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Are enough people vaccinated in time for England's 'freedom day'?
Four charts that show why the big unlocking could be coming too soon Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The government has technically hit its 19 July target of offering all adults in the UK a Covid-19 vaccine. But although all adults have been offered a first dose, not all of them have had it, and a significant number have had only one dose, not two. Only 68% of UK adu
9h
Elon Musk Brutally Mocks Jeff Bezos for Spaceship That Can't Reach Orbit
Suborbital Memes Amazon founder and Blue Origin CEO Jeff Bezos is getting ready to strap in to a seat on board his space company' New Shepard rocket and fly to an altitude of 62 miles later this week — hitting the internationally agreed upon edge of space, although nowhere near the lowest stable orbit. But not everybody agrees that's really space . SpaceX CEO and noted loudmouth Elon Musk, for in
1h
What Will Happen to My Music Library When Spotify Dies?
The first time I remember shopping for music was at a Best Buy one day in 2001. I came home with two CDs: the Baha Men's Who Let the Dogs Out and the pop compilation Now That's What I Call Music! 5. Each of those albums cost more than a month of streaming does today, which reflects all that happened to music listening in the intervening 20 years—Napster and LimeWire, iPods and iPhones, Spotify an
5h
What Is Happening to Our Apolitical Military?
The nation's senior military adviser, General Mark Milley, is once again in the news, for reportedly having described President Donald Trump's postelection rhetoric as " a Reichstag moment " and privately reassuring friends and members of Congress that the president and his supporters "may try, but they're not going to f—ing succeed" in preventing the peaceful transition of power. As CNN report
6h
How the billionaire space race could be one giant leap for pollution
One rocket launch produces up to 300 tons of carbon dioxide into the upper atmosphere where it can remain for years Last week Virgin Galactic took Richard Branson past the edge of space, roughly 86 km up – part of a new space race with the Amazon billionaire Jeff Bezos, who aims to make a similar journey on Tuesday. Both very wealthy businessmen hope to vastly expand the number of people in space
10h
Perfectionism Can Become a Vicious Cycle in Families
Roshni Ray Ricchetti was 16 years old when she arrived at MIT with perfect SAT scores and "lots and lots" of AP credits. She said her parents pushed her to make the absolute most of her talents. "I was a very, very high-performing student who, frankly, crashed and burned. I dropped out of MIT. And I've ended up okay in spite of that," the Illinois-based science editor told me. But while she says
4h
New Shape Opens 'Wormhole' Between Numbers and Geometry
The grandest project in mathematics has received a rare gift, in the form of a mammoth 350-page paper posted in February that will change the way researchers around the world investigate some of the field's deepest questions. The work fashions a new geometric object that fulfills a bold, once fanciful dream about the relationship between geometry and numbers. "This truly opens up a tremendous…
1h
Starwatch: another moon cruise past Jupiter and Saturn
Low in the south, the planets are slowly moving apart following December's great conjunction If you missed it last month, this week offers night owls another chance to watch the moon cruise past the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn. Low in the south, Jupiter and Saturn are gradually moving apart following their great conjunction last December, when they appeared so close in the sky that they coul
11h
Olympic Organizers: Actually Those Cardboard Beds Can Withstand Vigorous Sex
Anti-Sex Beds Despite growing concerns over a resurgence of COVID-19 cases in the country and increased calls to cancel the event, Japan is going ahead with the Tokyo Olympics. Athletes are slowly starting to arrive at the Olympic village and getting settled in for what will likely be one of the quietest international sporting events in recent memory. As part of their allotted space, competitors
31min
How To Heat-Proof Your Summer Workout
With much of the U.S. already sweltering this summer, even avid runners, hikers and bikers are wilting. We've got 10 strategies from experts on how to enjoy hot weather exercise without keeling over. (Image credit: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
7h
Half of U.S. tidal marsh areas vulnerable to rising seas
Sea level is rising worldwide, thanks in large part to climate change. Rising seas threaten coastal communities and ecosystems, including marshes that lie at the interface between salt water and freshwater. Tidal marsh ecosystems feature distinct plants and play key ecological roles, such as serving as nurseries for fish. It is known that some tidal marshes can avoid destruction by migrating inlan
5h
Migration and Covid deaths depriving poorest nations of health workers
Fragile health systems are at risk due to high numbers of medical staff leaving to work in richer countries, say experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The loss of frontline health workers dying of Covid around the globe, is being compounded in the hospitals of developing nations by trained medical staff leaving to help in the pandemic effort abroad, according to ex
6h
Understanding the physics in new metals
Researchers from the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), working in an international team, have developed a new method for complex X-ray studies that will aid in better understanding so-called correlated metals. These materials could prove useful for practical applications in areas such as superconductivity, data processing, and quantum computers. Today the re
4h
EHT pinpoints dark heart of the nearest radio galaxy
An international team anchored by the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) Collaboration, which is known for capturing the first image of a black hole in the galaxy Messier 87, has now imaged the heart of the nearest radio galaxy Centaurus A in unprecedented detail. The astronomers pinpoint the location of the central supermassive black hole and reveal how a gigantic jet is being born. Most remarkably, o
1h
Chinese astronomers investigate X-ray bursts of SGR J1935+2154
By analyzing the data from NASA's Fermi spacecraft, astronomers from the Hebei Normal University and Nanjing University in China, have investigated X-ray bursting activity of a soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) known as SGR J1935+2154. Results of the study, published July 9 on arXiv.org, deliver more hints about the properties of X-ray bursts from this source.
