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What Cat People Can Teach Us
In the cats-versus-dogs debate, pop culture tends to skew in one direction. Many animated movies portray cats as manipulative and nefarious, and dogs as the (less canny) embodiments of loyalty and love. Cats also have a long association with the witchy and supernatural, underscoring their folkloric legacy as otherworldly beings. While some recent works have broadened depictions of felines, a new
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Suddenly, Conservatives Care About Vaccines
Updated at 8:06 p.m. ET on July 20, 2021. Conservatives are not necessarily vaccine-hesitant, to paraphrase John Stuart Mill, but most vaccine-hesitant Americans are conservatives . Resistance to vaccines has been concentrated among Republican voters, and led by GOP politicians and various leading lights in conservative media. And that makes the past day or so one of the stranger stretches in rec
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UK scientists back Covid boosters as study finds post-jab falls in antibodies
Exclusive: Waning antibody levels are possible warning sign of lower protection in months after vaccination Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists have backed proposals for Covid boosters in the autumn after blood tests on hundreds of people revealed that protective antibodies can wane substantially within weeks of second vaccine shots being given. Falls in antib
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UAE Says Rainstorms Were Caused by Its Cloud Seeding Drones
Weather Report On Sunday, torrential downpours drenched the people of Dubai. That wouldn't normally be news. But this time, authorities say the rain clouds were conjured up by weather-altering drones as part of a deliberately engineered plan to fight the intense, 120-plus degree Fahrenheit heats that have been bombarding the desert city. In Dubai's case, engineering the weather is a matter of urg
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4 Reasons I'm Wearing a Mask Again
Earlier this month, I pulled a mask out of the bin of hats, scarves, and gloves I keep by the door; strapped it on; and choked. I had inhaled a mouthful of cat hair—several weeks' worth, left by my gray tabby, Calvin , who has been napping on a nest of face coverings since I largely dispensed with them in May. I've been fully vaccinated for two months . I spent the end of spring weaning myself of
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This Tiny Electric Car Is Solar-Powered and Costs $6,800
In December of last year, a California-based startup called Aptera Motors started taking pre-orders for an electric car that's partly solar powered. The Aptera has a unique, streamlined design, just three wheels, and a price tag of $25,900 to $44,900. As of this month, it also may have a new competitor—though the similarities between the two seem to end after the solar panels. A Dutch startup cal
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Astronomers make first clear detection of a moon-forming disc around an exoplanet
Using the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which the European Southern Observatory (ESO) is a partner, astronomers have unambiguously detected the presence of a disk around a planet outside our Solar System for the first time. The observations will shed new light on how moons and planets form in young stellar systems.
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View from Juno during its flyby of Ganymede and Jupiter
Visualizations shape how we perceive space exploration. Whether it's the Pale Blue Dot, the Hubble Ultra Deep Field, Earthrise, or any other myriad images captured as part of this great endeavor, they all help inspire the next generation of explorers. Now, with advances in image capture and processing technology, we can finally start to take the next step in those visualizations—video. Ingenuity w
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DeepMind says it will release the structure of every protein known to science
Back in December 2020, DeepMind took the world of biology by surprise when it solved a 50-year grand challenge with AlphaFold , an AI tool that predicts the structure of proteins. Last week the London-based company published full details of that tool and released its source code. Now the firm has announced that it has used its AI to predict the shapes of nearly every protein in the human body , a
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Roman road discovered in the Venice lagoon
The discovery of a Roman road submerged in the Venice Lagoon is reported in Scientific Reports this week. The findings suggest that extensive settlements may have been present in the Venice Lagoon centuries before the founding of Venice began in the fifth century.
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Stone tool tells the story of Neanderthal hunting
65,000 years ago Neanderthal from the Swabian Jura hunted horses and reindeer with hafted leaf-shaped stone points. A newly discovered leaf point from the UNESCO World Heritage site of Hohle Fels Cave documents the evolution of hunting. A team under the direction of Professor Nicholas Conard for the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment in sout
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Scientists determine Mars crustal thickness
Based on the analysis of marsquakes recorded by NASA's InSight mission, the structure of Mars's crust has now been determined in absolute numbers for the first time. Beneath the InSight landing site, the crust is either approximately 20 or 39 kilometers thick. That is the result of an international research team led by geophysicist Dr. Brigitte Knapmeyer-Endrun at the University of Cologne's Insti
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Reducing industrial carbon emissions
A critical challenge in meeting the Paris Agreement's long-term goal of keeping global warming well below 2 degrees Celsius is to vastly reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gas emissions generated by the most energy-intensive industries. According to a recent report by the International Energy Agency, these industries—cement, iron and steel, chemicals—account for about 20 percent of g
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America Is Getting Unvaccinated People All Wrong
Last week, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said that COVID-19 is " becoming a pandemic of the unvaccinated ." President Joe Biden said much the same shortly after. They are technically correct. Even against the fast-spreading Delta variant , the vaccines remain highly effective, and people who haven't received them are falling sick far more often than those who have. But their vulnerability to COV
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Witnessing England's response to Covid at first hand has profoundly shocked me | William Hanage
On a visit to the UK from the US, I have seen how incoherent government policy is allowing Delta to run rampant William Hanage is a Harvard epidemiology professor England ended all pandemic restrictions on Monday. Nightclubs reopened, along with other large events and gatherings – with masks, testing and other mitigation measures "encouraged" (which is another way of saying "optional"). This is a
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After Covid, the climate crisis will be the next thing the right says we 'just have to live with' | Aditya Chakrabortty
The politics of this new, extreme individualism will make collective responses to social crises impossible Soon, a few of the more shameless newspaper commentators will urge the rest of us to "learn to live" with climate breakdown. Soon, a couple of especially sharp-elbowed cabinet ministers will sigh to the Spectator that, yes, carbon emissions should ideally be slashed – but we must make a trad
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China Builds World's Fastest Train, But No Tracks for It to Travel on
Lack of Tracks China has built a maglev bullet train that it says can reach a blistering 373 miles per hour — making it the world's fastest train . Unfortunately, it doesn't have any place to go right now, because the inventors behind it haven't yet built any tracks for it to travel on. Eventually, though, they say there will be an entire network of maglev tracks to supercharge the country's tran
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We're Zeroing In On the 'Holy Grail' of COVID-19 Immunity
When Kishana Taylor welcomes her twins into the world this December, she'll be pretty confident that they won't be carrying the virus that causes rubella, an infection that can be disastrous in infants. Thanks to a vaccine she received as a child, Taylor, a virologist at Carnegie Mellon University, is still immune to the pathogen decades later. She was able to confirm that in June through a simpl
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The California Dream Is Dying
B ehold California, colossus of the West Coast: the most populous American state; the world's fifth-largest economy; and arguably the most culturally influential, exporting Google searches and Instagram feeds and iPhones and Teslas and Netflix Originals and kimchi quesadillas. This place inspires awe. If I close my eyes I can see silhouettes of Joshua trees against a desert sunrise; seals playing
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Men Are Causing Way More Climate Change Than Women, Scientists Say
Boys Vs. Girls Men cause a whole lot more damage to the environment than women do, scientists concluded in a new study. A team of European researchers compared the buying habits of Swedish men and women and compared the overall climate impact of their choices. Despite only spending two percent more money on consumer goods than women, men's purchases and behaviors caused 16 percent more carbon emi
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Video Shows Tesla Driving Through Deep Flood Waters
Swim Lesson A recently surfaced video shows a Tesla Model 3 surging through deep flood waters reportedly in China's Henan province , an area hard hit by historic floods this month. The vehicle can be seen spraying water high, but faring a whole lot better than the stalled gas-powered vehicles nearby. The vehicle's rear wheel drive appears to allow the Model 3 to actually motor its way through the
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His Name Was Emmett Till
Photographs by Hannah Price for The Atlantic This article was published online on July 22, 2021. T he dentist was a few minutes late, so I waited by the barn, listening to a northern mockingbird in the cypress trees. His tires kicked up dust when he turned off Drew Ruleville Road and headed across the bayou toward his house. He got out of his truck still wearing his scrubs and, with a smile, exte
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Dying COVID Patients Beg for Vaccine
Despite three COVID-19 vaccines having been made widely available for free, most people in Alabama are choosing to not get them. Only 33.7 percent of people in the state are fully vaccinated, Advance Local reports . That's already having disastrous consequences. Cases of COVID-19 are surging across the state, in large part due to the more transmissible Delta variant of the coronavirus. In a grim
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Two Ways to Think About the New Mask Debate
We are a nation of under-doers and over-doers. Every time the government has issued COVID-19 guidance throughout the pandemic, one slice of America has ignored it, while another slice has followed it to the letter, and then some. The government says stay six feet apart? Some Americans scoffed, while others didn't set foot inside a restaurant for a year. The CDC's decision to let vaccinated people
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Covid restrictions on women giving birth are causing heartbreak. We need to be more humane | Hannah Dahlen
I've been studying the effects of restrictions on pregnant women since last year. Some are too harsh Having a baby is one of the most significant life events in the human spectrum of experiences. While it is a physical experience, it is also a profoundly social, psychological, cultural, and spiritual experience. This is something that is forgotten at times by busy health providers, but never by t
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Jeff Bezos Says Now He's Gonna Pollute Space, Too
It's been just over 24 hours since Amazon founder and Blue Origin CEO Jeff Bezos took off on his rocket . It was a fleeting moment in space, or at least somewhere near it , giving Bezos the opportunity to look back down at the surface below and ponder just how much humanity has messed with the natural beauty of our once pristine planet. That's an environmental toll, it's worth noting, that Bezos
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Are Wind Turbines a Danger to Wildlife? Ask the Dogs.
Kayla Fratt began preparing for her summer job in March, when a package of frozen bat carcasses arrived for her in the mail. Well, actually, the bats were for her border collies, Barley and Niffler, and it is really their summer job too. They needed to learn the scent of a dead bat, because they would be spending three months on wind farms, looking for bats killed by spinning turbines. To teach t
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Grandfather Dies of Heart Attack After Minors SWAT His Home
Deadly Swatting Marking Herring, a 60-year-old grandfather from Tennessee, suffered a fatal heart attack after police stormed his home, local ABC -affiliated news station WKRN reports. The man was "swatted," a criminal harassment scheme in which a person tricks the police into sending a SWAT team to a person's address. The reason why Herring drew the harassment is equally strange. The harassers a
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How to Find Rational Points Like Your Job Depends on It
You're sitting at the end of a long conference table, interviewing for your dream job. You've made it this far, but there's just one more question you have to answer. "Is it possible for a line that passes through the origin to pass through no other rational points?" Five pairs of intense eyes watch you, waiting for your response. Do you get the job? You might think this only happens in story…
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Deadly coral disease sweeping Caribbean linked to wastewater from ships
Researchers find 'significant relationship' between stony coral tissue loss disease and nearby shipping A virulent and fast-moving coral disease that has swept through the Caribbean could be linked to waste or ballast water from ships, according to research. The deadly infection, known as stony coral tissue loss disease (SCTLD), was first identified in Florida in 2014, and has since moved through
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Oops, Elon Musk Says Tesla Might Start Taking Bitcoin Again
Just kidding! Tesla might soon start accepting Bitcoin payments again — but under one condition. At today's The B Word Conference, which was all about blockchain, Tesla CEO Elon Musk and Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey were among the invitees discussing the latest and greatest when it comes to cryptocurrencies. At the event, Musk revealed that "most likely, Tesla would resume accepting Bitcoin," but for
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Crypto Dev Thrown in Jail for Checking His Coinbase Account
Virgil Griffith, a prominent developer of the cryptocurrency Ethereum who was previously charged for violating US sanctions against North Korea, is back in lockup after reportedly accessing his cryptocurrency wallet on Coinbase in May, Cointelegraph reports . The move was allegedly a violation of his bail. Griffith was remanded in custody today, but it's still unclear if it was due to him violati
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Plasmid, Virus or Other? DNA 'Borgs' Blur Boundaries.
