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Nyheder2021juni03

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Nasa plans return to Venus with two missions by 2030
Nasa sets aside $1bn for two ventures, which will be first US exploration of the planet since 1989 Nasa is returning to Venus for the first time in more than three decades to gain a better understanding of the history of what scientists believe could have been the first habitable planet in the solar system. Plans for two separate and ambitious deep space missions to Earth's nearest neighbour were
18h
Grimes Says AI Will Usher in an Era of Luxurious Communism
Acclaimed musician Claire "Grimes" Boucher posted a TikTok video on Wednesday night in which she returned to one of her favorite pastimes: overpromising what artificial intelligence can provide to society. "I have a proposition for the communists," she said in the video . "Typically, most of the communists I know are not big fans of AI. But — if you think about it — AI is actually the fastest pat
28min

LATEST

The Capitol Rioters Won
Republicans say they would like to move on from the 2020 election. "A lot of our members, and I think this is true of a lot of House Republicans, want to be moving forward and not looking backward," John Thune, the third-ranking Republican in the Senate, told CNN on May 19. "Anything that gets us rehashing the 2020 elections I think is a day lost on being able to draw a contrast between us and th
6h
The empty office: what we lose when we work from home
For decades, anthropologists have been telling us that it's often the informal, unplanned interactions and rituals that matter most in any work environment. So how much are we missing by giving them up? In the summer of 2020, Daniel Beunza, a voluble Spanish social scientist who taught at Cass business school in London, organised a stream of video calls with a dozen senior bankers in the US and E
8h
Mathematicians Identify Threshold at Which Shapes Give Way
In the 1950s, four decades before he won a Nobel Prize for his contributions to game theory and his story inspired the book and film "A Beautiful Mind," the mathematician John Nash proved one of the most remarkable results in all of geometry. Among other features, it implied that you could crumple a sphere down to a ball of any size without ever creasing it. He made this possible by inventing a..
3h
Which way does the solar wind blow?
High performance computers are central to the quest to understand the sun's behavior and its role in space weather events. With funding from NSF and NASA, scientists are using the Frontera supercomputer to improve the state-of-the-art in space weather forecasting. Writing in the Astrophysical Journal in April 2021, researchers described the role of backstreaming pickup ions in the acceleration of
4min
Let's talk about the elephant in the data
Many data scientists try to create models that can "fit an elephant," referring to a complex set of data points. CSHL Professor Partha Mitra describes how he views problems like these in Nature Machine Intelligence. While the role of strong prior knowledge can work well in some situations, the complete absence of prior assumptions will work adequately in others. Mitra discusses a middle ground tha
4min
Fifty years of progress in women's health
On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the National Academy of Medicine, Manson and co-author Cynthia Stuenkel, M.D., of the University of California San Diego's School of Medicine, wrote a Perspective piece for The New England Journal of Medicine chronicling major points of progress in women's health since the 1970s and expectations for the future.
4min
Researchers reveal the inner workings of a viral DNA-packaging motor
In a trio of papers, researchers have discovered the detailed inner workings of the molecular motor that packages genetic material into double-stranded DNA viruses. The advance provides insight into a critical step in the reproduction cycle of viruses such as pox-, herpes- and adeno-viruses. It could also give inspiration to researchers creating microscopic machines based on naturally occurring bi
4min
InSight Mars lander gets a power boost
The team behind NASA's InSight Mars lander has come up with an innovative way to boost the spacecraft's energy at a time when its power levels have been falling. The lander's robotic arm trickled sand near one solar panel, helping the wind to carry off some of the panel's dust. The result was a gain of about 30 watt-hours of energy per sol, or Martian day.
9min
Coastal flooding increases Bay Area traffic delays and accidents
Almost half of the world's population currently lives in cities and that number is projected to rise significantly in the near future. This rapid urbanization is contributing to increased flood risk due to the growing concentration of people and resources in cities and the clustering of cities along coastlines.
15min
Five million years of climate change preserved in one place
An international team of researchers, led by the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany, has now succeeded in reconstructing changes in rainfall in Central Asia over the past five million years. The information preserved within the sedimentary succession provides the missing link for understanding land-water feedbacks for global climate.
15min
Archaeological research shows prehistoric pendants used in dance
"Ornaments composed of elk teeth suspended from or sown on to clothing emit a loud rattling noise when moving," says auditory archaeologist and Academy of Finland Research Fellow Riitta Rainio from the University of Helsinki. "Wearing such rattlers while dancing makes it easier to immerse yourself in the soundscape, eventually letting the sound and rhythm take control of your movements. It is as i
15min
Scientist discovers how leafbirds make complex color-producing crystals
A recent study by a team of researchers led by Dr. Vinod Kumar Saranathan from the Division of Science at Yale-NUS College has discovered a complex, three-dimensional crystal called the single gyroid within feathers of the blue-winged leafbird. Dr. Saranathan and his team's breakthrough came from their investigation of the feather colors of leafbirds, an enigmatic group of perching birds endemic t
15min
Study exposes increasing flood risk in the UK
As climate change continues to cause unpredictable and extreme weather events around the world, Xi'an Jiaotong-Liverpool University researchers are calling for engineers to rethink how they design for flood prevention.
15min
Climate tipping points could topple like dominoes, warn scientists
Analysis shows significant risk of cascading events even at 2C of heating, with severe long-term effects Ice sheets and ocean currents at risk of climate tipping points can destabilise each other as the world heats up, leading to a domino effect with severe consequences for humanity, according to a risk analysis. Tipping points occur when global heating pushes temperatures beyond a critical thres
24min
Using advanced imaging to study sickle cell disease
Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh used a whole-body 7-Tesla MRI scanner alongside their optimized Tic-Tac-Toe RF head coil system to study sickle cell disease's impact on the brain. They discovered that SCD can have a severe effect on specific subfields of the hippocampus – a highly complex part of the human brain that controls learning and memory and is very susceptible to injury or d
25min
Are wind farms slowing each other down?
