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Nyheder2021juni02

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HJERNEN PÅVIRKES AF HIV-INFEKTION ELLER MÅSKE AF BEHANDLINGEN AF INFEKTIONEN. White matter in the brain can shrink as a result of an HIV infection. However, ART drugs commonly used to treat HIV, can also cause white matter shrinkage. Researchers are therefore trying to discern the effects HIV has on the brain compared to the effects that ART drug treatment has, to fully understand the risks of each. 

Read here:  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/06/210602153339.h
 
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Naomi Osaka Is Part of a Larger War Within Sports
Congratulations, tennis. You've won neither the battle nor the war with Naomi Osaka, but you have just bullied one of the biggest stars in your sport into quitting a major tournament that could use the publicity she would have brought to it. Osaka, the second-ranked woman in international tennis and the highest-paid female athlete in the world, withdrew from the French Open after a power struggle
7h
China's New Space Station Is Powered by Ion Thrusters
China's first module of its upcoming Tiangong space station makes use of ion drives, technology that could vastly cut down the time it takes to travel to Mars — and greatly reduce the amount of fuel needed to make that trip, as the South China Morning Post reports . The module, called Tianhe and launched in late April , is powered by four ion thrusters that use electricity to accelerate ions as a
2h
Barack Obama: Humans Could Be Extinct in a Hundred Years
Thanks Obama If we don't start to take urgent action to prevent the worst impacts of climate change today, then we may experience the end of our species within a century, former President Barack Obama said in a new interview. Obama made the argument in a wide-ranging chat , on The New York Times ' podcast The Ezra Klein Show, that also broached partisan politics, racial justice, the impacts of hi
2h
The Frightening New Republican Consensus
Former President Donald Trump has been speaking publicly about running to reclaim the White House in 2024, but he's also reportedly expecting to make a comeback before then. "Trump has been telling a number of people he's in contact with that he expects he will get reinstated by August," Maggie Haberman, the New York Times ' ace Trump reporter, tweeted Tuesday . There's no such thing as reinstati
23h
Microwave weapons that could cause Havana Syndrome exist, experts say
Russia and possibly China have developed technology capable of injuring brain and a US company made a prototype in 2004 Portable microwave weapons capable of causing the mysterious spate of "Havana Syndrome" brain injuries in US diplomats and spies have been developed by several countries in recent years, according to leading American experts in the field. A US company also made the prototype of
6h
Hackers Shut Down Almost a Quarter of the US Beef Supply
Meat Hack Hackers managed to force the shutdown of all the US-based beef plants of the world's largest meat producer JBS SA, according to Bloomberg . The hack managed to disrupt almost a quarter of the total US supply of beef. The company's meatpacking operations were also affected. It's yet another stark reminder that essential infrastructure — and even the national food supply — remains incredi
6h
Scientists Say They've Created Candy That Heals Tooth Enamel
A team of scientists say they have developed an experimental lozenge, kind of like a breath mint, that could regrow your tooth enamel and strengthen your teeth. Researchers from the University of Washington are preparing to launch clinical trials to test out the lozenges, which are coated with genetically-engineered protein building blocks that are expected to bind to the user's teeth and add a t
7h
NIH Director: We Need an Investigation Into the Wuhan Lab-Leak Theory
Gabriella Demczuk A s Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, recounted the moment, his eyes welled with tears. A few months before, he and his colleague Anthony Fauci had confided in each other their hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine. The FDA had set the threshold for approval at 50 percent efficacy, roughly what the flu vaccine achieves each year. They would have been qui
12h
The Conservative Publishing Industry Has a Joe Biden Problem
In the conservative book world, nothing is supposed to set off a gold rush like a new Democratic president. Ever since Bill Clinton inspired a wave of right-wing best sellers in the '90s, publishing houses that cater to Republican readers have learned to make the most of a new villain in the Oval Office, churning out polemics and exposés that aim to capitalize on fear of the new president. Unless
13h
The Gods Were Right
I n Iceland, where I live, we have an eruption now. For the first time in my memory, we here in Reykjavík can see the glow of a volcano from our windows, like a sunrise just across the bay. We are witness to Earth's most powerful forces at work: the birth of a mountain. But to observe a volcanic eruption is not to see something far greater than ourselves. To visit a volcano is to look in a mirror
13h
'A sacrificed generation': psychological scars of Covid on young may have lasting impact
Young people across Europe reveal how the pandemic has made them impatient for systemic change after bearing brunt of fallout 'So many revolutions to lead': Europe's Gen Z on their post-Covid future How the Covid shock has radicalised Generation Z Covid-19 policies risk leaving psychological and socioeconomic scars on millions of young people across Europe, with far-reaching consequences for them
8h
'Black fungus' is creating a whole other health emergency for Covid-stricken India | Ian Schwartz and Arunaloke Chakrabarti
Rates of mucormycosis were high even before the pandemic, and now the country is running out of antifungal drugs Covid-19 has killed millions around the world, but for some who are lucky enough to survive the infection, the nightmare is not over: adding insult to injury are deadly fungal infections that follow in the wake of the virus. Making matters worse, inequities that long predated the pande
16h
RNA Brakes May Stabilize a Cellular Symbiosis
Seen through a microscope, the hairy, slipper-shaped aquatic microbe Paramecium bursaria often looks as if it is bursting at the seams with tiny green marbles. Yet the verdant spheres are a different organism altogether: Chlorella, an alga that occasionally takes refuge within the confines of the paramecium's cushy cell membrane. Each species can survive on its own, but the two frequently and…
8h
Tesla Files Patent for Burger Chain at Supercharger Locations
Teslaburger Electric automaker Tesla may be planning an unusual pivot in its business model: burger joints or other restaurants next to its network of charging stations. Tesla recently filed a number of trademarks in the restaurant industry, Electrek reports , suggesting that Tesla-branded restaurants could be coming soon. It's a reasonable move for the company — drivers are essentially captive a
3h
Russia Is Getting Ready to Chop an Entire Section Off the Space Station
Out With the Old A pair of Russian cosmonauts spent seven hours early Wednesday morning preparing a docking module of the International Space Station for eventual dismemberment. It was the first time that cosmonauts Oleg Novitsky and Pyotr Dubrov have ventured out into the unprotected vastness of space — and another sign that Russia is still committed to the aging space lab for the time being, de
7h
New method developed to improve durability of nano-electronic components, further semiconductor manufacturing
University of South Florida researchers recently developed a novel approach to mitigating electromigration in nanoscale electronic interconnects that are ubiquitous in state-of-the-art integrated circuits. This was achieved by coating copper metal interconnects with hexagonal boron nitride (hBN), an atomically-thin insulating two-dimensional (2-D) material that shares a similar structure as the "w
16h
Machine learning platform mines nature for new drugs
Researchers have developed a new process using machine learning algorithms to match the signals of a microbe's metabolites with its genomic signals and identify which likely correspond to a natural product. Knowing that, researchers are better equipped to isolate the natural product to begin developing it for a possible drug and possibly reinvigorate the search for natural product drugs.
42min
Scientist identifies signaling underlying regeneration
The mystery of why salamanders can regenerate a lost limb, but adult mammals cannot has fascinated observers for thousands of years. Now, a team of scientists has come a step closer to unraveling that mystery with the discovery of differences in molecular signaling that promote regeneration in the axolotl, a highly regenerative salamander, while blocking it in the adult mouse.
42min
Dead zones formed repeatedly in North Pacific during warm climates
An analysis of sediment cores from the Bering Sea has revealed a recurring relationship between warmer climates and abrupt episodes of low-oxygen 'dead zones' in the subarctic North Pacific Ocean over the past 1.2 million years. The findings provide crucial information for understanding the causes of low oxygen or 'hypoxia' in the North Pacific and for predicting the occurrence of hypoxic conditio
42min
Shadow figment technology foils cyberattacks
Scientists have created a cybersecurity technology called Shadow Figment that is designed to lure hackers into an artificial world, then stop them from doing damage by feeding them illusory tidbits of success. The aim is to sequester bad actors by captivating them with an attractive — but imaginary — world. The technology is aimed at protecting physical targets — infrastructure such as building
1h
A new dimension in the quest to understand dark matter
As its name suggests, dark matter — material which makes up about 85% of the mass in the universe — emits no light, eluding easy detection. Its properties, too, remain fairly obscure. Now, a theoretical particle physicist have shown how theories positing the existence a new type of force could help explain dark matter's properties.
1h
How is the genome like an open book? New research shows cells' 'library system'
The organization of the human genome relies on physics of different states of matter – such as liquid and solid. The findings reveal how the physical nature of the genome changes as cells transform to serve specific functions and point to new ways to potentially better understand disease and to create improved therapies for cancer and genetic disorders.
