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Nyheder2021juni06

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FORSKERE FORSTÅR NU BEDRE HVORDAN IMMUNSYSTEMETS T-CELLER AKTIVERES AF SYGDOMS-ANTIGENER: Monash researchers make fundamental advance in understanding T cell immunity

Scientists have made an important advance in the understanding of how a T cell becomes activated by pathogenic antigens. This study will be relevant to the ongoing research into T cell-related immunotherapy development.

 
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FORSKERE I KINA HAR LYKKEDES MED EN 100 SEKUNDER LANG "REAKTORFUSION": By recreating nuclear fusion, the process that occurs in stars, China has made an "artificial Sun". When they will be able to maintain the temperature stable for a long period of time, it will create an effective source of energy with minimal waste products, right now they could maintain it stable for 100 seconds, but at a very high temperature.
 
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STJERNER STØDTE SAMMEN RELATIVT TÆT PÅ VORES SOLSYSTEM: Scientists did not expect to witness a star collision so close to Earth. When scientists detected gamma-rays with the use of NASA space-based observatories, Fermi and Swift, they did not blend with the cosmic background as it usually happens, so they came to the conclusion that the source must be closer than expected. The source most likely is a detonated star.
 
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Viktigt att korta vårdtiden i respirator
Att försöka minska patienters vårdtider i respirator kan både skona patienterna och frigöra viktiga resurser inom intensivvården. Forskare har undersökt hur det kan gå till. Vård i respirator på en intensivvårdsavdelning är ofta nödvändigt för att upprätthålla liv, och längre vårdtider ökar riskerna för svåra komplikationer och ökad dödlighet. Avvecklingen av respiratorn för att kunna andas själv
5h
Efficient metal-free near-infrared phosphorescence films
The fluorescence dyes were the dominant species of the near-infrared (NIR) dyes, but the energy gap of the NIR dyes between S1 and S0 is generally small to induce the ultrafast internal conversion dynamics to quench the NIR emission of the fluorescence dyes. Here, scientists based in China proposed a new assumption to construct efficient NIR materials based on the metal-free room-temperature phosp
5h
Māori connections to Antarctica may go as far back as 7th century
Over the last 200 years, Antarctic narratives have been of those carried out by predominantly European male explorers. However, a research project led by Manaaki Whenua—Landcare Research and Te Rūnanga o Ngāi Tahu researchers looked into the connection of Māori with Antarctica to better document and understand the contributions and perspectives of under-represented groups who are missing from curr
6h
Establishing a link between air pollution and dementia
More people around the world are falling ill and dying from dementia than they used to. Between 2000 and 2019, the rate of dementia increased by 86%, while deaths from the cognitive disorder more than doubled. Longer life spans and aging populations in much of the world are partly to blame. However, evidence suggests that lifestyle and environmental causes may also play a role, namely, air polluti
6h
GMRT measures the atomic hydrogen gas mass in galaxies 9 billion years ago
A team of astronomers from the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR) in Pune, and the Raman Research Institute (RRI), in Bangalore, has used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to measure the atomic hydrogen gas content of galaxies 9 billion years ago, in the young universe. This is the earliest epoch in the universe for which there is a measurement of the atomic hydrogen conte
6h
A new approach to calculate earthquake slip distributions
During an earthquake, Earth's crust moves, or slips, along fractures in rock called faults. These movements can be detected and recorded by geophysical instruments located at various locations on Earth's surface. Recordings from geophysical instruments have a different orientation relative to the earthquake's epicenter and therefore record a different aspect of a fault slip. An important problem i
6h
Ivermectin As a COVID-19 Therapy
I last wrote about ivermectin here , but I'm getting so many question about it that I need to revisit the topic. Although (I've said this before), I believe that I will regret doing it, because I expect the signal/noise in the comments section to degenerate to mid-pandemic levels in response. The mechanistic story here has always been confused, but to be honest, that doesn't bother me too much. T
6h
Artificial intelligence spots coronal holes to automate space weather prediction
Scientists from the University of Graz (Austria), Skoltech and their colleagues from the US and Germany have developed a new neural network that can reliably detect coronal holes from space-based observations. This application paves the way for more reliable space weather predictions and provides valuable information for the study of the solar activity cycle. The paper was published in the journal
6h
Wider applications for the 'unboil an egg' machine
Wider clean chemistry applications of the extraordinary Vortex Fluidic Device—invented by Flinders University's Professor Colin Raston—are likely in the wake of new research that has been published outlining the seemingly endless possible uses.