Many countries promote the expansion of wind farms. However, if these offshore wind farms are set up close to each other, wind energy and hence electricity yield is reduced. A study by the Helmholtz Zentrum Hereon, which has now been published in the journal Nature Scientific Reports, shows that the losses with increasing offshore wind energy production will be considerable and detectable as large
25min
Enantiomorph distribution maps for metals and metallic alloys
The spatially resolved determination of which of the two enantiomorphic structural variants — the left-handed or the right-handed — of a chiral phase is present in a polycrystalline material is the focus of our publication in Science Advances. With the EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) -based technique, this is shown for the first time for the chiral element structure β-Mn for which a dete
25min
The biodegradable battery
The number of data-transmitting microdevices, for instance in packaging and transport logistics, will increase sharply in the coming years. All these devices need energy, but the amount of batteries would have a major impact on the environment. Empa researchers have developed a biodegradable mini-capacitor that can solve the problem. It consists of carbon, cellulose, glycerin and table salt. And i
25min
FBI Blames Russia Hackers for Shutting Down Much of US Beef Supply
Ribeye Ransom The FBI is now blaming the Russian hacking group REvil, also known as Sodinokibi, for the massive ransomware hack that threatened about a quarter of the US beef supply. REvil, which the BBC reports is one of the most prominent and profitable hacker groups in the world, specifically targeted the meat processing giant JBS, shutting down operations in the US, Canada, and Australia. REv
42min
UNH research: Black bears may play important role in protecting gray fox
Bears are known for being devoted and protective of their baby cubs, but research from the University of New Hampshire shows that they may also play a significant role in shielding gray fox from predators like coyotes, who compete with the fox for food and space. The research is one of the first studies to show how black bears provide a buffer to allow other, smaller carnivores to safely co-exist.
47min
Role of women highlighted in study focused on the benefits of good farmer seed production
The CABI-led research – which sought to assess the benefits of good farmer seed production through a case study of the Good Seed Initiative in Tanzania – reveals that while around 70% of the labour to grow African Indigenous Vegetables (AIVs) is provided by women only 10 to 30% are contract farmers who own the fields, make decisions on sales and control revenues.
47min
Tipping elements can destabilize each other, leading to climate domino effects
Under global warming, tipping elements in the Earth system can destabilize each other and eventually lead to climate domino effects. The ice sheets on Greenland and West Antarctica are potential starting points for tipping cascades, a novel network analysis reveals. The Atlantic overturning circulation would then act as a transmitter, and eventually elements like the Amazon rainforest would be imp
47min
The DNA of three aurochs found next to the Elba shepherdess opens up a new enigma for palaeontology
Research involving scientists from the University of A Coruña has succeeded in sequencing the oldest mitochondrial genome of the immediate ancestor of modern cows that has been analysed to date. The remains, some 9,000 years old, were found next to a woman. Why were they with her if cattle had not yet been domesticated? Do they belong to ancestors of today's Iberian cows?
47min
Filter membrane renders viruses harmless
Researchers at ETH Zurich are developing a new filter membrane that is highly efficient at filtering and inactivating a wide variety of air-borne and water-borne viruses. Made from ecologically sound materials, the membrane has an appropriately good environmental footprint.
47min
COVID-19: Seroprevalence and vaccine responses in UK dental care professionals
Dental care professionals are thought to be at enhanced risk of occupational exposure to SARS-CoV-2, but robust data to support this is lacking. The study 'COVID-19: Seroprevalence and Vaccine Responses in UK Dental Care Professionals,' published in the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), provides a longitudinal analysis of antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein, including early analysis of the
47min
How quantum dots can 'talk' to each other
A group has worked out theoretically how the communication between two quantum dots can be influenced with light. The team shows ways to control the transfer of information or energy from one quantum dot to another. To this end, the researchers calculated the electronic structure of two nanocrystals, which act as quantum dots. With the results, the movement of electrons in quantum dots can be simu
55min
Is Earth's core lopsided? Strange goings-on in our planet's interior
Seismic waves generated by earthquakes travel through Earth's solid iron inner core faster in the direction of the rotation axis than along the equator. Scientists created a core growth model to explain this. To fit seismic data, the model predicts that asymmetric growth of the core leads to crystal movement that preferentially aligns iron-nickel crystals north-south. The model implies that the co
55min
It's a Great Time to Sell Your Rental Property. And Roofstock Is the Smart Way to Sell.
With demand for single-family rentals at an all-time high, there has never been a better time to sell your rental property than right now. Unfortunately, a lot of investors are reluctant to strike while the iron is hot because the traditional process of selling real estate takes too long, costs too much money, and requires too much work. So instead of cashing out on a property and using the profi
57min
How do we know the sun is a star?
The simplest questions are often the hardest to answer. At first blush, the sun and stars are very different. The former is close and hot, the latter far away and cold. We couldn't confirm the sun to be a star until telescopes and spectroscopes were invented. Sometimes, as a scientist, you forget how much you take for granted about the amazingness of the universe. The other day, my colleagues and
1h
Is elevated level of lung protein an early predictor for COPD?
UNC School of Medicine researchers led by mucin expert Mehmet Kesimer, PhD, had previously discovered that the total mucin concentrations in the lungs are associated with COPD disease progression and could be used as diagnostic markers of chronic bronchitis, a hallmark condition for patients with COPD. Kesimer and colleagues now report that one of these mucins, MUC5AC, is more closely and reliably
1h
Preclinical research reveals that new IgM antibodies administered intranasally to fight COVID-19 more potent than commonly used ones
A nasal therapy, built upon on the application of a new engineered IgM antibody therapy for COVID-19, was more effective than commonly used IgG antibodies at neutralizing the COVID-19 virus in animal models, according to research recently published by The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth), The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston (UTMB Health), the Universi
1h
New study further advances the treatment of chronic pain
Scientists from the Immuno-Pharmacology and Interactomics group at the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH), in collaboration with the Center for Drug Discovery at RTI International (RTI), have demonstrated that conolidine, a natural painkiller derived from the pinwheel flower and traditionally used in Chinese medicine, interacts with the newly identified opioid receptor ACKR3/CXCR7 that regulates
1h
Which are future home products you wish you had?