3h
Three key habitat-building corals face worrying future due to climate crisis
The climate crisis will lead to changes in distribution and habitat loss of stony corals in the tropical Atlantic, shows a new study published by the open access publisher Frontiers. The loss of such coral species could have devastating consequences for the marine ecosystems they inhabit. The results of the study highlight an urgent need for coral reef management in the Atlantic.
8h
The Marriage Plot for the Age of Workism
A scene midway through Hacks finds the show's protagonists, Deborah and Ava, in bed together—but not in bed together. The two comedians, one in her 70s and the other in her 20s, are chatting on the phone late one evening, Ava from her Las Vegas hotel room and Deborah from her Vegas mansion. Both are watching Law & Order: Criminal Intent . "I think I could play a dead body," Ava muses. "Well, you
5h
New method found for moving tiny artificial swimmers
Princeton researchers have debuted a novel way of generating and potentially controlling locomotion in tiny objects called artificial swimmers. These swimmers have sparked considerable interest for their potential applications in medicine, industry and other sectors.
5h
Are 5G-connected cars the future of driving?
The market for connected cars is predicted to be worth over $215 billion by 2027 . With the demand for greater connectivity set to soar, 5G-enabled connected cars will become the new norm. What we expect of a vehicle is fundamentally changing from a tool used to merely move us from A to B, to an integrated, fully-connected hub. Connected cars have clear benefits, being potentially safer and less
9h
Bezos to attempt his most ambitious delivery yet with Blue Origin spaceflight
First human spaceflight of Blue Origin's sub-orbital New Shepard rocket to launch in Texas How billionaire space race could be giant leap for pollution The billionaire Amazon founder Jeff Bezos will attempt his most ambitious delivery on Tuesday, when he accompanies an octogenarian aviation pioneer, a college student and his own brother Mark into space on a rocket that he funded and built himself
3h
Virtual school exposed digital gaps for Black families
The unanticipated transitions to virtual schooling due to COVID-19 exposed the lack of digital resources among Black families in the United States, including access to Wi-Fi and technological savviness, a new study finds. As two-thirds of the country's Black children are born into single-parent households, the findings help explain the extensive stress virtual schooling caused for many Black fami
11min
RNA modification may protect against liver disease
An RNA modification may offer protection against non-alcoholic fatty liver, a condition that results from a build-up of fat in the liver and can lead to advanced liver disease, according to a new study by UCLA researchers. The modification may also explain why females tend to have higher fat content in the liver.
11min
Firefighters found to have persistent lung damage from Fort McMurray wildfire
Firefighters at the center of the battle against the massive Fort McMurray, Alberta wildfire in 2016 have persistent lung damage, according to new findings by a occupational health research team. The firefighters had more than double the risk of developing asthma compared with the general population. They also exhibited a number of changes in lung function tests supportive of an effect on the lung
21min
Novel approach for developing new antibiotics
Researchers have developed a novel method for producing new antibiotics to combat resistant bacteria. Through an approach that would target bacteria with an antibiotic that is masked by a pro-drug, which the bacteria would themselves remove, the researchers identified a method that would allow for development of new, effective antibiotics that could overcome issues of resistance.