When the microbiologist Jillian Banfield and her colleagues started combing through samples of mud from wetland environments three years ago, they had a specific goal in mind: to recover and analyze fragments of DNA from large bacteria-killing viruses. And they did. But they also found something unexpected. Some of the DNA in those samples wasn't immediately recognizable as coming from viruses…
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American Parents Are Way Too Focused on Their Kids' Self-Esteem
For two kids who share so much of their DNA, my children couldn't be more different in their displays of self-confidence. My 7-year-old recently got toothpaste on her dress while brushing her teeth, and in response, she burst into tears, dropped to the floor, and rolled around screaming, "I'm the worst person ever! " My 10-year-old, however, acts as though his knowledge already surpasses that of
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Catastrophic floods could hit Europe far more often, study finds
Slow-moving storms such as recent deluge in Germany could become 14 times more frequent by 2100 Catastrophic floods such as those that struck Europe recently could become much more frequent as a result of global heating, researchers say. High-resolution computer models suggest that slow-moving storms could become 14 times more common over land by the end of the century in a worst-case scenario. T
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Limited number of critical workers to be allowed to avoid self-isolation
Policy will only apply to named staff in approved workplaces who are fully vaccinated Workers from 16 key services including health, transport and energy will not have to isolate after being pinged by the NHS Covid app, as it was revealed that more than 600,000 people in England and Wales were sent self-isolation alerts last week. The raft of changes, after days of frantic talks with industry lea
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Australia PM says sorry for vaccine failures amid bleak outlook for Sydney lockdown
Scott Morrison apologises for missing vaccine targets as New South Wales reports record cases during fourth week of stay-at-home order See all our coronavirus coverage Australia's prime minister has apologised for failures in the disastrous coronavirus vaccine rollout as cases in the states of New South Wales and Victoria grew further despite millions living in lockdown. One day after notably ref
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The Republicans Have Already Given Biden What He Needs
T he much-ballyhooed bipartisan infrastructure agreement was always a shaky proposition. When President Joe Biden announced the accord last month—"We have a deal," the beaming president proclaimed outside the White House, flanked by 10 beaming senators—all the negotiators had agreed to was an outline, a three-page sketch of how to spend $1.2 trillion on roads, bridges, rail, and broadband, and a
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Scientists Find Alarming Chemicals in Mothers' Breast Milk
An alarming new study has found high levels of dangerous chemicals in the breast milk of new mothers, hinting at the possibility of health risks to their children. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are a class of over 4,000 chemicals that last for an extremely long time in the environment. They cause liver damage, reduced birthrates, and immunological disruption in animal tests, as well
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Excessive Coffee Drinking Linked to Dementia
Bad news for the caffeine-crazed among us. A massive new study linked excessive coffee drinking — and we're talking excessive — to a considerably greater risk of developing dementia later in life. After probing the medical records of 17,702 volunteers in the UK Biobank database , a team of scientists from the University of South Australia found a startling correlation between drinking lots of cof
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Scientists Discover Dozens of Ancient Viruses, Frozen in Ice
Ancient Infection During a research expedition that sounds indistinguishable from the first act of a horror movie, a team of intrepid scientists have discovered dozens of ancient, never-before-seen viruses within a sample of Tibetan ice. The Ohio State University researchers behind the work are curious about how viruses have changed in response to shifting climates, according to a university pres
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Rates of double-jabbed people in hospital will grow – but that does not mean Covid vaccines are failing
Several factors, including the portion of those at highest risk among the double-vaccinated and antibody levels, account for the data Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The next wave of Covid will be different. When cases soared in spring and winter last year lockdowns rapidly brought them back under control. This time it will be vaccines that do the hard work. But Covi
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For all our sakes, let's hope Jeff Bezos's space trip is just a midlife crisis | Gaby Hinsliff
The flight by the Amazon boss could mark the unchecked commercial exploitation of the ultimate virgin environment One very small step for mankind, one giant ego trip for Jeff Bezos. The world's richest man ejaculated himself into space this week, in what was not quite the first suborbital tourist flight – Richard Branson beat him up there – but definitely the fastest. "Everybody who's been up int
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The University of California Is Lying to Us
"Liberté, égalité, fraternité!" is the cry that once stirred a nation to action, but out here in the crumbling state of California, we're at a lower ebb. A hobbled people rally to a revolutionary whimper: "Put your pencils down." In May, the University of California announced an immediate end to the use of standardized testing in admissions and scholarship decisions at the nine schools in its sys
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Then the Birds Began to Die
A fter the end of the world, there will be birdsong. I used to imagine this when everything was going awry. I would lay in bed in my college dorm room and listen to the lone mockingbird who sang all night outside my window in the spring months. I was worried about something or other; he was getting on with things. It's what birds do. They have a knack for it. In the Book of Genesis, after the dev
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It's time to rethink what loneliness is | Miriam Kirmayer
Research suggests that chronic loneliness may be as damaging to health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. But do we know what loneliness actually is? As a clinical psychologist who specializes in friendships and social connection, I am deeply concerned about the feelings of loneliness that so many of us are experiencing. Three in five American adults report feeling lonely and 18% (roughly 46 million
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China refuses further inquiry into Covid-19 origins in Wuhan lab
WHO proposal to audit Chinese laboratories is 'arrogance towards science', says health official Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage China's government has refused to cooperate with the second stage of an international investigation into the origins of Covid-19, labelling a proposal to audit Chinese labs as "arrogance towards science". Chinese health officials held a pres
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DNA from 93-year-old butterfly confirms the first US case of human-led insect extinction
The Xerces blue butterfly was last seen flapping its iridescent periwinkle wings in San Francisco in the early 1940s. It's generally accepted to be extinct, the first American insect species destroyed by urban development, but there are lingering questions about whether it was really a species to begin with, or just a sub-population of another common butterfly. In a new study in Biology Letters, r
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Elon Musk Says Tesla Has Caused Him More Suffering Than Anything Else in His Life
One of the richest people in the world has made life extremely difficult for himself. During a blockchain conference on Wednesday, Tesla CEO Elon Musk talked about the hardships he's had over the years — and blamed his electric carmaker Tesla for them. "I would say I've had some pretty tough life experiences and Tesla's probably responsible for two-thirds of all personal and professional pain com
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What happens when someone falls into a black hole?
Black holes are stranger than fiction, especially when we explore the weird effects of watching someone or something fall into one. Rotating black holes may be traversable if the physics as we understand it holds. To discuss the physics, we explore a fictional tale with a grand ending. If you are the unfortunate soul being gobbled up, things don't look too bad until they turn really bad. Unless,
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M. Night Shyamalan Hits On a Universal Fear
M. Night Shyamalan has been making Hollywood thrillers for more than 20 years, and despite his career's ups and downs, he's never lost the power to wring tension out of the simplest situations: someone opening a door, a shape walking across a TV screen, a scowl shifting into a smile. Early on in Old , his latest macabre roller-coaster ride, a trio of children play freeze tag on a beach, ducking a
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Can quantum physics explain consciousness?
One of the most important open questions in science is how our consciousness is established. In the 1990s, long before winning the 2020 Nobel Prize in Physics for his prediction of black holes, physicist Roger Penrose teamed up with anaesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff to propose an ambitious answer. They claimed that the brain's neuronal system forms an intricate network and that the consciousness
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Nanostructures enable record high-harmonic generation
Cornell researchers have developed nanostructures that enable record-breaking conversion of laser pulses into high-harmonic generation, paving the way for new scientific tools for high-resolution imaging and studying physical processes that occur at the scale of an attosecond.
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Review: Why Facebook can never fix itself
The Facebook engineer was itching to know why his date hadn't responded to his messages. Perhaps there was a simple explanation—maybe she was sick or on vacation. So at 10 p.m. one night in the company's Menlo Park headquarters, he brought up her Facebook profile on the company's internal systems and began looking at her personal data. Her politics, her lifestyle, her interests—even her real-time
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Fossil reveals burrowing lifestyle of tiny dino
A finger-sized fossil from 308 million years ago unearthed in the United States gives tantalizing clues to the habits of tiny dinosaur-like creatures that may be the forerunners of reptiles, researchers revealed Wednesday.
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'Part-time adventurers': amateur fossil hunters get record haul in Cotswolds
More than 1,000 scientifically significant specimens taken from former quarry after discovery When Sally and Neville Hollingworth started going stir crazy in lockdown, rather than baking bread or doing quizzes on Zoom, the amateur palaeontologists turned to Google Earth. The couple passed the time planning for their next trip – using the satellite images to inspect sites that had previously yield
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Covid has caused 'hidden pandemic of orphanhood', says global study
1.5 million children lost a caregiver during pandemic, including thousands in the UK An estimated 1.5 million children worldwide under the age of 18 have lost a parent, grandparent or caregiver due to Covid-19, according to a global study. Of those, more than 1 million experienced the death of one or both parents during the first 14 months of the pandemic, leading to what one researcher called "t
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Apollo's First Lunar Rover, Driven 50 Years Ago
Next week will mark the 50th anniversary of the launch of Apollo 15—the fourth crewed mission to reach the moon. Launched on July 26, 1971, Apollo 15 became the first Apollo mission to carry a lunar roving vehicle (LRV) to the lunar surface. While the command module pilot, Alfred Worden, remained in orbit around the moon, the commander, David Scott, and the lunar-module pilot, James Irwin, set do
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The Board Games That Ask You to Reenact Colonialism
T he board game "Puerto Rico" begins after everyone around the table receives a mat printed with the verdant interior of the game's namesake island. Players are cast as European tycoons who have trekked across the Atlantic at the height of the Age of Exploration. "In 1493 Christopher Columbus discovered the easternmost island of the Great Antilles," read the back of the game box that once sat on
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The Trash Parrots of Australia Are Very Annoying but Very Clever
When Barbara Klump ran into homeowners on trash-collection day , she would tell them that something very special was happening in their suburb of Sydney. She meant the birds. The big white ones? , the residents asked. The birds that are always opening trash cans and making a huge mess? Yes, those, the sulphur-crested cockatoos . The trash-raiding behavior that was annoying the suburban homeowners
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To Be Honest With You, No Influencer Has Been Treated More Unfairly Than Donald Trump Jr.
Donald Trump Jr.'s highest-performing Instagram post of the year (so far) is a piece of misinformation. Shared in March, it's a black square with "THIS IS A TEST" written in red across the top. "Instagram has been limiting our posts so that no more than 7% of our friends see our posts," it reads. "If you see this post, please simply comment with 'Yes' and then like it." This exact text—with its s
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Sulphur-crested cockatoos learn to open wheelie bins in Sydney – video
Sulphur-crested cockatoos are learning to pry open bins, with researchers finding the new skill has caught on in 44 Sydney suburbs in just two years. With help from the public, Australian and German ecologists have documented cockatoos learning the bin-diving behaviour through social interactions. The research, published in the journal Science , also found differences in the cockatoos' bin-openin
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Elon Says SpaceX is Also Hoarding Bitcoin, Not Just Tesla
Hoarding Bitcoin It's not just Tesla that's hoarding Bitcoin — SpaceX is also amassing undisclosed amounts of the cryptocurrency, Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk revealed during a blockchain conference on Wednesday. "SpaceX, Tesla, and I own Bitcoin," Musk revealed during the conference. But he also took the opportunity to come clean as well about the company's intentions. "We're not selling any B
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AI firm DeepMind puts database of the building blocks of life online
AlphaFold program's prediction of nearly 20,000 human protein structures now free for researchers Last year the artificial intelligence group DeepMind cracked a mystery that has flummoxed scientists for decades: stripping bare the structure of proteins, the building blocks of life. Now, having amassed a database of nearly all human protein structures, the company is making the resource available
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The Threat of an Unvaccinated South
Frank Scott unbuttoned his shirt, rolled up the exposed white T-shirt sleeve beneath, and prepared to get the jab. On March 12, Scott, the mayor of Little Rock, Arkansas, was sitting in a wooden chair in the Express Rx pharmacy surrounded by cameras in an effort to help ease his constituents' fears about the COVID-19 vaccine. Scott has never been a fan of getting shots—and had never had a flu sho
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This Will End With President Tucker Carlson
The United States is responsible for so many questionable transatlantic exports— The Apprentice , gray squirrels, dressing your dog up for Halloween—that we in Britain deserve to have our revenge. As if sending you James Corden wasn't enough, our latest gift is that quintessentially British figure, the journalist turned politician. The New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof is considering a ru
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After 11 Minutes in America, I Got Hit by the Crime Wave
Before the blessed release of full-dose vaccination, I spent much of the pandemic in Norway and Canada, dodging COVID-19 waves and rising violent-crime rates in American cities. Both of my hideout countries managed infection well, and their residents very rarely kill each other. (Today Norway marks the tenth anniversary of one of the exceptions to this rule.) But I missed America, so earlier this
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Those Who Share a Roof Share Emotions
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. "Laugh, and the world laughs with you; / Weep, and you weep alone," the poet Ella Wheeler Wilcox wrote in 1883, in what wound up being her most popular verse. "For the sad old earth must borrow its mirth, / But has trouble enough of its own." The poem is lovely, to be sure. But in truth, unha
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New framework applies machine learning to atomistic modeling
Northwestern University researchers have developed a new framework using machine learning that improves the accuracy of interatomic potentials—the guiding rules describing how atoms interact—in new materials design. The findings could lead to more accurate predictions of how new materials transfer heat, deform, and fail at the atomic scale.
