Search Posts

Nyheder2021juli30

Tegn abonnement på BioNyt!

Vil du hjælpe med at finde nyheder? DO YOU WANT TO HELP FINDING SCIENCE NEWS? Email: bionyt@gmail.com Phone-sms: (45)21729908

LATEST

Simone Biles's Critics Don't Understand This Generation of Athletes
Simone Biles was expected to be the story of the Tokyo Olympics because of her long series of jaw-dropping performances up to now. Instead, she's become the story of these Olympics because she's not performing. Citing her mental health, Biles removed herself from the women's gymnastics team final after one rotation on Tuesday night. A day later, she withdrew from the individual all-around competi
23h
Eternal Change for No Energy: A Time Crystal Finally Made Real
In a preprint posted online Thursday night, researchers at Google in collaboration with physicists at Stanford, Princeton and other universities say that they have used Google's quantum computer to demonstrate a genuine "time crystal." In addition, a separate research group claimed earlier this month to have created a time crystal in a diamond. A novel phase of matter that physicists have strived
5h
Vanderbilt engineer the first to introduce low-power dynamic manipulation of single nanoscale quantum objects
Led by Justus Ndukaife, assistant professor of electrical engineering, Vanderbilt researchers are the first to introduce an approach for trapping and moving a nanomaterial known as a single colloidal nanodiamond with nitrogen-vacancy center using low power laser beam. The width of a single human hair is approximately 90,000 nanometers; nanodiamonds are less than 100 nanometers. These carbon-based
5h
Elon Musk Reportedly Demanded to Be Made CEO of Apple
Power Play According to explosive allegations in a new book, Elon Musk once demanded to be made CEO of software megacorporation Apple — prompting Tim Cook, the actual CEO, to hang up the phone in disgust. Here's how things went down during a 2016 call, according to the Los Angeles Times ' synopsis of " Power Play: Tesla, Elon Musk and the Bet of the Century ," by Wall Street Journal reporter Tim
2h
Russia Says Don't Worry, It's No Big Deal That We Threw the ISS Into a Tailspin
Shrug It Off On Thursday, Russia docked its new Nauka module to the International Space Station — and, just three hours later, sent the entire orbital facility careening off course when it suddenly and unexpectedly fired up its thrusters . Now, the Russian space agency Roscosmos says that a software glitch is to blame, Reuters reports . Apparently the module received the command to "withdraw," se
4h
Down With Morning People
Tim Lahan This article was published online on July 30, 2021. M e, I can fake it. Stale as I may be from the night before, one foot—one leg—stuck in the underworld, I can still crank up the sociability. I can manufacture perkiness at an early hour. Good morning! Good morning! Am I even faking it? Perhaps not. It is good to wake up. I do rejoice in the restoration of consciousness, the grand democ
4h
Germany Found a Way to Reduce Polarization. Could It Work in the U.S.?
W hen Edmund Schechter, a Viennese Jew who fled the Nazis, arrived in postwar Germany in 1945, he encountered a "wasteland"—not just physically, he said, but "psychologically." All newspapers had ceased publication. Radio stations were destroyed and devoid of their Nazi staff. The "silent" media landscape provided "virgin territory" to "do all sorts of things really from scratch," recalled Schech
4h
Women participate less at conferences, even if gender-balanced – study
Exclusive: small changes in conference design can make big difference to female inclusion, say researchers Women are less likely to participate in proceedings at medical and scientific conferences, even with gender-balanced delegates, although simple interventions in conference design sparked a significant improvement in female inclusion, a study has found. Medical and scientific conferences are
13h
Elon Musk Shows Off Pic of Monstrous Super Heavy Booster Engine System
Musk's Monster It's no secret that SpaceX's Starship Super Heavy Booster will be an absolute beast. The rocket stage, meant to launch the also-huge Starship spacecraft into orbit, will be sporting an outrageous number of individual rocket engines — 29 to be exact — making it one of the biggest rocket boosters in history. A photo shared by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk today on Twitter shows the sheer scal
23h
How Did It Come to This?
The CDC's color-coded coronavirus case map , if you can find it, is easy enough to read. It's a county-by-county snapshot of viral transmission—the agency's new fallback for advising fully vaccinated people on whether they need to don a mask indoors. The parts painted in those scary shades of orange or red are areas of substantial or high transmission, respectively; they're the places where you s
4h
Space Station Astronauts Threw Their Own Zero-G Olympic Games
Space Olympics The Olympic spirit has become so infectious that even astronauts stationed on board the International Space Station were inspired to put on their own microgravity games — a heartwarming example of international camaraderie . "Today the Olympics start in Tokyo, but we held the very first space Olympics last week," European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet wrote in a caption of
1d
We're Talking About Vaccines All Wrong
So far this year, freshman Representative Marjorie Taylor Greene has outraised all of her GOP colleagues in the House, raking in $4.53 million in the first six months of 2021. (Among congressional Republicans, only Senators Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley have raised more.) Yes, Greene is paying quite a bit to raise those funds, but it remains a staggering amount for an incumbent in a safe red district,
4h
Congressman Proposes Four-Day Work Week
Three Day Weekend If US Congressman Mark Takano has his way, most Americans will end up working four days — that's just 32 hours — instead of the more-or-less universally accepted five day, 40 hour week that we have today. The Californian Democrat introduced new legislation on Tuesday that, if enacted, would change the threshold for overtime work throughout the country, according to a press relea
5h
Nikola's Fake Hydrogen Truck Was Actually Plugged In During Demo, According to Lawsuit
One-Way Trip Nikola became the laughingstock of the automotive world last year when it emerged that it had rolled its (purportedly) hydrogen-electric semi truck down a hill in a high-profile demo because it couldn't actually drive yet. Now, though, it turns out the ruse may have been even more pathetic — federal prosecutors in the new fraud charges levied against Nikola founder Trevor Milton now
3h
Delta Is Ruining the Summer, and It's Anti-vaxxers' Fault
"Just think back to where this nation was a year ago," an ebullient Joe Biden said on July 4 , as he gave remarks billed as a celebration of U.S. independence—and independence from COVID-19. "Think back to where you were a year ago. And think about how far we've come." You might not have to work very hard to remember. Across the country, summer 2021 is starting to look distressingly like summer 2
4h
Hundreds of AI tools have been built to catch covid. None of them helped.