1h
Marking the 40th anniversary of the AIDS epidemic: A paper in the New England Journal of Medicine
June 5, 2021 marks the 40th anniversary of the first report of AIDS cases and the onset of the American AIDS epidemic. In a new, thought-provoking paper in the New England Journal of Medicine, Columbia professors capture the experiences of the physicians who were central to the AIDS epidemic. In the words of the doctors, they relay what it meant to look back after 40 years and how they "aged toget
1h
Immunotherapy after surgery reduces deadly relapse risk in advanced bladder cancer
A phase 3 clinical trial co-led by Mount Sinai researchers is the first to show that immunotherapy after surgery to remove bladder cancer can reduce the risk of relapse for patients who are at high risk of their cancer returning in a deadly metastatic form, according to results published in The New England Journal of Medicine. The immunotherapy nivolumab was used as an adjuvant therapy, which is g
1h
This Advanced Crypto Trading Platform Is Perfect for Beginners and Experts Alike
Unless you live under a rock, it's unlikely that this is the first you've heard of cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin or Ethereum. But you might have assumed that it's too late for you to get into this field in any effective way because you've already missed the boat. Fortunately, you'd be wrong, and Kraken is the crypto trading platform that gives everyone, regardless of skill or experience level, wh
1h
Lighting Hydrogels Via Nanomaterials
Hydrogels are commonly used inside the body to help in tissue regeneration and drug delivery. However, once inside, they can be challenging to control for optimal use. A team of researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University is developing a new way to manipulate the gel — by using light.
1h
People of color twice as likely to die after traumatic brain injury, new study finds
People of color are more than twice as likely to die after a traumatic brain injury as white people, according to a new retrospective review from Oregon Health & Science University. The researchers found no bias in the treatment patients received while in the hospital. Rather, they say the findings highlight underlying disparities in health that disproportionately affect people of color.
1h
NASA Is Officially Headed Back to Venus
NASA announced today that it has selected two new missions to Venus, Earth's closest planetary neighbor. The goals of the missions, named DAVINCI+ (Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry, and Imaging) and VERITAS (Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography, and Spectroscopy), are to gain a deeper understanding into how Venus turned into the hell hole it is today — d
1h
UMaine researchers: Culture drives human evolution more than genetics
University of Maine researchers found that culture helps humans adapt to their environment and overcome challenges better and faster than genetics. Tim Waring and Zach Wood found that humans are experiencing a "special evolutionary transition" in which the importance of culture is surpassing the value of genes as the primary driver of human evolution. Due to the group-orientated nature of culture,
2h
After 15 years, deep brain stimulation still effective in people with Parkinson's
Deep brain stimulation continues to be effective in people with Parkinson's disease 15 years after the device is implanted, according to a study published in the June 2, 2021, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Researchers found that compared to before deep brain stimulation, study participants continued to experience significant improvement in mo
2h
Male piglets less resilient to stress when moms get sick during pregnancy
When pigs get hit with significant illnesses during key stages of pregnancy, their immune response may negatively affect developing piglets, making them less productive on the farm. New research from the University of Illinois shows that when those piglets—especially males—experience a second stressor in early life, they are at higher risk of neurodevelopmental and other neurological anomalies, pu
2h
California urges EPA to let state set car-emissions standard
Officials from California, New York and other states urged the Environmental Protection Agency on Wednesday to allow California to set its own automobile tailpipe pollution standards, which would reverse a Trump administration policy and could help usher in stricter emissions standards for new passenger vehicles nationwide.
2h
Spiders can sniff out and avoid killer ants
Spiders avoid building webs near European fire ants, their natural predators, by sensing the chemicals they give off in the environment, researchers have found. The findings give us a peek inside the enduring struggle between spiders and ants, and could lead to the development of natural repellents for homeowners worried about unwanted eight-legged guests.
2h
Changing the shape of soft matter using logic circuits made from DNA
The myriad processes occurring in biological cells may seem unbelievably complex at first glance. And yet, in principle, they are merely a logical succession of events, and could even be used to form digital circuits. Researchers have now developed a molecular switching circuit made of DNA, which can be used to mechanically alter gels, depending on the pH. DNA-based switching circuits could have a
2h
Essential questions to ask your future self | Meg Jay, Whitney Pennington Rodgers
How much do you think about your future self? If your answer is not much, you're not alone. It can be difficult to plan for a version of yourself you haven't met yet, says psychologist Meg Jay. Sharing how to close the empathy gap between you and your future selves, she outlines courageous questions to ask about how your present and future can align, so you can begin to achieve your goals. (This c
2h
The Ugly Side of NBA Fandom Can No Longer Be Ignored
Late Sunday night, after the fourth game of a playoff series between the Brooklyn Nets and Boston Celtics, the most talked-about video was not a high-definition highlight but a few frames of zoomed-in graininess. As Kyrie Irving—once a Celtic, now a Net, fresh off scoring 39 points in a Brooklyn rout—exited the court in Boston, a 21-year-old fan named Cole Buckley allegedly hurled a plastic water
2h
The Cowardice of Cruella
This article contains mild spoilers for Cruella . "It's time to make some trouble. You in?" reads one of the posts promoting Cruella , Disney's prequel-meets-reconsideration of the classic One Hundred and One Dalmatians villain. The line is in keeping with the film: It's slick and witty and teasingly imprecise about what "trouble," in this context, might entail. Previous incarnations of Cruella d
2h
The best strawberries to grow in hot locations
It's strawberry season in many parts of the U.S, and supermarkets are teeming with these fresh heart-shaped treats. Although the bright red, juicy fruit can grow almost anywhere with lots of sunlight, production in some hot, dry regions is a challenge. Now, researchers have identified five cultivars that are best suited for this climate, which could help farmers and consumers get the most fragrant
3h
Gut to brain: Nerve cells detect what we eat
Nerve cells of the vagus nerve fulfill opposing tasks. The gut and the brain communicate with each other in order to adapt satiety and blood sugar levels during food consumption. The vagus nerve is an important communicator between these two organs. Researchers now took a closer look at the functions of the different nerve cells in the control center of the vagus nerve, and discovered something ve
3h
Nanomaterials with laser printing
An interdisciplinary team presents a laser-driven technology that enables them to create nanoparticles out of materials such as copper, cobalt and nickel oxides. At the usual printing speed, photoelectrodes are produced in this way, for example, for a wide range of applications such as the generation of green hydrogen.
3h
Printing a better microgrid
The future of electronic displays will be thin, flexible and durable. One barrier to this, however, is that one of the most widely used transparent conductors for electronic displays—indium tin oxide (ITO)—doesn't perform as well on larger areas and can crack and break down with wear. Indium is also a rare earth mineral, which is relatively scarce, and the process to create ITO requires high energ
3h
A sticky subject: Studying shellfish for advanced adhesives
Don't look now, but you're surrounded. Really. Within arm's reach—probably even touching you—are troublesome, sticky, potentially even toxic, substances. Bad for the planet, permanent, maybe even bad for your health. They're in your shoes, in your phone, in your laptop, lurking in the folds of envelopes, on books, in the chair you're sitting in, the flooring beneath your feet, and in uncountable o
3h
CMU Team develops machine learning platform that mines nature for new drugs
Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Computational Biology Department in the School of Computer Science have developed a new process using machine learning algorithms to match the signals of a microbe's metabolites with its genomic signals and identify which likely correspond to a natural product. Knowing that, researchers are better equipped to isolate the natural product to begin develo
3h
MDI Biological Laboratory scientist identifies signaling underlying regeneration
The mystery of why salamanders can regenerate a lost limb, but adult mammals cannot has fascinated observers for thousands of years. Now, a team of scientists led by James Godwin, Ph.D., of the MDI Biological Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, has come a step closer to unraveling that mystery with the discovery of differences in molecular signaling that promote regeneration in the axolotl, a highly
3h
Anyone can get super-hearing
Humans can observe what and where something happens around them with their hearing, as long as sound frequencies lie between 20 Hz and 20 000 Hz. Researchers have now developed a new audio technique that enables people to also hear ultrasonic sources that generate sound at frequencies above 20,000 Hz with simultaneous perception of their direction.
3h
Laser physics: Two-stage particle-beam booster
Laser physicists have built a novel hybrid plasma accelerator. Particle accelerators have become an indispensable tool for studies of the structure of matter at sub-atomic scales, and have important applications in biology and medicine.