I wish I had: A robot 2 in 1 vacuum cleaner/floor wipe robot A smart thermomix with V.I voice instructions to aid cooking A cleaning drone to wipe tables and surfaces Self cleaning clothes Sonic showers & toothbrushes submitted by /u/LieutenantKurin [link] [comments]
1h
Watch What's Happening in Red States
It's not just voting rights. Though this year's proliferation of bills restricting ballot access in red states has commanded national attention, it represents just one stream in a torrent of conservative legislation poised to remake the country. GOP-controlled states—including Florida, Tennessee, Georgia, Texas, Arizona, Iowa, and Montana—have advanced their most conservative agenda in years, and
1h
Watch a Man Soar Into the Sky With a Helicopter Backpack
CopterPack A new video shows a daring pilot take off using what amounts to be a backpack helicopter — a futuristic blend of a jetpack and drone. The contraption is called CopterPack, and was created by an Australian startup of the same name. The video shows a pilot effortlessly taking to the skies on a beach, twisting and turning over a body of water. Is it a glimpse into the future of personal f
1h
Protect the sea, neglect the people? Social impact of marine conservation schemes revealed
Governments and international organizations are expanding targets to conserve marine spaces to stem the depletion of biodiversity and fish stocks around the globe. A new study demonstrates the wide range of unintended impacts that such conservation efforts have on affected communities.Published today in World Development, the research presents a ground-breaking case study of the Cambodian Koh Sdac
1h
Stone Age raves to the beat of elk tooth rattles?
In the Stone Age, some 8,000 years ago, people danced often and in a psychedelic way. This is a conclusion drawn from elk teeth discovered in the Yuzhniy Oleniy Ostrov burial site in the Republic of Karelia, Russia, whose wear marks and location in the graves indicate that the objects were used as rattlers.
1h
Tick for insomnia treatment
If insomnia keeps you awake at night, Flinders University researchers recommend a trip to the doctor – not for a sleeping pill prescription but for a short course of intensive behavioural therapy. Researchers have developed new clinical guidelines for Australian doctors to give family GPs insights into the most effective treatment for insomnia – Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for insomnia (or 'CBTi
1h
Biomarker predicts bowel cancer recurrence
A biomarker in the blood of patients with bowel cancer may provide valuable insight into the risk of cancer relapse after surgery and the effectiveness of chemotherapy.Research published in PLOS found circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) measured before and after surgery provided a reliable marker for predicting whether the cancer would recur following chemotherapy treatment.
1h
Bilingualism as a natural therapy for autistic children
Autism spectrum has a particular impact on social interaction. Bilingual families with an autistic child often tend to forego the use of one of the home languages, so as not to further complicate the development of their child's communicative skills. A team led by UNIGE has shown that bilingualism allows autistic children to partially compensate for deficits in theory of mind and executive functio
1h
Puppies are born ready to communicate with people, study shows
Anyone that's ever interacted with a dog knows that they often have an amazing capacity to interact with people. Now researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on June 3 have found that this ability is present in dogs from a very young age and doesn't require much, if any, prior experience or training. But, some of them start off better at it than others based on their genetics.
1h
Fossils reveal some fish survived in ancient hot water
Fishes thrived in the tropics in an ancient warm period despite high ocean temperatures, according to a new study. The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum, or PETM, was a short interval of highly elevated global temperatures 56 million years ago that is frequently described as the best ancient analog for present-day climate warming. Fish are among the organisms thought to be most sensitive to warmin
1h
Covid variants: how much protection do we get from vaccines?
While restrictions in England could lift soon, impact of Delta variant on vaccination programme is uncertain Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage On Wednesday Boris Johnson said he saw nothing in the current data to stop the planned lifting of Covid restrictions in England on 21 June. But he said questions remained over how much protection the current vaccines offered aga
1h
Water droplets become hydrobots by adding magnetic beads
Using a piece of magnet, researchers have designed a simple system that can control the movement of a small puddle of water, even when it's upside down. The new liquid manipulation strategy, described in the journal Cell Reports Physical Science on June 3, can have a wide range of applications including cleaning hard-to-reach environments or delivering small objects.