21min
Study may show why MS patients develop progressive disability
Did you know multiple sclerosis (MS) means multiple scars? New research shows that the brain and spinal cord scars in people with MS may offer clues to why they developprogressive disability but those with related diseases where the immune system attacks the central nervous system do not. In a study published in Neurology, Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues assessed if inflammation leads to pe
33min
Doctors Say They Found a Protein Linking All Cancers
Every kind of cancer seems to fall into one of two newly-discovered categories, according to new research, based on whether or not they produce a single protein. The researchers, led by scientists from various institutions within the Sinai Health System, published a study in the journal Cancer Cell last week that links all forms of cancer out there to a transcriptional regular called Yes-associat
59min
Diver's Close Encounter with Alaska's Salmon Sharks | Shark Week
Stream Extinct or Alive: Jaws of Alaska on discovery+ ► https://links.discoveryplus.com/jawsofalaska About Extinct or Alive: Jaws of Alaska: International wildlife biologist Forrest Galante travels the world in search of rare and elusive wildlife, including those lost to science, and mysterious cold water sharks. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https:
1h
Heart attack treatment could come from deadly spider venom
A potentially life-saving treatment for heart attack victims has been discovered from a very unlikely source—the venom of one of the world's deadliest spiders. A drug candidate developed from a molecule found in the venom of the Fraser Island (K'gari) funnel web spider can prevent damage caused by a heart attack and extend the life of donor hearts used for organ transplants. "For people who are l
1h
Come In
Photo illustrations by Miki Lowe Robert Frost is commonly thought of as a "nature poet"—a simple chronicler of stoic New England beauty. Quotes from "Stopping By the Woods on a Snowy Evening" and "The Road Not Taken" are plastered on mugs , plaques , and a host of other mundane products, their out-of-context words used as inspirational mantras and pleasant home decor. But Frost rejected the natur
1h
Championing chrononutrition with protein, the morning elixir for muscle growth
Proteins are essential for body growth and muscle building. However, protein metabolism varies depending on the body's internal biological clock. Therefore, it is important to know how distribution of protein intake over the day affects muscles. Researchers have now found that consumption of proteins at breakfast increases muscle size and function in mice and humans, shedding light on the concept
1h
Too Many Papers
If you do a search in PubMed for the words "Cov-2 main protease screen inhibitors", you get 295 hits. That's as of this morning, of course – there will be more as time goes on. That represents a great deal of work done in a relatively short time (all of the citations, naturally, are from 2020 and 2021). But allow me to express what might be (for some) an annoying or unpopular opinion: that's far,
1h
Google Gets One Step Closer to Error-Corrected Quantum Computing
One of the biggest barriers standing in the way of useful quantum computers is how error-prone today's devices are. Now, Google has provided an experimental demonstration of how to correct this problem and scale it up for much larger devices. The power of quantum computers comes from their ability to manipulate exotic quantum states, but these states are very fragile and easily perturbed by sourc
1h
Bats in Tel Aviv enjoy a rich variety of food
A new Tel Aviv University study found that, like humans, bats living in Tel Aviv enjoy the wide variety and abundance of food that the city has to offer, in contrast to rural bats living in Beit Guvrin, who are content eating only one type of food. The study was led by research student Katya Egert-Berg, under the guidance of Prof. Yossi Yovel, head of Tel Aviv University's Sagol School of Neurosci
1h
Mechanisms to separately regulate synaptic vesicle release and recycling
Chemical synapses transmit information within the nervous system. When a presynaptic cell is electrically excited, synaptic vesicles fuse with the presynaptic membrane causing messenger substances within the vesicles to be released into the synaptic cleft. These then bind to receptors in the postsynaptic cell where they trigger an electrical signal once again. The temporal and spatial sequence of
1h
Cosmic rays help supernovae explosions pack a bigger punch
The final stage of cataclysmic explosions of dying massive stars, called supernovae, could pack an up to six times bigger punch on the surrounding interstellar gas with the help of cosmic rays, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of Oxford. The work will be presented by Ph.D. student Francisco Rodríguez Montero today (19 July) at the virtual National Astronomy Meeting (NA
1h
Experts challenge current understanding of transition dairy cow health
In a new review in the Journal of Dairy Science, a team from Iowa State University Department of Animal Science critically reviews the current accepted understanding of cow health between giving birth and beginning to produce milk to investigate the reasons for persistent health problems. Their findings suggest lines of inquiry that may prove more effective and call into question methods and concl
1h
A new metric for designing safer streets
A new study shows how biometric data can be used to find potentially challenging and dangerous areas of urban infrastructure. By analyzing eye-tracking data from cyclists navigating Philadelphia's streets, researchers from the lab of Megan Ryerson found that these individual-based metrics can provide a more proactive approach for designing safer roadways for bicyclists and pedestrians.
1h
In vitro Zoo helps in understanding SARS-CoV-2
A team of researchers from the University of Bern and the Institute of Virology and Immunology (IVI) have used a unique collection of advanced cell culture models of cells lining the airways from various domesticated and wildlife animals to determine which animals are susceptibly to SARS-CoV-2 infection. The team found that SARS-CoV-2 efficiently infected respiratory cells from monkey and cats, an
1h
A novel approach for developing new antibiotics
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a novel method for producing new antibiotics to combat resistant bacteria. Through an approach that would target bacteria with an antibiotic that is masked by a prodrug, which the bacteria would themselves remove, the researchers identified a method that would allow for development of new, effective antibiotics that could ove
1h
To die or not to die in response to stress: A decision regulated by MK2 protein levels
Living organisms are often exposed to stress stimuli generated either by external or internal factors, and they need to respond accordingly. At a cellular level, stress usually triggers the activation of survival pathways that contribute to the recovery of cell homeostasis. However, when stress is too high, a process of cell death is initiated that eliminates the damaged cell.
