Search Posts

Nyheder2021juli20

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

First lethal attacks by chimpanzees on gorillas observed
A research team from Osnabrück University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, has, for the first time, observed lethal attacks by chimpanzees on gorillas in the wild. Whether this behavior is due to competition for food or to the decline of the rainforest's productivity caused by climate change will now be investigated in more detail.
8h

LATEST

Jeff Bezos Heads Toward Space, Turns Back Before He Gets There
It was like listening to a family riding a thrill ride together at a theme park. But it was actually a billionaire and a few of his pals screaming as Blue Origin successfully completed its first crewed mission to the edge of space. The company's New Shepard spacecraft RSS First Step rocketed from the West Texas desert high into the Earth's upper atmosphere, reaching an apogee of 351,210 feet, or
7h
Lockdowns do not harm health more than Covid, say researchers
Little evidence that social restrictions during the pandemic have added to rates of death and ill-health Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Since early in the coronavirus pandemic, critics of unprecedented lockdown measures seen worldwide have argued that these interventions cause more harm than the disease itself. But an analysis of global health data suggests there is
16h
New X-ray pulsar discovered
Using ART-XC and eROSITA telescopes onboard the Spectrum Roentgen Gamma (SRG) mission, an international team of astronomers has detected a new pulsar. The newly found object, designated SRGA J204318.2+443815, turns out to be a long-period, faint X-ray pulsar in a distant binary system. The finding is reported in a paper published July 12 on arXiv.org.
9h
The realization of curved relativistic mirrors to reflect high-power laser pulses
One of the topics investigated in recent physics studies is strong-field quantum electrodynamics (SF-QED). So far, this area has rarely been explored before, mainly because the experimental observation of SF-QED processes would require extremely high light intensities (>1025W/cm2), over three orders of magnitude higher than those attained using the most intense PetaWatt (PW)-class lasers available
1d
Long-period oscillations of the Sun discovered
A team of solar physicists led by Laurent Gizon of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) and the University of Göttingen in Germany has reported the discovery of global oscillations of the Sun with very long periods, comparable to the 27-day solar rotation period. The oscillations manifest themselves at the solar surface as swirling motions with speeds on the order of 5 kilomete
5h
Tomato fruits send electrical warnings to the rest of the plant when attacked by insects
A recent study in Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems shows that the fruits of a type of tomato plant send electrical signals to the rest of the plant when they are infested by caterpillars. Plants have a multitude of chemical and hormonal signaling pathways, which are generally transmitted through the sap (the nutrient-rich water that moves through the plant). In the case of fruits, nutrients f
14h
Invader removal triggers competitive release in a threatened avian predator [Ecology]
Changes in the distribution and abundance of invasive species can have far-reaching ecological consequences. Programs to control invaders are common but gauging the effectiveness of such programs using carefully controlled, large-scale field experiments is rare, especially at higher trophic levels. Experimental manipulations coupled with long-term demographic monitoring can reveal the…
1d
Observational evidence that cloud feedback amplifies global warming [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Global warming drives changes in Earth's cloud cover, which, in turn, may amplify or dampen climate change. This "cloud feedback" is the single most important cause of uncertainty in Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity (ECS)—the equilibrium global warming following a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Using data from Earth observations and climate…
1d
Insect-mediated apparent competition between mammals in a boreal food web [Ecology]
While the important role of animal-mediated interactions in the top-down restructuring of plant communities is well documented, less is known of their ensuing repercussions at higher trophic levels. We demonstrate how typically decoupled ecological interactions may become intertwined such that the impact of an insect pest on forest structure and…
1d
Contact with Child Protective Services is pervasive but unequally distributed by race and ethnicity in large US counties [Social Sciences]
This article provides county-level estimates of the cumulative prevalence of four levels of Child Protective Services (CPS) contact using administrative data from the 20 most populous counties in the United States. Rates of CPS investigation are extremely high in almost every county. Racial and ethnic inequality in case outcomes is…
1d
'The Last Acceptable Prejudice'
In early July, The New York Times published two articles that had seemingly little to do with one another. One covered the Entomological Society of America's decision to stop using the terms gypsy moth and gypsy ant . The other was about a new movie by the director Paul Verhoeven featuring an affair between two 17th-century nuns. "Forgive them, Father, for they have sinned," the article begins. "
12h
Rocket Launches Are Shockingly Bad for the Environment
Rocketing Emissions The billionaire space race is well on its way , setting the stage for a burgeoning space tourism industry. More civilian space tourists are making their way into space than ever before — a trend likely to grow substantially as the sector advances. At the same time, widespread rocket launches also appear to come with a considerable cost to the environment, The Guardian reports
1d
To Fight Overpopulation, India May Pay People to Get Sterilized
Two-Child Policy The government of the extremely densely-populated Indian state Uttar Pradesh may soon implement new policies meant to combat overpopulation by limiting how big families in the area can get. Newly proposed policies include cash incentives for parents who only have one child, as well as free healthcare and education. But on the other hand, new punishments for larger families would
1d
Jeff Bezos Really Flew to Space
Updated at 10:53 a.m. ET on July 20, 2021. VAN HORN, Texas—This morning, the richest person on Earth boarded a reusable rocket he dreamed up and funded, launched to the edge of space to experience a few minutes of weightlessness, and then came back down. Jeff Bezos made the trip with three people who decided they trusted him enough with their lives: his brother, Mark Bezos; Wally Funk, a storied
8h
82-Year-Old Woman Becomes Oldest Person in Space
Funk Flight Spurned astronaut Wally Funk just made it to the edge of space on board Blue Origin's New Shepard spacecraft RSS First Step. The small rocket launched from the West Texas desert, just after 9 am Eastern time. At 82-years-young, Funk has become the oldest person to travel to space — or at least past the Kármán line at 62 miles, the arbitrary boundary between the Earth's atmosphere and
8h
Guy Who Started Wikipedia Says Wikipedia Is Untrustworthy
Oops, Nevermind Wikipedia cofounder Larry Sanger recently shared some harsh words about his own creation. Much like every teacher you've ever had , Sanger warned in an interview with Lockdown TV that Wikipedia cannot be relied upon as a reliable source of the truth. Though he seemed to defend the original vision of Wikipedia as an accessible "open-source" project, Sanger said that Wikipedia, as i
1d
Jupiter Officially Has Yet Another Moon
Moonspotting It's a big month for space: Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson both almost made it there , but more importantly we can announce the discovery of yet another moon orbiting Jupiter. Jupiter already has dozens of moons — at least 80, with more being discovered all the time, Space.com notes . But even though it's just another small space rock in the crowd, the new moon S/2003J24 stands out f
5h
Physicists Say the Universe Wraps Around Itself Like a Giant Donut
D'ohniverse According to new astrophysics research, our universe may not be expanding outward in all directions. Instead, it may be rolled around itself like a gigantic cosmic donut. A team of European scientists argue in preliminary research that the folded universe — the edges of which connected in multiple places to form a closed loop — may make more sense than the endless expanse that we typi
7h
How Bell's Theorem Proved 'Spooky Action at a Distance' Is Real
We take for granted that an event in one part of the world cannot instantly affect what happens far away. This principle, which physicists call locality, was long regarded as a bedrock assumption about the laws of physics. So when Albert Einstein and two colleagues showed in 1935 that quantum mechanics permits "spooky action at a distance," as Einstein put it, this feature of the theory seemed…
7h
Why is Bezos flying to space? Because billionaires think Earth is a sinking ship | Hamilton Nolan
He and his fellow space-obsessed billionaires are exactly like the rich men aboard the Titanic who pushed others aside to jump into lifeboats Jeff Bezos is the most reptilian of billionaires. His heart has never shown evidence of a drop of warm blood. Despite all of the public relations that money can buy, his discomfort with normal human emotion shines through every time he is forced to contort
8h
Baby Birds Are Leaping From Their Nests and Dying Because of Extreme Heat
Hawkocalypse Now Throughout Oregon and California, a grim phenomenon is taking hold: baby birds are trying to flee the intense heat by hopping out of their nests before they're old enough to fly, plummeting to the ground below at rates that have conservationists extremely alarmed. The problem is particularly common among the various hawks in the region, according to The Washington Post . Wildlife
1d
Jeff Bezos Couldn't Qualify for Normal Astronaut Wings, So Blue Origin Invented Its Own
Along with three other passengers, Blue Origin CEO Jeff Bezos rocketed high into the upper atmosphere on what the company is calling its first crewed mission to space. The company's New Shepard rocket, dubbed the RSS First Step, launched from the West Texas desert and reached three Gs and a blistering speed of 2,233 mph during the trip. "It's actually a pleasurable experience," Bezos said during
3h
Blue Origin launch: Bezos rides rocket on company's first flight with passengers
Billionaire launches from West Texas with his brother, an 18-year-old and an 82-year-old female aviation pioneer Bezos blasted for traveling to space as Amazon workers toil Jeff Bezos has completed his pioneering foray into space, the Amazon founder and three crewmates, including his brother Mark, touching down in the Texas desert early on Tuesday after a sub-orbital flight lasting a mere 11 minu
9h
Biden's Strategy: Treat Trump Like a 'Crazy Person'
He's banned from Twitter and Facebook, yet Donald Trump continues to be the dominant figure in Republican—and American—politics. Multiple times per day, his super PAC blasts out his pouty statements, a range of dictations that can be trivial or seemingly end a prospective GOP primary campaign. According to White House aides I've spoken with, the strategy from President Joe Biden on down remains t
13h
Bezos blasted for traveling to space while Amazon workers toil on planet Earth
Space-obsessed billionaires come under fire with the Amazon founder declaring the critics 'largely right' As Jeff Bezos blasts into space on Tuesday, his voyage has some people asking whether the billionaire's time, or at least money, might be better spent here on earth. Bezos, the Amazon founder who has an estimated net worth of $206bn , is taking off from Texas on Tuesday morning on the rocket
13h
Tesla's Full Self-Driving Costs as Much Per Month as Leasing an Entire Car
Full Self-Driving Subscription Tesla has officially launched a subscription for its "Full Self-Driving" (FSD) software suite — and it's not cheap. The add-on feature allows Teslas to change lanes, navigate complex traffic intersections, and be summoned from a distance. Previously, the feature could only be enabled for a one-time fee of $10,000. Now, Tesla is offering the same package for a cool $
1d
More than half the world is still unmapped — but not for long
About 56 percent of the Earth's surface has not yet been mapped. The uncharted area corresponds to 80 percent of the ocean floor. But that area is shrinking fast. By 2030, the entire ocean will be mapped. Research vessel collecting hydrographic data via multibeam sonar, fanning out sound waves beneath its hull to the ocean floor. Credit : NOAA / Public domain Dear billionaires, are you afraid of
1d
Feral Hogs Are Contributing Hugely to Climate Change, Experts Say
Feral Hogs All memes aside, feral hogs around the world are causing a huge problem for the environment, and experts aren't sure what to do about it. Animals, tools, or anything else rooting through soil tends to release sequestered carbon into the atmosphere. That's a natural part of the carbon cycle, but feral hogs are releasing boatloads of greenhouse gases as they invade and rampage through ne
2h
Does warm weather mean you are less likely to catch Covid?