2h
North Atlantic right whales have gotten smaller since the 1980s
Whales are largely protected from direct catch, but many populations' numbers still remain far below what they once were. A study published in the journal Current Biology on June 3 suggests that, in addition to smaller population sizes, those whales that survive are struggling. As evidence, they find that right whales living in the North Atlantic today are significantly shorter than those born 30
2h
Quantum computing with holes
Quantum computers, with their promises of creating new materials and solving intractable mathematical problems, are a dream of many physicists. Now, they are slowly approaching viable realization in many laboratories all over the world. But there are still enormous challenges to master. A central one is the construction of stable quantum bits—the fundamental unit of quantum computation, called "qu
2h
Ketamine infusion: an explainer
Ketamine is the first hallucinogen approved for therapeutic use in the U.S. Research has shown ketamine is effective at treating depression. Though ketamine infusion therapy is now being offered at hundreds of North American clinics, there are unaddressed dangers in the current ketamine gold rush. In March 2019, the FDA approved ketamine, under the trade name Spravato (esketamine), for clinical u
2h
A Brief Note About Aducanumab
There's a big FDA decision coming up in the next few days: whether or not to approve the Biogen antibody for Alzheimer's (aducanumab). I've had several people ask me what I think about this, and I can only refer them to what I said in 2019 and what I said late last year as well. Given the current data, I do not think that aducanumab should be approved. I don't believe that Biogen's clinical trial
2h
3D printed micro-optics for quantum technology
Making quantum networks a reality relies crucially on building efficient optical fiber-based quantum light sources. Here, scientists in Germany present an advanced manufacturing approach to accomplish this task. Femtosecond 3D printing is used to create complex micrometer-sized optics to both enhance the single-photon extraction efficiency of semiconductor quantum dots and couple their emission in
2h
Quantum-optically integrated light cage on a chip
Controlling coherent interaction between optical fields and quantum systems in scalable, integrated platforms is essential for quantum technologies. A German-British research team has developed an on-chip hollow-core light cage that could provide a platform for quantum-storage and quantum-nonlinear applications. Showing stable non-degrading performance and extreme versatility, the laterally access
2h
The Early Universe Was a Vast Liquid Ocean, Scientists Say
Physicists used the world's largest atom accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Switzerland, to smash lead particles together at just shy of the speed of light in a bid to recreate the first matter created by the creation of the universe. This primordial goo, called "quark-gluon plasma" (QGP), only appeared for a tiny fraction of a second — 10 to the minus 23 seconds, to be precise — but
2h
Why NASA Is Blasting Water Bears And Bobtail Squid Into Space
The animals are being launched into the cosmos as NASA researchers attempt to learn more about how the conditions of spaceflight can affect biological organisms and, by extension, future astronauts. (Image credit: Jamie S. Foster/University of Florida)
2h
IVF test actually rules out viable embryos
A new study casts doubt on the genetic test that eliminates a majority of potential embryos from use in vitro fertilization due to possible abnormalities. The selection process limits the success of IVF, especially among older women and those diagnosed with premature ovarian aging. As reported in Nature Cell Biology , researchers found that embryos often develop into healthy babies regardless of
2h
Galileo satellites' last step before launch
Europe's Galileo satellite navigation constellation is set to grow. Later this year the first two out of 12 "Batch 3" Galileo satellites will be launched by Soyuz from French Guiana. Their last step on the way to launch is situated beside sand dunes on the Dutch coast: the ESTEC Test Center, which is Europe's largest satellite test facility.
2h
Solar energy and pollinator conservation: A path for real impact?
Amid the steady growth of solar energy production in the United States, pollinator conservation at solar installations has become an appealing secondary pursuit, but the long-term success of such efforts remains to be seen. Can the land within a solar farm be made a true resource for pollinating insects? Will solar developers see value in the extra investment to plant and maintain flowering vegeta
2h
Culture drives human evolution more than genetics
Researchers found that culture helps humans adapt to their environment and overcome challenges better and faster than genetics. Tim Waring and Zach Wood found that humans are experiencing a 'special evolutionary transition' in which the importance of culture is surpassing the value of genes as the primary driver of human evolution. Due to the group-orientated nature of culture, they also concluded
2h
Mangrove root model may hold the key to preventing coastal erosion
Mangrove vegetation, which grows naturally in subtropical shorelines, provides a wide range of ecosystem functions such as reducing coastal erosion, promoting biodiversity, and removing nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon dioxide. These vital ecological functions are influenced by the water flow around the intricate mangrove roots, which create a complex energetic process that mixes up sediments and g
2h
The Atlantic Daily: America's Two-Decade Bender
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. When the pandemic forced Americans to stay home, many turned to alcohol to cope, slurping down the apocalyptic news cycle with a hearty glass of red wine. But which bad habits, new or old, should
2h
Latest issue of Pacific Asia Inquiry showcases philosophical wisdom of the Pacific
The latest volume of 'Pacific Asia Inquiry: Multidisciplinary Perspectives,' a peer-reviewed online journal by the University of Guam's College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, includes manuscripts representing examples of historical, socio-cultural, and philosophical research from the Asia Pacific region. Topics range from the impact of climate change and food security in the Marshall Islands
2h
Microbes protect crops from microbes
Farmers do not love them all. Microbes can cause tragic consequences for crops. Even the presence of just one pathogenic fungus or bacterium can drastically reduce yields. Still, there are exceptions. In that case, a pathogenic microbe is present in the soil, but does not cause any harm. Adam Ossowicki graduated 1 June after a voyage of discovery to unravel the principles of this mystery.
2h
The biodegradable battery that's 3D printed, disposable and made of paper
The fabrication device for the battery revolution looks quite unconspicuous: It is a modified, commercially available 3D printer, located in a room in the Empa laboratory building. But the real innovation lies within the recipe for the gelatinous inks this printer can dispense onto a surface. The mixture in question consists of cellulose nanofibers and cellulose nanocrystallites, plus carbon in th
2h
Promising biological control agents detected faster with new method
Daily kill rates of predatory insect species and parasitoid species appear to be a useful criterion for determining which natural enemies are most effective in biological control of insect pests. That's the conclusion of a global research team led by Joop van Lenteren, professor of entomology at Wageningen University & Research. The researchers have explained their findings in an article published
2h
Workers who feel powerless get paranoid and aggressive
When employees lack power at work, they can feel vulnerable and paranoid. In turn, that paranoia can cause people to lash out against colleagues or family members and even seek to undermine their organization's success, according to new research. "History is filled with examples of individuals with little power being subjugated and objectified, causing many people to associate low power with vuln
2h
More people with disabilities are developing technology—and it's good for everyone
Unless you're blind or know someone who is, you might not know that blind people use the same smartphones as sighted people. In fact, many blind people use touch-screen smartphones every day. The secret is that smartphones have a screen reader, a tool that allows blind people to use a mix of gestures and taps, along with vibrations or audio feedback, to use their apps.
2h
Stripes give away Majoranas
Majorana particles have been getting bad publicity: a claimed discovery in ultracold nanowires had to be retracted. Now Leiden physicists open up a new door to detecting Majoranas in a different experimental system, the Fu-Kane heterostructure, they announce in Physical Review Letters.