When covid-19 struck Europe in March 2020, hospitals were plunged into a health crisis that was still badly understood. "Doctors really didn't have a clue how to manage these patients," says Laure Wynants, an epidemiologist at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, who studies predictive tools. But there was data coming out of China, which had a four-month head start in the race to beat the pa
9h
Russia rocket mishap briefly nudges International Space Station out of position
After several 'hiccups' on the journey to the ISS, the Nauka lab module accidentally fired its rockets after docking Russia's troubled Nauka laboratory module has caused a fright when its rockets accidentally fired after docking the with the International Space Station, briefly throwing the station out of position. A few hours after docking, Nauka's propulsive devices unexpectedly fired, forcing
20h
A Baby Was Born With Her "Parasitic" Twin Inside Her Stomach
Earlier this month, doctors were alarmed by a baby girl who was born with an unusually enlarged stomach. When the doctors took a closer look, they found a partially developed human embryo resting inside, The Times of Israel reports — likely a sign of what could have been a twin sibling that got absorbed during prenatal development. The phenomenon, called fetus in fetu — literally "fetus in fetus"
1d
Study: These Countries Are Most Likely to Survive Collapse of Civilization
Civilization Collapse While Australians are fighting over rat carcasses in a "Mad Max" scenario, it might be pretty much business as usual in New Zealand. At least, that's the conclusion of a new study by researchers at the UK's Anglia Ruskin University, who examined which places on Earth would be best prepared to deal with breakdowns in global supply chains, financial structures, and other compl
1h
95% of British adults still wearing a mask when out, says survey
Figure same as before legal requirement relaxed, while most still feel that complying with other Covid safety measures is important Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Only one British adult in 20 is no longer wearing a mask outside of their homes despite the relaxing of legal mask-wearing requirements earlier this month, according to the first official survey on complyi
2h
Lil Nas X, DaBaby, and the Incoherence of Homophobia
One big reason HIV/AIDS remains a deadly crisis despite the existence of lifesaving drugs is stigma: Fear of shame and ostracization discourages people from accessing testing, preventive measures, and treatment. In other words, a factor causing needless suffering is people like DaBaby, one of the hottest names in hip-hop . Performing in Miami this past weekend, the rapper asked fans to raise thei
4h
Fire Breaks Out at Tesla Battery Power Station
Battery Blaze On Thursday night, a Tesla Megapack battery system burst into flames at a facility in Australia. It's still not entirely clear why the massive energy storage unit caught fire, according to Electrek . But the fact that the blaze happened while running initial tests on the batteries suggests that there are still kinks to sort out before Tesla is fully able to help stabilize Australia'
4h
Israel to offer Pfizer Covid booster shots to people over 60
Announcement makes Israel the first country to offer a third dose of a western vaccine to its citizens on a wide scale See all our coronavirus coverage Israel's prime minister has announced that the country would offer a coronavirus booster shot to those people over 60 who have already been vaccinated. The announcement by Naftali Bennett makes Israel, which launched one of the world's most succes
19h
Scandal-Plagued Robinhood Suffers Worst IPO in History
New Record! The scandal-ridden stock trading app Robinhood went public on Thursday with a record-shattering IPO. The only problem? It broke the record in the wrong direction. Robinhood's IPO is officially the worst-performing out of all 51 American companies that raised at least the same amount of money, according to analysis from Bloomberg . Trading began at $38 per share in the company, which w
1h
American imperialism: fat-shaming Uncle Sam
In the years before 1900, the United States was experiencing a spectacular spurt of growth. Not everyone approved: many feared continued expansionism would lead to American imperialism. To illustrate the threat, Uncle Sam was depicted as dangerously or comically fat. Detail from "Charge of the 24th and 25th Colored Infantry, July 2nd 1898", depicting the Battle of San Juan Hill – a turning point
6h
Why Sweat Is A Human Superpower
Sweat is an "evolutionary marvel," says Sarah Everts, the author of The Joy of Sweat. In her new book, Everts delves into the science of perspiration and how this trait has enabled humans to thrive. (Image credit: Cavan Images/Getty Images)
3h
The Return of Hypocrisy
Governments, even democratic ones, are often ineffective or simply bad. Elections sometimes produce uninspiring results, particularly when a patchwork of parties forms an unwieldy coalition government that struggles to get much of anything done. This doesn't mean it should be overthrown. Nor should the United States ignore coup attempts staged in the name of bypassing the messiness of democracy.
4h
The magnetic field in the galactic outflow of M82
Messier 82 (M82) is a luminous infrared galaxy about twelve million light-years away from the Milky Way. Its burst of star formation powers the radiation and drives a bipolar superwind that originates near the core of the galaxy. The wind extends perpendicular to the galactic plane out into the halo and intergalactic medium; ionized gas in the wind traces a continuous structure that is about thirt
7h
An endlessly changing playground teaches AIs how to multitask
DeepMind has developed a vast candy-colored virtual playground that teaches AIs general skills by endlessly changing the tasks it sets them. Instead of developing just the skills needed to solve a particular task, the AIs learn to experiment and explore, picking up skills they then use to succeed in tasks they've never seen before. It is a small step toward general intelligence. What is it? XLand
2h
Time for Covidnomics
First Canada overtook the United States in the vaccination race. Now the European Union has done so. Even poor European countries such as Greece, Lithuania, and Poland have surpassed vaccine-resistant U.S. states such as Ohio, Arkansas, and Missouri. Why is this happening? Facebook exists on the other side of the Atlantic as much as it does on ours. Europeans do not lack for far-right political p
2h
Remains of ancient dogs found among early human ancestral remains in Georgia
A team of researchers from Italy, Spain and Georgia has found the remains of ancient hunting dogs at a dig site in what is now modern Georgia. In their paper published in the journal Scientific Reports, the group describes the fossils they found, their attempts to classify them and the possibility of the dogs interacting with early human ancestors.