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New quantum research gives insights into how quantum light can be mastered
A team of scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory propose that modulated quantum metasurfaces can control all properties of photonic qubits, a breakthrough that could impact the fields of quantum information, communications, sensing and imaging, as well as energy and momentum harvesting. The results of their study were released yesterday in the journal Physical Review Letters, published by th
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How to photograph the July full moon on your phone or camera, and the best settings to use
Guardian Australia picture editor Carly Earl explains the dos and don'ts of taking pictures of the July 2021 full moon, which is also known as the buck or thunder moon. When a full moon rises, many people will pull out their mobile phones to try and get an Instagram-worthy photograph, but unfortunately the moon is really challenging to get a great photo of. Two reasons: it is very far away and un
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YouTube pulls Jair Bolsonaro videos for Covid-19 misinformation
Move comes after the Brazilian president wrongly said masks were ineffective and touted unproven cures See all our coronavirus coverage YouTube has removed videos from Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro's channel for spreading misinformation about the coronavirus outbreak, becoming the latest tech giant to pull his statements about the pandemic. YouTube said in a press release the decision was ta
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Lyft Says It'll Deploy Self-Driving Cars by the End of the Year
No Hands! Rideshare giant Lyft says it plans to roll out a "modest" fleet of self-driving cars in Miami by the end of the year, giving passengers the option to commute or joyride around town in an autonomous vehicle. The cars themselves will come from Argo AI, a startup with funding from both Ford and Volkswagen, The Verge reports . Passengers in certain geographic locations will reportedly get t
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An albino opossum proves CRISPR works for marsupials, too
Mice: check. Lizards: check. Squid: check. Marsupials … check. CRISPR has been used to modify the genes of tomatoes, humans, and just about everything in between. Because of their unique reproductive biology and their relative rarity in laboratory settings, though, marsupials had eluded the CRISPR rush—until now. A team of researchers at Japan's Riken Institute, a national research facility, have
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Glass sponges reveal important properties for the design of ships, skyscrapers and planes of the future
The remarkable structural properties of the Venus flower basket sponge (E. aspergillum) might seem fathoms removed from human-engineered structures. However, insights into how the organism's latticework of holes and ridges influences the hydrodynamics of seawater in its vicinity could lead to advanced designs for buildings, bridges, marine vehicles and aircraft, and anything that must respond safe
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Astrophysicist outlines plans for a gravitational wave observatory on the moon
Vanderbilt astrophysicist Karan Jani has led a series of studies that make the first case for a gravitational wave infrastructure on the surface of the moon. The experiment, dubbed Gravitational-Wave Lunar Observatory for Cosmology, uses the moon's environment and geocentric orbit to analyze mergers of black holes, neuron stars and dark matter candidates within almost 70 percent of the entire obse
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Robot Collision Sets London Warehouse Ablaze, Delays Orders
Credit: Ocado Online-only grocer Ocado was forced to cancel some customers' orders last week following a fire at its London warehouse. This marks the second fire Ocado has experienced at one of its warehouses; this time, a three-robot collision is to blame. The company announced via Twitter Friday that it would be canceling some orders due to a "major incident." Soon after, the company released a
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SuperBIT: A low-cost, balloon-borne telescope to rival Hubble
Durham, Toronto and Princeton Universities have teamed up with NASA and the Canadian Space Agency to build a new kind of astronomical telescope. SuperBIT flies above 99.5% of the Earth's atmosphere, carried by a helium balloon the size of a football stadium. The telescope will make its operational debut next April and when deployed should obtain high-resolution images rivaling those of the Hubble
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Institutional Authority Has Vanished. Wikipedia Points to the Answer.
Much as his predecessors warned Americans against tobacco and opioid abuse, Surgeon General Vivek Murthy issued a formal advisory last Thursday that misinformation—such as the widespread propaganda now sowing doubts about coronavirus vaccines on social media—is "an urgent threat to public health." It is, but the discussion soured quickly. After President Joe Biden said social-media platforms that
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NASA Releases Stunning First Images From Repaired Hubble Telescope
NASA's Hubble Space Telescope had a rough start to the summer. After more than 30 years of observing the cosmos, the telescope suffered a major computer failure in June. NASA worked on the issue over the next few weeks, arriving at a solution last week . Now, the fully restored Hubble has started doing science again. NASA has now released the first new images since the failure. The issues began o
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Enormous balloon could help astronomers get clear view of space
SuperBIT project will suspend telescope under balloon the size of a football stadium 25 miles above surface of Earth A balloon the size of a football stadium could help astronomers get crystal-clear shots of space for a fraction of the cost of an orbital telescope like Hubble. The secret weapon behind the SuperBIT project is a simple helium balloon – albeit one that floats up to 25 miles (40km) a
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Disability rights advocates are worried about discrimination in AI hiring tools
Your ability to land your next job could depend on how well you play one of the AI-powered games that companies like AstraZeneca and Postmates are increasingly using in the hiring process. Some companies that create these games, like Pymetrics and Arctic Shores, claim that they limit bias in hiring. But AI hiring games can be especially difficult to navigate for job seekers with disabilities. In
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Why Do Mammals Kill Each Other?
Humans run the animal kingdom's only criminal courts. We alone bicker over the difference between murder and manslaughter, and plumb the ethical depths of intent. Other animals still kill their own kind, but whether they do so deliberately, with any semblance of malevolence or premeditation, is up for debate—mostly because we don't have any real way to tell. "Humans answer when you ask those ques
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Coronavirus live news: China rejects stage two of WHO origins probe; two more athletes test positive in Tokyo
Shinzo Abe 'not attending' opening ceremony in Tokyo; US president says it is 'gigantically important' that Americans get vaccinated ; YouTube removes Bolsonaro videos Stark silence in Tokyo speaks volumes about Olympic fears 'Never thought this would happen in France': day one of vaccine pass Fiji records its highest number of weekly deaths from Covid See all our coronavirus coverage 6.34am BST
17h
The secret to the formation of brinicles – icy fingers of death
Spectacular brinicles form under the ice of our planet's coldest regions. Their formation resembles that of hydrothermal vents. The structures have been called "icy fingers of death" because of their ability to freeze living organisms. Nature's grace and fury find equal measure in unique formations called brinicles or more evocatively "icy fingers of death." The strange phenomenon that forms thes
6h
NASA's Webb to explore a neighboring, dusty planetary system
Researchers will use NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope to study Beta Pictoris, an intriguing young planetary system that sports at least two planets, a jumble of smaller, rocky bodies, and a dusty disk. Their goals include gaining a better understanding of the structures and properties of the dust to better interpret what is happening in the system. Since it's only about 63 light-years aw
10h
Santa Ana winds and power line failures found to be behind autumn and winter fires in Southern California
A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in the U.S. and one in Canada has found that the increasing number of large fires in Southern California during the autumn and winter months are mostly due to the Santa Ana winds and power line failures, rather than rising temperatures. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, the group describes their study of fires in S
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Plantwatch: beauty can grow from unpromising ground
The discovery of the rare maiden pink at an electricity substation shows how nature can flourish in unlikely spots A beautiful rare flower has been found growing at an unlikely site – an electricity substation near Bury St Edmunds in Suffolk. Maiden pink is a relative of carnations, and grows only at a few places on the sandy dry soils of Breckland . Another rare plant, the lesser calamint, which
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InSight mission: Mars unveiled
Using information obtained from around a dozen earthquakes detected on Mars by the Very Broad Band SEIS seismometer, developed in France, the international team of NASA's InSight mission has unveiled the internal structure of Mars. The three papers published on July 23, 2021 in the journal Science, involving numerous co-authors from French institutions and laboratories, including the CNRS, the Ins
2h
C is for Vitamin C — a key ingredient for immune cell function
Regulatory T cells (Tregs) help control inflammation and autoimmunity in the body. Unfortunately, it has proven difficult to find the right molecular ingredients to induce stable iTregs. Now a new study reports that Vitamin C and TET proteins can work together to give Tregs their life-saving power.
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Covid jab uptake slows among young people in England, PHE says
Scientists say efforts to increase vaccinations by tactics seen as coercive are less useful than good communication via role models Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Clearer information and messages from role models are needed to boost Covid vaccination uptake among young people, experts have said, as figures showed that fewer than 60% of 18- to 25-year-olds had receiv
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Italian astronomers inspect galaxy Markarian 509 with ALMA
Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), Italian astronomers have investigated an active galaxy known as Markarian 509. Results of the study, presented in a paper published July 14 on arXiv.org, deliver important insights into the distribution and kinematics of the galaxy's cold molecular gas.
9h
Mysterious Record-Breaking Comet Has Now Grown a Tail
Astronomers announced earlier this year that an enormous 62-mile (100-kilometer) object was creeping inward from the fringes of the solar system. We didn't know what this mysterious visitor was at the time, but a recent development has shed light on the subject. The object, now officially designated C/2014 UN271, began forming a coma or tail in recent weeks. That confirms it's a comet , and it ma
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Good practice in the treatment of mental illness | Letters
A lack of note-taking is not always a red flag in therapy, writes Dr Helen Damon , and Ruth Medhurst says that the terminology around illness is totally outdated Your article ( 'It was devastating': what happens when therapy makes things worse? , 17 July) lists several "red flags" that indicate a therapist is unprofessional, including never taking notes in session. I am a counselling psychologist
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US in 'another pivotal moment' as Delta variant drives surge in Covid cases
Hospitals are filling up, especially in areas with low vaccinations CDC offers no change in guidance on mask wearing The US is "at another pivotal moment in this pandemic" as rising Covid-19 cases show no signs of abating, driven by the Delta variant, and some hospitals are filling up, especially in areas with low vaccination rates, government officials warned on Thursday. The US government did n
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An undersea volcano discovered near Christmas Island looks like the Eye of Sauron
Looking like the Eye of Sauron from the Lord of the Rings Trilogy, an ancient undersea volcano was slowly revealed by multibeam sonar 3,100 meters below our vessel, 280 kilometers southeast of Christmas Island. This was on day 12 of our voyage of exploration to Australia's Indian Ocean Territories, aboard CSIRO's dedicated ocean research vessel, the RV Investigator.
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The Atlantic Daily: Welcome to the Era of Private Space Travel
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. This is what spaceflight looks like now: A rich person with a dream (and an enormous amount of cash to burn) doesn't wait for NASA to call, but instead self-launches beyond Earth's atmosphere. Ric
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GLOSTAR: Tracing atomic and molecular gas in the Milky Way
By combining two of the most powerful radio telescopes on Earth, an international team of researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) in Bonn, created the most sensitive maps of the radio emission of large parts of the Northern Galactic plane so far. The data were taken with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico in two different configurations and the
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Most detailed study to date of gut contents of Tollund Man
A team of researchers from Denmark's Museum Silkeborg, the National Museum of Denmark, Moesgaard Museum and Aarhus University, has conducted the most detailed study to date of Tollund Man's stomach and intestinal contents. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, the group describes their in-depth study of the famous "bog body."