1h
Everything could have been so different
Jorge Borges' story, The Library of Babel , asks us to imagine all the books that could be written using a random shuffling of 25 characters. Daniel Dennett argues that, in some ways, the genetic makeup of all life is similar but with only four characters. The history of the universe is only one possible way our story could have gone. Much of our reality is simply arbitrary. Imagine all the lives
1h
How financial hardship affects voter turnout
Many studies have shown that poverty hampers political participation. For the first time, Max Schaub has examined the influence of acute financial hardship on political participation—situations, often lasting only a few days, in which money is so tight that it no longer covers the bare necessities. These situations are experienced primarily by people living below the poverty line. In Germany, that
1h
Inadequate protection for women and girls seeking refuge in Germany
Germany is not meeting its legal obligations to protect refugee women and girls from discrimination. This is the conclusion of a "shadow report" by the University of Göttingen, the association Pro Asyl and the refugee councils of Bavaria, Hesse, Lower Saxony and Saxony-Anhalt. Shadow reports are a useful tool to present important information in parallel with official government reports. Based on c
1h
The era of single-spin color centers in silicon carbide is approaching
Prof. Li Chuanfeng, Prof. Xu Jinshi and their colleagues from Prof. Guo Guangcan's group at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), realized the high-contrast readout and coherent manipulation of a single silicon carbide divacancy color center electron spin at room temperature for the first time. They were working in cooperation with Prof.
1h
Why is the eastern monarch butterfly disappearing?
Michigan State University ecologists led an international research partnership of professional and volunteer scientists to reveal new insights into what's driving the already-dwindling population of eastern monarch butterflies even lower.
1h
Novel coronavirus discovered in British bats
A coronavirus related to the virus that causes Covid-19 in humans has been found in UK horseshoe bats. However, there is no evidence that this novel virus has been transmitted to humans, or that it could in future, unless it mutates.
1h
Repairing hearts with deadly spider venom: Study
A potentially life-saving treatment for heart attack victims has been discovered from a very unlikely source – the venom of one of the world's deadliest spiders. A drug candidate developed from a molecule found in the venom of the Fraser Island (K'gari) funnel web spider can prevent damage caused by a heart attack and extend the life of donor hearts used for organ transplants.
1h
Unsustainable Arctic shipping risks accelerating damage to the Arctic environment
The economic and environmental pros and cons of melting Arctic ice creating shorter shipping routes through the polar region are weighed up in ground-breaking research from experts in energy and transport. They conclude that policy makers must properly assess the environmental trade-offs and costs in addition to the commercial benefits and opportunities in Arctic shipping. The authors also want to
1h
New alpine moth solves 180-year-old mystery
Butterflies and moths are among the most diverse animal groups. Scientists have found as many as 5,000 species from the Alps alone. Having been a place of intensive research for 250 years, it is considered a sensation if a new species is discovered from the mountain range these days.
1h
Words matter: Language can reduce mental health and addiction stigma
Using appropriate language to describe mental illness and addiction can help to reduce stigma and improve how people with these conditions are treated in health care settings and throughout society. The authors define stigma as negative attitudes toward people that are based on certain distinguishing characteristics.
1h
China wastes almost 30% of its food
Nature, Published online: 15 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01963-3 Out-of-home dining accounts for some of the nation's wasted food, but much more is lost during food storage and processing.
1h
CHOP researchers establish novel approach for developing new antibiotics
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed a novel method for producing new antibiotics to combat resistant bacteria. Through an approach that would target bacteria with an antibiotic that is masked by a prodrug, which the bacteria would themselves remove, the researchers identified a method that would allow for development of new, effective antibiotics that could ove
1h
Scientists adopt deep learning for multi-object tracking
Implementing algorithms that can simultaneously track multiple objects is essential to unlock many applications, from autonomous driving to advanced public surveillance. However, it is difficult for computers to discriminate between detected objects based on their appearance. Now, researchers at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST) adapted deep learning techniques in a multi-obje
1h
Kids' sleep: check in before you switch off
The struggle to get your child to go to sleep and stay asleep is something most parents can relate to. Once the bedtime battle is over and the kids have finally nodded off, many parents tune out as well. But University of South Australia researcher Professor Kurt Lushington is calling for parents to check on their small snoozers before switching off.
1h
At last: Separated and freshly bound
The carbon-hydrogen bonds in alkanes–particularly those at the ends of the molecules, where each carbon has three hydrogen atoms bound to it–are very hard to "crack" if you want to replace the hydrogen atoms with other atoms. Methane (CH(4)) and ethane (CH(3)CH(3)) are made up, exclusively, of such tightly bound hydrogen atoms. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of researchers has now desc
2h
A simple compound to control complex gut microbes
Researchers at the RIKEN, Japan have discovered that acetate, a major metabolite produced by some intestinal bacteria, is involved in regulating other intestinal bacteria. Experiments specifically showed that acetate could trigger an immune response against potentially harmful bacteria. These discoveries will lead to the development of new ways to regulate the balance of intestinal bacteria.