7h
Astronomers Directly Image Planet Just 35 Light Years Away
In the hunt for exoplanets, astronomers are only rarely able to look upon a world directly with even the most powerful telescopes. So, it's always notable when we can actually see a new exoplanet. Scientists from the University of Hawaii report they have spotted a new exoplanet only 35 light-years away , and we can see this one because it's enormous and very far from its host star. In fact, it mi
8h
'Digging' into early medieval Europe with big data
During the middle of the sixth century CE a dramatic transformation began in how the people of western Europe buried their dead. The transition from 'furnished' inhumation (those with grave goods to include jewellery, dress accessories, tools and personal items etc) to 'unfurnished' (those without grave goods) was widespread and by the early eighth century an unfurnished inhumation was by far the
12h
Godzilla and mushroom clouds: How the first postwar nuclear tests made it to the silver screen
As I sat in a darkened cinema in 1998, mesmerised and unnerved by the opening nuclear bomb explosions that framed the beginning of Roland Emmerich's Godzilla , it felt like I was watching the most expensive special effect in history. Vast expanding clouds and fireballs eclipsed their surroundings and smothered everything in their path, dropping radioactive material that gave rise to the title mon
5h
'Leave the Rest to Me'
For raw emotional content, Tuesday's hearing of the new House select committee to investigate the January 6 insurrection was nonpareil. Four police officers who fought to hold back armed hordes seeking to disrupt Congress told stories of physical injury, racist abuse, and post-traumatic distress. Even for Americans who paid close attention to the crisis, these stories added new texture and horror
42min
UK appears to defy dire 'freedom day' predictions as Covid cases fall
Government will not say they believe worst is over, but cases fell for seven consecutive days this week Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As England's "freedom day" dawned on 19 July, Boris Johnson was grumpily confined to his 16th-century grace-and-favour mansion, humiliated by the row over a bungled quarantine exemption. Cases were at more than 46,000 per day as all
3h
Astronomers discover how to feed a black hole
The black holes at the centers of galaxies are the most mysterious objects in the Universe, not only because of the huge quantities of material within them, millions of times the mass of the sun, but because of the incredibly dense concentration of matter in a volume no bigger than that of our solar system. When they capture matter from their surroundings they become active, and can send out enorm
6h
Russian space module mishap pushes ISS out of position – video
Russia's troubled Nauka laboratory module caused a fright when its rockets accidentally fired after docking the with the International Space Station , briefly throwing the station out of position. A few hours after docking, Nauka's propulsive devices came on unexpectedly, forcing personnel onboard the ISS to launch thrusters on the Russian segment of the station to counter the effect Russia rocke
10h
'I Would Go Tomorrow to Get the Third Shot'
And just like that, it's Groundhog Day. The news from the CDC is bad. Yes, we have vaccines—and they are miraculously effective at preventing serious illness and death from COVID-19. Thank goodness for that. But the CDC now says that when vaccinated people are infected, they may spread the coronavirus just as easily as the unvaccinated do. On top of that, the Delta variant is tremendously contagi
42min
Plant reproduction: Unraveling the role of a new membrane within pollen grain
While the reproduction process of flowering plants has been known for more than 120 years, there still remain many mysteries to unravel. Researchers from INRAE, ENS de Lyon, CNRS and Limagrain characterized a new membrane within pollen grain that surrounds the two sperm cells. In a publication in Journal of Cell Biology on 29 July 2021, the scientists show that this membrane is key to guarantee th
7h
Remember more by taking breaks
We remember things longer if we take breaks during learning, referred to as the spacing effect. Scientists gained deeper insight into the neuronal basis for this phenomenon in mice. With longer intervals between learning repetitions, mice reuse more of the same neurons as before — instead of activating different ones. Possibly, this allows the neuronal connections to strengthen with each learning
19h
Natural mineral hackmanite enables new method of x-ray imaging
Researchers from the University of Turku have discovered a new method of X-ray imaging based on the coloring abilities of the natural mineral hackmanite. The international group of researchers also found out how and why hackmanite changes color upon exposure to X-rays.
5h
No particular risk of infection of SARS-CoV-2 from cash, study finds
How long do coronaviruses remain infectious on banknotes and coins? Is it possible to become infected through contact with cash? Researchers developed a method specifically to test how many infectious virus particles can be transferred from cash to the skin in real-life conditions. Conclusion: under realistic conditions, the risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2 from cash is very low.
20h
Pressure transforms 'squishy' compound in bizarre ways
Remarkable things happen when a "squishy" compound of manganese and sulfide (MnS2) is compressed in a diamond anvil, researchers report. "This is a new type of charge transfer mechanism, and so from a science community point of view this is very, very exciting. We are showing remarkable physical transformations over a very, very short range of parameters, in this case pressure," says Ashkan Salam
33min
A sleep study's eye-opening findings
Getting more sleep, by itself, does not change work productivity or overall well-being for impoverished workers in India. Naps or better-quality sleep at night may have a bigger impact, according to a new study.
47min
Your phone's dark mode may not actually save much battery power
Your phone's dark mode feature is unlikely to make a big difference to battery life, according to a new study. When Android and Apple operating system updates started giving users the option to put their smartphones in dark mode, the feature showed potential for saving the battery life of newer phones with screens that allow darker-colored pixels to use less power than lighter-colored pixels. And
47min
Fli1+ cells transcriptional analysis reveals an Lmo2-Prdm16 axis in angiogenesis [Physiology]
A network of molecular factors drives the development, differentiation, and maintenance of endothelial cells. Friend leukemia integration 1 transcription factor (FLI1) is a bona fide marker of endothelial cells during early development. In zebrafish Tg(fli1:EGFP)y1, we identified two endothelial cell populations, high-fli1+ and low-fli1+, by the intensity of green fluorescent…
1h
PolyG-DS: An ultrasensitive polyguanine tract-profiling method to detect clonal expansions and trace cell lineage [Genetics]
Polyguanine tracts (PolyGs) are short guanine homopolymer repeats that are prone to accumulating mutations when cells divide. This feature makes them especially suitable for cell lineage tracing, which has been exploited to detect and characterize precancerous and cancerous somatic evolution. PolyG genotyping, however, is challenging because of the inherent biochemical…
1h
Clinical evidence that a dysregulated master neural network modulator may aid in diagnosing schizophrenia [Neuroscience]
There are no validated biomarkers for schizophrenia (SCZ), a disorder linked to neural network dysfunction. We demonstrate that collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2), a master regulator of cytoskeleton and, hence, neural circuitry, may form the basis for a biomarker because its activity is uniquely imbalanced in SCZ patients. CRMP2's activity…
1h
The effects of graded calorie restriction XVII: Multitissue metabolomics reveals synthesis of carnitine and NAD, and tRNA charging as key pathways [Physiology]
The evolutionary context of why caloric restriction (CR) activates physiological mechanisms that slow the process of aging remains unclear. The main goal of this analysis was to identify, using metabolomics, the common pathways that are modulated across multiple tissues (brown adipose tissue, liver, plasma, and brain) to evaluate two alternative…