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Space-based infrared imaging reveals the nighttime weather on Venus
Little is known about Venus weather at night, as the absence of sunlight makes imaging difficult. Now, researchers have devised a way to use infrared sensors on board the Venus orbiter Akatsuki to reveal the first details of the nighttime weather of our nearest neighbor. Their analytical methods could be used to study other planets including Mars and gas giants as well. Furthermore, the study of V
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Scientists harness the naturally abundant CRISPR-Cas system to edit superbugs
A research team led by Dr. Aixin Yan, Associate Professor from the Research Division for Molecular & Cell Biology, Faculty of Science, in collaboration with Honorary Clinical Professor Patrick Cy Woo from the Department of Microbiology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong (HKU), reported the development of a transferrable and integrative type I CRISPR-based platform that c
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A new key for species identification in salt marsh harvest mice
It's hard to save what you can't identify. That's been a problem for the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse, which is found only in the salty, brackish waters of the San Francisco Bay area. The mouse competes for space with about eight million humans, and more than three-quarters of its habitat has been eaten by development and land conversion. That loss is expected to increase amid rising sea le
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Scientists analyze how the pandemic affected air quality
The coronavirus pandemic has changed the way we live, and several studies have documented how those widespread changes in human behavior have impacted the environment. NASA scientists and others using data from NASA and our partner satellites have shown that air pollution levels dropped significantly during COVID-19. A new, NASA-funded study, conducted by scientists at The George Washington Univer
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Podcast: Playing the job market
Increasingly, job seekers need to pass a series of tests in the form of artificial-intelligence games just to be seen by a hiring manager. In this third of a four-part miniseries on AI and hiring, we speak to someone who helped create these tests, and we ask who might get left behind in the process and why there isn't more policy in place. We also try out some of these tools ourselves. We Meet: M
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New device could help visually impaired avoid obstacles, research suggests
Chest-mounted video camera and vibrating wristbands developed by US team reduce collisions by 37% in small study Vibrating wristbands could help visually impaired people to avoid collisions when out and about, a study indicates. According to the NHS , about 360,000 people in the UK alone are registered as blind or partially sighted, with long canes and guide dogs among the methods used to help in
6h
Accelerating geometry optimization in molecular simulation
Machine learning, a data analysis method used to automate analytical model building, has reshaped the way scientists and engineers conduct research. A branch of artificial intelligence (AI) and computer science, the method relies on a large number of algorithms and broad datasets to identify patterns and make important research decisions.
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Higher levels of omega-3 acids in the blood increases life expectancy by almost five years
Researchers have found that omega-3 levels in blood erythrocytes are very good mortality risk predictors. The study used data from a long-term study group, the Framingham Offspring Cohort, which has been monitoring residents of this Massachusetts town, in the United States, since 1971 and concludes that, 'Having higher levels of these acids in the blood, as a result of regularly including oily fis
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Imaging tool under development exposes concealed detonators—and their charge
Behold the neutron, the middle child of subatomic particles. At times overshadowed by its electrically charged siblings the proton and the electron, neutrons quietly play important roles in national security. They start nuclear reactions for weapons and power plants. They bombard materials for nuclear safety tests. And now they have a new skill: telling whether a concealed, electric detonator is c
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Deep Space Nine Project Update: Why MakeMKV-Derived Files Don't Work
(Photo: mlange_b/ Flickr , CC BY-SA 2.0) The most common question I've been asked about my DS9 upscaling work is whether there's a way to make it work with files created via MakeMKV. MakeMKV is (and has been) a popular application for ripping DVDs for a very long time. I started with MakeMKV files and persisted in attempting to work with them without success for about six months. One of the most
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DeepMind and EMBL release the most complete database of predicted 3D structures of human proteins
DeepMind today announced its partnership with the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), Europe's flagship laboratory for the life sciences, to make the most complete and accurate database yet of predicted protein structure models for the human proteome. This will cover all ~20,000 proteins expressed by the human genome, and the data will be freely and openly available to the scientific com
7h
Pathogens get comfy in designer goo
New hydrogels mimic intestines when lined with epithelial cells. A study demonstrated hydrogels in various stiffnesses are valuable for learning the dynamics of pathogens that cause diarrhea and other intestinal diseases.
20min
Advanced bladder cancers respond to immunotherapy regardless of gene mutation status
UNC Lineberger researchers and colleagues report a study has demonstrated that patients with advanced bladder cancers whose tumors have a mutated FGFR3 gene respond to immunotherapy in a manner that is similar to patients without that mutation. This discovery runs counter to previous research that suggested FGFR3-mutated bladder cancers should not be treated with immunotherapy.
43min
Unravelling the knotty problem of the Sun's activity
A new approach to analysing the development of magnetic tangles on the Sun has led to a breakthrough in a longstanding debate about how solar energy is injected into the solar atmosphere before being released into space, causing space weather events. The first direct evidence that field lines become knotted before they emerge at the visible surface of the Sun has implications for our ability to pr
56min
Perfecting collagen production in osteogenesis imperfecta
Mesenchymal stem cells are the origin for osteoblasts, but MSC transplantation has not resulted in long-term success as a treatment option for brittle bone disease. Hematopoietic stem cells usually give rise to blood cells and osteoclasts, but researchers hypothesized that they could give rise to osteoblasts too. By replacing osteoblasts, they offer a potential therapeutic opportunity that is not
1h
'Good cholesterol' may protect liver
The body's so-called good cholesterol may be even better than we realize. New research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that one type of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) has a previously unknown role in protecting the liver from injury. This HDL protects the liver by blocking inflammatory signals produced by common gut bacteria.
1h
Cattle losing adaptations to environment, MU researchers find
In a new PLOS Genetics study, researchers have uncovered evidence showing that cattle are losing important environmental adaptations, losses the researchers attribute to a lack of genetic information available to farmers. After examining genetic material stretching back to the 1960s, they identified specific DNA variations associated with adaptations that could one day be used to create DNA tests
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Investigational magnetic device shrinks glioblastoma in first-in-world human test
Houston Methodist Neurological Institute researchers from the department of neurosurgery shrunk a deadly glioblastoma tumor by more than a third using a helmet generating a noninvasive oscillating magnetic field that the patient wore on his head while administering the therapy in his own home. The 53-year-old patient died from an unrelated injury about a month into the treatment, but during that s
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'Wrapping' anodes in 3D carbon nanosheets: The next big thing in li-ion battery technology
The lithium-ion battery is the future of sustainable energy technology, but drastic volume fluctuations in their anodes related to enhanced battery capacity raises a safety concern. Recently, researchers from the Republic of Korea have found that embedding manganese selenide anodes in a 3D carbon nanosheet matrix is an innovative, simple, and low-cost means of reducing drastic volume expansion whi
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Visualizing a city's energy use
Researchers used the City of Pittsburgh to create a model built upon the design, materials and purpose of commercial buildings to estimate their energy usage and emissions.
2h
Mobility restrictions can have unexpected impacts on air quality
Reduced mobility induced by the COVID-19 restrictions had only minor influence on particulate pollution levels, according to atmosphere studies in the Po Valley region of northern Italy. Eventually computer simulations indicated that the change in air quality led to an increase in secondary aerosol formation.
2h
Structural biology provides long-sought solution to innate immunity puzzle
Researchers report the first structural confirmation that endogenous — or self-made — molecules can set off innate immunity in mammals via a pair of immune cell proteins called the TLR4-MD-2 receptor complex. The work has wide-ranging implications for finding ways to treat and possibly prevent autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis and antiphospholipid syndrome.
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Gamma-secretase 'buckles up' to reach its destination
New research has uncovered the early assembly of gamma-secretase, a protein complex linked to numerous cellular processes including the development of Alzheimer's disease. In a first step, two dimeric subcomplexes are formed, which independently exit the ER and only afterwards assemble into a four-subunit complex. This 'buckle up' mechanism is thought to prevent premature assembly and activity.
2h
Western wildfires grow, but better weather helps crews
Lower winds and better weather helped crews using bulldozers and helicopters battling the nation's largest wildfire in southern Oregon while a Northern California wildfire crossed into Nevada, prompting new evacuations as blazes burn across the West.
2h
The anatomy of a planet
Researchers at ETH Zurich working together with an international team have been able to use seismic data to look inside Mars for the first time. They measured the crust, mantle and core and narrowed down their composition. The three resulting articles are being published together as a cover story in the journal Science.
2h
Try it: Name unrelated words to test your creativity
A simple exercise of naming unrelated words and then measuring the semantic distance between them could serve as an objective measure of creativity, according to a new study. Can you think of three words that are completely unrelated to one another? What about four, five, or even ten? The new study uses the Divergent Association Task (DAT), a 4-minute, 10-word test to measure one aspect of creati
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Researchers develop tool to drastically speed up the study of enzymes
For much of human history, animals and plants were perceived to follow a different set of rules than the rest of the universe. In the 18th and 19th centuries, this culminated in a belief that living organisms were infused by a non-physical energy or "life force" that allowed them to perform remarkable transformations that couldn't be explained by conventional chemistry or physics alone.
2h
Is Solar Worth It in 2021? This Free Service Has the Answer.
While many people are interested in switching to solar energy, the process can be very intimidating. Despite the fact that solar power is now cheaper than it's ever been, it's still a major investment, and it certainly doesn't make sense for every home. And with so many different variables, making the right choice can seem daunting. But if you're asking yourself, "is solar worth it," the experts
2h
Clever cockatoos learn through social interaction
Scientists have shown that cockatoos, an iconic Australian bird species, learn from each other a unique skill — lifting garbage bin lids to gather food. The research confirms that cockatoos spread this novel behavior through social learning. This behavior by cockatoos is actually learnt, rather than a result of genetics.
2h
The First Mobile Phone Call Was 75 Years Ago—How Technologies Go From Breakthrough to Big Time
I have a cellphone built into my watch. People now take this type of technology for granted, but not so long ago it was firmly in the realm of science fiction. The transition from fantasy to reality was far from the flip of a switch. The amount of time, money, talent, and effort required to put a telephone on my wrist spanned far beyond any one product development cycle. The people who crossed a
2h
New study provides clues to decades-old mystery about cell movement
A new study, led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities engineering researchers, shows that the stiffness of protein fibers in tissues, like collagen, are a key component in controlling the movement of cells. The groundbreaking discovery provides the first proof of a theory from the early 1980s and could have a major impact on fields that study cell movement from regenerative medicine to cancer re
3h
Immersive technology will revolutionize everything from theme parks to daily life
Extended reality technologies — which include virtual reality, augmented reality, and mixed reality — have long captivated the public imagination, but have yet to become mainstream. Extended reality technologies are quickly becoming better and cheaper, suggesting they may soon become part of daily life. Over the long term, these technologies may usher in the "mirror world" — a digital layer "map"
3h
Cell membrane-camouflaged liposomes for tumor cell-selective glycans engineering and imaging in vivo [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The dynamic change of cell-surface glycans is involved in diverse biological and pathological events such as oncogenesis and metastasis. Despite tremendous efforts, it remains a great challenge to selectively distinguish and label glycans of different cancer cells or cancer subtypes. Inspired by biomimetic cell membrane–coating technology, herein, we construct pH-responsive…
3h
KRAS4A induces metastatic lung adenocarcinomas in vivo in the absence of the KRAS4B isoform [Genetics]
In mammals, the KRAS locus encodes two protein isoforms, KRAS4A and KRAS4B, which differ only in their C terminus via alternative splicing of distinct fourth exons. Previous studies have shown that whereas KRAS expression is essential for mouse development, the KRAS4A isoform is expendable. Here, we have generated a mouse…
3h
Isotope mass-balance constraints preclude that mafic weathering drove Neogene cooling [Physical Sciences]
Park et al. (1) use a global biogeochemical model (GEOCLIM) to suggest that weathering associated with emergence of mafic islands in Southeast Asia resulted in a ∼350-ppm decrease in atmospheric CO2 during the last 15 Ma. However, only matching pCO2 yields nonunique solutions that cannot be distinguished from previous hypotheses,…
3h
The magnitude of germinal center reactions is restricted by a fixed number of preexisting niches [Immunology and Inflammation]
Antibody affinity maturation occurs in the germinal center (GC), a highly dynamic structure that arises upon antigen stimulation and recedes after infection is resolved. While the magnitude of the GC reaction is highly fluctuating and depends on antigens or pathological conditions, it is unclear whether GCs are assembled ad hoc…
3h
An otopetrin family proton channel promotes cellular acid efflux critical for biomineralization in a marine calcifier [Physiology]
Otopetrins comprise a family of proton-selective channels that are critically important for the mineralization of otoliths and statoconia in vertebrates but whose underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that otopetrins are critically involved in the calcification process by providing an exit route for protons liberated by the…
3h
Mechanotaxis directs Pseudomonas aeruginosa twitching motility [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa explores surfaces using twitching motility powered by retractile extracellular filaments called type IV pili (T4P). Single cells twitch by sequential T4P extension, attachment, and retraction. How single cells coordinate T4P to efficiently navigate surfaces remains unclear. We demonstrate that P. aeruginosa actively directs twitching in…
3h
Chromosome 10q26-driven age-related macular degeneration is associated with reduced levels of HTRA1 in human retinal pigment epithelium [Genetics]
Genome-wide association studies have identified the chromosome 10q26 (Chr10) locus, which contains the age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2 (ARMS2) and high temperature requirement A serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) genes, as the strongest genetic risk factor for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) [L.G. Fritsche et al., Annu. Rev. Genomics Hum. Genet. 15, 151–171,…
3h
Inside-out regulation of E-cadherin conformation and adhesion [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Cadherin cell–cell adhesion proteins play key roles in tissue morphogenesis and wound healing. Cadherin ectodomains bind in two conformations, X-dimers and strand-swap dimers, with different adhesive properties. However, the mechanisms by which cells regulate ectodomain conformation are unknown. Cadherin intracellular regions associate with several actin-binding proteins including vinculin, which
3h
Characterization of DNA-protein complexes by nanoparticle tracking analysis and their association with systemic lupus erythematosus [Applied Biological Sciences]
Nanotechnology enables investigations of single biomacromolecules, but technical challenges have limited the application in liquid biopsies, for example, blood plasma. Nonetheless, tools to characterize single molecular species in such samples represent a significant unmet need with the increasing appreciation of the physiological importance of protein structural changes at nanometer scale….