6h
Sea snakes show their sensitive side to court potential mates
Decades of research has revealed the remarkable morphological adaptations of sea snakes to aquatic life, which include paddle-shaped tails, salt-excreting glands, and the ability to breathe through their skin. In a new study published in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, researchers at the University of Adelaide detail the enlarged touch receptors that evolved in male turtle-headed sea sn
6h
Measuring gene expression changes over time may help predict T1D diabetes progression
New research suggests that measuring how patterns of gene expression in white blood cells change in children starting in infancy – before autoantibodies appear indicating an autoimmune reaction against pancreatic β cells – can predict earlier and more robustly which genetically-susceptible individuals will progress to T1D. The international study, based on blood samples longitudinally collected fr
6h
A mechanism through which 'good' viruses kill 'bad' bacteria and block their reproduction
The battle against antibiotic-resistant bacteria: A new study at Tel Aviv University revealed a mechanism through which 'good' viruses can attack the systems of 'bad' bacteria, destroy them and block their reproduction. The researchers demonstrated that the good virus (bacteriophage) is able to block the replication mechanism of the bacteria's DNA without damaging its own, and note that the abilit
6h
Drop in testing during COVID could lead to STI surge
Screening and testing for sexually transmitted infections decreased by 63% for men and 59% for women during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. Restrictions placed on direct patient care and shifts to telehealth may explain the finding, which could lead to a possible future surge in sexually transmitted infection (STI) cases, researchers say. This is the first nat
6h
Do gut bacteria shape how babies feel fear?
Why do some babies react to perceived danger more than others? According to new research, part of the answer may be found in a surprising place: an infant's gut bacteria. The human digestive system is home to a vast community of microorganisms known as the gut microbiome. Researchers discovered that the gut microbiome was different in infants with strong fear responses and infants with milder rea
6h
Study supports gene therapy as a promising treatment for soft bone disease
A preclinical study led by scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys has established that AAV8-TNAP-D10–a gene therapy that replaces a key enzyme found in bone–may be a safe and effective single-dose treatment for hypophosphatasia (HPP). The study, published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research and performed in a murine model of the disease, further supports advancing the therapy toward human
6h
Wider applications for Vortex Fluidic Device
Wider clean chemistry applications of the extraordinary Vortex Fluidic Device — invented by Flinders University's Professor Colin Raston — are likely in the wake of new research that has been published outlining the seemingly endless possible uses.The defining paper on understanding fluid flow in the Vortex Fluidic Device has just been comprehensively explained in an article published in Nanosca
6h
A targeted treatment for IgA nephropathy at last?