1h
Cell-free reconstitution reveals the molecular mechanisms for the initiation of secondary siRNA biogenesis in plants [Plant Biology]
Secondary small interfering RNA (siRNA) production, triggered by primary small RNA targeting, is critical for proper development and antiviral defense in many organisms. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR) is a key factor in this pathway. However, how RDR specifically converts the targets of primary small RNAs into double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) intermediates…
1h
Microbiota-derived metabolites inhibit Salmonella virulent subpopulation development by acting on single-cell behaviors [Microbiology]
Salmonella spp. express Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 Type III Secretion System 1 (T3SS-1) genes to mediate the initial phase of interaction with their host. Prior studies indicate short-chain fatty acids, microbial metabolites at high concentrations in the gastrointestinal tract, limit population-level T3SS-1 gene expression. However, only a subset of Salmonella…
1h
UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 2, a regulator of glycogen synthesis and glycosylation, is critical for pancreatic cancer growth [Medical Sciences]
UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 2 (UGP2), the enzyme that synthesizes uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose, rests at the convergence of multiple metabolic pathways, however, the role of UGP2 in tumor maintenance and cancer metabolism remains unclear. Here, we identify an important role for UGP2 in the maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) growth in…
1h
Gram-negative outer-membrane proteins with multiple {beta}-barrel domains [Biophysics and Computational Biology]
Outer-membrane beta barrels (OMBBs) are found in the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and eukaryotic organelles. OMBBs fold as antiparallel β-sheets that close onto themselves, forming pores that traverse the membrane. Currently known structures include only one barrel, of 8 to 36 strands, per chain. The lack of multi-OMBB chains…
1h
A functional mammalian display screen identifies rare antibodies that stimulate NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity [Immunology and Inflammation]
Therapies that boost the antitumor immune response have shown a great deal of success. Although most of these therapies have focused on enhancing T cell functions, there is a growing interest in developing therapies that can target other immune cell subsets. Like T cells, natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic…
1h
Specific electromagnetic radiation in the wireless signal range increases wakefulness in mice [Neuroscience]
Electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in the environment has increased sharply in recent decades. The effect of environmental EMR on living organisms remains poorly characterized. Here, we report the impact of wireless-range EMR on the sleep architecture of mouse. Prolonged exposure to 2.4-GHz EMR modulated by 100-Hz square pulses at a nonthermal…
1h
GHB analogs confer neuroprotection through specific interaction with the CaMKII{alpha} hub domain [Pharmacology]
Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha subunit (CaMKIIα) is a key neuronal signaling protein and an emerging drug target. The central hub domain regulates the activity of CaMKIIα by organizing the holoenzyme complex into functional oligomers, yet pharmacological modulation of the hub domain has never been demonstrated. Here, using a combination…
1h
Dopaminergic modulation of human consciousness via default mode network connectivity [Neuroscience]
Decades of preclinical studies indicate that dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the midbrain modulate animal behavior and cognition (1). The role of dopaminergic VTA neurons in wakefulness, and hence consciousness, emerged more recently from VTA stimulation experiments utilizing pharmacologic (2, 3), electrophysiologic (4), optogenetic (5, 6),…
1h
One Day of Greenland's Ice Melt Could Submerge Florida
It shouldn't be surprising by now to learn that the Arctic is melting at an alarming rate thanks to worsening climate change — and spelling bad news for the rest of the planet. But sometimes it can be hard to conceptualize the vast scale of the problem , or how big of an impact it'll have on the rest of us, thousands of miles away. Well, new World Meteorological Organization data may help paint a
1h
Amygdala found to have role in important pre-attentive mechanism in the brain
Researchers have shown how the amygdala, a brain region typically associated with fear, contributes to prepulse inhibition (PPI) by activating small inhibitory neurons in the mouse brain stem. The discovery advances understanding of the systems underlying PPI and efforts to ultimately develop medical therapies for schizophrenia and other disorders by reversing pre-attentive deficits.
1h
eDNA effective in the calculation of marine biodiversity
For almost 20 years, researchers have conducted detailed censuses of the majestic kelp forests off Santa Barbara. By counting fish species and placing them in the context of their environmental conditions, coastal marine ecologists can look at the effects of human activity and natural drivers on kelp and its ability to maintain the kelp forest communities.
1h
What Misspellings Reveal About Cultural Evolution – Facts So Romantic
Stable cultural forms do not have to result from close replication; they can emerge continuously out of subtle changes. Illustration by VectorMine / Shutterstock Something about me must remind people of a blind 17th-century poet. My last name, Miton, is French, yet people outside of France invariably misspell it as "Milton"—as in the famed English author, John Milton, of the epic poem Paradise Lo
1h
Applied science facilitates the large-scale expansion of protected areas in an Amazonian hot spot
Meeting international commitments to protect 17% of terrestrial ecosystems worldwide will require >3 million square kilometers of new protected areas and strategies to create those areas in a way that respects local communities and land use. In 2000–2016, biological and social scientists worked to increase the protected proportion of Peru's largest department via 14 interdisciplinary inventories
1h
Van der Waals epitaxy of nearly single-crystalline nitride films on amorphous graphene-glass wafer
Van der Waals epitaxy provides a fertile playground for the monolithic integration of various materials for advanced electronics and optoelectronics. Here, a previously unidentified nanorod-assisted van der Waals epitaxy is developed and nearly single-crystalline GaN films are first grown on amorphous silica glass substrates using a graphene interfacial layer. The epitaxial GaN-based light-emitti
1h
FAN1-MLH1 interaction affects repair of DNA interstrand cross-links and slipped-CAG/CTG repeats
FAN1, a DNA structure-specific nuclease, interacts with MLH1, but the repair pathways in which this complex acts are unknown. FAN1 processes DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) and FAN1 variants are modifiers of the neurodegenerative Huntington's disease (HD), presumably by regulating HD-causing CAG repeat expansions. Here, we identify specific amino acid residues in two adjacent FAN1 motifs that a
1h
Sedimentary ancient DNA shows terrestrial plant richness continuously increased over the Holocene in northern Fennoscandia
The effects of climate change on species richness are debated but can be informed by the past. Here, we generated a sedimentary ancient DNA dataset covering 10 lakes and applied novel methods for data harmonization. We assessed the impact of Holocene climate changes and nutrients on terrestrial plant richness in northern Fennoscandia. We find that richness increased steeply during the rapidly war
1h
Predicting non-state terrorism worldwide
Several thousand people die every year worldwide because of terrorist attacks perpetrated by non-state actors. In this context, reliable and accurate short-term predictions of non-state terrorism at the local level are key for policy makers to target preventative measures. Using only publicly available data, we show that predictive models that include structural and procedural predictors can accu
1h
