Sinai Health, in findings that could provide a new strategy for treating the most aggressive and untreatable forms of the disease.In new research out this month in Cancer Cell, scientists at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute (LTRI) divide all cancers into two groups, based on the presence or absence of
6h
Pee-soaked pack rat nests hold ancient beetle DNA
The urine-caked nests of ancient desert pack rats are offering scientists a glimpse of the genetic makeup of insects from more than 34,000 years ago. For many years, scientists have been extracting DNA from the bones of ancient humans, humanoids, and animals to paint a picture of evolution and species movement. Despite what the movie Jurassic Park portrays—dinosaurs resurrected based on preserved
6h
Training shows special ed teachers how students will do math
A four-week training course made a substantial difference in helping special education teachers anticipate different ways students with learning disabilities might solve math problems, researchers report. The findings suggest that the training would help instructors more quickly identify and respond to a student's needs. The researchers also say their findings could help teachers in special educa
7h
Noninvasive, label-free optical method visualizes deep, cellular brain disease in vivo
Using long wavelength near-infrared light, scientists at UC Davis developed a label-free microscopy approach that achieves a unique combination of deep, high resolution, and minimally invasive brain imaging. The technique images neurons and axonal myelination across the mouse neocortex and some sub-cortical regions, through the thinned skull. Now studies of brain disease can be conducted deep in t
7h
Organic electronics possibly soon to enter the GHz-regime
Physicists of the Technische Universität Dresden introduce the first implementation of a complementary vertical organic transistor technology, which is able to operate at low voltage, with adjustable inverter properties, and a fall and rise time demonstrated in inverter and ring-oscillator circuits of less than 10 nanoseconds, respectively. With this new technology they are just a stone's throw aw
7h
Artificial sweetener 'carriers' deliver CO to protect kidneys
A new oral prodrug based on artificial sweetener ingredients delivers carbon monoxide to protect against acute kidney injury, a new study with mice shows. Although carbon monoxide (CO) gas is toxic in large doses, scientists have discovered it can have beneficial effects by reducing inflammation and protecting cells against injury. Previous studies have demonstrated the protective effects of CO a
7h
Study finds exactly how long people want to live: it isn't forever
A new study reports that aging Norwegians would like to live 91 years. Most people prefer a shorter life if they have dementia, chronic pain, or are a burden to their families. There is more to life than just making sure it doesn't end. The search for immortality is the plot to the oldest epic ever written . Allegedly, alchemists and conquistadors sought after it. Claims of ridiculously old age f
7h
Complexity yields simplicity: The shifting dynamics of temperate marine ecosystems
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba find that the combined effects of ocean warming and acidification in temperate marine ecosystems are resulting in a loss of kelp habitat and a shift to a simple turf-dominated ecosystem. Such changes will lead to a loss of the ecosystem services provided by productive macroalgal forests or tropicalized coral-dominated reefs. These results highlight the ne
7h
DIY tracker counts burned calories better than a smartwatch
A system made with two inexpensive sensors is more accurate than smartwatches for tracking calories burned during activity, researchers report And the instructions for making the system yourself are available for free online. Whereas smartwatches and smartphones tend to be off by about 40 to 80% when it comes to counting calories burned during an activity, this system averages 13% error. "We buil
7h
Evaluation of India's 'Mission Indradhanush' finds improvements in vaccination outcomes
Washington, DC / New Delhi, India – Researchers at CDDEP recently published 'Improving vaccination coverage and timeliness through periodic intensification of routine immunization: evidence from Mission Indradhanush' where they evaluated the performance of India's Mission Indradhanush (MI) child vaccination campaign — a periodic intensification of the routine immunization program.