According to epidemiologists, meeting outside helps minimise infection risks but heat itself has a negligible effect on the virus Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage With the recent rising temperatures and more people now mixing outdoors as restrictions have been lifted in England, and eased in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, experts explain how much of an impact t
4h
Vaccination in America Might Have Only One Tragic Path Forward
America's vaccination rates have fallen off a cliff, and nothing seems to help. On June 2, President Joe Biden announced a frantic plan to reverse what already seemed to be an awful, exponential slide: At the peak of the country's vaccine rollout, in mid-April, almost 3.5 million doses were being put into arms every single day, but that number had quickly dropped by half , and then by half again.
10h
3 Tropes of White Victimhood
I n the conservative world, the idea that white people in the United States are under siege has become doctrine. In recent weeks, three prominent figures have each offered their own versions of this tenet. In June, Brian Kilmeade, one of the hosts of Fox & Friends , claimed that activists were "trying to take down white culture." Also in June, Tucker Carlson, speaking on his nightly show with an
11h
Scientist casts doubt on validity of Boris Johnson's 'workplace pilot'
Statistician says PM's initial excuse for not self-isolating is part of pattern of pilot studies that lack transparency Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage A scientist has cast doubt on the validity of a workplace pilot scheme used by Boris Johnson and Rishi Sunak to initially avoid self-isolation, accusing the government of secrecy surrounding it and other research. On
1d
Wally Funk fulfills lifelong dream to go to space with Blue Origin flight
The 82-year-old became the oldest person to go to space, six decades after being denied by the US government Bezos hails 'best day ever' after successful Blue Origin flight Wally Funk, a pilot who was denied the chance to go into space in the 1960s because she was a woman, said "I want to go again, fast", after returning from a successful flight with the Amazon founder, Jeff Bezos. With Bezos's b
4h
Upcoming Electric Car Designed to Mine Crypto While Charging
Crypto by Night The computational muscle of electric cars is rising exponentially. Self-driving cars require some beefy specs to make sense of the world around them and ensure their riders' safety. That's why several companies are now marketing vehicles not just based on how many miles they can cover on a single charge, but good they are at number crunching as well. For instance, Aldo Baoicchi, t
6h
Scientists create world's thinnest magnet
The development of an ultrathin magnet that operates at room temperature could lead to new applications in computing and electronics—such as high-density, compact spintronic memory devices—and new tools for the study of quantum physics.
14h
What the latest Pegasus spyware leaks tell us
Over the weekend, a consortium of international news outlets published their findings from an investigation into the use of Pegasus, the marquee spyware product of the secretive billion-dollar Israeli surveillance company NSO Group. The reports from the Guardian , the Washington Post , and 15 other media organizations are based on a leak of tens of thousands of phone numbers that appear to have b
1d
Blue Origin takes its first passengers to space
This time, there was a blastoff. Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos and three other civilians watched the sky turn from blue to black this morning as the company's reusable rocket and capsule system New Shepard passed the Kármán line, the boundary between Earth's atmosphere and outer space. Around 9:25 a.m. US Eastern time, Bezos and his fellow passengers landed safely, successfully completing the co
4h
Disney's Black Widow Gamble Didn't Pay Off
The release of Black Widow earlier this month was one of the biggest tests of a new Hollywood paradigm that emerged after the coronavirus pandemic began: the simultaneous rollout of a blockbuster in theaters and on streaming services. The latest Marvel movie opened in thousands of cinemas in the U.S. and Canada on the same day it was made available to Disney+ subscribers for a $30 surcharge. At f
5h
Chimpanzees have not entered the stone age
Unlike early human species, chimpanzees do not seem to be able to spontaneously make and use sharp stone tools, even when they have all the materials and incentive to do so. That was the finding of a study of a total of eleven chimpanzees at a zoo in Kristiansand, Norway, and Chimfunshi Wildlife Orphanage, a sanctuary in Zambia. The study was conducted by Dr. Elisa Bandini and Dr. Alba Motes-Rodri
7h
In the 1500s, Mail Disinfection Was Really, Really Weird
As a young boy, Denis Vandervelde realized he faced two major obstacles to achieving distinction in the study of stamps, called philately: he was penniless, and, worse, color-blind. "A lot of the expertise in stamp collecting depends on shades and tiny variations in printings," he told us. "So it was a daft hobby for me to have." Instead, Vandervelde began collecting postmarks and quickly found h
11h
Why NASA should visit Pluto again
In 1930, Clyde Tombaugh , a 25-year-old amateur astronomer, spied a small, dim object in the night sky. He'd been working at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, for about a year when he used a blink comparator—a special kind of microscope that can examine and compare images—to glimpse what was for a time considered to be the ninth planet in our solar system: Pluto. By all accounts, Plut
1d
'Virulent microbes everywhere': how can anxious people fend off reopening panic?
Re-emerging from lockdown can feel fraught with danger, especially for people with a history of anxiety I recently took my first flight since the pandemic began. As I arrived at the airport, I prepared for a scene of utter carnage: people everywhere, all of them insisting on breathing; virulent microbes reveling in a field of unsuspecting targets. As someone with a history of anxiety, I took a de
17h
15,000-year-old viruses discovered in Tibetan glacier ice
Scientists who study glacier ice have found viruses nearly 15,000 years old in two ice samples taken from the Tibetan Plateau in China. Most of those viruses, which survived because they had remained frozen, are unlike any viruses that have been cataloged to date.
4h
Jeff Bezos Is Ready to Cross a Cosmically Controversial Line
Days after Richard Branson flew to space and back , Jeff Bezos is preparing for his turn. The dueling space billionaires share a lifelong fascination with space travel and aspire to sell customers a few glorious minutes of weightlessness, high above Earth. But on one very basic point they disagree: Where does space begin? Bezos's Blue Origin is designed to take passengers to a higher altitude tha
1d
Using archeology to better understand climate change
Throughout history, people of different cultures and stages of evolution have found ways to adapt, with varying success, to the gradual warming of the environment they live in. But can the past inform the future, now that climate change is happening faster than ever before?
1d
Worker Robots Start Fire in Warehouse
Burn It Down Last Friday, three autonomous worker robots set fire to their warehouse when they crashed into each other and combusted. The unfortunate glitch ­— or perhaps the first whispers of a robot uprising — threw everything out of whack at the London warehouse of the UK grocery giant Ocado, Insider reports . The company uses its robotic warehouse to prepare and send out around 150,000 grocer
5h
Scenes From the 2021 Tour de France
The 108th edition of the Tour de France cycling race finished in Paris yesterday, won by Tadej Pogačar of UAE Team Emirates, after 23 teams of riders raced 2,122 miles (3,415 km) in 21 stages from June 26 to July 18. Placing second and third were Jonas Vingegaard of Team Jumbo-Visma, and Richard Carapaz of Ineos Grenadiers. Collected below are images from this year's competition.
1d
A foot tumor and two tail fractures complicated the life of this hadrosaur
When it was discovered in the 1980s in Argentina, this hadrosaur was diagnosed with a fractured foot. However, a new analysis now shows that this ornithopod commonly known as the duck-billed dinosaur actually had a tumor some 70 million years ago, as well as two painful fractures in the vertebrae of its tail, despite which, it managed to survive for some time.