Due to the immunological pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, patients used to be given immunosuppressive therapy; however, this was shown to have no long-term benefit over optimal supportive therapy. Promising data from the interim analysis of a Phase II study with iptacopan now show that the targeted inhibition of a specific factor of the immune system allows a specific approach to therapy for IgAN
6h
Lung sonography is an useful guide to lung decongestion in HD patients at high CV risk
In hemodialysis patients at high cardiovascular risk, including patients with coronary artery disease and heart failure, lung congestion, a condition predisposing to decompensated heart failure and pulmonary edema, is much common. By means of ultrasound examination of the lungs, the degree of lung congestion can be estimated relatively easily, and the therapy aimed at lung decongestion can be adap
6h
Dapagliflozin provides kidney protection even in cases of FSGS kidney disease
Many patients with the rare kidney disease FSGS require dialysis in the course of the disease, despite anti-inflammatory corticosteroid therapies. The DAPA-CKD study showed a significant benefit in renal outcomes for chronic kidney disease patients with and without diabetes mellitus, following treatment with dapagliflozin, an SGLT-2 (sodium dependent glucose co-transporter 2) inhibitor [1]. A subg
6h
The ACCOLADE study on C3 glomerulopathy
C3 glomerulopathy is a rare disease in which the deposition of C3 protein causes severe inflammation of the glomeruli, which can progress to end stage kidney disease requiring dialysis or transplantation. A new study demonstrates that the inflammatory C5a receptor can be selectively blocked with avacopan. This targeted intervention in the immune system is much less risky than general immunosuppres
6h
Fly me to the Moon
Nature, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01519-5 Loredana Bessone instructs astronauts on living in space, walking on the Moon's surface and choosing rock samples for analysis.
6h
How Long Can We Live? New Research Says the Human Lifespan Tops Out at 150
Even with a healthy diet, plenty of exercise, a lucky draw in the genetic lottery, and the best medicine known to man, your natural lifespan has a hard limit of 150 years, say researchers. But understanding why could help us break through that ceiling. In the last decade, breakthroughs in our understanding of the aging process and promising early results from age reversal experiments in animals h
6h
Targeted COVID-19 therapy: What can we learn from autoimmune kidney diseases?
That viruses and bacteria can trigger autoimmune processes is well known. In autoimmune disease, the immune system attacks the body's own cells, which can become life-threatening, for example in lupus nephritis. In COVID-19, the same autoantibodies (antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies) have been found repeatedly in lupus patients – a new study even describes a specific site of attack site where aPL
7h
COVID-19 as systemic disease: What does that mean for kidneys?
Renal tropism or virus detection can be associated with severe course, greater incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and earlier death – yet the immediate role of the virus in the kidney has not been clarified. An essential role in AKI is played by the overall combination of pneumonia/ARDS, cytokines and complement, ischemia hemodynamics and hypercoagulopathy/ microembolism. The high rate of AKI
7h
COVID-19: Long-term consequences for the kidneys can be expected
It was realized early on in the pandemic that kidney values can predict a severe COVID-19 course [1]. A new concern is that molecular tissue changes caused by the virus could lead in the long term to kidney injury, not only in COVID-19 patients who have suffered acute kidney injury, but also in those who have experienced renal dysfunction during acute disease. Kidney experts stress the importance
7h
Mechanisms of kidney protection by gliflozins
SGLT2 inhibitors (gliflozins) are oral anti-diabetic drugs. They not only reduce blood sug-ar, but also improve cardiovascular and renal outcomes — not only in type 2 diabetics, but also in non-diabetics. This benefit cannot be due to lower blood sugar levels per se; however, it is not yet known how these positive effects are actually mediated. A recent study has now discovered correlations with
7h
Healthy environment, healthy kidneys!
Climate change represents one of the greatest global health threats of our time. In choosing Healthy Environment, Healthy Kidneys as the theme for the 2021 fully virtual Congress, the ERA-EDTA highlights the central role of nephrologists and other health professionals in advocacy for global efforts to reduce emissions and protect against climate change.
7h
Skalamöbor vinnare i framtidens syrefattiga hav
De kallas foraminiferer eller skalamöbor och har funnits i världshaven i 545 miljoner år. Och kommer att klara sig galant även i en klimatförändrad framtid tack vare förmågan att andas nitrat. En konsekvens av klimatförändringarna är högre vattentemperaturer och minskad syrgashalt i världshaven. Det är dåliga nyheter för nästan alla organismer eftersom de flesta respirerar syrgas, det vill säga a
7h
How vulnerable groups were left behind in pandemic response
Viruses like COVID-19 make no distinction between those they infect. They should in theory cause disease in the rich just as they do the poor and pay no heed to social status or cultural background. But in practice the pandemic has widened the gulf between vulnerable groups and other populations in Europe rather than helping to level out inequalities in society, researchers warn.