7h
Non-genetic photoacoustic stimulation of single neurons by a tapered fiber optoacoustic emitter
Neuromodulation at high spatial resolution is crucial for advancing understanding of brain circuits and treatment of neurological diseases. Here, a tapered fiber optoacoustic emitter (TFOE) is developed for stimulation of single neurons and subcellular structures. The TFOE enabled integration with patch clamp recording and unveiled cell-type-specific response of excitatory and inhibitory neurons t
7h
A new facet of fuel cell chemistry
Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are a promising technology for cleanly converting chemical energy to electrical energy. But their efficiency depends on the rate at which solids and gasses interact at the devices' electrode surfaces. Thus, to explore ways to improve SOFC efficiency, an international team led by researchers from Berkeley Lab studied a model electrode material in a new way – by exposi
7h
Mechanical Shark Infiltrates Great White Feeding Ground | Shark Week
Stream MechaShark on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/mechashark About MechaShark: To track down New Zealand's monster great whites, researchers build a submersible designed to look like a shark and pilot it deep into what they believe could be a mating ground — the Holy Grail of shark science. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.
8h
RUDN University biologists prove the anticancer potential of macrophages
RUDN University biologists discovered the way how macrophages (the cells of the "first line" immune response) respond to inflammation and identified how the immune response depends on their origin. It turned out that when exposed to an inflammatory stimulus, two opposing mechanisms are activated in macrophages simultaneously — inducing and inhibiting inflammation. These data can potentially be us
8h
The Books Briefing: What the Best Travel Writing Can Do
Joe Sanderson arrived in El Salvador as a white American traveler with ambitions of writing a novel. But during his journey, he became something else entirely: a revolutionary, fully enmeshed in the culture he'd set out to document. The journalist Héctor Tobar's The Last Great Road Bum chronicles this transformation , interrupting Sanderson's real journal entries with commentary from Tobar. The r
8h
Study highlights long road toward gender parity in the geosciences
Women and people of color remain underrepresented along every step of the tenure track in every academic field in the United States. As a new MIT study shows, progress toward equitable representation for women in academia will require active, concerted, and sustained effort—and even then, change may be slow in coming.
8h
Big Bang: How We Are Trying to 'Listen' to It—and the New Physics It Could Unveil
Exactly what happened at the beginning of the universe, 14 billion years ago, is one of the greatest mysteries in physics; there's no simple way to probe it. That's because, in its early stages , the universe was filled with a dense plasma—a gas made out of charged particles including electrons and protons (particles that comprise the atomic nucleus alongside neutrons). Photons (particles of ligh
8h
New tool changes the game for heterogeneous material modeling
The performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries (LIB) can be attributed to complex electrode microstructures. Microstructure analysis at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) aims to apply in-depth knowledge of the electrodes to predict battery performances and identify optimal microstructure architecture to guide LIB development.
8h
Image: Lima, Peru as seen from orbit
The commercial and industrial center of Peru, Lima is located on the mostly flat terrain in the Peruvian coastal plain, within the valleys of the Chillón, Rímac and Lurín rivers. The city is bordered on the east by the foothills of the Andes Mountains and on the west by the Pacific Ocean.
8h
NASA Fixes Iconic Hubble Space Telescope and Brings It Back Online
It has now been more than a month since the Hubble Space Telescope reverted to safe mode following an apparent memory failure. NASA attempted all the standard fixes such as turning it off and on, but the aging observatory stubbornly refused to come back online. After investigating the issue, NASA traced the failure to a power component on the Science Instrument Command and Data Handling module. T
8h
Electronic air cleaning technology can generate unintended pollutants
As the COVID-19 pandemic raged, news reports show that sales of electronic air cleaners have surged due to concerns about airborne disease transmission. But a research team at the Georgia Institute of Technology has found that the benefits to indoor air quality of one type of purifying system can be offset by the generation of other pollutants that are harmful to health.
8h
Staying on schedule
Tsukuba University researchers develop a scheduling algorithm that helps automated biology labs optimize their samples throughout experiments while adhering to time constraints set by perishable materials. This work may help robots more effectively process cellular assays and clinical blood tests.
8h
Floods leave at least 126 dead in Europe
The death toll from devastating floods in Europe soared to at least 126 on Friday, most in western Germany where emergency responders were frantically searching for missing people.