5h
Extremely Rare Monkey Virus Kills Veterinarian in China
A veterinarian in China died in May after he was infected by an extremely rare disease, called the Monkey B virus, marking the first documented case in the country's history. The Monkey B virus, also known as herpes B, almost never jumps to humans. But when it does, The Washington Post reports , cases tend to result in death. About 80 percent of untreated patients will die from complications from
1h
Cities are scrambling to prevent flooding
US cities are working to shore up their flood defenses in the face of climate change, building and upgrading pumps, storm drains, and other infrastructure. In many cases, their existing systems are aging and built for the climate of the past. And even upgrades can do only so much to mitigate the intense flooding that's becoming more common, leaving cities to come up with other solutions. Floods h
11h
Bitcoin Crashes Below $30,000. Again.
Bitcoin Dip Bitcoin has dipped below the $30,000 mark yet again, CNN reports , as investors grow anxious about a resurgence of COVID-19 cases putting a damper on the economic recovery. The cryptocurrency fall around six percent over the last 24 hours, alongside other cryptos including Ethereum and Dogecoin. It was following the same trend as the stock market, which also fell on Monday, with share
1h
Ocean microbes team up brilliantly to gather food when it's scarce
What's a hungry marine microbe to do when the pickings are slim? It must capture nutrients—nitrogen, phosphorus, or iron—to survive, yet in vast expanses of the ocean, nutrients are extremely scarce. And the stakes are high: Marine microbial communities drive many of the elemental cycles that sustain all life on Earth.
1d
Thanks to Iceland, the four-day workweek is coming
A study in Icelandic government offices again shows the benefits of a shorter workweek. Productivity rose enough to ensure that all services were still provided as needed. Because of the study's success, 86 percent of Icelanders now or soon will have the right to a shorter workweek. In 1886, the standard workweek in the United States consisted of six, ten-hour days. On May 4th of that year, a rio
9h
Widespread cultural diffusion of knowledge started 400 thousand years ago
Different groups of hominins probably learned from one another much earlier than was previously thought, and that knowledge was also distributed much further. A study by archaeologists at Leiden University on the use of fire shows that 400,000 years ago knowledge and skills must already have been exchanged via social networks. The discovery was published in PNAS on 19 July.
8h
Number of COVID Cases Linked to Tokyo Olympics Spikes to 71
Japan chose to ignore many warnings from doctors and went ahead with the Tokyo Olympics. Now, organizers are reaping what they sowed. The total tally of confirmed COVID-19 cases among athletes and staff has already spiked up to 71, the Associated Press reports — and that's four days before the opening ceremony. That figure also includes 31 people from the tens of thousands of international visito
2h
Supermassive black holes put a brake on stellar births
Black holes with masses equivalent to millions of suns do put a brake on the birth of new stars, say astronomers. Using machine learning and three state of the art simulations to back up results from a large sky survey, the researchers resolve a 20-year long debate on the formation of stars. Joanna Piotrowska, a Ph.D. student at the University of Cambridge, will present the new work today at the v
14h
Pathogenic fungi colonize microplastics in soils
Representatives of numerous pathogenic fungal species are finding new habitat on microplastic particles in the soil and could thus be one of the possible causes of an increase in fungal infections. Researchers from Bayreuth, Hannover and Munich demonstrated this in a new study. Using high-throughput methods, the scientists analyzed fungal communities from soil samples taken from sites near human s
7h
Why are extreme weather events on the rise? (part one) – podcast
The Guardian's global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, speaks to Shivani Dave about extreme weather events – including the extreme heat recently recorded in the US and Canada. In the first of two parts, we hear how extreme heat comes about and why extreme weather events such as floods and monsoons look set to become more likely and even more extreme Continue reading…
17h
Capturing electrons in space
Interstellar clouds are the birthplaces of new stars, but they also play an important role in the origins of life in the Universe through regions of dust and gas in which chemical compounds form. The research group, molecular systems, led by ERC prize winner Roland Wester at the Institute for ion physics and applied physics at the University of Innsbruck, has set itself the task of better understa
5h
Composite piezoelectric materials extracted from common waste products
A research team led by Professor Jyh-Ming Wu of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at National Tsing Hua University (NTHU) in Taiwan has recently developed two composite piezoelectric materials extracted from common waste products. One is a new type of catalyst extracted from discarded rice husks and is capable of treating industrial wastewater 90 times quicker than the photocatal
10h
A Stark Choice for America
The shocking assassination of Haiti's president, Jovenel Moïse, raises urgent questions about the country's future and has serious implications for the United States. As Haiti descends further into chaos, we need to have a realistic understanding of its long history of political turmoil, to better grasp the situation it finds itself in. Of all the things we must grapple with, none is more importa
12h
The Atlantic Daily: How to Think About Your COVID-19 Risk, Post-vaccination
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. If you're feeling unnerved about the rise in COVID-19 cases in the United States, you aren't alone. Officials in Los Angeles reimplemented indoor mask restrictions for the fully vaccinated and the
6h
Jeff Bezos successfully completes space flight – video
Jeff Bezos has completed his pioneering foray into space. The Amazon founder and three crewmates touching down in the Texas desert early on Tuesday after a sub-orbital flight lasting 11 minutes. Bezos, 57, one of the world's richest people with an estimated net worth of $206bn (£151bn), has attracted criticism for investing his fortune into space tourism amid concerns over working conditions at A
4h
Novel autoantibody adds fuel to COVID-19 'firestorm' of inflammation, blood clots
Researchers have discovered another functional autoantibody in COVID-19 patients that contributes to the disease's development and the 'firestorm' of blood clots and inflammation it induces. The autoantibody makes it much harder for the body to degrade neutrophil extracellular traps, the toxic webs of DNA and proteins produced by overactive immune cells at heightened levels in COVID patients.
1d
Signs of life on Mars? Perseverance rover begins the hunt
NASA's Mars 2020 Perseverance rover has begun its search for signs of ancient life on the Red Planet. Flexing its 7-foot (2-meter) mechanical arm, the rover is testing the sensitive detectors it carries, capturing their first science readings. Along with analyzing rocks using X-rays and ultraviolet light, the six-wheeled scientist will zoom in for closeups of tiny segments of rock surfaces that mi
1h
Exoplanet discovery tool begins its mission
The NEID spectrometer, a new tool for the discovery of planets outside of our solar system, has now started its scientific mission at the WIYN 3.5m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, Arizona.
5h
Child protective services do work, but they are unevenly distributed
Roughly one in seven New York City children suffer confirmed mistreatment at home and many are placed in foster care. But relatively few children are permanently separated from their parents by the termination of parental rights, according to new research from Duke University and Rutgers University-Newark.
7h
Genome reveals that lichens can produce different climate-specific natural substances
Natural substances are biologically active components produced by organisms. So far, they have been of interest to researchers primarily as the basis for medicines, because some natural substances have been shown to inhibit tumor growth or have antiviral or antibacterial effects. Natural substances are also produced by organisms in order to better cope with their environment. For example, some lic
7h
Tracking the impacts of El Nino drought and fire in human-modified Amazonian forests [Sustainability Science]
With humanity facing an unprecedented climate crisis, the conservation of tropical forests has never been so important – their vast terrestrial carbon stocks can be turned into emissions by climatic and human disturbances. However, the duration of these effects is poorly understood, and it is unclear whether impacts are amplified…
1d
Stock market bubbles: Our evolutionary roots explain why investors follow the herd
Stock market bubbles, or asset bubbles, refer to a situation where stocks are valued far above what they're fundamentally worth. Unique factors contribute to each stock market bubble, but all play out in a generally similar series of stages. Research on the human social brain network offers insight into why investors participate in asset bubbles. In retrospect, there were clear signs that the sto
16min
Strong immune response underlies acute kidney injury related to COVID-19
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that acute kidney injury associated with COVID-19 resembles sepsis-caused kidney injury, and the immune response triggered by the infection plays a pivotal role.The findings, published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, also suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction — a loss of function in cellular energy production — is commonly found in kidney injury related to COVID-1
1h
'Springing forward' affects early birds less than night owls
Every spring, the Daylight Saving Time shift robs people of an hour of sleep – and a new study shows that DNA plays a role in how much the time change affects individuals. People whose genetic profile makes them more likely to be 'early birds' can adjust to the time change in a few days. But those who tend to be 'night owls' could take more than a week to get back on track.