2h
Novel techniques extract more accurate data from images degraded by environmental factors
A team of researchers, led by Yale-NUS College Associate Professor of Science (Computer Science) Robby Tan, who is also from the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering, has developed novel approaches using computer vision and deep learning to resolve the problem of low-level vision in videos caused by rain and night-time conditions, as well as improve the accuracy of 3D human po
2h
uOttawa study first to investigate newly introduced butterfly which could become widespread in Canada
This summer, if you see a butterfly with wings that are blue on top with orange spots underneath, you may have crossed paths with a male European Common Blue (or Polyommatus icarus), a newly introduced species in Canada. Could it be a fluke? Probably not, according to a group of researchers from the University of Ottawa who have taken a close look at this captivating blue creature. They are in fac
2h
No stone unturned: An extensive search for cation substitution in lithium-ion batteries
Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) power all of modern-day electronic devices. However, with the shift from gasoline-powered vehicles to electric counterparts, there is a demand for higher battery capacity. In their quest for higher battery capacity, scientists from Japan devised a low-cost computational technique for extensively screening for atomic substitutions in LIBs to improve their discharge capa
2h
An automated flight control system for drone swarms has been developed
Creating new procedures that improve mass drone traffic is the purpose of LABYRINTH, a European research project coordinated by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) with the participation of 13 international organisations within the R&D&I, transport, emergency, and auxiliary services fields. Researchers hope to use these drone swarm applications to improve civil road, train, sea, and air tr
2h
MIT Technology Review names Mat Honan its new Editor in Chief
MIT Technology Review announced today that veteran tech editor Mat Honan has been hired as its new editor in chief. Honan joins from BuzzFeed News, where he and his teams have published impactful, hard-hitting journalism that asks important questions, captures attention, and has won multiple awards, including a 2021 Pulitzer Prize. In his new role, Honan will provide leadership, creative vision,
2h
Personal weight management boosts recovery after endometrial cancer
Women recovering from endometrial cancer need individualized weight management plans to help with their recovery, a new study shows. Endometrial cancer is the most common sub-type of womb cancer and survivors often have issues with obesity and weight gain before and following treatment, says Monika Janda, professor of behavioral science at the Centre for Health Services Research the University of
2h
Survey shows rise in vaccine hesitancy in Ghana
Research led by the University of Southampton into the uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine in Ghana, West Africa has concluded that vaccine hesitancy has seen a small, but significant increase over the last three months. This research is in collaboration with youth-led not-for-profit organisation PACKS Africa.
2h
Financial hardship and voter turnout
Short-term financial difficulties prevent poor people in Germany from voting and participating in politics. Such are the findings of a study by Max Schaub, a research fellow at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center (WZB), published in American Political Science Review. Among individuals at risk of poverty, both turnout intentions and actual turnout are reduced by 5 percentage points when election d
2h
Test of Lord Kelvin's isotropic helicoid ideas fail to prove theory correct
A small team of researchers from Wesleyan University, Aix Marseille University and Gothenburg University has attempted to test Lord Kelvin's isotropic helicoid theory by building several test objects and dropping them in a tub of water. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes how they constructed their objects, how they tested them and what they observe
2h
Breaking the C–H bonds in hydrocarbons to synthesize complex organic molecules
The carbon–hydrogen bonds in alkanes—particularly those at the ends of the molecules, where each carbon has three hydrogen atoms bound to it—are very hard to "crack" if you want to replace the hydrogen atoms with other atoms. Methane (CH4) and ethane (CH3CH3) are made up, exclusively, of such tightly bound hydrogen atoms. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, a team of researchers has now described ho
2h
A breath of fresh air for emphysema research
Researchers from TMDU and Osaka University have found that a protein called FCHSD1 is involved in the development of emphysema, which is destruction of the tiny air sacs in the lungs, and is a component of chronic pulmonary respiratory disease that causes illness and death worldwide. Mice deficient in FCHSD1 showed less lung damage, inflammation, and cell death. The team were able to uncover the m
2h
Repairing hearts with deadly spider venom
A potentially life-saving treatment for heart attack victims has been discovered from a very unlikely source – the venom of one of the world's deadliest spiders. A drug candidate developed from a molecule found in the venom of the Fraser Island (K'gari) funnel web spider can prevent damage caused by a heart attack and extend the life of donor hearts used for organ transplants.
2h
How chemistry undergraduates benefit from graduate student diversity
Diversity among graduate student teaching assistants (TAs) may be among the most essential factors in retaining underrepresented minority undergraduate students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses, according to statistical evidence from a new study set to publish in the August issue of the Economics of Education Review.