3h
Reply to Rugenstein et al.: Marine Sr and Os records do not preclude Neogene cooling through emergence of the Southeast Asian islands [Physical Sciences]
In Park et al. (1) we used a coupled climate and silicate weathering model (GEOCLIM) to make the case that emergence of the Southeast Asian islands (SEAIs) played a significant role in cooling Earth's climate over the past 15 My. The findings were that mountains built through arc–continent collision in…
3h
The archaeology of climate change: The case for cultural diversity [Sustainability Science]
Anthropogenic climate change is currently driving environmental transformation on a scale and at a pace that exceeds historical records. This represents an undeniably serious challenge to existing social, political, and economic systems. Humans have successfully faced similar challenges in the past, however. The archaeological record and Earth archives offer rare…
3h
Ancient DNA from the koala lemur puts Madagascar on the paleogenomic map [Anthropology]
In the Southern Hemisphere, there are two exceptionally large noncontinental landmasses with very long histories of geographical isolation—New Zealand and Madagascar. Both landmasses have unique and distinctive fauna and flora that nonetheless present a number of intriguing parallels, including the long-term preservation of distant sister lineages to otherwise globally widespread…
3h
RNA polymerase spoiled for choice as transcription begins [Biochemistry]
Papers concerning transcription, and its regulation at promoters, abound in the scientific literature, but reports about initiation, defined as the moment that the first 3′−5′phosphodiester bond of a new transcript is forged, are scarce. In PNAS, Skalenko et al. (1), working with the bacterial multisubunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), combine…
3h
Parkinson's disease: How lysosomes become a hub for the propagation of the pathology
Over the last few decades, neurodegenerative diseases became one of the top 10 global causes of death. Researchers worldwide are making a strong effort to understand neurodegenerative diseases pathogenesis, which is essential to develop efficient treatments against these incurable diseases. A team of researchers found out the implication of lysosomes in the spread of Parkinson's disease.
3h
Global warming may limit spread of dengue fever, new research finds
Infection with dengue virus makes mosquitoes more sensitive to warmer temperatures, according to new research led by Penn State researchers. The team also found that infection with the bacterium Wolbachia, which has recently been used to control viral infections in mosquitoes, also increases the thermal sensitivity of the insects. The findings suggest that global warming could limit the spread of
3h
Study on chromosomal rearrangements in yeast reveals potential avenue for cancer therapy
Researchers from Osaka University have found that the attachment of a ubiquitin molecule to a protein called PCNA at the lysine 107 position causes gross chromosomal rearrangements. This lysine is located where two PCNA molecules interact, and the ubiquitin attachment to it may change the ring structure they form. The ubiquitin attachment occurs through the action of Rad8 (a ubiquitin ligase) and
3h
InSight mission: Mars unveils its inner structures
From a dozen earthquakes detected on Mars by the SEIS seismometer, developed in France, the InSight team reveals the internal structure of Mars. The three studies published in Science and involving many co-authors from French institutions, reveal, by analyzing the seismic waves, an estimate of the size of the core, the thickness of the crust and the structure of the mantle.
3h
Neurotransmitter levels predict math ability
The neurotransmitters GABA and glutamate have complementary roles — GABA inhibits neurons, while glutamate makes them more active. Published 22nd July in PLOS Biology, researchers led by Roi Cohen Kadosh and George Zacharopoulos from the University of Oxford show that levels of these two neurotransmitters in the intraparietal sulcus of the brain can predict mathematics ability. The study also fou
3h
Less-sensitive COVID-19 tests may still achieve optimal results if enough people tested
A computational analysis of COVID-19 tests suggests that, in order to minimize the number of infections in a population, the amount of testing matters more than the sensitivity of the tests that are used. Philip Cherian and Gautam Menon of Ashoka University in Sonipat, India, and Sandeep Krishna of the National Centre for Biological Sciences TIFR, Bangalore, India, present their findings in the op
3h
3D imaging reveals neural 'vicious cycle' in fatty liver disease
With the application of a novel three-dimensional imaging technology, researchers have discovered that one portion of the autonomic nervous system in the liver undergoes severe degeneration in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. The study, which is conducted in mice and human liver tissue, shows that the degeneration of nerves is correlated with the severity of liver pathology.
3h
Cougar Infiltrates the Shelter on Night One | Naked and Afraid
Stream Naked and Afraid on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/naked-and-afraid About Naked and Afraid: What happens when you put two complete strangers – sans clothes – in some of the most extreme environments on Earth? Each male-female duo is left with no food, no water, no clothes, and only one survival item. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Faceb
3h
1 protein stops T cells from fighting multiple sclerosis
A new study shows that a certain protein prevents regulatory T cells from effectively doing their job in controlling the damaging effects of inflammation in a model of multiple sclerosis. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a devastating autoimmune disease of the nervous system. The new study, which appears in Science Advances , illuminates the important role of Piezo1, a specialized protein called an ion
3h
Studying chromosomal rearrangements in yeast reveals potential avenue for cancer therapy
Researchers from Osaka University have found that the attachment of a ubiquitin molecule to a protein called PCNA at the lysine 107 position causes gross chromosomal rearrangements. This lysine is located where two PCNA molecules interact, and the ubiquitin attachment to it may change the ring structure they form. The ubiquitin attachment occurs through the action of Rad8 (a ubiquitin ligase) and
4h
Coherent manipulation of an Andreev spin qubit
Two promising architectures for solid-state quantum information processing are based on electron spins electrostatically confined in semiconductor quantum dots and the collective electrodynamic modes of superconducting circuits. Superconducting electrodynamic qubits involve macroscopic numbers of electrons and offer the advantage of larger coupling, whereas semiconductor spin qubits involve indiv
4h
Upper mantle structure of Mars from InSight seismic data
For 2 years, the InSight lander has been recording seismic data on Mars that are vital to constrain the structure and thermochemical state of the planet. We used observations of direct ( P and S ) and surface-reflected ( PP , PPP , SS , and SSS ) body-wave phases from eight low-frequency marsquakes to constrain the interior structure to a depth of 800 kilometers. We found a structure compatible w
4h
Thickness and structure of the martian crust from InSight seismic data
A planet's crust bears witness to the history of planetary formation and evolution, but for Mars, no absolute measurement of crustal thickness has been available. Here, we determine the structure of the crust beneath the InSight landing site on Mars using both marsquake recordings and the ambient wavefield. By analyzing seismic phases that are reflected and converted at subsurface interfaces, we
4h
Seismic detection of the martian core
Clues to a planet's geologic history are contained in its interior structure, particularly its core. We detected reflections of seismic waves from the core-mantle boundary of Mars using InSight seismic data and inverted these together with geodetic data to constrain the radius of the liquid metal core to 1830 ± 40 kilometers. The large core implies a martian mantle mineralogically similar to the
4h
Inhibited nonradiative decay at all exciton densities in monolayer semiconductors
Most optoelectronic devices operate at high photocarrier densities, where all semiconductors suffer from enhanced nonradiative recombination. Nonradiative processes proportionately reduce photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY), a performance metric that directly dictates the maximum device efficiency. Although transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers exhibit near-unity PL QY at low ex
4h
Atomically resolved single-molecule triplet quenching
The nonequilibrium triplet state of molecules plays an important role in photocatalysis, organic photovoltaics, and photodynamic therapy. We report the direct measurement of the triplet lifetime of an individual pentacene molecule on an insulating surface with atomic resolution by introducing an electronic pump-probe method in atomic force microscopy. Strong quenching of the triplet lifetime is o
4h
Innovation and geographic spread of a complex foraging culture in an urban parrot
The emergence, spread, and establishment of innovations within cultures can promote adaptive responses to anthropogenic change. We describe a putative case of the development of a cultural adaptation to urban environments: opening of household waste bins by wild sulphur-crested cockatoos. A spatial network analysis of community science reports revealed the geographic spread of bin opening from th
4h
Retinal waves prime visual motion detection by simulating future optic flow
The ability to perceive and respond to environmental stimuli emerges in the absence of sensory experience. Spontaneous retinal activity prior to eye opening guides the refinement of retinotopy and eye-specific segregation in mammals, but its role in the development of higher-order visual response properties remains unclear. Here, we describe a transient window in neonatal mouse development during
4h
Enterically derived high-density lipoprotein restrains liver injury through the portal vein
The biogenesis of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) requires apoA1 and the cholesterol transporter ABCA1. Although the liver generates most of the HDL in the blood, HDL synthesis also occurs in the small intestine. Here, we show that intestine-derived HDL traverses the portal vein in the HDL 3 subspecies form, in complex with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)–binding protein (LBP). HDL 3 , but not HDL 2 or l
4h
Skull and vertebral bone marrow are myeloid cell reservoirs for the meninges and CNS parenchyma
The meninges are a membranous structure enveloping the central nervous system (CNS) that host a rich repertoire of immune cells mediating CNS immune surveillance. Here, we report that the mouse meninges contain a pool of monocytes and neutrophils supplied not from the blood but by adjacent skull and vertebral bone marrow. Under pathological conditions, including spinal cord injury and neuroinflam
4h
Revealing enzyme functional architecture via high-throughput microfluidic enzyme kinetics
Systematic and extensive investigation of enzymes is needed to understand their extraordinary efficiency and meet current challenges in medicine and engineering. We present HT-MEK (High-Throughput Microfluidic Enzyme Kinetics), a microfluidic platform for high-throughput expression, purification, and characterization of more than 1500 enzyme variants per experiment. For 1036 mutants of the alkali
4h
Heterogeneity of meningeal B cells reveals a lymphopoietic niche at the CNS borders
The meninges contain adaptive immune cells that provide immunosurveillance of the central nervous system (CNS). These cells are thought to derive from the systemic circulation. Through single-cell analyses, confocal imaging, bone marrow chimeras, and parabiosis experiments, we show that meningeal B cells derive locally from the calvaria, which harbors a bone marrow niche for hematopoiesis. B cell
4h
Structure of an AMPK complex in an inactive, ATP-bound state
Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)–activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates metabolism in response to the cellular energy states. Under energy stress, AMP stabilizes the active AMPK conformation, in which the kinase activation loop (AL) is protected from protein phosphatases, thus keeping the AL in its active, phosphorylated state. At low AMP:ATP (adenosine triphosphate) ratios, ATP inhibits AMPK by
4h
Plant "helper" immune receptors are Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channels
Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat receptors (NLRs) regulate immunity and cell death. In Arabidopsis , a subfamily of "helper" NLRs is required by many "sensor" NLRs. Active NRG1.1 oligomerized, was enriched in plasma membrane puncta, and conferred cytoplasmic calcium ion (Ca 2+ ) influx in plant and human cells. NRG1.1-dependent Ca 2+ influx and cell death were sensitive to Ca 2+ chann
4h
Peta-electron volt gamma-ray emission from the Crab Nebula
The Crab Nebula is a bright source of gamma rays powered by the Crab Pulsar's rotational energy through the formation and termination of a relativistic electron-positron wind. We report the detection of gamma rays from this source with energies from 5 x 10 –4 to 1.1 peta–electron volts with a spectrum showing gradual steepening over three energy decades. The ultrahigh-energy photons imply the pre
4h
Infrared held in a pincer
Many applications, from fiber-optic telecommunications to biomedical imaging processes require substances that emit light in the near-infrared range (NIR). A research team has now developed the first chromium complex that emits light in the coveted, longer wavelength NIR-II range. The team has introduced the underlying concept: a drastic change in the electronic structure of the chromium caused by
4h
Scientists harness the naturally abundant CRISPR-Cas system to edit superbugs with the hope of treating infections caused by drug resistant pathogens
Researchers reported the development of a transferrable and integrative type I CRISPR-based platform that can efficiently edit the diverse clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a superbug capable of infecting various tissues and organs and a major source of nosocomial infections. The technique can accelerate the identification of resistance determinants of multidrug resistant (MDR) pathogen
4h
Algorithm beats human pilots in drone race for the 1st time
For the first time, an autonomously flying quadrotor has outperformed two human pilots in a drone race, researchers report. The success is based on a new algorithm that researchers at the University of Zurich developed. It calculates time-optimal trajectories that fully consider the drones' limitations. "Our drone beat the fastest lap of two world-class human pilots on an experimental race track.