1h
Solar cells: Boosting photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices
The photovoltaic effect of ferroelectric crystals can be increased by a factor of 1,000 if three different materials are arranged periodically in a lattice. Researchers achieved this by creating crystalline layers of barium titanate, strontium titanate and calcium titanate which they alternately placed on top of one another. These findings could significantly increase the efficiency of solar cells
1h
Rapidly diversifying birds in Southeast Asia offer new insights into evolution
New findings from zoologists working with birds in Southeast Asia are shining fresh light on the connections between animal behaviour, geology, and evolution – underlining that species can diversify surprisingly quickly under certain conditions. Sulawesi Babblers (Pellorneum celebense), shy birds that live in the undergrowth on Indonesian islands, have begun to diverge quite significantly despite
1h
Research shows employer-based weight management program with access to anti-obesity medications results in greater weight loss
Research Shows Employer-Based Weight Management Program With Access To Anti-Obesity Medications Results in Greater Weight Loss Clinical trial was conducted in the real-world setting of a workplace health plan A Cleveland Clinic study demonstrates that adults with obesity lost significantly more weight when they had access to medications for chronic weight management in conjunction with their emplo
1h
Carbon Tax, Beloved Policy to Fix Climate Change, Is Dead at 47
The American carbon tax, an alluringly simple policy once hailed by environmentalists, scholars, and politicians as a cure-all for climate change that, for all its elegance in economic models, could not overcome its enduring unpopularity with the American public, died last month at its home in Washington, D.C. It was 47. The death was confirmed by President Joe Biden's utter lack of interest in p
1h
Researchers develop novel method for glucagon delivery
For children with Type 1 diabetes, the risk of experiencing a severe hypoglycemic episode is especially common—and for parents, the threat of that happening in the middle of the night is especially frightening. Sudden and critical drops in blood sugar can go undetected overnight when the child is asleep, resulting in coma and death—an event known as "dead in bed syndrome."
1h
COVID-19 shutdowns reveal racial disparities in exposure to air pollution
A new study of COVID-19 shutdowns in the United States reveals pronounced disparities in air pollution—with disenfranchised, minority neighborhoods still experiencing more exposure to a harmful air pollutant compared to wealthier, white communities. This first-of-a-kind study published today by researchers at the George Washington University looks at how air pollution changed after schools and bus
2h
Benjamin Franklin on vaccination and a deadly virus outbreak
Exactly 300 years ago, in 1721, Benjamin Franklin and his fellow American colonists faced a deadly smallpox outbreak . Their varying responses constitute an eerily prescient object lesson for today's world, similarly devastated by a virus and divided over vaccination three centuries later. As a microbiologist and a Franklin scholar , we see some parallels between then and now that could help gove
2h
Using snakes to monitor Fukushima radiation
Ten years after one of the largest nuclear accidents in history spewed radioactive contamination over the landscape in Fukushima, Japan, a University of Georgia study has shown that radioactive contamination in the Fukushima Exclusion Zone can be measured through its resident snakes.
2h
Blue Origin Successfully Launches Humans Into Space
Blue Origin has successfully launched humans into space today on its New Shepard rocket. Wally Funk, Mark Bezos, Jeff Bezos, and Oliver Daemen all traveled above the 100km boundary that marks the internationally accepted von Karman line, the point at which the atmosphere of Earth is said to give way to space. Richard Branson's flight a few days ago reached 85km above sea level, which is high enou
2h
Watch a bubble pop like a blooming flower
A new study using high-speed cameras and analytical modeling offers clues on how different kinds of bubbles form and eventually pop. The oil industry, pharmaceutical companies, and bioreactor manufacturers all face one common enemy: bubbles. Bubbles can form during the manufacturing or transport of various liquids, and their formation and rupture can cause significant issues in product quality. S
2h
How green is your plastic?
Despite the best efforts of industry to work towards sustainability, most plastics (or polymers) are still made using non-renewable fossil fuels. However, researchers have now found an economical method for producing biobased acrylate resins. The study shows how all the synthesis steps, from initial building blocks right up to polymerization, can be carried out in a single reactor (one pot), minim
2h
No IgA leads to intestinal inflammation in mice
Researchers have found that immunoglobulin A (IgA) deficiency leads to disruption of the ileal gut microbiota and increased inflammation in the ileum in mice. This suggests that IgA plays an important role in mucosal homeostasis by regulating the intestinal microbiota and protecting against mucosal inflammation, especially in the ileum
2h
Revealing the secrets of cell competition
Cellular competition is a crucial quality control process that ensures that the development of an organism relies on healthy cells. Researchers revealed the secrets underlying cell competition and what features can pre-determine whether a cell will survive or not. Defects in energy production are critical in making cells vulnerable to elimination.
2h
Digital health technologies hold key to new Parkinson's treatments
The use of digital health technologies across health care and drug development has accelerated. A new paper titled "Digital Progression Biomarkers as Novel Endpoints in Clinical Trials: A Multistakeholder Perspective," co-authored by experts across diverse disciplines, highlights how new remote monitoring technologies present a tremendous opportunity to advance digital medicine in health care even
2h
What's the latest on a COVID-19 vaccine for kids?
More than half a year has passed since the first vaccine for COVID-19 and almost half the US has protection against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. But there still isn't one for children younger than 12. Vaccine makers have been working to make their products available to younger patients, launching clinical trials to evaluate whether the vaccines can safely and effectively protect children as young as 6 m
3h
Quantifying COVID-19 importation risk in a dynamic network of domestic cities and international countries [Environmental Sciences]
Since its outbreak in December 2019, the novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) has spread to 191 countries and caused millions of deaths. Many countries have experienced multiple epidemic waves and faced containment pressures from both domestic and international transmission. In this study, we conduct a multiscale geographic analysis of the spread…
3h
Reply to Klein: Ysterfontein 1 shell midden (South Africa) and the antiquity of coastal adaptation [Social Sciences]
Klein (1) challenges two interpretations in Niespolo et al. (2). Regarding his first point, we maintain that Ysterfontein 1 (YFT1) does provide the oldest known example of full coastal adaptation as indicated by the presence of shell middens (cf. ref. 3). Klein inaccurately characterizes the age of the deepest shell…
3h
COVID-19 pandemic reveals persistent disparities in nitrogen dioxide pollution [Sustainability Science]
The unequal spatial distribution of ambient nitrogen dioxide (NO2), an air pollutant related to traffic, leads to higher exposure for minority and low socioeconomic status communities. We exploit the unprecedented drop in urban activity during the COVID-19 pandemic and use high-resolution, remotely sensed NO2 observations to investigate disparities in NO2…
3h
Reward-specific satiety affects subjective value signals in orbitofrontal cortex during multicomponent economic choice [Economic Sciences]
Sensitivity to satiety constitutes a basic requirement for neuronal coding of subjective reward value. Satiety from natural ongoing consumption affects reward functions in learning and approach behavior. More specifically, satiety reduces the subjective economic value of individual rewards during choice between options that typically contain multiple reward components. The unconfounded…
3h
Glucocorticoid receptor condensates link DNA-dependent receptor dimerization and transcriptional transactivation [Biochemistry]
The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-regulated transcription factor (TF) that controls the tissue- and gene-specific transactivation and transrepression of thousands of target genes. Distinct GR DNA-binding sequences with activating or repressive activities have been identified, but how they modulate transcription in opposite ways is not known. We show that…
3h
Characterization of neoantigen-specific T cells in cancer resistant to immune checkpoint therapies [Immunology and Inflammation]
Neoantigen-specific T cells are strongly implicated as being critical for effective immune checkpoint blockade treatment (ICB) (e.g., anti–PD-1 and anti–CTLA-4) and are being targeted for vaccination-based therapies. However, ICB treatments show uneven responses between patients, and neoantigen vaccination efficiency has yet to be established. Here, we characterize neoantigen-specific CD8+ T…
3h
Termite gas emissions select for hydrogenotrophic microbial communities in termite mounds [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
Organoheterotrophs are the dominant bacteria in most soils worldwide. While many of these bacteria can subsist on atmospheric hydrogen (H2), levels of this gas are generally insufficient to sustain hydrogenotrophic growth. In contrast, bacteria residing within soil-derived termite mounds are exposed to high fluxes of H2 due to fermentative production…
3h
Active liquid crystals powered by force-sensing DNA-motor clusters [Physics]
Cytoskeletal active nematics exhibit striking nonequilibrium dynamics that are powered by energy-consuming molecular motors. To gain insight into the structure and mechanics of these materials, we design programmable clusters in which kinesin motors are linked by a double-stranded DNA linker. The efficiency by which DNA-based clusters power active nematics depends…
3h
Grain boundary formation through particle detachment during coarsening of nanoporous metals [Engineering]
Grain boundary formation during coarsening of nanoporous gold (NPG) is investigated wherein a nanocrystalline structure can form by particles detaching and reattaching to the structure. MicroLaue and electron backscatter diffraction measurements demonstrate that an in-grain orientation spread develops as NPG is coarsened. The volume fraction of the NPG sample is…
3h
Dynamic chromatin regulatory landscape of human CAR T cell exhaustion [Immunology and Inflammation]
Dysfunction in T cells limits the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy. We profiled the epigenome, transcriptome, and enhancer connectome of exhaustion-prone GD2-targeting HA-28z chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and control CD19-targeting CAR T cells, which present less exhaustion-inducing tonic signaling, at multiple points during their ex vivo expansion. We found…
3h
Grudge Match: JJ Da Boss vs Michael Prock | Street Outlaws: Memphis
Stream Street Outlaws: Memphis on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/street-outlaws-memphis About Street Outlaws: Memphis: Street Outlaws is traveling to the toughest, meanest and wildest streets in the South, as it heads to Memphis to spotlight JJ Da Boss and his team of family and friends who have been racing together for decades. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDisc
3h
Mind and matter: Modeling the human brain with machine learning
A content recommendation system based on the user's brain model would be ideal for targeted advertising. Creating such a brain model, however, is computationally expensive. In a new study, researchers from Japan propose and validate a machine learning scheme to infer a user's brain model from their profile with high accuracy while optimizing the information collection cost using a feature selectio
3h
Gene expression mechanism may have immunity, cancer implications
Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is an RNA processing mechanism that regulates gene expression by generating different ends on RNA transcripts of the same gene. Scientists describe an important function of APA in allowing certain mRNAs to reach specific sites of protein synthesis that can determine the destination of mRNAs within the cell.