3h
A new non-invasive technique for parchment diagnosis
The conservation state of parchments is typically assessed using invasive and sometimes destructive investigation techniques. Scientists from Université Paris-Saclay, the CNRS, École Polytechnique, and the French Ministry of Culture have developed a non-destructive and non-invasive advanced optical imaging technique to quantitatively assess the degradation state of parchments. The approach was val
3h
African swine fever: No risk to consumers
African swine fever (ASF), first detected in Germany in domestic pigs on 15 July 2021, does not pose a health hazard to humans. "The ASF pathogen cannot be transferred to humans", explains Professor Dr. Dr. Andreas Hensel, President of the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR). "No risk to health is posed by direct contact with diseased animals or from eating food made from infected d
3h
Climate change is forcing conservationists to be more ambitious
As climate change brings record droughts and floods, extended fire seasons continue to make headlines, and the role of humans in this terrible situation is now undisputed, institutional change has been slow and unsteady. In particular, conservationists have been wary of pointing to climate change as the biggest threat to biodiversity, given the many other threats that exist.
3h
Kafkaesque: How Franz Kafka's books reveal a real-life dystopia
In Franz Kafka's works, we meet a world clogged with an absurd and soul-destroying bureaucracy that no one understands nor bothers to challenge. When a country experiences political instability through a high turnover of its elected representatives, there is a marked increase in ineffective legislation. Democratic reform and a change in culture is needed to give our politicians space to pass thou
3h
New method allows unambiguous identification of wolf hybrids in Europe's forests
Together with a European team, Senckenberg scientists have presented a new method in the scientific journal BMC Genomics that allows the reliable identification of wolf-dog hybrids on the basis of environmental samples such as feces, hair, or saliva residue. The method has a much higher resolution than conventional methods and is expected to serve as a standard procedure in the future, allowing fo
3h
Rescuing the Integral spacecraft: No thrust? No problem
A year ago tomorrow, a failure on the Integral spacecraft meant it fired its thrusters for likely the last time. In the days since, the spacecraft in Earth orbit has continued to shed light on the violent gamma ray universe, and it should soon be working even more efficiently than before, as mission control teams implement an ingenious new way to control the 18-year-old spacecraft.
3h
New sunspot catalogue to improve space weather predictions
Scientists from the University of Graz, Kanzelhöhe Observatory, Skoltech, and the World Data Center SILSO at the Royal Observatory of Belgium, have presented the Catalog of Hemispheric sunspot Numbers. It will enable more accurate predictions of the solar cycle and space weather, which can affect human-made infrastructure both on Earth and in orbit. The study came out in the Astronomy & Astrophysi
3h
Rapport från årsmötet 2021
Nya funktionärer valda Vetenskap och Folkbildnings årsmöte genomfördes även i år digitalt, den 29 maj. Ett trettiotal medlemmar deltog på själva årsmötesförhandlingarna och följande funktionärer utsågs: Till styrelsen: Pontus Böckman … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
4h
Arginine methylation in global control of RNA splicing and translation
Thousands of proteins undergo arginine N-methylation, a widespread post-translational modification catalyzed by several protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) that covalently link methyl groups to arginine side chains. Nine PRMTs, PRMT1 to PRMT9, have been identified in the human genome, which are further classified into three types according to the final methylarginine products. Arginine met
4h
A new theoretical model of tacit knowledge transfer
In today's fast-paced industries, withholding valuable information or knowledge at the wrong time can lead to corporate disaster. For this reason, it is imperative for sales and marketing professionals to take advantage of communication opportunities and increase their understanding of each other's goals to exchange tacit knowledge, or industry knowledge gained from years of field experience.
4h
Satellites map floods in western Europe
Record rainfall has caused swollen rivers to burst their banks and wash away homes and other buildings in western Europe—leading to more than 90 casualties and over 1000 people missing. Data from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission are being used to map flooded areas to help relief efforts.
4h
'Cool flames' ignited in space
A discovery has been made in Earth's orbit—steady spherical cool diffusion flames. Measurements in these flames could help improve the engines of the future.
4h
Daily briefing: Maths proof hints at the true nature of infinity
Nature, Published online: 16 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01980-2 An extra size of infinity might sit between the first and second infinitely large numbers. Plus, severe COVID-19 seems to be even rarer in children than we thought, and AlphaFold is going open source.