3h
A Truly Revolting Treatment Is Having a Renaissance
In its larval stage, Lucilia sericata looks unassuming enough. Beige and millimeters long, a bottle-fly grub may lack good looks, but it contains a sophisticated set of tools for eating dead and dying human flesh. The maggots ooze digestive enzymes and antimicrobials to dissolve decaying tissue and to kill off any unwanted bacteria or pathogens. Lacking teeth, they use rough patches on their exte
3h
Plans to build world's deepest pool in Cornwall to train astronauts
Blue Abyss applies for permission to build £150m centre with pool that would reach depths of 50m Plans have been submitted to build the world's deepest artificial pool in Cornwall to train astronauts and help advance undersea robotics. The project would be 40 metres by 50 metres at the surface, with a 16-metre wide shaft plunging to 50 metres at its lowest point – nearly as deep as Nelson's Colum
3h
Elon Musk Tweets About "Baby Shark," Causing Financial Chaos
Elon Shark Seemingly innocuous tweets by one of the richest people in the world should arguably be met with a dismissive shrug shake of the head. But when it's Elon Musk, errant posts can send entire markets into a tailspin. In the latest instance, the Tesla CEO sent shares of Samsung Publishing soaring by more than ten percent CNBC reports . How? He tweeted about the children's musical blockbust
3h
Spiders can sniff out and avoid killer ants, SFU study finds
Spiders avoid building webs near European fire ants, their natural predators, by sensing the chemicals they give off in the environment, Simon Fraser University researchers have found.The findings, published recently in Royal Society Open Science, give us a peek inside the enduring struggle between spiders and ants, and could lead to the development of natural repellents for homeowners worried abo
4h
Glia-derived temporal signals orchestrate neurogenesis in the Drosophila mushroom body [Neuroscience]
Intrinsic mechanisms such as temporal series of transcription factors orchestrate neurogenesis from a limited number of neural progenitors in the brain. Extrinsic regulations, however, remain largely unexplored. Here we describe a two-step glia-derived signal that regulates neurogenesis in the Drosophila mushroom body (MB). In a temporal manner, glial-specific ubiquitin ligase…
4h
Tumors overcome the action of the wasting factor ImpL2 by locally elevating Wnt/Wingless [Developmental Biology]
Tumors often secrete wasting factors associated with atrophy and the degeneration of host tissues. If tumors were to be affected by the wasting factors, mechanisms allowing tumors to evade the adverse effects of the wasting factors must exist, and impairing such mechanisms may attenuate tumors. We use Drosophila midgut tumor…
4h
Mitochondria-dependent synthetic small-molecule vaccine adjuvants for influenza virus infection [Immunology and Inflammation]
Vaccine adjuvants enhance and prolong pathogen-specific protective immune responses. Recent reports indicate that host factors—such as aging, pregnancy, and genetic polymorphisms—influence efficacies of vaccines adjuvanted with Toll-like receptor (TLR) or known pattern-recognition receptor (PRR) agonists. Although PRR independent adjuvants (e.g., oil-in-water emulsion and saponin) are emerging, th
4h
High-throughput developability assays enable library-scale identification of producible protein scaffold variants [Applied Biological Sciences]
Proteins require high developability—quantified by expression, solubility, and stability—for robust utility as therapeutics, diagnostics, and in other biotechnological applications. Measuring traditional developability metrics is low throughput in nature, often slowing the developmental pipeline. We evaluated the ability of 10 variations of three high-throughput developability assays to predict th
4h
Luring bacteria into a trap
Researchers have developed a vaccine that protects animals from Salmonella. These bacteria often escape the effects of vaccination by genetically modifying their protective coat. The researchers have succeeded in manipulating this process to lure the bacteria into an evolutionary trap.
4h
How platelets help resolve lung inflammation
Scientists have found how platelets interacting with white blood cells contribute to the resolution of bacterial lung inflammation in mice. The results may help in the search for therapies to specifically regulate inflammation.
4h
Why short selling is good for the capital markets
Short selling often gets a bad rap because it is a type of trade that bets against the success of a firm. In essence, short selling allows investors to borrow stock from a broker to sell into the market with the hope of buying the stock back at a cheaper price, thus, profiting on the difference between the sell and buy prices. Because of this practice, short selling is sometimes seen as a controve
4h
At-home COVID-19 tests: How good are they?
As the country gets vaccinated and begins to reopen, testing remains a key element of safe interactions. Rapid testing for COVID-19 has become more common and accessible, including over-the-counter (OTC) tests approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, puts five of these at-home rapid tests
4h
'Giant flexoelectricity' breakthrough in soft elastomers paves way for improved robots and self-powered pacemakers
Researchers have demonstrated "giant flexoelectricity" in soft elastomers that could improve robot movement range and make self-powered pacemakers a real possibility. In a paper published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists from the University of Houston and Air Force Research Laboratory explain how to engineer ostensibly ordinary substances like silicone
4h
The uneven benefits of CSR efforts
Whether they are in the technology or oil sector, selling shoes or healthcare products, for many companies, green is the new black. While maximizing profit might have been the sole priority for most businesses a decade ago, these days it is common for mission-oriented companies to pursue the "triple bottom line" of people, planet and profit, particularly through corporate social responsibility (CS
4h
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's shadow figment technology foils cyberattacks
Scientists have created a cybersecurity technology called Shadow Figment that is designed to lure hackers into an artificial world, then stop them from doing damage by feeding them illusory tidbits of success. The aim is to sequester bad actors by captivating them with an attractive–but imaginary–world. The technology is aimed at protecting physical targets–infrastructure such as buildings, the
4h
US conservatives less able than liberals to distinguish truth from falsehoods in study of responses to 20 political news stories
In a six-month study of more than 1,000 Americans, R. Kelly Garrett and Robert Bond found that U.S. conservatives were less able to distinguish truth from falsehoods in 20 viral political news stories that appeared online between January and July 2019. Differences in the political orientation of these stories may help explain this observation, the researchers note, writing that "we find that high-
4h
Can echolocation help those with vision loss?
While echolocation is well known in whale or bat species, previous research has also indicated that some blind people may use click-based echolocation to judge spaces and improve their navigation skills.Equipped with this knowledge, a team of researchers, led by Dr Lore Thaler, of Durham University, UK, delved into the factors that determine how people learn this skill.
4h
Conservatives more susceptible to believing falsehoods
Conservatives are less able to distinguish political truths from falsehoods than liberals, mainly because of a glut of right-leaning misinformation, a new national study conducted over six months shows.Researchers found that liberals and conservatives in the United States both tended to believe claims that promoted their political views, but that this more often led conservatives to accept falseho
4h
Corals may co-evolve with the algae inside them
Corals co-evolve with the microscopic algae that live within their cells, according to a new study. The study reveals that genetic differences within a species of these microalgal symbionts correspond to the coral species they inhabit, a discovery that could have implications for the conservation of endangered corals . " Acroporid corals are some of the primary reef-building species in the Caribb
4h
Direct dating of lithic surface artifacts using luminescence
Archaeological surface assemblages composed of lithic scatters comprise a large proportion of the archaeological record. Dating such surface artifacts has remained inherently difficult owing to the dynamic nature of Earth-surface processes affecting these assemblages and because no satisfactory chronometric dating technique exists that can be directly applied to constrain the timing of artifact m
4h
Substrate deformation regulates DRM2-mediated DNA methylation in plants
DNA methylation is a major epigenetic mechanism critical for gene expression and genome stability. In plants, domains rearranged methyltransferase 2 (DRM2) preferentially mediates CHH (H = C, T, or A) methylation, a substrate specificity distinct from that of mammalian DNA methyltransferases. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here, we report structure-function characterization of DRM2
4h
Prdm16-mediated H3K9 methylation controls fibro-adipogenic progenitors identity during skeletal muscle repair
H3K9 methylation maintains cell identity orchestrating stable silencing and anchoring of alternate fate genes within the heterochromatic compartment underneath the nuclear lamina (NL). However, how cell type–specific genomic regions are specifically targeted to the NL is still elusive. Using fibro-adipogenic progenitors (FAPs) as a model, we identified Prdm16 as a nuclear envelope protein that an
4h
Comment on Trophic strategy and bleaching resistance in reef-building corals
In an era of major environmental changes, understanding corals' resistance to bleaching is as crucial as it is challenging. A promising framework for inferring corals' trophic strategies from Stable Isotope Bayesian Ellipses has been recently proposed to this end. As a contribution to this framework, we quantify a risk of bias inherent in its application and propose three alternative adjustments.