2h
Molecular powerhouse of the cell division motor
All living cells must grow and divide in order to multiply. The multiplication of bacteria normally occurs through so-called binary fission. This makes particularly rapid growth possible and is the reason why bacteria, including microbial pathogens, can multiply exponentially.
2h
Scientists discover new approach to stabilize cathode materials
A team of researchers led by chemists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory has studied an elusive property in cathode materials, called a valence gradient, to understand its effect on battery performance. The findings, published in Nature Communications, demonstrated that the valence gradient can serve as a new approach for stabilizing the structure of high-nicke
2h
Study confirms invasive lionfish now threaten species along Brazilian coast
Since arriving to the northern Atlantic Ocean less than 30 years ago, lionfish have quickly become one of the most widespread and voracious invasive species, negatively impacting marine ecosystems—particularly coral reefs—from the northeast coast of the United States to the Caribbean Islands. In a new study, an international research team including the California Academy of Sciences presents four
2h
Ny biobank ger insikter om Parkinsons sjukdom
Idag lider cirka 20 000 svenskar av Parkinsons sjukdom men ännu finns bara symptomlindrande behandlingar. Genom en ny biobank får forskarna tillgång till 1 000 patienters genetiska profiler tillsammans med utförlig information om deras livsstil och sjukdomshistoria.
2h
Breast cancer patients embrace integrative health during treatment
Nearly three-quarters of breast cancer patients (73%) report using at least one type of complementary medicine after cancer diagnosis, while oncologists believe that less than half (43%) of patients are using these approaches during cancer care. These and other findings from a national survey of oncologists and breast cancer patients were released in conjunction with the 2021 ASCO Annual Meeting.
3h
SpaceX Will Have an Offshore Spaceport Ready for Starship Launches as Soon as Next Year
A year ago SpaceX made headlines after posting job openings for operations engineers. The task at hand? To help design and build an offshore rocket launch facility—aka, a floating spaceport. Between the job postings and Elon Musk's tweet that the spaceports were intended for launches to Mars, the moon, and hypersonic travel around Earth, the whole thing seemed somewhat outlandish. A year later, t
3h
How much carbon will peatlands lose as permafrost thaws?
Just as your freezer keeps food from going bad, Arctic permafrost protects frozen organic material from decay. As the climate warms, however, previously frozen landscapes such as peatlands are beginning to thaw. But how much fresh carbon will be released into the atmosphere when peat leaves the deep freeze of permafrost?
3h
UN urges intense restoration of nature to address climate and biodiversity crises
Facing the triple threat of climate change, loss of nature and pollution, the world must deliver on its commitment to restore at least one billion degraded hectares of land in the next decade—an area about the size of China. Countries also need to add similar commitments for oceans, according to a new report by the UN Environment Program (UNEP) and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (
3h
Researchers unveil complex defect structure of Li-ion cathode material
Skoltech scientists have studied the hydroxyl defects in LiFePO4, a widely used cathode material in commercial lithium-ion batteries, contributing to the overall understanding of the chemistry of this material. This work will help improve the LiFePO4 manufacturing process to avoid formation of adverse intrinsic structural defects which deteriorate its performance. The paper was published in the jo
3h
White Monument in Syria could be oldest known war memorial
A team of researchers from the University of Toronto, the Euphrates Salvage Project and the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology has found evidence that suggests the White Monument in Syria could be the oldest known war memorial. In their paper published in Cambridge University Press's, Antiquity, the group describes their study of material found in the earth mound before it disappear
3h
How does climate change drive migration, and what can be done about it?
In the face of a mounting humanitarian crisis at the U.S./Mexico border, the Biden administration has acknowledged climate change among the powerful forces pushing migrants from Central America. A $4 billion federal commitment to address the root causes of irregular migration acknowledges the need for adaptation efforts to help alleviate the situation.
3h
How COVID-19 is disrupting and transforming the future of sports
The COVID-19 pandemic not only disrupted Australian sport, but accelerated long term trends that are fundamentally changing how sport is consumed, delivered and managed, suggest researchers of a new report from Swinburne University of Technology, Deakin University and sports thought leadership summit, SportNXT.
3h
Strain-driven autonomous control of cation distribution for artificial ferroelectrics
Theoretical material design and experimental synthesis have advanced in the past few decades with a key role in the development of functional materials, useful for next generation technologies. Ultimately, however, the goal of synthesis science remains to be achieved in order to locate atoms in a specific position of matter. In a new report now published on Science Advances, Changhee Sohn and rese
3h
Why countries best placed to handle the pandemic appear to have fared worst
During the first year of the pandemic, it was wealthier countries, with their comparatively stronger health systems, civil services, legal systems and other public services, that suffered the highest rates of COVID-19. Indeed, countries rated to be best prepared to respond to public health threats such as pandemics—those with the greatest "global health security"—had the most COVID-related fatalit
3h
Turning tree residue into smart hydrogels
NC State researchers are turning wood byproducts into sensory hydrogels that can react to different stimuli and, through advanced manufacturing methods, are made into sustainable, biodegradable smart materials that can be used in agriculture, health care and even veterinary medicine.
3h
Humans aren't overpopulated. We're aging and shrinking
A new study used demographic data to explore current and projected population changes around the world. Europe and Asia are shrinking, while Africa is still growing. For the first time in history, people aged 65+ outnumber children younger than five. Underpopulation will cause serious challenges for sustainability. The 20th century saw the greatest population surge in human history, rising global
4h
Electrochemical cell harvests lithium from seawater
Lithium is a vital element in the batteries that power electric vehicles, but soaring lithium demand is expected to exhaust land-based reserves by 2080. KAUST researchers have now developed an economically viable system that can extract high-purity lithium from seawater.