4h
Why COP26 is our best chance for a greener future | Alok Sharma
Something powerful is happening around the world. The issue of climate change has moved from the margins to the mainstream, says Alok Sharma, the President-Designate of COP26, the United Nations climate conference set to take place in November 2021 in Glasgow, Scotland. He unpacks what this shift means for the world economy and the accelerating "green industrial revolution" — and lays out the urg
5h
How cells control mitochondria
Errors in the metabolic processes of mitochondria are responsible for a variety of diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. Scientists needed to find out just how the necessary building blocks are imported into the complex biochemical apparatus of these cell areas. The TOM complex (translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane) is considered the gateway to the mitochondrion, the proverbial
5h
Long-term satellite analysis shows rainy season wetter now than ever
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have analyzed long-term precipitation radar data from satellites and found significantly enhanced rainfall over the most recent decade during the annual Meiyu-Baiu rainy season in East Asia. The data spans 23 years and gives unprecedented insight into how rainfall patterns have changed. They showed that the increased rainfall was driven by the decadal
5h
Teaching AI Imagination
Artificial intelligence (AI) has made tremendous strides in the last few decades. Every time someone comes up with something an AI can't do, someone builds a system that can do it (eventually). At first experts believed that no AI could beat a chess master in chess, now no human has any chance against the best chess algorithms. The skepticism then moved onto the game "Go" which was thought to req
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Work, reinvented: Tech will drive the office evolution
In an early May blog post , Google chief executive officer (CEO) Sundar Pichai shared the company's vision for its workplace future—over a year after the covid-19 pandemic forced offices around the world to shutter almost overnight and employees suddenly shifted to working remotely using Zoom, Microsoft Teams, and a host of other virtual collaboration tools. "The future of work is flexibility," h
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Will mask wearing continue after COVID?
Mask mandates are in place in Victoria and New South Wales as these states continue to see COVID cases in the community. And public health experts have argued face masks will continue to be an important measure in our fight against the virus for some time to come.
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Hubble reveals a 'rediscovered' star cluster
This image shows the globular cluster NGC 6380, which lies around 35,000 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Scorpio (the Scorpion). Globular clusters are spherical groups of stars held together by gravity; they often contain some of the oldest stars in their galaxies. The very bright star at the top of the image is HD 159073, which is only around 4,000 light-years from Earth, making it a
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Bonding's next top model: Projecting bond properties with machine learning
Designing materials that have the necessary properties to fulfill specific functions is a challenge faced by researchers working in areas from catalysis to solar cells. To speed up development processes, modeling approaches can be used to predict information to guide refinements. Researchers from The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science have developed a machine learning model to det
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The Influencers Normalizing Tourette's Syndrome on TikTok
Halfway through our conversation, Glen Cooney calls me a four-letter word often cited as the most offensive in the English language. But that's okay. He doesn't mean it. Cooney has Tourette's syndrome, which causes tics, twitches, and—in some people—a symptom called coprolalia, which the Tourette Association of America characterizes as "the involuntary outburst of obscene words or socially inappr
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The Future of Wellness Will Be Driven by Data and Biomarkers
As technology shapes our future, it also shapes our perspective; the way we perceive the world changes with the tools we use to explore it further. The way we view health is changing because of people like Daniel Tal Mor, who believes wellness will go from being "trendy" to absolutely essential, and the advent of a device that hacks your health with metabolism data. Tal Mor is the CEO of Lumen ,
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Analyse: Mere end hver femte borger er digitalt udsat
Ny rapport om digitalt udsatte borgere fra Digitaliseringsstyrelsen og Kommunernes Landsforening er fyldt med grelle eksempler på urimelige vilkår for samfundets svageste. Mellem de hjerteskærende fortællinger har myndighederne også løsningsforslag til fremtiden.
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'Tortured phrases', lost in translation: Sleuths find even more problems at journal that just flagged 400 papers
What do subterranean insect provinces and motion to clamor have to do with microprocessors and microsystems? That's an excellent question. Read on, dear reader. Earlier this month, as we reported, Elsevier announced that it had concerns about some 400 papers published in special issues in one of its journals. The publisher said that "the integrity … Continue reading
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Myofibroblast transcriptome indicates SFRP2hi fibroblast progenitors in systemic sclerosis skin
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24607-6 Myofibroblasts drive fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc), but the cellular progenitors are unknown. Utilizing single cell RNA-sequencing, the authors show that SSc dermal myofibroblasts arise in a two-step process from SFRP2/DPP4-expressing progenitors and implicate upstream transcription factors.
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The effect of water on colloidal quantum dot solar cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24614-7 Surface of colloidal quantum dot is sensitive to water, and the interaction could potentially alter its chemical environments. Here, Shi et al. investigate how the interaction effects the nanostructures and carrier dynamic in CQDs, and subsequently introduce meniscus-guided coating technique to mitigate CQD fusi
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Insulin protects acinar cells during pancreatitis by preserving glycolytic ATP supply to calcium pumps
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24506-w Acute pancreatitis is a serious inflammatory disease, which is more severe in diabetic mice. Here the authors use mice lacking pancreatic acinar cell insulin receptors to show that this may be because insulin preserves glycolytic energy supply in acinar cell during pancreatitis, which prevents cytotoxic calcium
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Dimensional reduction by geometrical frustration in a cubic antiferromagnet composed of tetrahedral clusters
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24636-1 Dimensionality reduction can occur in magnetically frustrated systems; however, it typically involves lattice distortions. Here, the authors report two- and one-dimensional character of spin correlations in a three-dimensional tetrahedral cluster antiferromagnet, driven purely by geometrical frustration.