5h
Silicon with a two-dimensional structure
Silicon, a semi-metal, bonds in its natural form with four other elements and its three-dimensional structure takes the form of a tetrahedron. For a long time, it seemed impossible to achieve the synthesis and characterisation of a two-dimensional equivalent—geometrically speaking, a square. Now scientists from the field of Inorganic Chemistry at Heidelberg University have succeeded in producing a
5h
New insight on the reproductive evolution of land plants
Around 470 million years ago, plants began to conquer the terrestrial surfaces. The first examples had a small axis terminated by a structure capable of forming spores, almost like current mosses. The appearance of plant organs mediated the explosive radiation of land plants, which shaped the surface of our planet and allowed the establishment of terrestrial animal life.
5h
Lifting advice doesn't stand up for everyone, study finds
Commonly accepted advice to keep a straight back and squat while lifting in order to avoid back pain has been challenged by new research. The research examined people who had regularly performed manual lifting through their occupation for more than five years and found those who experienced low back pain as a result were more likely to use the recommended technique of squatting and keeping a strai
5h
SuperBIT: A low-cost balloon-borne telescope to rival Hubble
Astronomersand engineers are building a new kind of astronomical telescope. SuperBIT flies above 99.5% of the Earth's atmosphere, carried by a helium balloon the size of a football stadium. The telescope will make its operational debut next April and when deployed should obtain high-resolution images rivaling those of the Hubble Space Telescope.
5h
Characterized drugs show unexpected effects
When Alexander Flemming discovered a mold on a culture plate overgrown with bacteria in 1928, he did not expect to find one of the most widely used active substances: penicillin. Accidental discoveries and the identification of active ingredients from traditional remedies, such as the morphine of the opium poppy, have shaped the discovery of new medicines for a long time.
5h
Antimatter from laser pincers
In the depths of space, there are celestial bodies where extreme conditions prevail: Rapidly rotating neutron stars generate super-strong magnetic fields. And black holes, with their enormous gravitational pull, can cause huge, energetic jets of matter to shoot out into space. An international physics team with the participation of the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) has now proposed a
5h
How to reduce gun violence without taking people's guns
Approximately 41,000 people are killed each year due to gun violence. That's more lives lost to guns than to car accidents. So why do we devote more attention (and money) to car safety than we do gun safety? As Northwell Health CEO Michael Dowling points out, the deaths are not the whole story. The physical, emotional, and psychological trauma reverberates through communities and the public at-la
5h
Informing policy for long-term global food security
More than 820 million people in the world don't have enough to eat, while climate change and increasing competition for land and water are further raising concerns about the future balance between food demand and supply. The results of a new IIASA-led study can be used to benchmark global food security projections and inform policy analysis and public debate on the future of food.
5h
How an old quarry became a global geological reference point
The international team of geoscientists led by Prof. Silke Voigt from the Goethe University Frankfurt, Prof. Ireneusz Walaszczyk from the University of Warsaw and Dr. André Bornemann from LBEG have thoroughly investigated 40 meters of the geological strata sequence in the former limestone quarry at Hasselberg. The researchers determined that this is only sequence in the transition between Turonian
5h
Printing a comfortable 3D 'house' for co-living cells
Scientists of the MIPT Cell Signaling Regulation Laboratory have developed a new low cost, reproducible system for the co-cultivation of cells. This system is based on a polymerized BSA membrane. Its size and relief are determined by a mold created using a 3D printer. The possibility of co-cultivation is achieved with magnetic nanoparticles (NPs). This NPs cross-linked into the membrane, which all
5h
A new method for simultaneous processing of different types of waste
An international research team has come up with an innovative method for metal recovery from industrial waste. The new method allows the simultaneous recovery of multiple metals from waste oxides in a single process. This novel route will lower the burden on waste storage facilities with significant contributions to the economic and environmental sustainability of industrial waste management. The
5h
A rock with many perspectives
The Alum Shale of Northern Europe not only has an eventful history of formation, connected with the microcontinent Baltica, it also holds great potential as an object of investigation for future research questions. Geologists use the rock to reconstruct processes of oil and gas formation, and even possible traces of past life on Mars can be identified with its help. Researchers at the German Resea
5h
High-level anion doping towards fast charge transfer kinetics for capacitors
The research team of Prof. Xiaobo Ji and associate Prof. Guoqiang Zou has proposed an ingenious oxygen vacancy (OV) engineering strategy to realize high content anionic doping in TiO2 and offered valuable insights into devise electrode materials with fast charge transfer kinetics in the bulk phase. The article titled "High content anion (S/Se/P) doping assisted by defect engineering with fast char
5h
Reaping the benefits: Training in rice growing system ups yields and well-being
Researchers conducted randomized trials of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) agronomy method. Following SRI training of 5,486 Bangladeshi rice farmers, they compared trained and untrained farmers. The results showed compelling benefits for SRI's efficacy in increasing yield and profits, how it improves farming households' well-being, and its positive spillover effects in communities. This b
6h
Shaken memory
image source: http://epilepsycongress.blogspot.com/2018/07/epilepsy-and-memory-loss.html Like any college student in his early 20's, I had a bit of a wild streak with alcohol back in April of this year (2021), getting drunk off my a**. That lasted about half a week. As I have written in a previous article, I suffer from a condition known as posttraumatic […]
6h
An X-ray vision-like camera to rapidly retrieve 3D images
It's not exactly X-ray vision, but it's close. In research published in the journal Optica, University of California, Irvine researchers describe a new type of camera technology that, when aimed at an object, can rapidly retrieve 3D images, displaying its chemical content down to the micrometer scale. The new tech promises to help companies inspect things like the insides of computer chips without
6h
Rensselaer-designed platform could enable personalized immunotherapy
An innovative testing platform that more closely mimics what cancer encounters in the body may allow for more precise, personalized therapies by enabling the rapid study of multiple therapeutic combinations against tumor cells. The platform, which uses a three-dimensional environment to more closely mirror a tumor microenvironment, is demonstrated in research published in Communications Biology.
6h
Sharks' spiral intestines work like a Nikola Tesla invention
Researchers have produced a series of high-resolution, 3D scans of intestines from nearly three dozen shark species. The scans will advance the understanding of how sharks eat and digest their food. "The vast majority of shark species, and the majority of their physiology, are completely unknown." Contrary to what popular media portrays, we actually don't know much about what sharks eat. Even les
6h
Land repair vital for survival
Restoration of degraded drylands is urgently needed to mitigate climate change, reverse desertification and secure livelihoods for the two billion people who live there, experts warn in a major new paper in Nature Ecology & Evolution. Scientists leading the Global Arid Zone Project examined restoration seeding outcomes at 174 sites on six continents, encompassing 594,065 observations of 671 plant
6h
Geneticists reveal how mutation causes childhood cancer; use drug to reverse its effects
Geneticists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered how a specific genetic mutation (H3K27M) causes a devastating, incurable childhood cancer, known as diffuse midline glioma (DMG), and – in lab studies working with model cell types – successfully reverse its effects to slow cancer cell growth with a targeted drug. Their landmark work – just published in leading international journal, Nature G
6h
The Atlantic Daily: Delta Is Thriving on America's Immunity Gap
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. The Delta variant is thriving on America's immunity gap. The majority of those currently hospitalized with COVID-19— we're talking more than 97 percent —are unvaccinated. Health-care workers recou
6h
Untwisting DNA reveals new force that shapes genomes
Advances in microscopy have enabled researchers to picture loops of DNA strands for the first time. The images reveal how the human genome organizes itself in three-dimensional space at much higher resolution than previously possible.
7h
Drought changes rice root microbiome
Drought can have a lasting impact on the community of microbes that live in and around roots of rice plants, a team led by UC Davis researchers has found. Root-associated microbes help plants take up nutrients from the soil, so the finding could help in understanding how rice responds to dry spells and how it can be made more resilient to drought. The work is published July 22 in Nature Plants.
7h
Cardio-cerebrovascular disease history complicates hematopoietic cell transplant outcomes
Transplanting hematopoietic stem cells to treat cancers and other conditions carries with it the risk of developing cardio-cerebrovascular diseases (CCVD)–disorders affecting the blood vessels of the heart and brain. Although research on post-transplant CCVD is extensive, there is paucity of knowledge on the effects of pre-transplant CCVD on transplant outcomes. Now researchers in China suggest p
7h
Burden of oral diseases in emerging countries: A prediction model
Jiachen Lin, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Mass., USA., presented the poster "Burden of Oral Diseases in Emerging Countries: A Prediction Model" at the virtual 99th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 45th Annual Meeting
7h
Longitudinal serological and vaccination responses to SARS-COV-2 in dental professionals
Alexandria, Va., USA – Iain Chapple, University of Birmingham, England, presented the oral session "Longitudinal Serological and Vaccination Responses to SARS-COV-2 in Dental Professionals" at the virtual 99th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AA
7h
Cannabidiol promotes oral ulcer healing by inactivating CMPK2-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome
Xingying Qi, West China Hospital of Stomatology, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China, presented the oral session "Cannabidiol Promotes Oral Ulcer Healing by Inactivating CMPK2-Mediated NLRP3 Inflammasome" at the virtual 99th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Denta
7h
Bodycam video cuts racial bias in police misconduct investigations
Video footage captured by police-worn body cameras is closing racial gaps in police misconduct investigations, according to a new study. "Police bodycams—when they're turned on—even the playing field by introducing objective evidence into the investigation of complaints about police behavior," says Volkan Topalli, professor at Georgia State University. "This technology now helps eliminate ambigui
7h
Are wild animals really "wild"? | Emma Marris
Human activity is affecting the planet in dramatic, unsustainable ways — including destroying the habitats of wild animals. Considering our obligation to care for the creatures we've impacted, environmental writer Emma Marris dives into the ethics of wildlife management, zoos and aquariums, offering her thoughts on how we can help Earth's wildlife flourish. (This conversation, hosted by TED scien
7h
Kids who had mild COVID still have antibodies months later
Researchers have found robust antibody responses up to four months after infection in children and adolescents who had mild to asymptomatic cases of COVID-19. The study found that the children and adolescents who previously had COVID-19 developed antibody responses capable of neutralizing the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Further, these responses were comparable or superior to those observed in adults. "Thes
7h
NTU Singapore scientists develop tougher, safer bicycle helmets using new plastic material
Researchers from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore), in collaboration with French specialty materials leader Arkema, have developed a tougher, safer bicycle helmet using a combination of materials. The new helmet prototype has higher energy absorption, reducing the amount of energy transferred to a cyclist's head in the event of an accident and lowering the chances of seri
7h
HKU scientists harness the naturally abundant CRISPR-Cas system to edit superbugs with the hope of treating infections caused by drug resistant pathogens
A joint research team from the University of Hong Kong reported the development of a transferrable and integrative type I CRISPR-based platform that can efficiently edit the diverse clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a superbug capable of infecting various tissues and organs and a major source of nosocomial infections. The technique can accelerate the identification of resistance determi
7h
Alzheimer-linked enzyme complex 'buckles up' for safe trip through the cell
A research team led by Wim Annaert (VIB-KU Leuven) uncovered the early assembly of gamma-secretase, a protein complex linked to numerous cellular processes including the development of Alzheimer's disease. In a first step, two dimeric subcomplexes are formed, which independently exit the ER and only afterwards assemble into a four-subunit complex. This 'buckle up' mechanism is thought to prevent p
7h
What makes a market transaction morally repugnant?