3h
New insight into 'training' highly reactive chemical compounds
Highly reactive molecules cannot survive for long in nature. If researchers want to study them more closely, they must produce them under very specific laboratory conditions. Compared to "normal" molecules, many of these tiny particles have a distinguishing feature: They simply bind with everything around them and are therefore very difficult to direct.
3h
DNA assay aids in identifying and protecting North American wolves, coyotes
Forensics specialists can use a commercial assay targeting mitochondrial DNA to accurately discriminate between wolf, coyote and dog species, according to a new study from North Carolina State University. The genetic information can be obtained from smaller or more degraded samples, and could aid authorities in prosecuting hunting jurisdiction violations and preserving protected species.
4h
SARS-CoV-2: Achilles' heel of viral RNA
When SARS-CoV-2 infects a cell, it introduces its RNA into it and re-programs it in such a way that the cell first produces viral proteins and then whole viral particles. In the search for active substances against SARS-CoV-2, researchers have so far mostly concentrated on the viral proteins and on blocking them, since this promises to prevent, or at least slow down, replication. But attacking the
4h
New insight into "training" highly reactive chemical compounds
Highly reactive molecules cannot survive for long in nature. If researchers want to study them more closely, they therefore have to be produced under very specific laboratory conditions. Compared to "normal" molecules, many of these tiny particles have a distinguishing feature: they simply bind with everything around them and are therefore very difficult to direct.
4h
Public trust in CDC, FDA, and Fauci holds steady, survey shows
Top U.S. health agencies retain the trust of the vast majority of the American public, as does Dr. Anthony Fauci, according to a new survey from the Annenberg Public Policy Center. Public confidence has grown in the safety and effectiveness of vaccines to prevent Covid-19. But people who say they rely on conservative media have less confidence in Fauci and are more likely to accept misinformation
4h
Rural young people have higher odds of late cancer diagnosis
Distance from the hospital ups the odds of a young adult or adolescent receiving a late-stage cancer diagnosis, research finds. Those living in rural versus metropolitan counties, and those living farther from the hospital where they received their cancer diagnosis, are more likely to find out at a later cancer stage, when it's generally less treatable and survival rates are lower, the study find
4h
The environmental toll of disposable masks
The high monetary cost and environmental toll of disposable N95 masks could be dramatically cut by adopting reusable masks, according to a new study that calculated the financial and environmental cost of several different mask usage scenarios.
4h
A Forest Fire in Oregon Is So Huge That It's Generating Freak Lightning Storms
Changing the Weather The largest wildfire in the US so far this season is so massive that it's causing mayhem with the weather itself, The New York Times reports . The Bootleg Fire in Southern Oregon has already burned 530 square miles of forest and grasslands over the last two weeks, spurred by heat waves linked to climate change — a bad omen, in other words, of what's still in store for us. "Th
4h
Not just COVID: mortality rates are up from homicides, drug overdoses, accidents
Mortality rates from drug overdoses, homicides, and unintentional injuries increased since the pandemic began. Surprisingly, the suicide rate was below expectations. Cancer deaths may increase in coming years due to delayed diagnosis and reduced treatment. In the U.S. the COVID pandemic cost hundreds of thousands of lives. Most deaths were directly attributable to the virus, but a substantial num
4h
Long-period oscillations of Sun discovered
A team of solar physicists has reported the discovery of global oscillations of the Sun with very long periods, comparable to the 27-day solar rotation period. The oscillations manifest themselves at the solar surface as swirling motions with speeds on the order of 5 kilometers per hour.
5h
Radiation and Immunotherapy Together
Cancer immunotherapy has been a huge topic in recent years, and deservedly so. But there are some types of tumors that respond much better than others, which means that there are also some that hardly respond at all. A great deal of effort is going into trying to find ways to make these immunologically "cold" tumors respond to checkpoint inhibitors and other such drugs. One way to do this is thro
5h
Review evaluates the evidence for an intensifying Indian Ocean water cycle
The Indian Ocean has been warming much more than other ocean basins over the last 50-60 years. While temperature changes basin-wide can be unequivocally attributed to human-induced climate change, it is difficult to assess whether contemporary heat and freshwater changes in the Indian Ocean since 1980 represent an anthropogenically-forced transformation of the hydrological cycle. What complicates
5h
Brain 'noise' keeps nerve connections young
EPFL researchers have found that a form of neuron-to-neuron communication that has long been dismissed as 'background noise' is required to keep nerve junctions intact as animals age. The finding suggests that defects in this type of neural communication could contribute to neurodegenerative disorders and other brain conditions.
5h
Enzyme-based plastics recycling is more energy efficient, better for environment
Researchers in the BOTTLE Consortium, including from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Portsmouth, have identified using enzymes as a more sustainable approach for recycling polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a common plastic in single-use beverage bottles, clothing, and food packaging that are becoming increasingly relevant in addressing the environmental challe
5h
Automobile class society
Up to now passenger cars are classified by experts in each country into categories such as micro, small, middle, upper middle, large and luxury class. But this old fashioned method has limitations in terms of compatibility. Moreover, some crossover vehicles are difficult to categorize. Empa scientists found a method to do this sorting fairly and in an efficient way by browsing databases with machi
5h
Why your second shot COVID vaccine really matters
The second shot of a COVID-19 vaccine induces a powerful boost to a part of the immune system that provides broad antiviral protection, according to a study. The finding strongly supports the view that the second shot should not be skipped. "Despite their outstanding efficacy, little is known about how exactly RNA vaccines work," says Bali Pulendran, professor of pathology and of microbiology and
5h
Economical synthesis of polyacrylates and polymethacrylates from biobased materials
Despite the best efforts of industry to work towards sustainability, most plastics (or polymers) are still made using non-renewable fossil fuels. However, researchers have now found an economical method for producing biobased acrylate resins. The study, published in the journal Angewandte Chemie, shows how all the synthesis steps, from initial building blocks right up to polymerization, can be car
5h
Shoppers' mobility habits: Retailers overestimate car use
Retail traders often fear that reducing the amount of urban space made available for parking private vehicles would have a negative effect on their businesses. A survey conducted by researchers from the Institute for Advanced Sustainability Studies (IASS) on two shopping streets in Berlin shows that traders have a skewed perception of their customers' mobility habits. The findings of this research
5h
A new method for uninterrupted monitoring of solid-state milling reactions
A team of chemists from the Croatian Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI) described a new, easy-to-use method for uninterrupted monitoring of mechanochemical reactions. These reactions are conducted in closed milling devices, so in order to monitor the reaction one has to open the reaction vessel, thus interfering with the process. The new method uses Raman spectroscopy to get deeper insight into solid-
6h
How Zello keeps people connected during South Africa's unrest
On June 29, former South African president Jacob Zuma was sentenced to 15 months in prison for corruption during his presidency. Zuma—the first ethnic Zulu to hold the country's highest office—has a loyal following. He also has many detractors, who blame his administration's corruption for a stagnant economy and weakened democracy. Zuma didn't turn himself in until July 7, saying he was innocent
6h
Hi Reddit! I'm Andy Stanford-Clark, CTO at IBM UK and leading the IBM technical team for the Mayflower Autonomous Ship, a first-of-its-kind un-crewed vessel. Ask me anything and I'll be here in r/futurology to answer your questions on July 21st at 4PM UTC/5PM BST/12PM EST/9AM PT!
Greetings from the Isle of Wight! I'm Prof Andy Stanford-Clark, Chief Technology Officer at IBM UK and a technical leader of the IBM team working on Mayflower Autonomous Ship. I am based at IBM's Hursley Park Labs in England where I have been working for more than 30 years. I'm incredibly passionate about tech for good and innovation for the future – I am an IBM Distinguished Engineer and Master
6h
Private immune protection at the border of the central nervous system
Nature, Published online: 20 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01962-4 At the outer border of the brain and spinal cord, immune cells have been observed that originate from the bone marrow of the adjacent skull and vertebrae. They reach this site through special bone channels, without passing through the blood.
6h
Back to work? Here's how to help your dog cope
Millions of people returning to the workplace means millions of dogs left home alone, some of them never having experienced their people being gone all day. "This is something that's a big deal for a dog, if you have been around home most of the time and now you're going to go back and be gone 40-50 hours a week," says Brian Hare , a professor of evolutionary anthropology and the co-director of t
6h
Medical debt in US
What The Study Did: Credit reports were analyzed to estimate the amount of medical debt in collections nationally and by geographic region and income group and its association with Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act.