4h
A tale of two Alpine towns: Study highlights how different tourism strategies influence resilience
The towns of Vent and Obergurgl are nestled in the Ötz Valley in the Tyrol region of Austria, just north of the Italian border. They sit on either end of the mountain valley, framed by jagged peaks and lush meadows. They appear quite similar, quintessentially picturesque mountain villages with chalets and steep roof peaks, but Vent and Obergurgl are in starkly different economic and social situati
4h
Wifi og 5G i intensiveret kamp om kontor-netværket
PLUS. De to største trådløse teknologier har indledt en kamp om at transportere data rundt på kontoret. Telenor installeret indendørs 5G-dækning på sine kontorer i Aalborg og København, mens en ny stor udvidelse af wifi er på trapperne med ekstra båndbredde.
4h
New species of milkweed family found in Mount Emei
Vincetoxicum is a genus of the milkweed family (Apocynaceae) which comprises 378 genera and about 5,350 species. Species of Vincetoxicum are shrubs, erect perennial herbs or herbaceous twiners. There are approximately 70 species of Vincetoxicum occurring in China, most of them are distributed in tropical or subtropical regions.
4h
Small packages with big benefits aboard SpX-22
When the Falcon 9 rocket launches on June 3, it will be carrying thousands of pounds of cargo to the International Space Station aboard SpaceX's 22nd commercial resupply services mission. Yet the last five items to be loaded will weigh less than an ounce. These include two plant and two animal species along with a microbial study. Scientists will examine these to better understand how to prepare f
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Novel SERS sensor helps to detect aldehyde gases
Prof. Huang Qing's group from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) developed a surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) gas sensor to detect aldehyde with high sensitivity and selectivity, which provided a new detection method for studying the adsorption of gas molecules on porous materials. The relevant research results have been published in Analytical Chemistry.
4h
Return of the Bird Flu
Remember the bird flu? Avian influenza (H5N1) was first discovered in birds in 1996, with the first human crossover detected in 1997. Since then it has bee discovered in 50 countries and is endemic is six. If you are old enough to remember, there was a bit of a bird flu panic back in the late 90s. Fortunately, so far, those fears have not been realized. But it's important to remember that the bir
4h
She Got Pregnant. His Body Changed Too.
When Kevin Gruenberg's wife was pregnant, he was anxious, irritable, and preoccupied with the thought that his stomach was growing. He kept thinking of a family story, from when his mother was pregnant with him, and his father gained weight in parallel. In 2014, three decades later, Gruenberg was having a similar experience, though it went beyond overeating. And although he is a psychologist in L
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Putting Microchips in Vaccines Is a Terrible Idea, When You Think About It
I got my first COVID-19 vaccine recently. The whole experience was tremendously routine: I showed my registration, stood in a waiting area, saw a nurse, got the jab, waited 15 minutes in case of an adverse reaction, and left. Oh, and I got a button. The waiting period, of course, was when it happened. James , said the pestilential voice inside my head, while I was scrolling on my phone. James! Wh
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Astronomers calculate genesis of Oort cloud in chronological order
A team of Leiden astronomers has managed to calculate the first 100 million years of the history of the Oort cloud in its entirety. Until now, only parts of the history had been studied separately. The cloud, with roughly 100 billion comet-like objects, forms an enormous shell at the edge of our solar system. The astronomers will soon publish their comprehensive simulation and its consequences in
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Enlisting good bacteria in the fight against pathogens in food processing
Disease-causing bacteria like Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica could survive sanitization in beef processing facilities. Scientists and collaborators in the United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA), Agricultural Research Center (ARS) are investigating how this happens while also seeking approaches to solve the problem.
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NASA to explore divergent fate of Earth's mysterious twin with Goddard's DAVINCI+
Although Earth and Venus are similar in size and location, they are very different worlds today. While Earth has oceans of water and abundant life, Venus is dry and fiercely inhospitable. Although it's somewhat closer to the sun—about 70 percent of Earth's distance—Venus is much hotter, with temperatures at the surface high enough to melt lead. The scorched landscape is obscured by clouds of sulfu
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White dwarf stars' debris disk formation delayed
White dwarfs, the glowing cores of dead stars, often host disks of dusty debris. However, these debris disks only appear 10 to 20 millions of years following the star's violent Red Giant phase. A new paper by Planetary Science Institute Research Scientist Jordan Steckloff unravels the reason for this delay.
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Method lets AI create better original images
Researchers report a new method for controlling how artificial intelligence systems create images. At issue is a type of artificial intelligence (AI) task called conditional image generation, in which AI systems create images that meet a specific set of conditions. For example, a system could be trained to create original images of cats or dogs, depending on which animal the user requested. More
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Read Fast And Smarter With A Blinkist 2-Year Premium Subscription That's Over 70% Off
It wasn't so long ago that the internet was supposedly about to kill the book. Instead, we now use the internet, or at least machine learning, to recommend books, find deals on books, and even to write books . Still, if you're nervous about getting to that ever-growing library on your Kindle or in the corner of your bedroom, or need to be picky about what you spend your time on, a two-year subscr
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Is Workplace Bullying a Genuine Phenomenon?
The term bullying is now used so broadly that the phenomenon may seem pervasive well beyond adolescence. In Ben Smith's recent New York Times exposé of WNYC, the subhead notes, "In public radio, there's either an epidemic of bullying or an epidemic of whining, depending on whom you ask." Left unasked was a key question: Is workplace bullying, writ large, a genuine phenomenon? The term, traditiona
5h
Republicans' Phony Argument for Election Audits
For critics who say that an audit of 2020 votes in Maricopa County, Arizona, is just a costly exercise in misinformation , the Republican state senators who ordered the count have a simple question: If you're sure that the votes were counted correctly, then what's the harm in counting them again to reassure voters who aren't convinced? "We are here to make sure Arizona voters can have faith and c
6h
Photocatalyzed cycloaromatization of vinylsilanes with arylsulfonylazides
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23326-2 Arene-fused siloles have attracted interest due to their promising applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, the authors report Ir(III)-catalyzed cycloaromatization of ortho-alkynylaryl vinylsilanes with arylsulfonyl azides via α-silyl radical Smiles rearrangement for accessing naphthyl-fused
6h
Dating Alphaproteobacteria evolution with eukaryotic fossils
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23645-4 Dating early bacterial evolution is challenging due to the limited bacterial fossil record. Here Wang and Luo use the close evolutionary relationship between Alphaproteobacteria and mitochondria to leverage the eukaryotic fossil record in dating Alphaproteobacteria origin and diversification.