4h
Metabolically engineered stem cell-derived exosomes to regulate macrophage heterogeneity in rheumatoid arthritis
Despite the remarkable advances in therapeutics for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a large number of patients still lack effective countermeasures. Recently, the reprogramming of macrophages to an immunoregulatory phenotype has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for RA. Here, we report metabolically engineered exosomes that have been surface-modified for the targeted reprogramming of macroph
4h
Strongly enhanced and tunable photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric-paraelectric superlattices
Ever since the first observation of a photovoltaic effect in ferroelectric BaTiO 3 , studies have been devoted to analyze this effect, but only a few attempted to engineer an enhancement. In conjunction, the steep progress in thin-film fabrication has opened up a plethora of previously unexplored avenues to tune and enhance material properties via growth in the form of superlattices. In this work
4h
Ultrafast self-gelling powder mediates robust wet adhesion to promote healing of gastrointestinal perforations
Achieving strong adhesion of bioadhesives on wet tissues remains a challenge and an acute clinical demand because of the interfering interfacial water and limited adhesive-tissue interactions. Here we report a self-gelling and adhesive polyethyleneimine and polyacrylic acid (PEI/PAA) powder, which can absorb interfacial water to form a physically cross-linked hydrogel in situ within 2 seconds due
4h
Conservatives susceptibility to political misperceptions
The idea that U.S. conservatives are uniquely likely to hold misperceptions is widespread but has not been systematically assessed. Research has focused on beliefs about narrow sets of claims never intended to capture the richness of the political information environment. Furthermore, factors contributing to this performance gap remain unclear. We generated an unique longitudinal dataset combinin
4h
Ultrahigh specific strength in a magnesium alloy strengthened by spinodal decomposition
Strengthening of magnesium (Mg) is known to occur through dislocation accumulation, grain refinement, deformation twinning, and texture control or dislocation pinning by solute atoms or nano-sized precipitates. These modes generate yield strengths comparable to other engineering alloys such as certain grades of aluminum but below that of high-strength aluminum and titanium alloys and steels. Here
4h
Controlling the anisotropy of a van der Waals antiferromagnet with light
Van der Waals magnets provide an ideal playground to explore the fundamentals of low-dimensional magnetism and open opportunities for ultrathin spin-processing devices. The Mermin-Wagner theorem dictates that as in reduced dimensions isotropic spin interactions cannot retain long-range correlations, the long-range spin order is stabilized by magnetic anisotropy. Here, using ultrashort pulses of l
4h
Structural insights into the cross-neutralization of SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 by the human monoclonal antibody 47D11
The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 antibody escape mutations highlights the urgent need for broadly neutralizing therapeutics. We previously identified a human monoclonal antibody, 47D11, capable of cross-neutralizing SARS-CoV-2 and SARS-CoV and protecting against the associated respiratory disease in an animal model. Here, we report cryo-EM structures of both trimeric spike ectodomains in complex with
4h
Live imaging of chromatin distribution reveals novel principles of nuclear architecture and chromatin compartmentalization
The three-dimensional organization of chromatin contributes to transcriptional control, but information about native chromatin distribution is limited. Imaging chromatin in live Drosophila larvae, with preserved nuclear volume, revealed that active and repressed chromatin separates from the nuclear interior and forms a peripheral layer underneath the nuclear lamina. This is in contrast to the cur
4h
Anion ordering enables fast H- conduction at low temperatures
The introduction of chemical disorder by substitutional chemistry into ionic conductors is the most commonly used strategy to stabilize high-symmetric phases while maintaining ionic conductivity at lower temperatures. In recent years, hydride materials have received much attention owing to their potential for new energy applications, but there remains room for development in ionic conductivity be
4h
Fibrinogen-mimicking, multiarm nanovesicles for human thrombus-specific delivery of tissue plasminogen activator and targeted thrombolytic therapy
Clinical use of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in thrombolytic therapy is limited by its short circulation time and hemorrhagic side effects. Inspired by fibrinogen binding to activated platelets, we report a fibrinogen-mimicking, multiarm nanovesicle for thrombus-specific tPA delivery and targeted thrombolysis. This biomimetic system is based on the lipid nanovesicle coated with polyethylene
4h
Renatured hydrogel painting
Hydrogel coatings pave an avenue for improving the lubricity, biocompatibility, and flexibility of solid surfaces. From the viewpoint of practical applications, this work establishes a scalable method to firmly adhere hydrogel layers to diverse solid surfaces. The strategy, termed as renatured hydrogel painting (RHP), refers to adhering dehydrated xerogel to a surface with appropriate glues, foll
4h
Structure of the merozoite surface protein 1 from Plasmodium falciparum
The merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) is the most abundant protein on the surface of the erythrocyte-invading Plasmodium merozoite, the causative agent of malaria. MSP-1 is essential for merozoite formation, entry into and escape from erythrocytes, and is a promising vaccine candidate. Here, we present monomeric and dimeric structures of full-length MSP-1. MSP-1 adopts an unusual fold with a la
4h
Causes and timing of recurring subarctic Pacific hypoxia
Several North Pacific studies of the last deglaciation show hypoxia throughout the ocean margins and attribute this phenomenon to the effects of abrupt warming and meltwater inputs. Yet, because of the lack of long records spanning multiple glacial cycles and deglaciation events, it is unclear whether deoxygenation was a regular occurrence of warming events and whether deglaciation and/or other c
4h
Epigenomic landscape and 3D genome structure in pediatric high-grade glioma
Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs), including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), are morbid brain tumors. Even with treatment survival is poor, making pHGG the number one cause of cancer death in children. Up to 80% of DIPGs harbor a somatic missense mutation in genes encoding histone H3. To investigate whether H3K27M is associated with distinct chromatin
4h
The development of a functional human small intestinal epithelium model for drug absorption
Advanced technologies are required for generating human intestinal epithelial cells (hIECs) harboring cellular diversity and functionalities to predict oral drug absorption in humans and study normal intestinal epithelial physiology. We developed a reproducible two-step protocol to induce human pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into highly expandable hIEC progenitors and a functional hIEC m
4h
Response to Comment on Trophic strategy and bleaching resistance in reef-building corals
Recently, we published a novel method used to assess the trophic niches of different coral species and demonstrated that their nutrition varied considerably, with some species highly dependent on their photosynthetic algal symbionts and others able to feed on plankton to meet energetic requirements. Adjustments to the use of this tool are necessary when it is applied to other scientific questions
4h
NASA Delays James Webb Space Telescope Launch Again
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope is expected to expand the bounds of human knowledge, allowing us to investigate the most distant, and therefore oldest, objects in the universe. So far, all it's done is cost a lot of money and get delayed. Well, prepare for more of the same. NASA has confirmed that the telescope will not hit its planned October 31st launch. However, the delay might only be a few
4h
Juvenile white-tailed sea eagles stay longer in the parental territory than assumed
The white-tailed sea eagle is known for reacting sensitively to human disturbances. Forestry and agricultural activities are therefore restricted in the immediate vicinity of the nests. However, these seasonal protection periods are too short in the German federal States of Brandenburg (until Aug. 31) and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (until July 31), as a new scientific analysis by a team of scie
4h
Target protein identified for improving heart attack treatment
A new study has identified a protein that could be the key to improving treatment outcomes after a heart attack. It suggests that protein kinase A (PKA) plays a role in heart muscle cell necrosis, a major type of cell death that commonly occurs after reperfusion therapy, the treatment used to unblock arteries and restore blood flow after a heart attack.
4h
Healthy diet before, during pregnancy linked to lower complications
A healthy diet around the time of conception through the second trimester may reduce the risk of several common pregnancy complications, suggests a new study. Expectant women in the study who scored high on any of three measures of healthy eating had lower risks for gestational diabetes, pregnancy-related blood pressure disorders and preterm birth.
4h
Gender differences exist even among university students' wage expectations
Gender wage gaps are a well-documented issue, and expectations related to this phenomenon seem to be present even among university students discussing future employment, according to a study published June 2, 2021 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ana Fernandes from the Berner Fachhochschule and the University of Fribourg and Martin Huber from the University of Fribourg, and Giannina Vaccaro
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Shining light on two-dimensional magnets
Atomically thin van der Waals magnets are widely seen as the ultimate compact media for future magnetic data storage and fast data processing. Controlling the magnetic state of these materials in real-time, however, has proven difficult. But now, an international team of researchers led by Delft University of Technology (TU Delft) has managed to use light in order to change the anisotropy of a van
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Burned Container Ship Is Sinking With 330 Tons of Oil On Board
Bad to Worse The new environmental crisis facing Sri Lanka just got even worse. After the container ship MV X-Press Pearl caught fire and burned for nearly two weeks, toxic chemicals and billions of plastic pellets leaked out, washing ashore and contaminating the Sri Lankan coastline . And now the ship is sinking, Agence France-Presse reports — bringing the nearly 330 tons of oil still in its tan
4h
Early trial shows flickering lights could fight Alzheimer's
An early feasibility study shows flickering lights and sound could be a new weapon against Alzheimer's disease. For the past few years, Annabelle Singer and her collaborators have been using flickering lights and sound to treat mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, and they've seen some dramatic results. Now they have results from the first human feasibility study of the flicker treatment, and the
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New articles for Geosphere posted online in May
GSA's dynamic online journal, Geosphere, posts articles online regularly. Locations and topics studied this month include the Moine thrust zone in northwestern Scotland; the Eastern California shear zone; implementation of 'OpenTopography'; the finite evolution of 'mole tracks'; the southern central Andes; the work of International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 351; and the Fairweather
4h
'Prescription' to sit less, move more advised for mildly high blood pressure and cholesterol
Physical activity is the optimal first treatment choice for adults with mild to moderately elevated blood pressure and blood cholesterol who otherwise have low heart disease risk. About 21% of adults in the US with mild to moderately raised blood pressure and 28-37% of those with mild to moderate elevated cholesterol levels may be best served by a prescription for lifestyle-only treatment, which i
5h
Atmospheric metal layers appear with surprising regularity
Twice a day, at dusk and just before dawn, a faint layer of sodium and other metals begins sinking down through the atmosphere, about 90 miles high above the city of Boulder, Colorado. The movement was captured by one of the world's most sensitive 'lidar' instruments and the regularly appearing layers promise to help researchers understand better how earth's atmosphere interacts with space, even p
5h
As cybersecurity evolves, so should your board
But how many directors get lost in the technicalities of technology? The challenge for a chief information security officer (CISO) is talking to the board of directors in a way they can understand and support the company. It's drilled into the heads of board directors and the C-suite by scary data-breach headlines, lawyers, lawsuits, and risk managers: cybersecurity is high-risk. It's got to be o
5h
Varje storstad har sitt eget mikrobiella fingeravtryck
Prover som samlats in från 60 storstäder världen över visar att varje stad har sin egen mikrobiella profil. En specifik uppsättning av virus, arkeer, bakterier och andra osynliga organismer. Om du ger mig din sko kan jag säga vilken stad i världen du kommer ifrån, säger forskare bakom projektet. Ett internationellt konsortium av forskare har genomfört den största studien någonsin av de mikrober s
5h
Tesla Owner Admits That Brake Failure Claims Were Made Up
Hype Cycle A crackdown by Tesla's legal team in China has led to a wave of public apologies by Chinese Tesla owners who previously alleged their vehicles experienced "brake failures," Teslarati reports . Tesla has struggled recently to keep up its reputation in China, facing mounting criticism over its vehicles' reliability and safety. But if the recent apologies are anything to go by, worries ov
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These Awesome Science Experiments Fill Kids' Stomachs While Expanding Their Minds
It's widely accepted that STEM education helps kids to evolve into more successful adults. That's because STEM helps kids with critical thinking, increases their scientific literacy, while also encouraging them to become the next generation of innovators. However, when it comes to educational toys marketed to help your kids gain interest in STEM, most don't keep children's interest for very long.