6h
Bleak cyborg future from brain-computer interfaces if we're not careful
The most promising method to achieve real-world BCI applications is through electroencephalography, a method of monitoring the brain's electrical activity. EEG-based BCIs will require a number of technological advances prior to widespread use, but more importantly, they will raise a variety of social, ethical, and legal concerns. Researchers conducted a review of modern commercial brain-computer i
6h
Data identifies turbine wake clustering, improves wind farm productivity via yaw control
In the Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy, researchers describe a real-time method for potentially helping turbine farms realize additional power from the clustering of their turbines. Their method requires no new sensors to identify which turbines at any given time could increase power production if yaw control is applied, and validation studies showed an increase of 1%-3% in overall pow
6h
Imagine an AI with an imagination
Humans are really good at imagining things based on the mixing and matching of existing elements. One of the holy grails of computer science is the development of an AI that can extrapolate from data, and USC researchers have a model for how that could happen. Rather than focusing on the tiny details of individual samples, the model uses groups of related samples to encourage AI to figure out bro
6h
The (de)colonizing of beauty | Sasha Sarago
Beauty is about more than the body you inhabit — it's a way of being that goes beyond genetics or societal ideals. Aboriginal writer and former model Sasha Sarago invites you to decolonize beauty, moving away from the monolithic Eurocentric archetype and towards a more essential, authentic understanding of self that belongs to everyone.
7h
New method for uninterrupted monitoring of solid-state milling reactions
Researchers from the Croatian Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI) described a new, easy-to-use method for uninterrupted monitoring of mechanochemical reactions. These reactions are conducted in closed milling devices, so in order to monitor the reaction one has to open the reaction vessel, thus interfering with the process. The new method uses Raman spectroscopy to get deeper insight into solid-state m
7h
Synthesis of new red phosphors with a smart material as a host material
Professor Hiromi Nakano of Toyohashi University of Technology used a material with a unique periodical structure (smart material: Li-M-Ti-O [M = Nb or Ta]) as a host material to synthesize new Mn4+-activated phosphors that exhibit red light emissions at 685 nm when excited at 493 nm. Because the valence of the Mn ions in the material changes from Mn4+ to Mn3+ according to the sintering temperature
7h
Millions of dollars saved when scheduled travel providers adapt to on-demand scheduling
Uber and Lyft are popular on-demand ways to travel, but does that mean trains and buses are a thing of the past? Travelers prefer different modes of transportation at different times. So how can all these modes co-exist and do so successfully? New research in the INFORMS Journal Transportation Science has created a model and an algorithm to redistribute transit resources based on commuter preferen
7h
SARS-CoV-2 spike mutation L452R evades human immune response and enhances infectivity
An international team of researchers led by Kumamoto and Tokyo Universities (Japan) have shown that the L452R mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, which is common to two variants (Epsilon and Delta), is involved in cellular immunity evasion via the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A24, and enhances viral infectivity. HLA-A24 is one of the most prominent HLA-class I alleles, especially in East/So
7h
Horizontal winds become major movers of carbon dioxide during cold fronts
Trees, crops and other vegetation in the midwestern United States act as large carbon sinks during summer, taking in carbon dioxide (CO2) and limiting the amount of the greenhouse gas that enters the atmosphere. What happens to carbon dioxide when a cold front moves in has largely remained a mystery, but Penn State-led research is offering new insights that may help improve global carbon models.
7h
3D hohlraum model assists in indirect-drive implosions at NIF
Scientists from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) have described a simple 3D model in hohlraums and capsules for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The model will assist in delivering the required implosion symmetry on layered deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions for ignition.
7h
Laser improves the time resolution of CryoEM
In 2017, Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their contributions to cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM), an imaging technique that can capture pictures of biomolecules such as proteins with atomic precision.
7h
Push to make supply chains more sustainable continues to gain momentum
Much of the effort to make businesses sustainable centers on their supply chains, which were severely disrupted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet, according to new research from the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics (CTL), supply chain sustainability (SCS) investments hardly slowed, even as the pandemic raged.
7h
Pre-election polls in 2020 had the largest errors in 40 years
Public opinion polls ahead of the 2020 election were the most inaccurate in a generation, according to Josh Clinton, Abby and Jon Winkelried Chair and professor of political science, who recently served as chair of a special task force convened by the American Association for Public Opinion Research specifically to evaluate polling. The task force found that polling during the two weeks before the
7h
Strong signals
University of Tsukuba scientists employed a mathematical model to simulate the differentiation of epithelial cells based on signaling molecules from the liver's portal vein. This work may lead to new tools to better understand the very complicated signaling pathways involved in cell differentiation.
7h
New biomechanical method draws roots into deeper soil layers to resist drought stress
Tree roots are drawn towards moist soil, a phenomenon known as hydrotropism. Near surface watering therefore causes roots to stay close to the surface instead of growing deep into the ground. Biomechanical engineers from Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed a new, easily applied method, the "gravel cylinder," to attract the tree roots towards deeper, moister soil layers. This should m
7h
Research reveals barriers to increasing diversity in voluntary organizations
The impact of COVID-19 and a lack of resources has led to charities and voluntary sector organizations facing challenges in increasing diversity, despite the majority having drawn up plans to address equality, diversity and inclusion (EDI) issues in their workplace, volunteers and services (79%) and 59% of these revising their EDI approach since March 2020.
8h
World's richest man Jeff Bezos blasts into space
The wealthiest man on the planet Jeff Bezos spent a few minutes in space Tuesday on Blue Origin's first human mission, a key moment for a fledgling industry seeking to make the final frontier accessible to elite tourists.
8h
Protein Folding AI Is Making a 'Once in a Generation' Advance in Biology
Thanks to AI, we just got stunningly powerful tools to decode life. In two back -to- back papers last week, scientists at DeepMind and the University of Washington described deep learning-based methods to solve protein folding—the last step of executing the programming in our DNA, and a " once in a generation advance ." Proteins are the minions of life. They form our bodies, fuel our metabolism,
8h
Working in intense heat may raise risk of kidney disease
Physically demanding work in hot temperatures could increase rates of kidney disease in the United States, a new study shows. The historic heat wave that hit the Pacific Northwest last month was not just uncomfortable and oppressive—it was deadly. In Oregon, the triple-digit temperatures that scorched the region were responsible for 116 deaths, according to the Oregon Medical Examiner's Office, a
8h
Solar cells: Layer of three crystals produces a thousand times more power
The photovoltaic effect of ferroelectric crystals can be increased by a factor of 1,000 if three different materials are arranged periodically in a lattice. This has been revealed in a study by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU). They achieved this by creating crystalline layers of barium titanate, strontium titanate and calcium titanate which they alternately placed on
8h
Mayo research provides insights into high-risk younger demographics for severe COVID-19
Using data from 9,859 COVID-19 infections, Mayo Clinic researchers have new insights into risk factors for younger populations, some of which differ significantly from their older counterparts. People younger than 45 had a greater than threefold increased risk of severe infection if they had cancer or heart disease, or blood, neurologic or endocrine disorders, the research found. These association
8h
Ecosystem functions of rubber plantations are lower than tropical forests
According to statistics, rubber plantations have covered more than 2 million ha in the tropics in the last decade globally. It has improved the economic status of farmers, but altered the habitat's ecology and ecosystem functions. However, few studies have focused on the impacts of rubber plantations on ecosystem functions of rubber plantation and no clear overview is available.
8h
Scientists shuffle atomic layers like playing cards to make new quantum materials
Materials scientists can now shuffle layered compounds together, much like combining two different decks of cards. The technique, recently discovered by a team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, is leading to development of new materials with unusual electron transport properties that have potential applications in next-generation quantum technologies.
8h
High magnetic fields control both rate and product of chemical reactions
Recently, using the SM1 superconducting magnet, a large scientific device with a steady-state high magnetic field, scientists carried out research on special functional materials and found that high magnetic fields can effectively regulate the rate, reaction path and reaction products of chemical reactions. The results were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.
8h
A new method produces improved surface strain rate maps
Earthquakes occur when tectonic strain that has gradually accumulated along a fault is suddenly released. Measurements of how much Earth's surface deforms over time, or the strain rate, can be used in seismic hazard models to predict where earthquakes might occur. One way that scientists estimate strain rate is via orbiting satellites and detailed measurements of how much GPS stations on Earth's s
8h
With the HUMANS project, a message that space is for everyone
When the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft launched in 1977, they each carried a Golden Record, a special project spearheaded by astrophysicist Carl Sagan, in addition to the scientific instruments necessary for their mission to explore the outer reaches of our solar system. Part time capsule, part symbolic ambassador of goodwill, the Golden Record comprises sounds, images, music, and greetings i
8h
Basement membrane underpins tissue interactions in the skin
In a discovery that could pave the way for therapies that promote wound healing and alleviate skin diseases, RIKEN researchers have found that the network of molecules under the outermost layer of mouse skin, the skin epithelium, is a highly specialized zone of biological activity that facilitates distinct sets of interactions between different types of tissues.
8h
SARS-CoV-2 spike mutation evades human immune response, enhances infectivity
An international team of researchers led by Kumamoto and Tokyo Universities (Japan) have shown that the L452R mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, which is common to two mutant strains (Epsilon and Delta), is involved in cellular immunity evasion via the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A24, and enhances viral infectivity. HLA-A24 is one of the most prominent HLA-class I alleles, especially in E
8h
Using machine-learning to find mutations in similar genome sequences of cancer samples
A team of researchers working at the Francis Crick Institute has developed a way to find mutations in similar genome regions of cancer samples. In their paper published in the journal Nature Biotechnology, the group describes using a machine-learning algorithm to spot cancerous mutations in non-unique parts of the genome.