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Development of a fixed module repertoire for the analysis and interpretation of blood transcriptome data
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24584-w The blood transcriptome of human subjects can be profiled on an almost routine basis in translational research settings. Here the authors show that a fixed and well-characterized repertoire of transcriptional modules can be employed as a reusable framework for the analysis, visualization and interpretation of su
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Targeting local lymphatics to ameliorate heterotopic ossification via FGFR3-BMPR1a pathway
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24643-2 Different types of mesenchymal progenitors participate in ectopic bone formation. Here, the authors show Col2+ lineage cells adopt a lymphatic endothelium cell fate, which regulates local inflammatory microenvironment after trauma, thus influencing heterotopic ossification (HO) development via a FGFR3-BMPR1a pat
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Specificities of exosome versus small ectosome secretion revealed by live intracellular tracking of CD63 and CD9
Nature Communications, Published online: 19 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24384-2 Extracellular vesicles (EVs) play a role in intercellular communication, however the precise biogenesis of different populations of EVs are not clear. Here, the authors follow the intracellular trafficking of two proteins before their secretion in EVs and report the biogenesis and protein markers of EV subtypes:
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The Wild Frontier of Model Organism Research
From the fruit fly to brewer's yeast to the proverbial lab rat, model organisms have been behind many of modern biology's basic discoveries. But research on these classic models has largely focused on domesticated strains, leaving their wild counterparts a mystery. Now, scientists are going wild.
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Bonding's next top model — Projecting bond properties with machine learning
Researchers from The University of Tokyo Institute of Industrial Science have developed a machine learning-based model to predict the characteristics of bonded systems. Using the density of states of the individual component reactants, they have achieved accurate predictions of the binding energy, bond length, number of covalent electrons, and Fermi energy. The broadly applicable model is expected
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Cyprus showcases ancient undersea harbor to draw tourists
It's said that Demetrius the Besieger, a mighty warrior king and one of Alexander the Great's successors, built this harbor on Cyprus' southern coast 2,400 years ago to thwart a potential naval invasion from the ruler of Egypt, Ptolemy I, another of Alexander's heirs.
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"Forskningsfusk är vanligare än många tror"
Det är 1990-tal. Åtta läkare, däribland Kjell Asplund, befinner sig i ett mötesrum någonstans i Tyskland. Det är tidig förmiddag och de ska gå igenom en studie av akut behandling vid stroke, den största som dittills genomförts i Europa. Läkarna ingår i säkerhetskommittén och deras uppgift är att bedöma risken för biverkningar. Allteftersom går det upp för läkarna i rummet att informationen om pati
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New alpine moth solves a 180-year-old mystery
Butterflies and moths (order Lepidoptera) are one of the most diverse animal groups. To date, scientists have found as many as 5,000 species from the Alps alone. Having been a place of intensive research interest for 250 years, it is considered quite a sensation if a previously unknown species is discovered from the mountain range these days. This was the case when a Swiss-Austrian team of researc
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Slagruta
Ett verktyg för "rutgängare" I sin ursprungligaste form är en slagruta en Y-formad grenklyka som hålls i ett spänt läge med båda händerna. En modernare variant är så kallade "vinkelpekare", … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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Futurology when?
Last year, I remember hearing about how 3D printed houses and shipping container homes would solve the housing crisis. I heard about how people in China are making pollution-free energy by converting ammonia to hydrogen. I heard sodium-cooled fast reactors are also very efficient. I heard about nuclear fusion and how it will solve all our energy problems. I learned about people building machines
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Discrimination and safety concerns barriers to accessing healthy food for food-insecure young adults
University of Minnesota School of Public Health researchers recently completed a study to determine how food-insecure young (emerging) adults (18-29 years of age) adapted their eating and child feeding behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic. The researchers also sought to identify barriers to food access and opportunities to improve local access to resources for emerging adults. Their study result
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Resilience isn't static. It fluctuates over time
Resilience is a dynamic process, rather than a fixed trait, a new study finds. "Our work here does a couple things," says Patrick Flynn, corresponding author of the study and an assistant professor of human resources management at North Carolina State University's Poole College of Management. "First it finds that resilience is more of a process than a characteristic. Second, it identifies some of
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Words matter: Language can reduce mental health and addiction stigma, NIH leaders say
In a perspective published in Neuropsychopharmacology, leaders from the National Institutes of Health address how using appropriate language to describe mental illness and addiction can help to reduce stigma and improve how people with these conditions are treated in health care settings and throughout society. The authors define stigma as negative attitudes toward people that are based on certain
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