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Female anatomy still causing a blush | Letters
If a gynaecologist is embarrassed to use real terms, perhaps he or she should have chosen a different speciality, says Susan Wolfe. While Susan Boyd finds the obsession with the vagina tiresome Re your article ( Most Britons cannot name all parts of the vulva, survey reveals , 30 May), I put some of the blame for this on the medical community for using infantilising euphemisms for female genitali
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Does the U.S. Senate Resemble Ancient Rome?
Over the weekend, this space held the third installment in the "Lessons of Rome" chronicles by my friend Eric Schnurer. This one went into the comparison between the Roman Senate, in the era of Cicero and the Catiline conspiracy, and the current one in Washington. If you haven't read it yet, please give it a try —among other reasons, for the speechwriter's view of classic Latin rhetoric. This thi
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Team links shift worker sleep to 'chronotype'
Researchers have discovered a link between chronotype and the amount of sleep shift workers can get with their irregular schedules. Getting enough sleep can be a real challenge for shift workers, affecting their overall health. But what role does being an early bird or night owl play in getting good rest? "Some people seem to be hardwired to sleep early, while others tend to sleep late. This pref
6h
THOR: Driving collaboration in heavy-ion collision research
In the universe's earliest moments, particles existed in an unimaginably hot plasma, whose behavior was governed by deeply complex webs of interaction between individual particles. Today, researchers can recreate these exotic conditions through high-energy collisions between heavy ions, whose products can tell us much about how hot, strongly-interacting matter behaves. Yet without extensive, highl
6h
DNA circuits
The myriad processes occurring in biological cells may seem unbelievably complex at first glance. And yet, in principle, they are merely a logical succession of events, and could even be used to form digital circuits. Researchers have now developed a molecular switching circuit made of DNA, which can be used to mechanically alter gels, depending on the pH. DNA-based switching circuits could have a
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Sinai Health scientists provide detailed map to understanding human cells
Researchers from Sinai Health have published a study providing an ultra-detailed look at the organization of a living human cell, providing a new tool that can help scientists around the world better understand what happens during disease.The new study, published in the journal Nature, was conducted in the laboratory of Dr. Anne-Claude Gingras, a senior investigator at the Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Rese
6h
The incredible story of Wu Hsin and Roy Melvyn
Wu Hsin is an allegedly ancient Chinese sage whose inspiring teachings were brought to light by an obscure character named Roy Melvyn. Wu Hsin's teachings have inspired millions of people across the globe — even if all evidence indicates that he never existed and was made up by Melvyn. The remarkable story of Wu Hsin and Roy Melvyn explores the conflict between the nature of faith and literal or
6h
Watch a Drone Get Obliterated by an Erupting Volcano
Pour One Out A drone that was sent to investigate an erupting volcano met an unfortunate end. But thankfully, it caught its own demise on video. YouTuber Joey Helms flew a camera drone up to Iceland's Fagradalsfjall volcano to get a close-up look at the eruption. But the volcano, which has been erupting since March according to the BBC , had other plans, and engulfed the drone in a spew of lava,
6h
How gamification helped explain the threat of COVID-19 to Indigenous people in Colombia
For the Embera, Wounaan and Kuna Tule peoples of the Choco region in Colombia, the COVID-19 pandemic is just one of the many threats they face. Like many other Indigenous communities around the world, they witnessed little in the way of a response from their government. Effectively they were left on their own to make sense of this new disease spreading across the world.
6h
Novel cross-disciplinary approach for identifying complex molecular adsorbates
Hybrid functional materials combine organic and inorganic components and have many advantageous properties. They are commonly utilized in emerging technologies, such as novel electronic devices and green energy solutions. Controlling the properties of these materials requires detailed knowledge of their atomic structure, in particular the configuration of molecular adsorbates in the hybrid organic
6h
Less aviation during the global lockdown had a positive impact on the climate
They studied the extent to which cirrus clouds caused by aircraft occurred during the global hard lockdown between March and May 2020, and compared the values with those during the same period in previous years. The study was led by Johannes Quaas, Professor of Theoretical Meteorology at Leipzig University, and has now been published in the renowned journal Environmental Research Letters.
6h
What could a green spring mean for fire season?
2021 is now one of the 10 wettest years on record since 1872 in the Denver area, with almost 10.5 inches of rain having fallen since the start of the year, according to the National Weather Service. That's more than half what the city gets on average in an entire year (14.3 inches annually) and more rain than Denver received in all of 2020 (8.74 inches), making it the wettest year since 1983 (10.5
6h
Machine Learning Deserves Better Than This
This is an excellent overview at Stat on the current problems with machine learning in healthcare. It's a very hot topic indeed, and has been for some time. There has especially been a flood of manuscripts during the pandemic, applying ML/AI techniques to all sorts of coronavirus-related issues. Some of these have been pretty far-fetched, but others are working in areas that everyone agrees that
7h
Gaining a clearer understanding of ocean acidification in the Northeast
By mid-century, the Northeast is expected to experience significant changes in climate, on land and in the region's waters. Leaders from across New England and the Canadian Maritime Provinces teamed up with experts to compile a report containing the most complete and up-to-date information on the Gulf of Maine, that is also filled with actionable solutions to increase resiliency in the coming deca
7h
What if the black hole at the center of the Milky Way is actually a mass of dark matter?
A team of researchers at the International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics has found evidence that suggests Sagittarius A* is not a massive black hole but is instead a mass of dark matter. In their paper published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters, the group describes the evidence they found and how it has stood up to testing.
7h
NASA's Lucy in the cleanroom
L'Ralph is one of the Lucy spacecraft's three primary science instruments. The L'Ralph instrument is a multicolor camera which will gather information on the surface composition of the Trojan asteroids, including organics. The L'Ralph camera sits atop the spacecraft's Instrument Pointing Platform (IPP) that's used to aim Lucy's instruments in a specific direction—seen here in the clean room at Loc
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Study of wild geladas reveals mid-size group living is best for survival and fitness
Scientists have long had difficulty establishing the group size that best allows animals to live long lives and raise many surviving offspring. But now a research team that includes Anthropology researchers from Stony Brook University has used 14 years of demographic data on multiple groups of wild geladas (an Old World monkey species) to determine that mid-size group living is best for fitness, e
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The feasibility of transformation pathways for achieving the Paris Climate Agreement
What drives the feasibility of climate scenarios commonly reviewed by organizations like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)? And can they actually be achieved in practice? A new systematic framework can help understand what to improve in the next generation of scenarios and explore how to make ambitious emission reductions possible by strengthening enabling conditions.
7h
On the origin of numbers
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01491-0 The cross-discipline effort to work our how ancient humans learned to count.
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Widespread deoxygenation of temperate lakes
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03550-y Analysis of temperate lakes finds a widespread decline in dissolved oxygen concentrations in surface and deep waters, which is associated with reduced solubility at warmer surface water temperatures and increased stratification at depth.
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Signatures of moiré trions in WSe2/MoSe2 heterobilayers
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03541-z Optical experiments on WSe2/MoSe2 heterobilayers reveal signatures of moiré trions, including interlayer emission with sharp lines and a complex charge-density dependence, features that differ markedly from those of conventional trions.
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CO2 doping of organic interlayers for perovskite solar cells
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03518-y CO2 and ultraviolet light are used to initiate the p-type doping of spiro-OMeTAD:LiTFSI films, which show enhanced efficiencies when used as hole-transporting layers in solar cells and have shorter fabrication times compared with interlayers doped using conventional methods.
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Asymmetric response of interfacial water to applied electric fields
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03504-4 Experimental measurements of vibrational sum-frequency generation spectra indicate that the dielectric response of water near an electrode may be strongly asymmetric, with different responses to positive and negative electrode charge.