8h
Tree-ring records reveal Asian monsoon variability
Chinese researchers along with international colleagues recently reported a 6,700-year-long, precisely dated and well-calibrated tree-ring stable isotope chronology from the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau. It reveals full-frequency precipitation variability in the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) from interannual to multimillennial timescales with a long-term decreasing trend and several abrupt climate ch
8h
New online tool helps better serve environmental justice
The Elizabeth River Project (ERP) has teamed with researchers from the Virginia Institute of Marine Science and William & Mary to build an online mapping tool that can help the non-profit and other community partners better incorporate environmental justice issues into planning and restoration efforts. Collaborating with the researchers was an Environmental Justice and Equity subcommittee recently
8h
The science of 'herd mentality'
What can monkeys teach us about stock market bubbles? It turns out that monkeys make decisions much like investors on the trading floor—they develop a herd mentality, mimicking the behavior of others until overinflation and the eventual pop. "This tendency to follow the herd emerges from our social brain networks," explains Michael Platt, professor of neuroscience at the University of Pennsylvani
9h
New Study Predicts Teeny Tiny Mountains on Neutron Stars
Physicists are still arguing over whether black holes have " hair ," but we're pretty sure neutron stars have mountains. These dead stars are extreme in every respect, from their magnetic field to gravitational influence, but the only thing extreme about the mountains is how small they are. A new analysis of neutron star physics predicts the "mountains" on the surface are less than a millimeter t
9h
Self-Reliance Index offers holistic view of refugee lives
A new tool, the Self-Reliance Index, tracks the self-reliance of refugees and other displaced populations over time, report researchers. "Humanitarian actors are increasingly recognizing the need to shift focus from providing refugees with immediate assistance to promoting their ability to obtain sustained self-reliance. Until now, we haven't had a comprehensive tool to measure progress toward th
9h
Sexual harassment is rife in many African media workplaces
Survivors of sexual violence around the world have begun to speak out more in recent years. This has happened partly due to the #MeToo movement, which began in 2006 in the US and gained momentum through high-profile cases like Hollywood executive Harvey Weinstein and actor Bill Cosby.
10h
Anomalous quantum transport phenomena observed in fractal photonic lattices
Fractals are complex structures that usually exhibit self-similarity and have a non-integer dimension. The terminology "fractal" was first introduced by the famous mathematician Benoit B. Mandelbrot. He noticed that here and there, many natural objects were fractals, such as snowflakes, branching trees, coastline, etc. Outside of nature, fractal patterns or structures are also artificially created
10h
New exploration marker identified for Western Australian mineral systems
Working with the world-leading mass spectrometry facilities at Curtin University's John de Laeter Centre, Professor Neal McNaughton and his research team have developed new methods for preparing and analyzing individual crystals of rutile to reveal hidden secrets of their chemical make-up that could help guide geologists searching for undiscovered ore deposits.
10h
Developing a tool for streamlined molecular weight analysis
New world-first Griffith University-led research has streamlined the process of identifying the structure and molecular weight of compounds, which could have positive implications for scientists working in the fields of drug discovery, pollution analysis, food security and more.
10h
We're Losing the Vaccine Race
In February on SBM I wrote about the Race Against Vaccine Hesitancy . At that point in time the pandemic was receding in the US in the face of a rapid vaccination program, but also the first new variants of SARS-CoV-2 were starting to appear. Essentially I argued that we were in a race between achieving herd immunity and the spread of new variants that might be more contagious or even vaccine res
10h
Award-winning nursing researcher's paper retracted for 'failure to acknowledge the contribution of other researchers and the funding source'
A nursing journal has retracted a 2019 paper by a researcher in Scotland after learning that she'd taken a wee bit more credit for the article than she deserved. The paper was titled "Co-designing technology with people with dementia and their carers: Exploring user perspectives when co-creating a mobile health application" and was written by … Continue reading
10h
Start Building Your Own Robots With This Nano Bot Construction Set
Robots are so complex, they can now do our dancing for us . Robotics are a fun, interactive way to learn circuitry, engineering, and coding, and the Smart Nano Bots PCB Construction Set with Toolkit has everything you need to get started. Your First Mad Science Lab This kit has seven different bots to build, each packaged like trading cards. First, you'll be instructed on how to set up your works
11h
Shri Pukka Science of Hindu Nationalism
Together with "Paul Jones" I celebrate here a great Hindu nationalist: Govardhan Das. The immunology professor previously cured tuberculosis with Photoshop, and now he cured COVID-19 with BCG vaccine. All while exposing alleged research fraudsters who dare to criticise the sacred and perfect Modi government!
11h
Reversible electroadhesion of hydrogels to animal tissues for suture-less repair of cuts or tears
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24022-x The authors demonstrate strong adhesion of cationic hydrogels to bovine tissues under a DC electric field. Such electroadhesion can be reversed by switching the polarity of the field. This approach could enable simpler surgeries, where sutures are not needed.
12h
Early-life social experience affects offspring DNA methylation and later life stress phenotype
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24583-x Early social experience can alter epigenetic patterns and stress responses later in life. A study on wild spotted hyenas finds that maternal care and social connections after leaving the den influence DNA methylation and contribute to a developmentally plastic stress response.
12h
TEM8 marks neovasculogenic tumor-initiating cells in triple-negative breast cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24703-7 Vasculogenic mimicry (VM) contributes to the development of triple-negative breast cancer. In this study, the authors show that TEM8 is expressed in VM-forming breast cancer stem cells and it promotes stemness and VM differentiation capacity through a RhoC/ROCK1/SMAD5 axis
12h
Temperature heterogeneity correlates with intraspecific variation in physiological flexibility in a small endotherm
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24588-6 Theory predicts that organisms in varied environments should evolve to be more phenotypically flexible. Evidence combining genetic and physiological variation with thermal acclimation experiments shows that the thermogenic flexibility of wild juncos is greatest in populations where temperatures are most variable
12h
Sedimentary pyrite sulfur isotopes track the local dynamics of the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone
Nature Communications, Published online: 20 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24753-x To explore the importance of local vs. global sulfur-cycle controls on variations in pyrite sulfur isotopes, the authors couple carbon-nitrogen-sulfur concentrations and stable isotopes of sediments from the Peruvian oxygen minimum zone, identifying a major role for the local organic carbon loading.
12h
Summer Catastrophes Bring the Climate Crisis into Focus
In the past few weeks, we've seen deadly heat domes across the Pacific Northwest, a petroleum pipeline leak in the middle of the ocean that set the Gulf of Mexico on fire, and deadly floods in Germany and Belgium. Here's what scientists are saying about climate change impacts this summer.
12h
Why are extreme weather events on the rise? (part one)
The Guardian's global environment editor, Jonathan Watts, speaks to Shivani Dave about extreme weather events – including the extreme heat recently recorded in the US and Canada. In the first of two parts, we hear how extreme heat comes about and why extreme weather events such as floods and monsoons look set to become more likely and even more extreme. Help support our independent journalism at t
17h
Never Lose a Document With A Lifetime Subscription to the iScanner App
As cameras have wound up everywhere, we've been scanning everything we can, from documents to our own eyeballs . Yet too often we just grab a snap of a crucial note or receipt when we can do a lot more with it. The iScanner app for iOS puts a scanner in your pocket, making your notes, snaps, and more a far more useful resource. A Scanner For Everything Rated the #1 Scanning App on App Store with
19h
Newly introduced butterfly could become widespread in Canada
This summer, if you see a butterfly with wings that are blue on top with orange spots underneath, you may have crossed paths with a male European Common Blue (or Polyommatus icarus), a newly introduced species in Canada. Could it be a fluke? Probably not, according to a group of researchers who have taken a close look at this captivating blue creature.
20h
Why MS patients develop progressive disability
Did you know multiple sclerosis (MS) means multiple scars? New research shows that the brain and spinal cord scars in people with MS may offer clues to why they developprogressive disability but those with related diseases where the immune system attacks the central nervous system do not. Researchers assessed if inflammation leads to permanent scarring in these three diseases.
1d
Tesla Rolls Out $200 Monthly Subscription for 'Full Self-Driving'
Tesla has finally rolled out the promised Full Self-Driving (FSD) subscription service. For $199 per month, owners of supported Tesla vehicles will be able to get a taste of the company's most advanced self-driving features. That might not sound like a great deal, but the only option previously was an up-front $10,000 package. However, not all of the Tesla faithful are happy. Some vague language
1d
How inflation fears can turn into the real thing
How bad could inflation get in the United States? Economist Narayana Kocherlakota has some answers. Kocherlakota says a return to 1970s levels of inflation is unlikely. But he also offers a cautionary note. Inflation refers to the rate of change in the prices of goods and services. But different goods' prices change at different rates. That means the inflation rate depends on how one averages the
1d
New metric for designing safer streets
A new study shows how biometric data can be used to find potentially challenging and dangerous areas of urban infrastructure. By analyzing eye-tracking data from cyclists navigating Philadelphia's streets, researchers found that these individual-based metrics can provide a more proactive approach for designing safer roadways for bicyclists and pedestrians.