North Atlantic Oscillation in winter is largely insensitive to autumn Barents-Kara sea ice variability
Arctic sea ice extent in autumn is significantly correlated with the winter North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the satellite era. However, questions about the robustness and reproducibility of the relationship persist. Here, we show that climate models are able to simulate periods of strong ice-NAO correlation, albeit rarely. Furthermore, we show that the winter circulation signals during these
1h
Single-cell analyses unravel cell type-specific responses to a vitamin D analog in prostatic precancerous lesions
Epidemiological data have linked vitamin D deficiency to the onset and severity of various cancers, including prostate cancer, and although in vitro studies have demonstrated anticancer activities for vitamin D, clinical trials provided conflicting results. To determine the impact of vitamin D signaling on prostatic precancerous lesions, we treated genetically engineered Pten (i)pe–/– mice harbor
1h
Bird neurocranial and body mass evolution across the end-Cretaceous mass extinction: The avian brain shape left other dinosaurs behind
Birds today are the most diverse clade of terrestrial vertebrates, and understanding why extant birds (Aves) alone among dinosaurs survived the Cretaceous-Paleogene mass extinction is crucial to reconstructing the history of life. Hypotheses proposed to explain this pattern demand identification of traits unique to Aves. However, this identification is complicated by a lack of data from non-avian
1h
Looping-in complexation and ion partitioning in nonstoichiometric polyelectrolyte mixtures
A wide variety of intracellular membraneless compartments are formed via liquid-liquid phase separation of charged proteins and nucleic acids. Understanding the stability of these compartments, while accounting for the compositional heterogeneity intrinsic to cellular environments, poses a daunting challenge. We combined experimental and theoretical efforts to study the effects of nonstoichiometr
1h
Metabolic control of nitrogen fixation in rhizobium-legume symbioses
Rhizobia induce nodule formation on legume roots and differentiate into bacteroids, which catabolize plant-derived dicarboxylates to reduce atmospheric N 2 into ammonia. Despite the agricultural importance of this symbiosis, the mechanisms that govern carbon and nitrogen allocation in bacteroids and promote ammonia secretion to the plant are largely unknown. Using a metabolic model derived from g
1h
SARS-CoV-2 antibody magnitude and detectability are driven by disease severity, timing, and assay
Interpretation of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) serosurveillance studies is limited by poorly defined performance of antibody assays over time in individuals with different clinical presentations. We measured antibody responses in plasma samples from 128 individuals over 160 days using 14 assays. We found a consistent and strong effect of disease severity on antibod
1h
Photonic skins based on flexible organic microlaser arrays
Flexible photonics is rapidly emerging as a promising platform for artificial smart skins to imitate or extend the capabilities of human skins. Organic material systems provide a promising avenue to directly fabricate large-scale flexible device units; however, the versatile fabrication of all-organic integrated devices with desired photonic functionalities remains a great challenge. Here, we dev
1h
The major mechanism of melanoma mutations is based on deamination of cytosine in pyrimidine dimers as determined by circle damage sequencing
Sunlight-associated melanomas carry a unique C-to-T mutation signature. UVB radiation induces cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) as the major form of DNA damage, but the mechanism of how CPDs cause mutations is unclear. To map CPDs at single-base resolution genome wide, we developed the circle damage sequencing (circle-damage-seq) method. In human cells, CPDs form preferentially in a tetranucle
1h
Solar-powered microbes to feed the world?
An international research team has shown that using solar-panels to produce microbial protein — which is rich not just in proteins but also in other nutrients — is more sustainable, efficient and environmentally friendly than growing conventional crops. This method uses solar energy, land, nutrients, and carbon dioxide from the air.
2h
Scientists discover a surprising new way that tuberculosis suppresses immunity
University of Maryland researchers discovered a way that Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, can cause a person's immune cells to lower their defenses. Specifically, they identified a gene in the bacterium that suppresses immune defenses in infected human cells, which could exacerbate the infection. The findings were published on July 29, 2021, in the journal
2h
'Green' synthesis of plastics from CO2
Using a CeO2 catalyst, researchers develop an effective catalytic process for the direct synthesis of polycarbonate diols without the need for dehydrating agents. The high yield, high selective process has CO2 blown at atmospheric pressure to evaporate excess water by-product allowing for a catalytic process that can be used with any substrate with a boiling point higher than water.
2h
Daily briefing: Rocket glitch nudges ISS
Nature, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02114-4 The International Space Station was briefly pushed out of position when rockets on a newly docked module accidentally fired. Plus: Female authors get fewer citations in elite medical journals, and why obesity doesn't always lead to ill health.
2h
"Acoustic tweezers" use sound waves to levitate bits of matter
Since the 1980s, researchers have been using sound waves to move matter through a technique called acoustic trapping. Acoustic trapping devices move bits of matter by emitting strategically designed sound waves, which interact in such a way that the matter becomes "trapped" in areas of particular velocity and pressure. Acoustic and optical trapping devices are already used in various fields, incl
2h
A blood test for your body clock? It's on the horizon
Sleep researchers have found it's possible to determine the timing of a person's internal biological clock via a single blood draw. Ultimately, the findings could lead to a simple blood test for assessing circadian rhythm and personalized recommendations for when people should eat, sleep, exercise and take medications.
2h
A single cell type map of human tissues
In a study published in the US journal Science Advances, a single cell type map of human tissues is presented. An open access atlas has been launched with more than 250,000 interactive plots to allow researchers to explore the expression in individual single cell types for all protein-coding genes in these tissues.
2h
Watching light break down a model photocatalyst in near real time
Chemists create catalysts for use in industry and other applications. One of the methods to create these catalysts is by using light to break down organometallic compounds—substances that include both metals and carbon. These types of compounds are called photocatalysts. Scientists call the process of breaking down molecules with light, photodissociation. Researchers often study the photodissociat
3h
Chemists discover a key to greener food production
Arguably the most important (if least well known) industrial advancement of the 20th century, the Haber-Bosch ammonia synthesis process essentially conquered food scarcity by creating the means to mass produce fertilizer—fertilizer then used to fortify food harvests around the world.
3h
Electron microscopy in the age of automation
"Many of the greatest challenges of our time, from clean energy to environmental justice, require new approaches to the craft of scientific experimentation. This is exceedingly apparent in the field of electron microscopy. As researchers utilize this powerful window to peer into the atomic machinery behind today's technologies, they are increasingly inundated with data and constrained by tradition
3h
How to make up your mind when the glass seems half empty?
Neuroscientists have connected some of the dots to reveal the brain networks that give anxiety influence over decisions. The group has published a review that synthesizes results from years of brain measurements in rats and primates and relates these findings to the human brain.