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A proximity-dependent biotinylation map of a human cell
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41586-021-03592-2 A proximity-dependent biotinylation technique defines the location of more than 4,000 proteins in a human cell, and almost 36,000 proximal interactions between proteins, including those at the interface of the mitochondria and ER.
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Natural killer cells lull tumours into dormancy
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01381-5 Natural killer cells can drive spreading cancer cells to enter a state of dormancy. That finding, together with the discovery of a pathway that hinders this antitumour function, could spur the development of new treatments.
7h
Hunting the strongest accelerators in our Galaxy
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01377-1 Twelve candidates for the most powerful astrophysical particle accelerators in the Milky Way have been detected. This advance will help to uncover the nature of these exotic objects.
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Charge-carrying films for solar cells made quickly and cleanly
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01378-0 Organic semiconductors used in a promising class of solar cell are processed in a 'doping' step to improve the transport of charge carriers. A fast doping method has been developed that might enable mass production of these cells.
7h
To talk about prenups, use metaphors
Prenuptial agreements, or "prenups," can be difficult to talk about. A look at comments on Reddit offers one way to discuss the often taboo subject: Use metaphors. "Many people view prenups as being negative, and argue that they indicate a lack of faith in the marriage from the outset," says Lynsey Romo, an associate professor of communication at North Carolina State University and corresponding
7h
Metal ions help COVID-19 virus to disguise itself
Scientists from The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio have discovered a mechanism by which SARS-CoV-2 exploits changes in metal ion concentrations to disguise itself in the body. Varying concentrations of metal ions—positively charged atoms such as magnesium, manganese and calcium—are observed in hospitalized COVID-19 patients.
7h
Coloring tumors reveals their bad influence
Red2Onco, an innovative genetic mouse model, allows to detect the very initial steps that lead to cancer development. Red2Onco's multi-colour labelling system allows to trace intestinal tumour development after the first oncogenic hit at the single cell level. The research carried out at IMBA – Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences – and the University of Cambrid
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Researchers identify how to prevent cancer metastases
Metastases can develop in the body even years after apparently successful cancer treatment. They originate from cancer cells that migrated from the original tumor to other organs, and which can lie there inactive for a considerable time. Researchers have now discovered how these "sleeping cells" are kept dormant and how they wake up and form fatal metastases. They have reported their findings in t
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Astronomers discover a massive star cluster, of intermediate age, in the constellation Scutum
An international team of astrophysicists led by the Stellar Astrophysics Group of the University of Alicante (UA), the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), and the University of Valparaíso (Chile) has discovered a massive cluster of stars of intermediate age in the direction of the Scutum constellation. This object, which has been named Valparaíso 1, lies some seven thousand light years awa
7h
Who judges the judges? | Jessica Kerr
What qualifies someone to become a judge? The answer is surprisingly vague and even taboo to discuss. Lawyer Jessica Kerr sifts through the murky, mysterious process that sits at the center of the Commonwealth judicial system in countries like Australia — and makes the case for "judge school," a legal education better fit to bring justice, legitimacy and public trust to any court.
7h
Humans may have set foot in North America way earlier than thought
The first humans may have arrived in North America more than 30,000 years ago—nearly 20,000 years earlier than originally thought. Researchers made the discovery while studying the origins of agriculture in the Tehuacan Valley in Mexico. As part of that work, they wanted to establish a date for the earliest human occupation of the Coxcatlan Cave in the valley, so they obtained radiocarbon dates f
7h
Urban crime plummets during lockdowns in cities around world
Impact on offences such as burglary and assault is revealed in 27 cities, but figures steadily rise as rules ease Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Urban crime ranging from vehicle theft and burglary to robbery and assault fell substantially during Covid lockdowns as stay-at-home orders around the world cleared the streets and ensured more houses were occupied in the d
7h
Regulation of the genome affects its 3D structure
All the cells of an organism share the same DNA sequence, but their functions, shapes or even lifespans vary greatly. This happens because each cell "reads" different chapters of the genome, thus producing alternative sets of proteins and embarking on different paths. Epigenetic regulation—DNA methylation is one of the most common mechanisms—is responsible for the activation or inactivation of a g
7h
Juvenile white-tailed sea eagles stay longer in their parental territory than nest protection periods
The white-tailed sea eagle is known for reacting sensitively to human disturbances. Forestry and agricultural activities are therefore restricted in the immediate vicinity of the nests. However, these seasonal protection periods are too short in the German federal States of Brandenburg (until August 31) and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania (until July 31), as a new scientific analysis by a team of sc
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Finding may improve models that allow predicting future climate
A new study by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) allows validating organic markers to quantify past primary productivity in the oceans, a key factor in the global marine carbon cycle. The research, carried out from the study of alkenones as a biomarker, puts an end to decades of scientific debate about the validity of these bi
7h
Cancer-promoting Ras protein exists in a pair within cells
Researchers from Bochum and Osnabrück have gained new insights into the structure of the Ras protein, which acts as a molecular switch for cell growth and is involved in the development of cancer. With the help of fluorescence markings, they have demonstrated that the protein is deposited in a pair at the cell membrane, and with the very structure that they predicted in theory back in 2012. The te
7h
Entangled quantum memories for a quantum repeater: A step closer to the Quantum Internet
During the '90s, engineers made major advances in the telecom arena spreading out the network to distances beyond the cities and metropolitan areas. To achieve this scalability factor, they used repeaters, which enhanced attenuated signals and allowed these to travel farther distances with the same features such as intensity or fidelity. Now, with the addition of satellites, it is completely norma
7h
The Mars helicopter's scary sixth mission
The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter was out on a photo-taking mission when it started to act strangely. It kept changing its speed and tipping back and forth. A single error threw its entire navigation system into confusion. Something went wrong on the Ingenuity Mars Helicopter's sixth flight. Not to worry, though: the copter is fine. The story of what went wrong and why it's okay now reminds us once a
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Current global environmental law and policy are failing, experts say
In 'Our Earth Matters: Pathways to a Better Common Environmental Future,' spanning two special issues of Environmental Policy and Law (EPL), leading scholars from more than five continents call for an honest introspection of what has been attained over the last 50 years relating to regulatory processes and laws and explore future trajectories with new ideas and frameworks for environmental governa
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Antiviral surfaces, surface coatings and their mechanisms of action
Scientists from The National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and the National Biofilms Innovation Centre (NBIC) provide a comprehensive review of the current state of knowledge, research direction and practices in the area of antiviral materials and coatings. The study is presented in the consortium's review article "Antiviral surfaces and surface coatings and their mechanisms of action," published in C
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Detecting mid-infrared light, one photon at a time
For some 30 years, scientists have used superconducting materials to record the tiniest specks of light imaginable—individual photons, or single particles of light. However, these detectors, which consist of ultracold wires only about one-thousandth the diameter of a human hair, were limited to recording single photons at visible-light and slightly longer wavelengths, in the near infrared (IR).
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Activation of carbon-fluorine bonds via cooperation of a photocatalyst and tin
Fluorinated compounds are an important group of compounds that are widely used in pharmaceuticals, agricultural chemicals, functional resins, and organic electronic materials. In particular, perfluorinated compounds with multiple carbon-fluorine bonds are attracting attention because of their high thermal and chemical stability and various excellent properties such as water and oil repellency and
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The incredible adventures of the Hera mission
Meet Hera, our very own asteroid detective. Together with two briefcase-sized Cubesats—Milani the rock decoder and Juventas the radar visionary—Hera is off on an adventure to explore Didymos and Dimorphos, an asteroid pair typical of the thousands that pose an impact risk to planet Earth.
7h
Mapping intermittent methane emissions across the Permian Basin
The Permian Basin, located in western Texas and southeastern New Mexico, is the largest oil- and gas-producing region in the U.S. The oilfield operations emit methane, but quantifying the greenhouse gas is difficult because of the large area and the fact that many sources are intermittent emitters. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology Letters have conducted an exte
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New data viz tool that reveals growth opportunities for 1K cities
The Growth Lab at Harvard University is announcing the launch of Metroverse, an Urban Economy Navigator designed to provide policymakers, entrepreneurs, investors, business organizations, civil society, and the general public with unprecedented economic data for more than 1,000 cities in 79 countries. The platform vividly illustrates the technological capabilities that underpin a city's economy an
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Human brain and testis found to have the highest number of common proteins
A team of researchers from the University of Aveiro and the University of Porto, both in Portugal, and the University of Birmingham in the U.K. has found that for humans, the brain and testis have the highest number of common proteins. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Biology, the group describes their study of protein similarities between tissues.