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Visible-light photoredox-catalyzed umpolung carboxylation of carbonyl compounds with CO2
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23447-8 Compounds bearing a carbonyl group, such as aldehydes and ketones, are important industrial chemicals and widespread in pharmaceuticals and natural products. Here, the authors report a strategy for visible-light photoredox-catalyzed umpolung carboxylation of diverse carbonyl compounds with CO2, to generate valua
6h
Lateral advection supports nitrogen export in the oligotrophic open-ocean Gulf of Mexico
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23678-9 The middle of the Gulf of Mexico is stratified and highly oligotrophic, yet there are anomalously high fluxes of sinking particulate matter from the euphotic zone. Here the authors show that lateral advection of organic matter supports nitrogen export in the Gulf of Mexico's open ocean.
6h
Non-universal current flow near the metal-insulator transition in an oxide interface
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23393-5 Macroscopic properties usually follow algebraic scaling laws near phase transitions. Here, the authors investigate the scaling properties of the metal‐insulator transition at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface, finding that coupling between structural and electronic properties prevents the universal behavior.
6h
Nuclear compartmentalization of TERT mRNA and TUG1 lncRNA is driven by intron retention
Nature Communications, Published online: 03 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23221-w RNA localization plays an important role in transcriptome regulation. The majority of TERT transcripts are detected in the nucleus and TUG1 lncRNAs in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Here, the authors combine single-cell RNA imaging, antisense oligonucleotides and splicing analyses to show that retention of spec
6h
Val av träd viktigt för att möta klimatförändringar
Trädarter från Afrikas höglänta bergsregnskogar kan anpassa både fotosyntes och bladens ämnesomsättning till uppvärmning. Men skilda artgrupper är olika bra på detta. Livskraften och sammansättningen hos framtidens tropiska skogar beror på hur träden kan anpassa sina inre fysiologiska processer till ett allt varmare och, på många ställen, torrare klimat. Trädarter från Afrikas höglänta bergsregns
6h
Kraftig nedgång av brott till följd av coronapandemin
När människor tvingades stanna hemma på grund av coronapandemin minskade antalet inbrott, rån och mord. I Malmö och Stockholm var effekterna på brottsligheten minst av alla jämförda länder. De restriktioner som införts världen över i kampen mot covid-19 har lett till en dramatisk minskning av brottsligheten i storstäderna, visar en ny studie. Sverige och Malmö sticker dock ut med den mest blygsam
6h
Skolmat varje dag gav eleverna högre inkomst
Skollunch infördes stegvis från mitten av fyrtiotalet. De elever som fick skolmat hela skoltiden blev längre, studerade mer och fick högre inkomst, visar forskning. Skolmaten ger inte bara mättnad för stunden. Skollunchprogram har betydande långsiktiga fördelar för elevernas utbildning, allmänna hälsa och livstidsinkomst, visar forskare i nationalekonomi och medicin i en studie, publicerad i The
6h
Why the ransomware crisis suddenly feels so relentless
Just weeks after a major American oil pipeline was struck by hackers , a cyberattack hit the world's largest meat supplier. What next? Will these criminals target hospitals and schools? Will they start going after US cities, governments—and even the military? In fact, all of these have been hit by ransomware already. While the onslaught we've seen in the last month feels new, hackers holding serv
6h
COVID-19 ICU Patients Reunited with Families Through Virtual Reality
Due to strict COVID-19 isolation protocols, many Intensive Care Unit patients in Spain's hospitals have gone months without a visit from their family and friends. On average, patients spend up to three months hospitalized in the ICU and recovery—all without a single visitor. A photographer formed an NGO group and reached out to Hospital del Mar, one of the largest public hospitals in Spain. And t
6h
Vat Grown Meats
On Saturday, December 19, 2020, a restaurant in Singapore called 1880 became the first restaurant in the world to put vat grown chicken on its menu. For $23 customers may order Good Meat Cultured Chicken. This order comes in 3 parts. ​ A steamed bao bun stuffed with crispy chicken and green onions Puff pastry stuffed with chicken in a black bean puree Spicy fried chicken with a maple waffle Vat g
6h
How to Escape the Happiness Guilt Trap
" How to Build a Life " is a weekly column by Arthur Brooks, tackling questions of meaning and happiness. B rowse your social media, scroll through your Netflix documentary queue, or turn on cable television, and you will be flooded with reasons to be worried and angry about issues large and small. There is plenty wrong in the world, lots of injustice, and too much suffering. The pandemic made th
6h
Låg inkomst ökar risken för återkommande hjärtinfarkt
Det finns god kunskap om vad som ökar risken att drabbas av en första hjärtinfarkt – men mindre om vad som orsakar återkommande hjärt-kärlsjukdom. Det undersöks i en avhandling från Karolinska Institutet. Läkaren Joel Ohm beskriver i sin avhandling hur socioekonomiska faktorer har en stor inverkan på de sekundärpreventiva insatserna och prognos. Resultaten kan få betydelse för personer som överle
7h
We Can End Lead Poisoning During This Lifetime
The Trump administration missed an opportunity to strengthen the country's out-of-date standards for soil contaminants like lead, which will never go away without mitigation. Perhaps it's time to envision a Clean Soil Act that could protect soil ecosystems and the health of the people who live on them.