3h
Adding color to your plate may lower risk of cognitive decline
A new study shows that people who eat a diet that includes at least half a serving per day of foods high in flavonoids like strawberries, oranges, peppers and apples may have a 20% lower risk of cognitive decline. The study looked at several types of flavonoids, and found that flavones and anthocyanins may have the most protective effect.
3h
As Vaccination Rates Lag, Delta Variant Presents New Challenges
In an announcement this week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted that vaccinated individuals with breakthrough infections are more likely to pass Covid-19 on than had been previously thought. Given this, the agency recommends that even vaccinated individuals return to wearing masks indoors.
3h
Get paid to be part of a Trinity College Cognitive Study
Hi everyone! I am currently recruiting participants for a paid study that aims to validate a smartphone-based brain task. Participation in this study will be remote and includes downloading the Neureka app and playing one of its science challenges along with the computerised classic version. The study will take 45 – 60 minutes to complete and you will receive €10 for your participation upon compl
3h
Giant pandas still face high risk of extinction
Giant pandas in the wild are more fragmented and isolated than they were 30 years ago and many continue to face a high risk of extinction despite recent gains in their overall numbers, a new study finds. Climate change, habitat loss , and reduced breeding viability—an inherent risk in small, remote populations where potential mates are few—could pose a triple whammy for these animals, the researc
3h
Artificial Intelligence learns better when distracted
Computer scientists from the Netherlands and Spain have determined how a deep learning system well suited for image recognition learns to recognize its surroundings. They were able to simplify the learning process by forcing the system's focus toward secondary characteristics.
4h
Blood test may flag women at risk for premature birth
A blood test during a routine prenatal visit could identify women at risk for premature birth, a new study shows. In the United States, one in 10 babies is born prematurely. "Preterm births are common," says Hanne Hoffmann, an assistant professor in the animal science department at Michigan State University. "If we know the mother is at risk for a preterm birth, her doctor can monitor her more cl
4h
The Books Briefing: The Many Sides of Identity
In 1983, the historian Benedict Anderson published his pioneering work Imagined Communities , which looks at the intangible factors that bond nations together. His analysis was prescient, thanks to the expansive lens it took in examining what unites people, and the book still helps deepen considerations of modern issues, such as the importance of a representative Pride flag . This nuanced way of
4h
Millennials, What Will It Take for You to Buy Life Insurance?
YuLife is something of a cross between Fortnite and a Fitbit. In the mobile game, players compete against one another to rack up bike miles and meditation hours. They can access hundreds of virtual worlds—collectively known as the " Yuniverse "—each of which represents a level with its own set of real-life tasks. They can challenge friends to a duel , and place bets on who will take the most step
4h
The Atlantic Daily: Is This the Start of a Healthier Era of Sports?
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Francois Nel / Getty The Olympics are supposed to be an athlete's ultimate test; a gold medal, the pinnacle of success. But this year, life is proving bigger than sport. Simone Biles, who— much li
4h
Amsterdam Debuts World's First 3D-Printed Steel Bridge
(Photo: Merlin Moritz/MX3D) Would you walk across a 3D-printed bridge? For folks in Amsterdam, the question now poses a real opportunity. Imperial College of London has spent the last four years working with Dutch company MX3D to develop a 3D-printed steel bridge that would serve as a "living laboratory." Through a network of built-in sensors, researchers at Imperial College will be able to monit
4h
Cockatoos teach each other the secrets of dumpster diving
If sharing learned knowledge is a form of culture, Australian cockatoos are one cultured bunch of birds. A cockatoo trick for opening trash bins to get at food has been spreading rapidly through Sydney's neighborhoods. But not all cockatoos open the bins; some just stay close to those that do. Like humans, some animals are capable of culture , including learning from one another. And the cockatoo
4h
Poll: 32% of parents say girls aren't as good at sports
Roughly one-third of parents think boys are better at sports than girls are, a new poll finds. The research indicates that gender stereotypes and double standards, where female athletes are treated differently or aren't taken as seriously as male counterparts, persist. Researchers polled more than 3,000 boys and girls aged 7 to 17 and their parents/guardians across the country and found that pare
4h
Chromosome positioning during sperm differentiation described
Chromosomes occupy specific regions of the cell nucleus called chromosome territories. In somatic cells, scientists have observed that there is a correlation between this positioning and genome regulation. In fact, alterations in chromosome distribution have been related to certain diseases. Nevertheless, there are very few studies on chromosome territoriality in the cells that originate oocytes a
5h
Weather during mountain race tragedy was predicted, but its impact was not
On May 22, about 170 ultramarathon racers were climbing an eight kilometer stretch of sand and gravel to a mountain top in Yellow River Stone Forest Park in northwest China. Suddenly, it seemed, the temperature dropped, the wind picked up, and the skies opened. Mostly dressed in shorts and t-shirts, armed with foil blankets, 29 runners were trapped, exposed to the weather elements. Twenty-one runn
5h
New study unveils novel technology for plasma separation using magnets
A team of researchers, affiliated with UNIST has recently unveiled a hemolysis-free and highly efficient blood plasma separation platform. Published in the May 2021 issue of Small, this breakthrough has been led by Professor Joo H. Kang and his research team in the Department of Biomedical Engineering Department at UNIST. The research team expects that the new technology will greatly improve the a
5h
Adapting roots to a hotter planet could ease pressure on food supply
The shoots of plants get all of the glory, with their fruit and flowers and visible structure. But it's the portion that lies below the soil—the branching, reaching arms of roots and hairs pulling up water and nutrients—that interests plant physiologist and computer scientist, Alexander Bucksch, associate professor of Plant Biology at the University of Georgia.
5h
Testis-specific gene involved in sex ratio regulation discovered
Although enormous progress has been made over the past few decades in genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry, the ways in which living beings orchestrate their internal processes at the microscopic scale is still full of mysteries. One clear example of this are long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) molecules, which are a relatively new class of genes that are not translated into proteins yet directly
5h
A phytoplankton that synthesizes petroleum-equivalent hydrocarbons
Director-General Naomi Harada and colleagues from the Research Institute for Global Change at the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, in collaboration with Assistant Professor Yuu Hirose from Toyohashi University of Technology and Specially Appointed Professor Kazuyoshi Murata from the National Institute for Physiological Sciences, discovered that the phytoplankton Dicrateria rot
5h
A new genome assembly for the 'Fielder' wheat cultivar
Wheat is a staple in the diets of numerous cultures. Increasing wheat production efficiency would help feed more people and reduce associated agricultural costs. Genetic engineering has the potential to generate better wheat cultivars with characteristics we desire, but unfortunately, wheat is also one of the hardest crops to genetically modify. This is because wheat is resistant to "transformatio
5h
An effective strategy for protecting skyrmions in quantum computing devices
A magnetic skyrmion is a versatile topological object that can be used to carry information in future spintronic information processing devices. As potential non-volatile information carriers, excellent endurance and robust retention are desired properties of skyrmions in spintronic devices. However, previous studies have suggested that skyrmions can be easily destroyed at device edges during high
5h
Unraveling mysteries of the ocean from space
Using nearly a decade of satellite data, researchers at Colorado State University have uncovered "milky seas" in a way they've never been seen before—a rare and fascinating oceanic bioluminescent phenomenon detected by a highly sensitive spaceborne low-light sensor.