7h
A speedy trial: What it takes to be the fastest land predator
What makes cheetah the fastest land mammal? Why aren't other animals, such as horses, as fast? While we haven't yet figured out why, we have some idea about how—cheetahs, as it turns out, make use of a galloping gait at their fastest speeds, involving two different types of 'flight': one with the forelimbs and hind limbs beneath their body following a forelimb liftoff, called gathered flight, whil
7h
Future pandemic? Consider radically altering animal agriculture practices
As early as the Neolithic period (circa 3900 BC), the domestication of animals likely led to the development of diseases including measles and smallpox. Since then, zoonotic disease has led to other major transnational outbreaks including HIV, Ebola, SARS, MERS, and H1N1 swine flu, among others. Currently, more than half of all existing human pathogens, and almost three-quarters of emerging infect
7h
Acoustic solutions made from natural fibers can reduce buildings' carbon footprints
Good acoustics in the workspace improve work efficiency and productivity, which is one of the reasons why acoustic materials matter. The acoustic insulation market is already expected to hit 15 billion USD by 2022 as construction firms and industry pay more attention to sound environments. Researchers at Aalto University, in collaboration with Finnish acoustics company Lumir, have now studied how
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SEC Report: Tesla Failed to Control Elon Musk's Tweets
According to documents obtained by The Wall Street Journal , Tesla failed on several occasions to preapprove CEO Elon Musk's tweets, as it was required to do by a court order. It's the latest chapter in the long saga of Musk's disagreement and frustration with federal regulators, governing bodies Musk has shown very little respect for over the last couple of years. In 2018, Musk was sued by the S
8h
Turn any place on earth into a New York street corner
Manhattan's street grid is famously regular and predictable. What if you extended it across the globe? This web tool does exactly that, and in the process, turning New York into the world's first, last, and only "planetary city." But grids are square, and the world is not. Somewhere in Uzbekistan, global Manhattan goes haywire. Sixth Avenue in midtown Manhattan. Add a few zeroes to the address, a
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App helps pregnant women to a healthy lifestyle
Researchers at Linköping University in Sweden have developed an app to help women achieve a healthy weight gain and lifestyle during a pregnancy. The results from an evaluation of the app have now been published in two scientific articles. Using the app contributed to a better diet. Pregnant women with overweight or obesity who received the app also gained less weight during pregnancy.
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Growing evidence fruit may lower type 2 diabetes risk
Eating at least two serves of fruit daily has been linked with 36% lower odds of developing type 2 diabetes, a new Edith Cowan University study has found. The study, published today in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, revealed that people who ate at least two serves of fruit per day had higher measures of insulin sensitivity than those who ate less than half a serve.
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The Atlantic Daily: The Housing Market Is Brutal
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. Millennials are, as my co-worker Robinson Meyer poetically put it, "passing through the U.S. economy like an elephant being digested by a boa constrictor ." Perhaps nowhere is that stretch more ap
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What's the Origin of Consciousness? Global Effort Puts Two Top Theories to the Test
How does consciousness work? A frenemy collaboration is duking it out. Six different teams from across the globe are uniting in a challenge to test our fundamental theories of consciousness. They don't agree on where or how consciousness originates in the brain. But they're willing to battle it out through a fair match. For the past two years—and the next few—the teams agreed to standardize tests
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Replicating patients' tumors to test different treatments
In order to offer a personalised treatment that best suits the case being treated, scientists led by UNIGE had already developed a spheroidal reproduction of tumours that integrates the tumour cells, but also their microenvironment. Today, the Geneva team has succeeded in integrating two types of immune cells that come directly from the patient into the spheroidal structure, making it possible to
8h
Young T. rexes had a powerful bite, capable of exerting one-sixth the force of an adult
Scientists have experimentally measured the bite force of adult T. rexes but not of younger tyrannosaurs. Fossils with juvenile bite marks have now allowed experts to experimentally test how hard juveniles could chomp. Though their bite force is one-sixth that of an adult, it is still stronger than that of living hyenas. The measurement is higher than previous estimates, suggesting a different eco
8h
Converting scar tissue to heart muscle after a heart attack
Researchers from the University of Tsukuba showed that cardiac scar tissue (fibroblasts) can be directly reprogrammed to heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes) in mice. By treating mice post-heart attack with a virus carrying cardiac transcription factors, they found that new cardiomyocytes were formed by fibroblasts converting into cardiomyocytes as opposed to fibroblasts fusing with existing cardio
9h
Seven EU countries just got a digital vaccine passport
The news: The European Union's digital vaccine passport system went live in seven countries yesterday, ahead of a full launch for all 27 member states on July 1. The document, called a digital green certificate, shows whether someone has been fully vaccinated against covid-19, recovered from the virus, or tested negative within the last 72 hours. Travelers who can prove they fit one of these thre
10h
SpaceX Plans Floating Ocean Spaceport for 2022
It has now been more than a year since SpaceX launched its first crewed Falcon 9 mission to the ISS, but the Falcon 9 isn't Elon Musk's vision of the future. That honor goes to the Starship, which SpaceX has been very publicly testing (and blowing up). The company is still riding high on the successful landing of the SN15 prototype, which landed in one piece last month . Now, Musk has let it slip
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When workers feel powerless, they get paranoid—and aggressive
When employees lack power at work, they can feel vulnerable and paranoid. In turn, that paranoia can cause people to lash out against colleagues or family members and even seek to undermine their organization's success, according to new research from the University at Buffalo School of Management.
10h
Kläder från träd ger hållbar garderob
Miljövänliga kläder växer inte på träd, men nästan. Viskos är ett textilmaterial som tillverkas av cellulosa från träd, men hur och var viskosen tillverkas avgör hur stor klimatpåverkan det blir. Bomull har länge dominerat textilbranschen i världen och står för drygt 25 procent av all textiltillverkning. Sedan några år har bomullsodlingen nått sitt tak och man talar om " peak cotton ", den gräns
10h
Hull kan skydda på ålderns höst
Undernäring är ett stort problem bland de allra äldsta och något som kan leda till döden. Övervikt kan däremot ge ett visst skydd. Till och med svår fetma tycks vara gynnsamt bland äldre, visar forskning. – Resultaten understryker vikten av att göra riskbedömningar bland de äldre för att förhindra undernäring och viktnedgång eftersom de kan medföra en stor risk för att avlida, säger Maria Burman,
10h
Healthy diet before, during pregnancy linked to lower complications, NIH study suggests
A healthy diet around the time of conception through the second trimester may reduce the risk of several common pregnancy complications, suggests a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Expectant women in the study who scored high on any of three measures of healthy eating had lower risks for gestational diabetes, pregnancy-related blood pressure disorders and preterm birth.
10h
5 ways to mend colonialism's legacy in ecology
The field of ecology needs to account for the historical legacy of colonialism that has shaped people and the natural world, researchers argue. They make this claim about ecology, the field of biology devoted to the study of organisms and their natural environments, in a new perspective in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution . To make ecology more inclusive of the world's diverse people and cu
10h
Using fungal electrical activity for computing
Materials have a variety of properties that can be used to solve computational problems, according to studies in substrate-based computing.BZ computers, slime mold computers, plant computers, and collision-based liquid marbles computers are just a few examples of prototypes produced for future and emergent computing devices. Modeling the computational processes that exist in such systems, however,
10h
Halloumiskam typiskt svenskt
Känner du skam när du lägger en halloumi på grillen? Liksom flygskam och klädskam är också "halloumiskam" ett ursvenskt begrepp, där ansvaret att välja rätt, läggs på den enskilda individen. Sommaren 2019 blåste det hårt kring den cypriska osten halloumi. Att grilla halloumi istället för en bit kött är populärt i Sverige då det kan uppfattas som ett bättre val. Vårt land är till och med ett av de
10h
Research describes slow and fast light in plasma
Slow and fast light, or large changes in the group velocity of light, have been observed in a range of optical media, but the fine control over the refractive index necessary to induce an observable effect has not been achieved in a plasma.
10h
A new way of comparing greenhouse gases could help us meet Paris Agreement goals
According to the Paris Agreement, the world needs to limit global warming to well below 2°C and to strive toward a 1.5°C increase above pre-industrial levels. How can we meet this goal at the lowest cost? In a May 2021 study, we try to answer this question. Our research found that we can meet the goals at a lower cost if we change how we value different greenhouse gases.
11h
Creating exotic 'outer space' ice in the lab
The search for life beyond Earth typically focuses on first looking for water, the basis for life as we know it. Whether the water is a gas, liquid, or solid, its presence and composition can tell researchers a lot about the planet, moon, comet, or asteroid on which it is detected and whether it could support life.
11h
A better look at how particles move
If you take a bucket of water balloons and jostle one of them, the neighboring balloons will respond as well. This is a scaled-up example of how collections of cells and other deformable particle packings respond to forces. Modeling this phenomenon with computer simulations can shed light on questions about how cancer cells invade healthy tissue or how leaves and flowers grow. But the behavior of
11h
Carbonate standards ensure better paleothermometers
The climate of ancient Earth left telltale signs in the geochemical record. On the basis of chemical properties of carbonate minerals, scientists can calculate a site's temperature hundreds of millions of years ago. Such a "paleothermometer" provides a peek not just into past climates but also into geological processes like elevation changes of Earth's surface. Analyses by different research group
11h
Win A PS5, XBOX Series X, Nintendo Switch, And More With This Epic Gaming Giveaway
As 2021 has unfolded, it's been easier to play with improbable swords from video games than play the games themselves. The PS5, Xbox Series X, and Nintendo Switch have all been in high demand, with stocks selling out instantly. Fortunately, in our giveaway , you can get all three and more, while contributing to the music charity Playing For Change. Our giveaway not only includes the PS5, Series X
11h
Newspapers can reduce polarization by focusing on local issues
If you're confused about opinion journalism and what it is, you're not alone. Many Americans are. But even so, the editorials, opinion columns and letters to the editor that fill the op-ed pages could help bridge political divides in the U.S. and offer some help to struggling local news outlets.