8h
Extraordinary carbon emissions from El Nino-induced biomass burning estimated
In 2015, massive biomass burning events occurred in Equatorial Asia which released a large amount of carbon into the atmosphere, whose signals were captured by in-situ high-precision measurements onboard commercial passenger aircraft and a cargo ship. A simulation-based analysis with those observations estimated the fire-induced carbon emissions to be 273 Tg C for September – October 2015.
8h
Why do scientific discoveries take long to reach the general public?
The results of scientific research can often bring considerable societal and economic benefits. But the path from the lab bench to a real-world application can take years, even for projects that are designed from the outset with a concrete use in mind. For instance, it took seven years for the pipetting robot developed by EPFL spin-off SEED Biosciences to reach the market, which it did in 2020. "O
8h
Researchers call for shorter work week to boost productivity, lower burnout
Do you feel a bit sluggish after weekends? Would taking Friday or Monday off do the trick? Researchers from UK think tank Autonomy and the non-profit Association for Sustainability and Democracy (Alda) tend to agree in their joint report. They claim that 40-hour workweeks aren't necessary and even harmful to our well-being.
9h
Research offers insights to South African looting rampage
The looting of businesses, shopping centers and warehouses in South Africa over the past week, particularly in the KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng provinces, has taken place at an unprecedented scale. It has affected both poor and middle-class areas. Private as well as government property has been damaged and destroyed. People have been injured and lives have been lost.
9h
Megaripples may be evidence of giant tsunami resulting from Chicxulub impact
A pair of geophysicists from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette working with two independent researchers has found what they believe might be evidence of a massive tsunami created by the Chicxulub asteroid impact. In their paper published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, the group describes their study of seismic data for a site in Louisiana and what they found.
9h
This Crypto Trading Platform Lets You Mimic the Moves of Its Top Investors
In the early days of cryptocurrencies , many experts viewed Bitcoin and Ethereum as passing fads. But today, it's pretty clear that cryptocurrencies are here to stay. And despite recent pullbacks, cryptocurrencies have still proven to be an unenviable investment over the long haul. So if you're looking to invest, the crypto trading platform eToro can provide you with all the innovative tools you'
9h
iAge: predicting health with your "inflammatory age"
Stanford scientists have found a more accurate way to measure a person's biological age based on a blood protein marker. The marker indicates a person's level of inflammation, which is the driver of many age-related conditions. A person's "iAge" more accurately predicts their health than their chronological age. According to biologist David Furman of Stanford University, "Every year, the calendar
9h
Co-locating contraceptive services and opioid treatment programs may help prevent unintended pregnancy
More than 75% of women with Opioid Use Disorder report having had an unintended pregnancy, but they are less likely to use effective contraception compared to women who do not use drugs. Results from a multi-year trial found that a two-part intervention featuring co-located contraceptive services in opioid treatment programs and financial incentives could offer an effective solution.
9h
The terms 'ancestry' and 'race' get muddled in forensics
A new study finds forensics researchers use terms related to ancestry and race in inconsistent ways. The study's authors call for the discipline to adopt a new approach to better account for both the fluidity of populations and how historical events have shaped our skeletal characteristics. "Forensic anthropology is a science , and we need to use terms consistently," says Ann Ross, corresponding
9h
More feverish babies in ER during COVID had serious infections
A new study documents a drop in emergency room visits and a spike in the proportion of serious bacterial infections detected in newborns and young infants during the first year of the pandemic. Published in JAMA Network Open , the study shows that from March 2020 to March 2021, the number of visits to the Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre (MCH-MUHC) emergency dep
10h
Epigenetic mechanism helps plants to live under high temperatures
Global warming imposes a major threat to plant growth and crop production. In many cases, plants could sense the temperature increase and adjust their morphology and development, facilitating plant cooling and warm adaptation. Hence, understanding the mechanisms of these morphological and developmental changes, collectively called thermomorphogenesis, could benefit the breeding of warm-adaptive cr
10h
Taking the Heat
About 70% of all energy produced in the world is wasted as heat. That's a pretty startling figure. This heat largely just dissipates into the environment, without doing anything useful. If we could reduce that waste to 40% then we could reduce our energy production needs by half. Imagine removing the least efficient and dirtiest half of our energy production from the system. Of course, this is ea
10h
Coastal landfills risk leaking long-banned toxic chemicals into the ocean
Five years ago, a killer whale called Lulu washed up on the shores of Scotland. She was thought to be over 20 years old, though autopsies revealed she had never had any offspring. Tissues recovered from Lulu suggested she was one of the most PCB-contaminated animals on the planet. She came from the UK's only resident killer whales, a group of eight, none of which had ever had young and are now con
10h
Measuring how effectively protected areas in Amazonia fight deforestation
While tropical forests remain threatened and their future is uncertain, the importance of understanding how well individual protected areas avoid deforestation increases. Researchers from the University of Turku and University of Helsinki, Finland, have investigated this question in a newly published study that focuses on the State of Acre in Brazilian Amazonia.