5h
Model predicts 10-year burst of wildfire, then gradual decline
A look at the long-term future of wildfires predicts an initial roughly decade-long burst of wildfire activity, followed by recurring fires of decreasing area. In recent years, wildfires on the West Coast have become larger and more damaging. A combination of almost a century of fire suppression and hotter and drier conditions has created a tinderbox ready to ignite, destroying homes and pollutin
5h
Rope Swinging Between Two 400 Foot Cliffs | Pushing the Line
Stream Pushing the Line on discovery+ ► https://www.discoveryplus.com/show/pu… About Pushing the Line: A young crew of daredevils spend their days risking their lives to break records on ropes stretched 500 feet in the air. At night, camp is all about parties, hook ups and break ups. Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Follow Us on TikTok: https://www.tiktok.com/@Discovery
5h
Ancient Brains: Inside the Extraordinary Preservation of a 310-Million-Year-Old Nervous System
Charles Darwin famously discussed the "imperfections" of the geological record in his book On the Origin of Species. He correctly pointed out that unless conditions are just right, it's unlikely for organisms to be preserved as fossils, even those with bones and shells. He also said "no organism wholly soft can be preserved." However, after more than a century of fossil hunting since his book was
5h
Plasmodium falciparum transcription in different clinical presentations of malaria associates with circulation time of infected erythrocytes
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-25062-z To understand malaria symptoms, several studies investigate association between parasite's transcriptome and disease severity. Here, Thomson-Luque et al. reanalyze available transcriptomic data of P. falciparum and find that longer circulation of infected erythrocytes without sequestering to endothelial cells as
6h
We need to talk about post-pandemic lectures
Nature, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-02112-6 Off-campus learning was essential during the pandemic. But when it ends, we should encourage students to return to campus for in-person lectures, says Michael Doran.
6h
Researchers find fat burning molecule in mice
Linked to serious health problems including cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, obesity affects more than a third of adults in the United States. Presently, there are few safe and effective nonsurgical therapeutic interventions available to patients with obesity.
6h
Filming the thermal death of electrons in matter
It is well known that an electric current increases the temperature of the material through which it is conducted due to the so-called Joule effect. This effect, which is used daily in domestic and industrial heaters, hair dryers, thermal fuses, etc., occurs because the new electrons injected into the material cannot go to the lower energy states because those are already occupied by the electrons
6h
Permafrost in Daisetsu Mountains in Japan projected to decrease significantly
Areas with ground temperatures that remain below 0 degrees Celsius for more than two years are referred to as permafrost, and approximately one-quarter of the Northern Hemisphere and 17% of the Earth's exposed land surface is permafrost. Permafrost is found in mountainous areas as well as in high-latitude tundra and taiga regions. Recent observations have shown that the permafrost in mountainous a
6h
New polymer composite for electromagnetic shielding applications
scientists from NUST MISIS, South Ural State University and Joint Institute for Nuclear Research together with colleagues from Egypt, Saudi Arabia and Belarus have developed a new radar absorbing polymer composite with exfoliated graphite (EG)/barium aluminum hexaferrite (HF) fillers. The new composite has excellent magnetic and microwave properties. It can absorb 99.9% of the incoming electromagn
6h
Visual Persistence in a Dynamic World
We mostly take our vision for granted. I am not referring to how much we appreciate having good vision, for those who do, but rather we tend to be unaware of how much of a neurological feat simple vision is. In a way, we evolved not to appreciate this – the experience of good vision evolved to be seamless, and to hide all the massive processing necessary to make it so. Neuroscientists, however, h
7h
Tool could predict drug combos that spark antibiotic resistance
Scientists propose a modeling framework that could predict how antibiotic resistance will evolve in response to different drug combinations. The research could help doctors optimize the choice, timing, dose, and sequence of antibiotics used to treat common infections in order to help halt the growing threat of antibiotic resistance to modern medicine. "Drug combinations are a particularly promisi
7h
Intentional cracks and wrinkles provide low-cost option for medical screening
Size matters when it comes to sorting biological materials. From identifying pathogens to screening for drug treatments, the ability to quickly identify and separate particles based on their size is an increasingly important tool in diagnosing and treating patients, according to Huanyu "Larry" Cheng, Dorothy Quiggle Career Development Professor in Penn State's Department of Engineering Science and
7h
New economic dashboard could serve as early warning system for state-level recessions, other economic shocks
The spread of COVID-19 was rapid and relentless, and so were its effects on economies worldwide. Knowing how state economies withstand economic shocks in near-real time can be beneficial for policymakers who have the power to enact strategies to counteract the negative impact. University of Notre Dame researchers developed the first near-real-time dashboard that tracks weekly state-level economic
7h
Mapping of genetic control elements in the cerebellum
The mammalian cerebellum has long been associated almost exclusively with motor control, yet recent studies indicate that it also contributes to many higher brain functions. An international research team led by Prof. Dr. Henrik Kaessmann from the Center for Molecular Biology of Heidelberg University (ZMBH) has now decoded the genetic programs that control the development of cerebellar cell types
7h
Lipid polymer enables safe delivery of RNA drugs to the lungs
Hokkaido University researchers in Japan created and tested a library of lipid-based compounds to find a way to safely and effectively deliver RNA drugs to the lungs. Their analyses, published in the journal Materials Horizons, pinpointed a lipid polymer that might in the future be used to treat acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary hypertension and lung cancers.
7h
Ultracold transistors serve as their own memory devices
Digital transistors—assembled by the billions in today's computer chips—act as near-perfect electronic switches. In the "on" position, achieved when an above-threshold voltage is applied to the device, the transistor allows current to flow. When the switch is off, the transistor prevents the flow of current. The on/off positions of the switch translate into the 1s and 0s of digital computation.