1d
High respiratory efforts in COVID-19 patients could result in self-inflicted lung injury, study shows
Some COVID-19 patients who experience acute respiratory failure respond by significantly increasing their respiratory effort — breathing faster and more deeply. There is concern among some doctors that this level of respiratory effort can lead to further damage to these patients' lungs. Working with intensive care clinicians, engineering researchers have used computational modeling to provide new
1d
Largest fire grows, forces evacuation of wildlife station
The nation's largest wildfire torched more dry forest in Oregon and forced the evacuation of a wildlife research station Monday as firefighters had to retreat from the flames for the ninth consecutive day due to erratic and dangerous fire behavior.
1d
Methods matter for assessing global variation in plant thermal tolerance [Biological Sciences]
Lancaster and Humphreys (1) attempted to identify drivers of plant thermal tolerances by analyzing a newly compiled database of heat and cold tolerances. Lancaster and Humphreys conclude that variation in thermal tolerances is attributable to a combination of phylogeny, geography, and local environment, and that the observed patterns "are not…
1d
The structurally conserved TELR region on shelterin protein TPP1 is essential for telomerase processivity but not recruitment [Genetics]
The shelterin protein TPP1 is involved in both recruiting telomerase and stimulating telomerase processivity in human cells. Assessing the in vivo significance of the latter role of TPP1 has been difficult, because TPP1 mutations that perturb telomerase function tend to abolish both telomerase recruitment and processivity. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae telomerase-associated…
1d
Non-Foster acoustic radiation from an active piezoelectric transducer [Applied Physical Sciences]
The quality factor of a passive, linear, small acoustic radiator is fundamentally limited by its volume normalized to the emitted wavelength, imposing severe constraints on the bandwidth and efficiency of compact acoustic sources and of metamaterials composed of arrangements of small acoustic resonators. We demonstrate that these bounds can be…
1d
Arabidopsis group C Raf-like protein kinases negatively regulate abscisic acid signaling and are direct substrates of SnRK2 [Plant Biology]
The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a major role in abiotic stress responses in plants, and subclass III SNF1-related protein kinase 2 (SnRK2) kinases mediate ABA signaling. In this study, we identified Raf36, a group C Raf-like protein kinase in Arabidopsis, as a protein that interacts with multiple SnRK2s. A…
1d
Surviving winter on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau: Pikas suppress energy demands and exploit yak feces to survive winter [Ecology]
The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, with low precipitation, low oxygen partial pressure, and temperatures routinely dropping below −30 °C in winter, presents several physiological challenges to its fauna. Yet it is home to many endemic mammalian species, including the plateau pika (Ochotona curzoniae). How these small animals that are incapable of hibernation…
1d
Long-term decrease in Asian monsoon rainfall and abrupt climate change events over the past 6,700 years [Environmental Sciences]
Asian summer monsoon (ASM) variability and its long-term ecological and societal impacts extending back to Neolithic times are poorly understood due to a lack of high-resolution climate proxy data. Here, we present a precisely dated and well-calibrated tree-ring stable isotope chronology from the Tibetan Plateau with 1- to 5-y resolution…
1d
Reply to Perez et al.: Experimental duration unlikely to bias global variation in plant thermal tolerances [Biological Sciences]
We recently published a pioneering synthesis study of plant thermal macrophysiology (1), revealing global patterns that are in agreement with the main patterns known from animals, as well as with expectations from theory (2, 3). Perez et al. (4) criticize our study, primarily on the basis that differences in experimental…
1d
A [3Fe-4S] cluster and tRNA-dependent aminoacyltransferase BlsK in the biosynthesis of Blasticidin S [Biochemistry]
Blasticidin S is a peptidyl nucleoside antibiotic. Its biosynthesis involves a cryptic leucylation and two leucylated intermediates, LDBS and LBS, have been found in previous studies. Leucylation has been proposed to be a new self-resistance mechanism during blasticidin S biosynthesis, and the leucyl group was found to be important for…
1d
Genome-scale metabolic network reconstruction of model animals as a platform for translational research [Systems Biology]
Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) are used extensively for analysis of mechanisms underlying human diseases and metabolic malfunctions. However, the lack of comprehensive and high-quality GEMs for model organisms restricts translational utilization of omics data accumulating from the use of various disease models. Here we present a unified platform of GEMs…
1d
Integration of signals from different cortical areas in higher order thalamic neurons [Neuroscience]
Higher order thalamic neurons receive driving inputs from cortical layer 5 and project back to the cortex, reflecting a transthalamic route for corticocortical communication. To determine whether or not individual neurons integrate signals from different cortical populations, we combined electron microscopy "connectomics" in mice with genetic labeling to disambiguate layer…
1d
Widespread remodeling of the m6A RNA-modification landscape by a viral regulator of RNA processing and export [Microbiology]
N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal messenger RNA (mRNA) modification, contributing to the processing, stability, and function of methylated RNAs. Methylation occurs in the nucleus during pre-mRNA synthesis and requires a core methyltransferase complex consisting of METTL3, METTL14, and WTAP. During herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infection, cellular gene expression…
1d
A method for measuring investigative journalism in local newspapers [Social Sciences]
Major changes to the operation of local newsrooms—ownership restructuring, layoffs, and a reorientation away from print advertising—have become commonplace in the last few decades. However, there have been few systematic attempts to characterize the impact of these changes on the types of reporting that local newsrooms produce. In this paper,…
1d
Achieving industrial ammonia synthesis rates at near-ambient conditions through modified scaling relations on a confined dual site [Chemistry]
The production of ammonia through the Haber–Bosch process is regarded as one of the most important inventions of the 20th century. Despite significant efforts in optimizing the process, it still consumes 1 to 2% of the worldwide annual energy for the high working temperatures and pressures. The design of a…
1d
Correction for Dagdeviren et al., Conformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung, and diaphragm [Corrections]
MEDICAL SCIENCES, ENGINEERING Correction for "Conformal piezoelectric energy harvesting and storage from motions of the heart, lung, and diaphragm," by Canan Dagdeviren, Byung Duk Yang, Yewang Su, Phat L. Tran, Pauline Joe, Eric Anderson, Jing Xia, Vijay Doraiswamy, Behrooz Dehdashti, Xue Feng, Bingwei Lu, Robert Poston, Zain Khalpey, Roozbeh Ghaffari,…
1d
Correction for Canher et al., Rocks in the auxin stream: Wound-induced auxin accumulation and ERF115 expression synergistically drive stem cell regeneration [Corrections]
PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for "Rocks in the auxin stream: Wound-induced auxin accumulation and ERF115 expression synergistically drive stem cell regeneration," by Balkan Canher, Jefri Heyman, Maria Savina, Ajay Devendran, Thomas Eekhout, Ilse Vercauteren, Els Prinsen, Rotem Matosevich, Jian Xu, Victoria Mironova, and Lieven De Veylder, which was first published June…
1d
This Advanced Acetylcholine Supplement Boosts Your Brain for Superior Mental Clarity
You might not think you have acetylcholine on your mind. But technically, you do. That's because acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter that the brain needs for mental processing. And if you've been feeling a little hazy or cloudy lately (and who hasn't?), you might benefit from a brain boost supplement like Acetylcholine Brain Food from Natural Stacks. Research on the subject of neurotransmitters i
1d
Program seeks to reduce preventable cancers with free screening, same-day results
George Mason University's Dr. Michelle Williams shares program evaluation results determining the feasibility of offering free, same-day cancer screening and health education to reduce disparities. The program examined how access to free screenings affects participants' knowledge about cancer, self-efficacy for obtaining healthcare, and intentions to change health behaviors. The program had a posi
1d
Researchers: HtrA1 augmentation is potential therapy for age-related macular degeneration
Research conducted at the Sharon Eccles Steele Center for Translational Medicine (SCTM) at the University of Utah's John A. Moran Eye Center explains why people carrying a block of genetic variants strongly associated with the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may develop the disease and identifies a potential therapeutic pathway for slowing or even reversing disease progressio
1d
College degree benefits health of graduate's parents
Adult children's educational attainment has an impact on their parents' mental and physical health, according to a new study. The researchers used a new wave of data from a survey launched in 1994 to further extend the geometry linking educational attainment and health that demonstrates another dimension of the intergenerational effects of completing college. "By analyzing these data we arrived a
1d
Some Cretaceous dinosaurs lived in extreme heat
In dinosaurs' heyday in the late Cretaceous Period roughly 78 million years ago, Earth's climate was both warmer and more varied than what we have known before, researchers report. Dinosaurs of the northern mid-latitudes (45 degrees north of the equator) experienced average summer temperatures of 27 degrees Celsius (about 80 degrees Fahrenheit). Winters were roughly 15 degrees C (59 degrees F). T
1d
Hand gestures can make this illusion less tricky
Under some circumstances, gestures can improve the accuracy of people's descriptions of object size relative to their estimations based on sight, research on the Müller-Lyer illusion finds. For example, imagine describing the precise dimensions of a common object, such as a coin, for another person. Do you move your hand, pretending to pick one up to show its size? If so, you likely aren't alone.
1d
'Inflammatory aging clock' predicts risk of illness and frailty
Researchers have discovered a way to predict an individual's susceptibility to the woes of old age such as cancer, heart attacks, and strokes. The inflammatory-aging clock is more accurate than the number of candles on your birthday cake in predicting how strong your immune system is, how soon you'll become frail, or whether you have unseen cardiovascular problems that could become clinical heada
1d
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Leave a Reply