Many people find it morally impermissible to put kidneys, children, or doctorates on the free market. But what makes a market transaction morally repugnant in the eyes of the public? And which transactions trigger the strongest collective disapproval? Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and the Robert Koch Institute have addressed these questions. Their findings, publis
8h
COVID-19 could prompt healthier cityscapes
Speculation about the impact of COVID-19 on America's thriving cities came almost as soon as the disease itself—and the diagnosis was usually grim. Plunging rents in New York and San Francisco indicated residents were fleeing their densely-packed urban lives for quarantine living in rural or suburban areas, perhaps never to return.
8h
Scientists come up with new method for simultaneous processing of different types of waste
An international research team has come up with an innovative method for metal recovery from industrial waste. The new method allows the simultaneous recovery of multiple metals from waste oxides in a single process. This novel route will lower the burden on waste storage facilities with significant contributions to the economic and environmental sustainability of industrial waste management. The
8h
Defect engineering assisting in high-level anion doping towards fast charge transfer kinetic
Titanium dioxide, promising anode materials for sodium ion batteries, nonetheless, suffers from its inferior charge transfer kinetics owing to low diffusion coefficient and electronic conductivity, which will result in unsatisfactory high-rate capability. Here, an oxygen vacancy (OV) engineering assisted in high-content anion (S/Se/P) doping strategy to enhance its charge transfer kinetics for ult
8h
Researchers automate brain MRI image labelling, more than 100,000 exams labelled in under 30 minutes
Researchers from the School of Biomedical Engineering & Imaging Sciences at King's College London have automated brain MRI image labelling, needed to teach machine learning image recognition models, by deriving important labels from radiology reports and accurately assigning them to the corresponding MRI examinations. Now, more than 100,00 MRI examinations can be labelled in less than half an hour
8h
Tesla vil åbne ladenetværk for andre elbiler
Senere i år bliver de første Tesla Supercharger-ladestandere tilgængelige for andre elbiler. Tesla-topchef Elon Musk skriver på Twitter, at det med tiden vil gælde i 'alle lande' – altså også Danmark. Hvornår og på hvilke vilkår er endnu uvist. I mens er resten af operatørmarkedet blevet enige om…
8h
The imperative of research in Nigeria: Lessons from the COVID-19 pandemic
The industrialized world has responded in disparate ways to the emergence of the novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, and the ensuing pandemic it caused, COVID-19. Technology was repursosed to track and monitor the disease and research and development focused on the development of vaccines and investigated pharmaceutical and physical interventions to treat the disease.
8h
Priming effect caused by root litter varies with root order
Plant litter can influence soil organic carbon dynamics via the priming effect, which is defined as changes in soil organic carbon decomposition rates due to increases in microbial growth and activities responding to plant carbon input. Current understanding of priming effect induced by plant litter is overwhelmingly from studies with leaf litter addition, little is known about how root litter dec
8h
Nuclear factor Y subunit facilitates histone acetylation for salt tolerance in soybean
Salinity and drought stress are major environmental factors affecting agricultural production. These abiotic stresses impaired growth and development of crops, leading to plant death and yield loss. Soybean is an important crop for food and feed resources, and more than 80% of the national demands require imports from other countries. Promotion of the salt tolerance in soybean would make the crop
8h
Mars Rover Prepares to Collect First Sample for Return to Earth
NASA's Perseverance rover has been playing second fiddle to the Ingenuity helicopter in recent months. But in fairness, it's a helicopter on Mars . Not to be outdone, Perseverance is gearing up for the next big step in its mission on the red planet. In the coming weeks, NASA will harvest the first of many samples that could one day return to Earth for study. First, the rover has to find just the
9h
Hydrogen Aircraft
When it comes to cars, the technology competition between batteries and hydrogen has been won. The future of cars appears to be battery technology . There are some hydrogen-fueled cars, but they are a tiny slice of the market. The bottom line is that batteries are more efficient than hydrogen, and they are only going to get better. Volkwagen pretty much declared a victor with this statement : "Th
9h
Biopolymer dressing could be cheap aid for chronic wounds
Researchers are working to develop a low-cost, practical biopolymer dressing that helps heal chronic wounds. Tens of millions of patients around the world suffer from persistent and potentially life-threatening wounds. These chronic wounds, which are also a leading cause of amputation, have treatments, but the cost of existing wound dressings can prevent them from reaching people in need. "The ex
9h
Stimulating blood vessel formation with magnetic fields
Magnetic fields can be used to stimulate blood vessel growth, according to a study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The findings, by researchers at the Tecnico Lisboa and NOVA School of Science and Technology in Portugal, could lead to new treatments for cancers and help regenerate tissues that have lost their blood supply.
10h
Management measures improve the conservation of the steppe bird in Lleida
Over the last forty years, the agricultural intensification, as well as the urban and farming development in the Lleida Plain, have reduced the expansion and quality of the available habitat for the steppe birds of this area, which covers a great part of species of such kind in Spain. The report on the State of Nature in Catalonia shows that this is one of the most threatened bird groups in the te
10h
The ethics of remote sensing in archaeology
Remote sensing—beginning with aerial photography—has been used for decades in one form or another in archaeology, but, the discussion on the ethical use of the information gathered through these methods is a newer topic, according to a team of researchers.
10h
Novel self-healing materials developed for testing on the International Space Station
Some materials used in aerospace applications such as polymers can degrade and erode with prolonged exposure to atomic oxygen, ultraviolet radiation, and extreme temperature cycling in the outer space. Also, because orbiting spacecraft such as the International Space Station travel at approximately 18,000 miles per hour, micrometeoroids and other space debris pose serious threats to the integrity
10h
A new chromium complex emits light in elusive NIR-II wavelength
Many applications, from fiber-optic telecommunications to biomedical imaging processes require substances that emit light in the near-infrared range (NIR). A research team in Switzerland has now developed the first chromium complex that emits light in the coveted, longer wavelength NIR-II range. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, the team has introduced the underlying concept: a drastic change in t
10h
Crustal motion and strain rates in the southern Basin and Range province
North America's Basin and Range Province is home to some of the most extreme environments on the continent, including Death Valley. Stretching from the Wasatch Mountains in Utah to the Sierra Nevada in California and into northwestern Mexico, this area experiences near-constant drought and extreme summer heat.
10h
Build Strength Where You Most Need It With The BodyGuide App
While science marshals gene hacks and virtual reality to control pain, in many cases what we most need is day-to-day solutions. BodyGuide is an app built to help you fight pain quickly, using basic exercises. Its list price is $229, but it's on sale now for just $39.99, a drop of 82%! Stopping Pain With Movement BodyGuide is built on exercise science and reporting on the effects of exercise on ch
11h
Two Texas studies on COVID-19 retracted because 'previously approved study protocols appear to violate IRB guidelines around prisoner research'
A journal has retracted a pair of studies on Covid-19 in prisoners after the authors' institution found that they had not obtained adequate ethics approval for the research. The two studies appeared in the Journal of Primary Care & Community Health, a Sage publication. The authors, from Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, … Continue reading
11h
Bidirectional interconversion of microwave and light with thin-film lithium niobate
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24809-y Coherent conversion between optical and microwave photonics is needed for future quantum applications. Here, the authors combine thin-film lithium niobate and superconductor platforms as a hybrid electro-optic system to achieve high-efficiency frequency conversion between microwave and optical modes.
11h
CD8+ tissue-resident memory T cells promote liver fibrosis resolution by inducing apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24734-0 The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the resolution of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis remain incompletely understood. Here the authors report a single cell-based analysis that identified CD8 + tissue-resident memory T cells, which contribute to resolution of liver fibrosis potentially via elimination
11h
All-inorganic perovskite quantum dot light-emitting memories
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24762-w Electric field induced ion migration is a well-known phenomenon in perovskite, but the consequences are notorious, and thus needs to be prevented. Here, on the other hand, the authors cleverly manipulate this event for realising resistive random-access memory and light-emitting electrochemical cell in one device
11h
Mitochondrial transcription factor A in RORγt+ lymphocytes regulate small intestine homeostasis and metabolism
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24755-9 RORγt is known to play critical roles in the regulation of a number of immune cell subsets. Here the authors implicate mitochondrial transcription factor A in the regulation of intestinal RORγt + lymphocyte homeostasis and metabolic control in a murine in vivo model.
11h
A machine learning approach to brain epigenetic analysis reveals kinases associated with Alzheimer's disease
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24710-8 Array-based epigenome-wide association studies only test about 2% of the CpG sites in the genome. Here, the authors describe EWASplus, a supervised machine learning strategy that extends EWAS coverage to the entire genome, and use it to identify novel brain CpGs associated with Alzheimer's disease.
11h
Ternary aromatic and anti-aromatic clusters derived from the hypho species [Sn2Sb5]3−
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24706-4 Ternary heterometallic clusters often display intriguing structures and bonding. Here the authors prepare four [Sn2Sb5]3−-based clusters stabilized by coordination of a transition metal ion; analysis of their electronic structure reveals that the resulting cluster displays globally aromatic or antiaromatic chara
11h
Spin defects in hBN as promising temperature, pressure and magnetic field quantum sensors
Nature Communications, Published online: 22 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24725-1 Spin defects in two-dimensional materials potentially offer unique advantages for quantum sensing in terms of sensitivity and functionality. Here, the authors demonstrate the use of spin defects in hexagonal boron nitride as sensors of magnetic field, temperature and pressure, and show that their performance is
11h
It's Time for a New International Space Treaty
With satellite traffic increasing and space tourism poised to take off, space is much busier than it used to be. Before extraterrestrial conflicts erupt, debris makes space travel unsustainable, and pollution irreversibly tarnishes other worlds, we need a new international rulebook for the cosmos.
12h
David Olagnier modtager endnu en international pris
David Olagnier fra Aarhus Universitet hædres af sine fagfæller og modtager en EMDS Young Investigator Award. Han får prisen for sin lovende og ambitiøse forskning i viral immunologi, som blandt andet kommer kræft- og COVID-19-patienter til gode.
13h
More residents flee as fires ravage western Canada
Thousands of residents fled blazes in western Canada on Wednesday with several hundred soldiers scheduled to deploy to fight this year's virulent and early fires, which are wreaking havoc across portions of western North America.
13h
EXPLAINER: As wildfire smoke spreads, who's at risk?
Smoke from wildfires in the western U.S. and Canada is blanketing much of the continent, including thousands of miles away on the East Coast. And experts say the phenomenon is becoming more common as human-caused global warming stokes bigger and more intense blazes.
13h
The Experiment Podcast: Who Is Protected by Hate-Crime Laws?