7h
Searching for dark matter inside the Earth
Dark matter remains one of the greatest mysteries in science. Despite decades of astronomical evidence for its existence, no one has yet been able to find any sign of it closer to home. There have been dozens of efforts to do so, and one of the most prominent just hit a milestone—the release and analysis of eight years of data. The IceCube Neutrino Observatory will soon be releasing results from t
7h
Red tide appearing in Gulf of Mexico
Red Tide is sweeping through much of the Gulf Coast of Florida, having killed millions of fish and other marine life, and it could be headed toward Texas, according to a Texas A&M University at Galveston marine biologist.
8h
Make STEM Exploration A Family Activity With These Ten DIY Kits
Science kits have gotten serious upgrades since the days of chemistry sets and seed packets. Check out these ten STEM DIY kits the whole family can enjoy, all at an extra 15 percent off the sale price. But act fast, because these deals are only available for a limited time. SunFounder Nano DIY 4-DOF Robot Kit Pictured above, this kit shows kids where robotics and coding intersect. First, you put
8h
'A very unfortunate event': Paper on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy retracted
A group of researchers in Canada and India have lost a paper on vaccine hesitancy and Covid-19 because they didn't have the proper license to mine a database of news articles used in the study. The paper, "Tracking COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and logistical challenges: A machine learning approach," was published in PLOS ONE on June … Continue reading
9h
Book Review: An Ode to the Dank World of Sweat and Stink
In the summer's ultimate beach read, journalist Sarah Everts delivers a chatty, informative romp through the science and history of perspiration. From the literal smell of fear to the chemical fingerprints in our sweat, Everts covers the latest science while calling for a celebration of our miraculous stink.
10h
Exites in Cambrian arthropods and homology of arthropod limb branches
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24918-8 The common ancestor of all living arthropods had biramous postantennal appendages, with an endopodite and exopodite branching off the limb base. This study uses microtomographic imaging of the Cambrian arthropod Leanchoilia to reveal a previously undetected exite at the base of most appendages, suggesting a deep
10h
Unidirectional ion transport in nanoporous carbon membranes with a hierarchical pore architecture
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24947-3 Ion transport through nano channels can exhibit intriguing non-linear behaviour. Here, Chen et al. fabricate a hierarchical system of sandwiched carbon membranes of wide and narrow pores with substantial enhancement in rectification ratio of the ionic current, adjustable by optical triggers.
10h
Wavelength conversion through plasmon-coupled surface states
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24957-1 Semiconductor surface states often stand in the way of device performance, but here, the authors take advantage of them for wavelength conversion. They present a compact, passive conversion device insensitive to optical alignment by using plasmon-coupled surface states that enable the efficient conversion withou
10h
Site-specific Umpolung amidation of carboxylic acids via triplet synergistic catalysis
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24908-w Catalytic amide bond-forming methods is important because they could potentially address the existing limitations of classical methods using superstoichiometric activating reagents. Here the authors show an Umpolung amidation reaction of carboxylic acids with nitroarenes and nitroalkanes enabled by FeI2, P(V)/P(
10h
A single dose of ChAdOx1 Chik vaccine induces neutralizing antibodies against four chikungunya virus lineages in a phase 1 clinical trial
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24906-y Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging mosquito-borne virus that has caused outbreaks in various regions of the world. Here the authors present safety and immunogenicity data from a phase 1 trial with the simian adenovirus vectored vaccine ChAdOx1 Chik, showing induction of neutralizing antibodies to four CHI
10h
The integrated stress response is tumorigenic and constitutes a therapeutic liability in KRAS-driven lung cancer
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24661-0 The Integrated Stress Response (ISR) is a cytoprotective pathway upregulated in many cancers. Here the authors show that the activation of PERK/p-eIF2α arm of ISR enhances ERK phosphorylation through translation repression of DUSP6, thus resulting in KRAS-driven lung tumorigenesis.
10h
PRMT1-dependent regulation of RNA metabolism and DNA damage response sustains pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma
Nature Communications, Published online: 30 July 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-24798-y Arginine methylation by PRMTs is dysregulated in cancer. Here, the authors use functional genomics screens and identify PRMT1 as a vulnerability in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and further show that PRMT1 regulates RNA metabolism and coordinates expression of genes in cell cycle progression, maintaining gen
10h
Researchers film human viruses in liquid droplets at near-atomic detail
A pond in summer can reveal more about a fish than a pond in winter. The fish living in icy conditions might remain still enough to study its scales, but to understand how the fish swims and behaves, it needs to freely move in three dimensions. The same holds true for analyzing how biological items, such as viruses, move in the human body, according to a research team led by Deb Kelly, Huck Chair
12h
Schneider Shorts 30.07.2021: The Pigs Did It!
Schneider Shorts 30.07.2021: shitty antivaxxery, innovative cancer cures, the REAL cause of global warming, Sputnik V goes over 100%, journalists discover find the new Galileo reincarnation, and don't you also just hate those medicinal regulatory authorities?
14h
The quantum refrigerator
By combining quantum theory and thermodynamics, it is possible to design a new kind of atomic refrigerator, which can cool down extremely cold Bose-Einstein-condensates even further.
17h
Dancing with the light: A new way to make crystals bend by shining light
Generating mechanical motion in crystals using light or heat has increasingly become the focus of materials scientists. However, the conventional mechanism employed for the purpose produces slow responses and is ineffective for thick crystals. Now, in a new study, scientists report and validate a new mechanism for generating fast bending motion in thick crystals with light-induced heating, opening
17h
Older adults are happier when space matches personality
A study has found photos of a person's living space can accurately point at personality traits and the mood of the people who live there, especially as a person gets older. Applying the findings could help lead to happier lives, including for older adults with frailty or cognitive impairment that has led them to be transferred from their homes to long-term care facilities.
17h
New nanomaterial to derive clean fuel from the sea
Hydrogen fuel derived from the sea could be an abundant and sustainable alternative to fossil fuels, but the potential power source has been limited by technical challenges, including how to practically harvest it. Researchers have designed a nanoscale material that can efficiently split seawater into oxygen and a clean energy fuel — hydrogen.
17h
Earthly rocks point way to water hidden on Mars
A combination of a once-debunked 19th-century identification of a water-carrying iron mineral and the fact that these rocks are extremely common on Earth, suggests the existence of a substantial water reservoir on Mars, according to a team of geoscientists.
19h
Study tests microplasma against middle-ear infections
Middle-ear infections are a common affliction in early life, affecting more than 80% of children in the U.S. Antibiotics are often employed as a first line of defense but sometimes fail against the pathogenic bacteria that can develop in the middle ear, just behind the eardrum. In a new study, researchers explore the use of microplasma — a highly focused stream of chemically excited ions and mole
19h

Leave a Reply