10h
Scientists Detect Isotopes on Exoplanet for the First Time
The nearest single star to the Sun hosts an exoplanet at least 3.2 times as massive as Earth — a so-called super-Earth. Data from a worldwide array of telescopes, including ESO's planet-hunting HARPS instrument, have revealed this frozen, dimly lit world. The newly discovered planet is the second-closest known exoplanet to the Earth and orbits the fastest moving star in the night sky.. This image
10h
Tetrasubstituted imidazoles as incognito Toll-like receptor 8 a(nta)gonists
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24536-4 Toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8) plays essential roles in the innate immune response to viral single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), so small molecule modulators of TLR8 are of interest, however adverse effects limit their use. Here, the authors report a tetrasubstituted imidazole CU-CPD107 with dichotomous behaviour, which in
12h
Empirical assessment and comparison of neuro-evolutionary methods for the automatic off-line design of robot swarms
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24642-3 Off-line neuro-evolution produces robot swarms whose good performance in simulation does not often transfer to the real word. With an extensive empirical study, Hasselmann et al. substantiate overfitting as the dominant cause.
12h
Biochemical and functional characterization of mutant KRAS epitopes validates this oncoprotein for immunological targeting
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24562-2 KRAS is commonly mutated at codon 12 in several cancer types, offering a unique opportunity for the development of neoantigen-targeted immunotherapy. Here the authors present a pipeline for the prediction, identification and validation of HLA class-I restricted mutant KRAS G12 peptides, leading to the generation
12h
Glucose limitation activates AMPK coupled SENP1-Sirt3 signalling in mitochondria for T cell memory development
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24619-2 Memory T cells are particularly reliant on fatty acid oxidation as a source of energy. Here the authors show this reliance is controlled by AMPK sensing of glucose deprivation that triggers SENP1-Sirt3 signalling, driving fatty acid oxidation and memory differentiation in T cells via deacetylation of YME1L1 to i
12h
Understanding potential-dependent competition between electrocatalytic dinitrogen and proton reduction reactions
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24539-1 Practical electrochemical N2 reduction reaction is challenged by competing side reactions. Here a combination of DFT and mikrokinetic modelling reveals the potential-dependent competition between electrochemical ammonia production and hydrogen evolution on a single-site iron catalyst embedded in N-doped graphene
12h
Selective targeting of ligand-dependent and -independent signaling by GPCR conformation-specific anti-US28 intrabodies
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24574-y Various GPCRs display constitutive ligand-independent activity, but it remains unclear whether ligand-dependent and -independent conformations differ. Here the authors demonstrate the recognition and blocking of G protein recruitment of either the ligand-bound active, or the constitutively active apo-conformatio
12h
The molecular basis of regulation of bacterial capsule assembly by Wzc
Nature Communications, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24652-1 The Wzc–Wza complex forms part of the bacterial extracellular polysaccharides synthesis machinery, where cycling of the Wzc between phosphorylation states is crucial to both synthesis and export. Here the authors report the structure of the Wzc octamer and provide insight into its regulation through phosphorylat
12h
'Please don't be afraid to talk about your errors and to correct them.'