11h
Geometrically encoded SERS nanobarcodes for the logical detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma-related progression biomarkers
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23789-3 SERS assays have potential for multiplexed detection of biomarkers but differentiation of SERS tags remains a challenge. Here, the authors report the creation of 14 distinct geometrically controlled metal carbonyl tags and demonstrate multiplexed detection of nasopharyngeal carcinoma biomarkers from patient bloo
11h
Welcome to Planet Egirl
What does it look like when women's long-held interest in gaming is finally accepted into the mainstream—and embraced by billion-dollar industries?
11h
The peer reviewers and editor wanted to publish my paper. The legal team rejected it.
Move over, Reviewer 2: The legal reviewer wants your job. Last month, I was relieved when the journal Research Ethics published my article, "The Use of Confidentiality and Anonymity Protections as a Cover for Fraudulent Fieldwork Data." One unexpected hurdle had almost thwarted publication. The problem wasn't with the proverbial hard-to-please peer reviewer called Reviewer … Continue reading
12h
Blue water thinking
The names of many of the new companies and technologies created to combat the effects of climate change on marine ecosystems can evoke thrilling acts of derring-do on the high seas. WaveKiller uses compressed air systems to create "walls" of bubbles up to 50 feet thick, to guard against erosion and contain waste and oil spills. The Inceptor is a solar-powered barge deployed by the Dutch nongovern
13h
Business of science: How to grow your start-up
Nature, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01006-x A successful entrepreneur needs to quickly develop a strategy to scale up their company, transfer skills to colleagues and shape a team.
13h
Roton-like acoustical dispersion relations in 3D metamaterials
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23574-2 Here, the authors introduce beyond-nearest-neighbour interactions as a mechanism for molding the flow of waves in acoustic metamaterials. They find that for strong third-nearest-neighbour interactions, this mechanism allows for engineering roton-like acoustical dispersion relations under ambient conditions.
13h
Ruderman–Kittel–Kasuya–Yosida-type interfacial Dzyaloshinskii–Moriya interaction in heavy metal/ferromagnet heterostructures
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23586-y The mechanism of the interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in heavy metal-ferromagnet heterostructures is debated. Here, the authors show the oscillating behaviour of the interaction as a function of the MgO spacer layer thickness, supporting the interlayer exchange coupling mechanism of the Ruderman-Kit
13h
An antibody against L1 cell adhesion molecule inhibits cardiotoxicity by regulating persistent DNA damage
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23478-1 Mechanisms underlying the cardiotoxicity associated with thoracic irradiation and doxorubicin treatment during anticancer therapy remain poorly understood. Here the authors show that treatment with an antibody against the L1 cell adhesion molecule inhibits nuclear L1CAM translocation, thereby controlling vascula
13h
Discovery of widespread transcription initiation at microsatellites predictable by sequence-based deep neural network
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23143-7 Mammalian genomes are scattered with repetitive sequences, but their biology remains largely elusive. Here, the authors show that transcription can initiate from short tandem repetitive sequences, and that genetic variants linked to human diseases are preferentially found at repeats with high transcription initi
13h
Through bonds or contacts? Mapping protein vibrational energy transfer using non-canonical amino acids
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23591-1 Vibrational energy transfer (VET) is essential for protein function as it is responsible for efficient energy dissipation in reaction sites and is linked to pathways of allosteric communication. Here authors equipped a tryptophan zipper with a VET injector and a VET sensor for femtosecond pump probe experiments
13h
Highly selective and robust single-atom catalyst Ru1/NC for reductive amination of aldehydes/ketones
Nature Communications, Published online: 02 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23429-w Single-atom catalyst (SAC) has emerged as a frontier in heterogeneous catalysis yet its robustness remains a critical concern. Here, a highly active, selective and robust Ru1-N3 SAC is explored for a challenging reaction, reductive amination of aldehydes/ketones for synthesis of primary amines.
13h
'Prescription' to sit less, move more advised for mildly high blood pressure & cholesterol
Physical activity is the optimal first treatment choice for adults with mild to moderately elevated blood pressure and blood cholesterol who otherwise have low heart disease risk. About 21% of adults in the US with mild to moderately raised blood pressure and 28-37% of those with mild to moderate elevated cholesterol levels may be best served by a prescription for lifestyle-only treatment, which i
13h
Blaming Covid mistakes on 'groupthink' lets the government off the hook | Stephen Reicher and John Drury
Dominic Cummings repeatedly used this dubious term – but it obscures the real reasons why bad decisions were made • Stephen Reicher and John Drury are participants in the Sage subcommittee advising on behavioural science In the seven hours of evidence he gave at the Houses of Commons, Dominic Cummings mounted a systematic attack on the decisions of the government and its scientific advisory group
13h
When the Bison Come Back, Will the Ecosystem Follow?
Before they were pushed to the edge of extinction, 30 to 60 million bison lived in North America, primarily on the Great Plains. Today, declining biodiversity and fragmentation make that ecosystems among the most endangered in the world. But a movement led by Indigenous nations is bringing the bison back.
13h
How an elephant's trunk manipulates air to eat and drink
New research from the Georgia Institute of Technology finds that elephants dilate their nostrils in order to create more space in their trunks, allowing them to store up to nine liters of water. They can also suck up three liters per second—a speed 50 times faster than a human sneeze (150 meters per second/330 mph).
14h
Gener gör stadsfåglar bättre rustade för stress
Talgoxar är vanliga i hela Europa och det är sedan tidigare känt att fåglar från olika europeiska populationer är genetiskt ganska lika varandra. Nu kommer dock oväntade forskningsresultat. I en ny studie har forskare identifierat tydliga genetiska skillnader mellan talgoxar som lever i städer jämfört med talgoxar som lever i lantlig miljö. Studien är publicerad i tidskriften Nature Communications
16h
Unforced Variations: Jun 2021
This month's open thread for climate science. Start of the meteorological summer, official hurricane season ( outlook ), the final stretches of the IPCC AR6 review process and a rare conjunction of Father's Day and the summer solstice. Please stay on topic. The post first appeared on RealClimate .
17h
Terrawatch: a saltmine and a sinking city in Brazil
More than 6,000 buildings in Maceió condemned and research suggests more subsidence to come It was early 2018 when residents of the Brazilian city of Maceió first spotted cracks appearing in buildings and roads. Heavy rainfall in mid February, followed by a small earthquake at the beginning of March, appeared to trigger the fractures. The situation in the neighbourhood of Pinheiro was so serious
17h
Ben-Gurion U. studies show promise using drones to elicit emotional responses
"There is a lack of research on how drones are perceived and understood by humans, which is vastly different than ground robots." says Prof. Jessica Cauchard together with Viviane Herdel of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev Magic Lab, in the Department of Industrial Engineering & Management. "For the first time, we showed that people can recognize different emotions and discriminate between diffe
18h
Wall Street's Skirmish With Exxon Is 'Monumental'
Every week, our lead climate reporter brings you the big ideas, expert analysis, and vital guidance that will help you flourish on a changing planet. Sign up to get T he Weekly Planet , our guide to living through climate change, in your inbox . Here's a question that has recently become surprisingly important in the battle against climate change: What is a company? There's a legal answer, of cou
21h
The Labor Shortage isn't Proof Universal Basic Income Wouldn't Work
The labor shortage isn't proof that a universal basic income would incentivize slothfulness. This video ( The Labor Shortage Best Explained by an Ex-Barista ) provides context for why the number of new business applications and digital storefronts doubled over the past year. Many low-wage workers aren't returning to their part-time jobs because the stimulus money gave them the time to learn a new
22h
Falcons have natural 'eye makeup' to improve hunting ability
Dark 'eyeliner' feathers of peregrine falcons act as sun shields to improve the birds' hunting ability, a new scientific study suggests. Scientists have long speculated that falcons' eye markings improve their ability to target fast-moving prey, like pigeons and doves, in bright sunlight. Now research suggests these markings have evolved according to the climate; the sunnier the bird's habitat, th
22h
Is the universe infinite?
The size and shape of the universe has yet to be resolved. The size of the universe is linked to understanding its shape and the limits of our observations. New studies and going deeper into space will help us answer the question: "" Does the universe keep extending endlessly into the abyss of space, or does it have a defined end? Of all the scientific questions you may ponder, "Is the universe i
23h
One More Reason to Admire Elephant Trunks
The trunk of an African elephant is an evolutionary marvel. Clocking in at weights well over 200 pounds, it ripples with thousands of individual muscles that help the superlong schnoz lift barbells , uproot trees , and fling bothersome lions into the air . A tortilla chip is an embarrassment of engineering. It weighs a fraction of an ounce and can measure less than a millimeter thick; it is so wo
23h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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