7h
The Brood X cicadas are here — and yes, there's an app for that
A few weeks ago, Michelle Watson woke up to a deafening, steadily oscillating screech. "What the heck is that noise?" she wondered. She went outside to her yard and saw hundreds of beady-eyed insects enrobed in a thick shell of gold emerging out of the ground and crawling up the trees. What Watson was seeing was the emergence of thousands of Brood X cicadas, part of a billions-strong insect swarm
7h
Electric fish also pause to make a point
Electric fish pause before sharing something particularly meaningful. Pauses also prime the sensory systems to receive new and important information, according to new research. American writer and humorist Mark Twain once offered, "The right word may be effective, but no word was ever as effective as a rightly timed pause." "There is an increased response in listeners to words—or in this case, el
7h
Deep bedrock mineral veins are microbial graveyards
Research in recent years has revealed that microorganisms inhabit fractured rocks of the continental and oceanic crust to depths of several kilometers, and that they have done so for millions of years. In a new study published in Communications Earth & Environment, an international team of researchers have collected mineral veins from more than 30 deep mines in the Swedish Precambrian basement to
7h
The supersense secret: Steve Biddulph on how to become healthier, happier and more fully human
The psychologist and author believes we are tapping into only a small corner of our potential. In his latest book, he explains how to harness all our senses and gut instincts Steve Biddulph is telling me about a patient who came to him after a life-changing incident in a car park. The woman, Andie, was getting into her car when she noticed a figure in the distance moving towards her. The young ma
8h
How do I know middle age is at an end? I fell over in the bath
The revelation that I've got eight weeks of pain ahead of me has made me realise: we humans get out of practice when it comes to falling down The older you get, the more dramatic it feels to fall over. I think this is less to do with creeping fragility than how out of practice adults are at it. When you are a kid, you fall over all the time and bounce straight back up like Wile E Coyote after he'
8h
Drought ravages California's reservoirs ahead of hot summer
Each year Lake Oroville helps water a quarter of the nation's crops, sustain endangered salmon beneath its massive earthen dam and anchor the tourism economy of a Northern California county that must rebuild seemingly every year after unrelenting wildfires.
9h
Scientists make powerful underwater glue inspired by barnacles and mussels
If you have ever tried to chip a mussel off a seawall or a barnacle off the bottom of a boat, you will understand that we could learn a great deal from nature about how to make powerful adhesives. Engineers at Tufts University have taken note, and today report a new type of glue inspired by those stubbornly adherent crustaceans in the journal Advanced Science.
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Lighting hydrogels via nanomaterials
Hydrogels are commonly used inside the body to help in tissue regeneration and drug delivery. However, once inside, they can be challenging to control for optimal use. A team of researchers in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at Texas A&M University is developing a new way to manipulate the gel—by using light.
9h
Coronavirus live news: Brazil anger as death toll mounts; Olympics will go ahead – Tokyo chief
Brazilian street protests erupt as Bolsonaro addresses nation; Tokyo Games organiser rejects doubters; pandemic pushes 100m into poverty says UN 'So many revolutions to lead': generation Z on post-Covid future Biden aims to vaccinate 70% of Americans in 'month of action' Australian toddler taken to hospital after positive test See all our coronavirus coverage 7.16am BST Workers in Melbourne in Au
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From the archive: Callum Roberts on a life spent diving in coral reefs
As temperatures soar in the UK, the Guardian's Science Weekly team have decided to pull this episode out of the archive. Prof Callum Roberts is a British oceanographer, author and one of the world's leading marine biologists. Sitting down with Ian Sample in 2019, he talks about his journey into exploring this marine habitat. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/sciencepod
13h
Social Marketing is Getting More Personal(ized)
Since the earliest days of MySpace, internet celebrities have flexed their promotional muscle by spinning up their own direct-to-consumer brands and selling millions of dollars worth of merchandise to their followers. It's no surprise their campaigns work so well: Influencer marketing is widely understood to be one of the most effective forms of marketing, primarily because we tend to trust recom
13h
About us
Exploring issues and controversies in the relationship between science and medicine Science-Based Medicine is dedicated to evaluating medical treatments and products of interest to the public in a scientific light, and promoting the highest standards and traditions of science in health care. Online information about alternative medicine is overwhelmingly credulous and uncritical, and even mainstr
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Tarzan Wasn't for Her – Issue 100: Outsiders
Elaine Morgan had sass. In Descent of Woman , published in 1972, she asked her readers to take science into their own hands. "Try a bit of fieldwork," she suggested. "Go out of your front door and try to spot some live specimens of Homo sapiens in his natural habitat. It shouldn't be difficult because the species is protected by law and in no immediate danger of extinction." After completing obse
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If Only 19th-Century America Had Listened to a Woman Scientist – Issue 100: Outsiders
Human-induced climate change may seem a purely modern phenomenon. Even in ancient Greece, however, people understood that human activities can change climate. Later the early United States was a lab for observing this as its settlers altered nature. By 1800 it was known that the mass clearing of forests raised temperatures in the Eastern U.S. and that climatic changes followed the pioneers as the
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How to Make Sense of Contradictory Science Papers – Issue 100: Outsiders
The science you can come across today can often appear to be full of contradictory claims. One study tells you red wine is good for your heart; another tells you it is not. Over the past year, COVID-19 research has offered conflicting reports about the overall effectiveness of wearing a mask. As scientists debate what policy best suits the current moment, they will be drawing on hundreds of studi
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NASA is ending its 30-year Venus drought with two new missions
The last time NASA launched a dedicated mission to Venus was in 1989. The Magellan orbiter spent four years studying Venus before it was allowed to crash into the planet's surface. For almost 30 years, NASA has given Venus the cold shoulder. All of that is about to change with a double feature. NASA administrator Bill Nelson announced Wednesday that the agency has selected two new missions to exp
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