Listen and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Stitcher | Google Podcasts Hate crimes in the United States have reached their highest levels in more than a decade, prompting bipartisan support for legislation to combat them and increased resources for law enforcement. But the recent COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act has spurred resistance from an unexpected source: activist groups that represent the peo
13h
A history of African dust
In a recently published paper, a research team, led by University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Professor Emeritus Joseph M. Prospero, chronicles the history of African dust transport, including three independent "first" discoveries of African dust in the Caribbean Basin in the 1950s and 1960s.
15h
How does the human body cope with extreme heat? (part two) – podcast
We learned in our previous episode about the very real consequences that extreme heat has on human health and wellbeing, but there is little research into what actually happens to our bodies when exposed to extreme heat apart from in the world of sports science. In the second part of our discussion, as fears mount that the Tokyo Olympics will be the hottest on record and the world gears up for Co
17h
How does the human body cope with extreme heat? (part two)
We learned in our previous episode about the very real consequences that extreme heat has on human health and wellbeing, but there is little research into what actually happens to our bodies when exposed to extreme heat apart from in the world of sports science. In the second part of our discussion, as fears mount that the Tokyo Olympics will be the hottest on record and the world gears up for Cop
17h
Plants Feel Pain and Might Even See – Issue 104: Harmony
In 2018, a German newspaper asked me if I would be interested in having a conversation with the philosopher Emanuele Coccia, who had just written a book about plants, Die Wurzeln der Welt (published in English as The Life of Plants ). I was happy to say yes. The German title of Coccia's book translates as "The Roots of the World," and the book really does cover this. It upends our view of the liv
20h
We're More of Ourselves When We're in Tune with Others – Issue 104: Harmony
When musicians have chemistry, we can feel it. There's something special among them that's missing when they perform alone. Anyone who's heard a Mick Jagger solo album knows that's the case. Clearly nature wants us to jam together and take flight out of our individual selves. The reward is transcendence, our bodies tell us so. What's the secret of that chemistry? It's a question that one of the m
20h
Reports of a Baleful Internet Are Greatly Exaggerated – Issue 104: Harmony
It's now fashionable, when something has you mildly obsessed, to say that it is "living rent-free in your head." Well, in my case, that something is an earworm—Bo Burnham's catchy, creepy, poignantly acidic song "Welcome to the Internet." I can't be alone. The song, part of Burnham's new hour-plus Netflix special, Inside , has been consumed on YouTube and Spotify more than 54 million times. The I
20h
How every child can thrive by five | Molly Wright
"What if I was to tell you that a game of peek-a-boo could change the world?" asks seven-year-old Molly Wright, one of the youngest-ever TED speakers. Breaking down the research-backed ways parents and caregivers can support children's healthy brain development, Wright highlights the benefits of play on lifelong learning, behavior and well-being, sharing effective strategies to help all kids thriv
21h
Kids eat more fruit and vegetables with longer seated lunch time
When kids sit down to eat lunch at school, fruits and vegetables may not be their first choice. But with more time at the lunch table, they are more likely to pick up those healthy foods. If we want to improve children's nutrition and health, ensuring longer school lunch breaks can help achieve those goals, according to new research.
21h
Study links vaccine immune response to age
Older people appear to have fewer antibodies against the novel coronavirus, a new laboratory study suggests. With vaccine uptake slowing in Oregon and across United States, researchers say their findings underscore the importance of promoting vaccinations in local communities.
21h
Chromosomes separation under focus
During cell division, chromosomes are duplicated and separated so that one copy of each chromosome is inherited by each of the two emerging daughter cells. Correct distribution of chromosomes requires high accuracy and defects in this process can cause aberrant distribution of chromosomes and facilitate cancer development. By analyzing the structure of the protein responsible for chromosome separa
22h
Who eats the invaders?
A landmark study documenting instances where native Mediterranean species have preyed upon two highly invasive marine fish — the Pacific red lionfish and the silver-cheeked toadfish — has just been published.
22h
Toxicity testing on the placenta and embryo
Researchers have developed a cell culture test to detect substances that are directly or indirectly harmful to embryos. Based on an existing test used for developing new drugs and chemicals, the augmented version is designed to help reduce the number of animal experiments.
22h
Advancing the long-term well-being of people living with HIV
A global multidisciplinary group of HIV experts has developed a consensus statement identifying the key issues health systems must address in order to move beyond the longtime emphasis on viral suppression to instead deliver integrated, person-centered healthcare for people living with HIV throughout their lives.
22h
Survey finds bullying and harassment systemic in astronomy and geophysics
Results from a new survey of astronomers and geophysicists show that these sciences have a systemic bullying problem; one that is disproportionately worse for women and those from minority groups. In a survey carried out by the Royal Astronomical Society (RAS) last year of over 650 people in the field, 44% of respondents had suffered bullying and harassment in the workplace within the preceding 12
23h
The Lancet: Experts call for urgent action to improve physical activity worldwide
Not enough progress has been made to address physical inactivity worldwide, with adolescents and people living with disabilities (PLWD) among the least likely populations to have the support needed to meet the World Health Organization (WHO)'s physical activity guidelines. Global efforts to improve physical activity have stalled, with overall deaths caused by physical activity remaining at more th
23h
David Williams named 2021 recipient of the IADR Gold Medal Award
The International Association for Dental Research (IADR) announced David Williams, Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London, UK, as the 2021 recipient of the IADR Gold Medal Award. Williams was recognized during the Opening Ceremonies of the virtual 99th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR held on July 21-24, 2021.
23h
Researchers find immune component to rare neurodegenerative disease
Researchers have identified an immune protein tied to the rare neurodegenerative condition known as Niemann-Pick disease type C. The finding, made in mouse models, could offer a powerful new therapeutic target for Niemann-Pick disease type C, a condition that was identified more than a century ago but still lacks effective treatments.
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Unexpected proteome plasticity in response to persistent temperature rise
Common yeast are able to adapt and thrive in response to a long-term rise in temperature by changing the shape, location and function of some of their proteins. The surprising findings demonstrate the unappreciated plasticity in the molecular and conformational level of proteins and bring the power of molecular biology to the organismal response to climate change.
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Long COVID and severe COVID-19 infections associated with Epstein-Barr virus reactivation
Two recently published studies indicate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation may play a role both in the development of long COVID symptoms, as well as severe COVID-19 cases. A study in Pathogens found over 73% of COVID-19 patients who were experiencing long Covid symptoms were also positive for EBV reactivation. A study in Scientific Reports by Nature found EBV reactivation was also associated w
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Inheriting mother's friends key to hyena success
In the wild, inheriting advantageous physical traits may be the difference between a long life and a short one. But for the spotted hyena, another kind of inheritance, one that has nothing to do with genetics, turns out to be extremely important for health and longevity — social networks inherited from their mothers.
1d
Genome editing meets marsupials
Researchers at RIKEN, Japan have succeeded in creating the first genetically engineered marsupial. This study will contribute to deciphering the genetic background of unique characteristics observed only in marsupials.
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New simulator helps robots sharpen their cutting skills
Researchers from the University of Southern California and NVIDIA have unveiled a new simulator for robotic cutting that can accurately reproduce the forces acting on a knife as it slices through common foodstuffs, such as fruit and vegetables. The system could also simulate cutting through human tissue, offering potential applications in surgical robotics. The paper was presented at the Robotics:
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Self-collected saliva and courier service — A feasible diagnostic strategy for COVID-19
Alexandria, Va., USA – Walter Siqueira, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada, presented the poster "Self-collected Saliva and Courier Service – A Feasible Diagnostic Strategy for COVID-19" at the virtual 99th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Rese
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Journals retract papers following publication of university investigation by Retraction Watch
Two journals have retracted three papers by a former researcher at the University of Colorado Denver six weeks after Retraction Watch first revealed that the university had recommended correcting the research record in 2016. Another journal has issued an expression of concern for a paper flagged in the investigation. Despite a recommendation that nine different … Continue reading
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Protect Your Privacy and Keep Your Data Safe With a VPN From Private Internet Access
A lot of us think of privacy and security as extinct quantities online, but actually there's something very simple to make sure your data and online activity stay yours and yours alone: getting a Private Internet Access VPN, or virtual private network. A virtual private network basically acts as a tunnel between you and the websites you visit, and keeps any prying eyes — be they the government's,
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10 ways to keep your heart healthy in summer heat
With high temperatures and humidity, it's important to protect your heart from the hazards of the summer heat. On Chen , interventional cardiologist and director of the CCU and Telemetry Units, Outpatient Cardiology Services, and the Lipid Program at Stony Brook Medicine, has some suggestions to help you stay heart-safe all summer long. People with an existing heart condition need to be careful w
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Study finds lifting advice doesn't stand up for everyone
Commonly accepted advice to keep a straight back and squat while lifting in order to avoid back pain has been challenged by new Curtin University research.The research examined people who had regularly performed manual lifting through their occupation for more than five years and found those who experienced low back pain as a result were more likely to use the recommended technique of squatting an
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Powerline failures and wind speeds are strongest drivers of land area burned by Santa Ana wind fires
Every year, Santa Ana Winds drive some of the largest wildfires in Southern California during autumn and winter, and a new analysis of 71 years of data suggests that the total amount of land burned is determined more by wind speed and power line ignitions than by temperature and precipitation. The findings suggest that maintaining utility lines and carefully planning
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New approach eradicates breast cancer in mice
A new approach to treating breast cancer kills 95-100% of cancer cells in mouse models of human estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancers and their metastases in bone, brain, liver and lungs. The newly developed drug, called ErSO, quickly shrinks even large tumors to undetectable levels.
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Large-scale ratcheting in a bacterial DEAH/RHA-type RNA helicase that modulates antibiotics susceptibility [Biochemistry]
Many bacteria harbor RNA-dependent nucleoside-triphosphatases of the DEAH/RHA family, whose molecular mechanisms and cellular functions are poorly understood. Here, we show that the Escherichia coli DEAH/RHA protein, HrpA, is an ATP-dependent 3 to 5′ RNA helicase and that the RNA helicase activity of HrpA influences bacterial survival under antibiotics treatment….
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The effect of RNA polymerase V on 24-nt siRNA accumulation depends on DNA methylation contexts and histone modifications in rice [Plant Biology]
RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) functions in de novo methylation in CG, CHG, and CHH contexts. Here, we performed map-based cloning of OsNRPE1, which encodes the largest subunit of RNA polymerase V (Pol V), a key regulator of gene silencing and reproductive development in rice. We found that rice Pol V…
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Membrane association of importin {alpha} facilitates viral entry into salivary gland cells of vector insects [Agricultural Sciences]
The importin α family belongs to the conserved nuclear transport pathway in eukaryotes. However, the biological functions of importin α in the plasma membrane are still elusive. Here, we report that importin α, as a plasma membrane–associated protein, is exploited by the rice stripe virus (RSV) to enter vector insect…
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Insertion of a synthetic switch into insulin provides metabolite-dependent regulation of hormone-receptor activation [Biochemistry]
Insulin-signaling requires conformational change: whereas the free hormone and its receptor each adopt autoinhibited conformations, their binding leads to structural reorganization. To test the functional coupling between insulin's "hinge opening" and receptor activation, we inserted an artificial ligand-dependent switch into the insulin molecule. Ligand-binding disrupts an internal tether designe
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Sulfatides are endogenous ligands for the TLR4-MD-2 complex [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Many endogenous molecules, mostly proteins, purportedly activate the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)–myeloid differentiation factor-2 (MD-2) complex, the innate immune receptor for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) derived from gram-negative bacteria. However, there is no structural evidence supporting direct TLR4–MD-2 activation by endogenous ligands. Sulfatides (3-O-sulfogalactosylceramides) are natural, abu
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Evolution of a {sigma}-(c-di-GMP)-anti-{sigma} switch [Biochemistry]
Filamentous actinobacteria of the genus Streptomyces have a complex lifecycle involving the differentiation of reproductive aerial hyphae into spores. We recently showed c-di-GMP controls this transition by arming a unique anti-σ, RsiG, to bind the sporulation-specific σ, WhiG. The Streptomyces venezuelae RsiG–(c-di-GMP)2–WhiG structure revealed that a monomeric RsiG binds c-di-GMP…
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