A "systematic error" in a mental health database has led to the retraction of a 2017 paper on how people with psychosis process facial expressions. Joana Grave, a PhD student at the University of Aveiro, in Portugal, and her colleagues published their article, "The effects of perceptual load in processing emotional facial expression in psychotic … Continue reading
12h
Question: Kurzweil's Turing Test Prediction for 2029
So, with the recent posts about the AI that fabricated better quantum experiments than a human, and the one that designed chips more efficiently than a human coming to mind: Fellow futurologists, what are your thoughts on Kurzweil's prediction that an AI will pass the turing test in 2029? At the current rate of progress I somehow feel like it's going to be sooner than that, which I find equally s
12h
Book Review: Lessons Learned From the Wayward Brain
In "Projections: A Story of Human Emotions" and "A Sense of Self: Memory, the Brain, and Who We Are," Karl Deisseroth and Veronica O'Keane, respectively, use patient stories as conduits to talk about advancements in neuroscience, illuminating the brain's various structures and the connections between them.
12h
Evacuations expand in Oregon as fire spreads erratically
More people living along the eastern edge of an Oregon wildfire were told to evacuate late Thursday as the inferno began spreading rapidly and erratically in hot afternoon winds and threatened to merge with a nearby, smaller fire that had also exploded in size.
14h
Nearly 20 percent of intact forest landscapes overlap with extractive industries
A new study from WCS and WWF reveals that nearly 20 percent of tropical Intact Forest Landscapes (IFLs) overlap with concessions for extractive industries such as mining, oil and gas. The total area of overlap is 376,449 square miles (975,000 square kilometers), about the size of Egypt. Mining concessions overlap most with tropical IFLs, at 11.33 percent of the total area, while oil and gas conces
15h
Help Stop The Flu With These Virus-Fighting Masks
Some rare good news out of the last year or so has been that our masking up and socially distancing has helped keep the flu and other respiratory infections at bay . And whether you need to protect your health, or just don't want to get sick, the Respokare Flu-Fighter Masks can help protect yourself and others. Typically selling for $69, you can get a 30 Pack of Respokare Flu-Fighter Masks on sal
15h
Schneider Shorts 16.07.2021 – Pinche Estúpido
Schneider Shorts 15.07.2021: TCM robots and Russian lasers in space, Swedish whistleblowers at the EU Court of Justice, fraudsters and bullies retiring, an ivermectin setback, German stinginess, how Vitamin D prevents colon cancer, and how paper-mill narrative gets purged of Smut.
17h
Swimming at the mesoscale
A team of researchers from Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), the University of Liège and the Helmholtz Institute Erlangen-Nürnberg for Renewable Energy have developed a microswimmer that appears to defy the laws of fluid dynamics: their model, consisting of two beads that are connected by a linear spring, is propelled by completely symmetrical oscillations. The findings have
18h
Fluorescence lighting helps detect impurities in water
Shining a beam of light into potentially contaminated water samples may hold the key to real-time detection of hydrocarbons and pesticides in water. Researchers are testing the use of fluorescence to monitor water quality. The results, they say, show great promise.
22h
One by One, My Friends Were Sent to the Camps
On a Saturday morning in May 2017, my wife, my daughters, and I piled into the car and headed to Turpan, a nearby city, to relax for the weekend. The winter cold still hadn't left Urumqi, and we were hoping a couple of days enjoying the warm spring weather in Turpan would be good for us. On long car trips, we usually passed the time with conversation. But it was hard to talk about anything beside
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Why science needs a new reward and recognition system
Nature, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01952-6 Researchers with children or carer roles have struggled more than others during the pandemic, amplifying existing inequalities, argue Edyta Swider-Cios and colleagues.
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A new spidey sense
Harvard researchers have shown that jumping spiders are able to tell the difference between animate objects and inanimate objects — an ability previously known only in vertebrates, including humans.
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