7h
New method eliminates interference of nicotine in detection of methamphetamine
Recently, a research group led by Chu Yannan and Huang Chaoqun from the Institute of Health & Medical Technology of the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) developed an effective method for on-site detection of methamphetamine (MA) in the presence of nicotine via homemade ion mobility spectrometry. Relevant results were published in Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.
7h
Lighting up ultrafast magnetism in a metal oxide
What happens when very short pulses of laser light strike a magnetic material? A large international collaboration led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory set out to answer this very question. As they just reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the laser suppressed magnetic order across the entire material for several picoseconds, or tr
7h
Artificial intelligence and data mining are being used to measure aerodynamic flows
Developing new ways to measure turbulent flows that are more efficient and reliable is the main objective of the NEXTFLOW research project at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), funded by an ERC Starting Grant from the European Union. These techniques, which use new developments in artificial intelligence and data mining, can be used to improve the aerodynamics of means of transport and r
7h
Global change: A tight squeeze for African great apes
Climate change will drastically reduce the range of African great apes over the next 30 years. This was predicted by an international team of researchers with the participation of the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research, the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg. In various models, they calculated the effects of climate
7h
Researchers claim to have sequenced the entire human genome
A large international team of researchers is claiming to have at last sequenced the entire human genome. Collectively, the team is known as the Telomere-to-Telomere (T2T) Consortium, and they have written a paper describing their efforts and have uploaded it to the bioRxiv preprint server.
7h
Model of development reveals shapes of cell lineages and links to regeneration
Various forms of complex multicellular organisms have evolved on Earth, ranging from simple Volvox carterii, which possess only two cell types, to humans, with more than 200 cell types. All originate from a single zygote, and their developmental processes depend on switch-like gene regulation. These processes have been studied in great detail within a few model organisms such as the worm C. elegan
7h
Bioinspired acid-catalyzed C2 prenylation of indole derivatives
Biomimetic catalysis is an emerging concept that emulates key features of enzymatic process. Prenylation is a ubiquitous process found in almost all living organisms. Inspired by the enzymatic mechanism, researchers developed a selective C2 prenylation of indoles via chemical catalysis, which can be applied to late-stage diversification of tryptophan-based peptides and concise synthesis of trypros
7h
A framework to simulate the same physics using two different Hamiltonians
Researchers at Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan have recently been investigating situations in which two distinct Hamiltonians could be used to simulate the same physical phenomena. A Hamiltonian is a function or model used to describe a dynamic system, such as the motion of particles.
7h
Researchers identify a molecule critical to functional brain rejuvenation
A new study has identified a molecule called ten-eleven-translocation 1 (TET1) as a necessary component in the repair of myelin, which protects nerves and facilitates accurate transmission of electrical signals. The discovery could have important implications in treating neurodegenerative diseases and for molecular rejuvenation of aging brains in healthy individuals.
7h
Pandemic prevention measures linked to lower rates of Kawasaki disease in children
Rates of Kawasaki disease — a condition that creates inflammation in blood vessels in the heart and is more common in children of Asian/Pacific Island descent — have substantially decreased in South Korea during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. The decrease could be due to mask-wearing, hand-washing, school closures and physical distancing, suggesting Kawasaki disease may be prom
7h
YouTube comments reveal scant evidence of political echo chambers
Conservative and liberal viewers on YouTube engage in crosstalk—although it's mostly one-sided—with conservatives commenting on left-leaning videos twice as much as liberals remarking on right-leaning videos, according to a large-scale study from the University of Michigan School of Information.
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Guided digital skills training enhances older people's digital skills and social relations
Older people need digital skills training to learn to use digital technology more independently, but they also seek digital training opportunities because of the social benefits they offer, according to a recent study from the University of Eastern Finland. Published in International Journal of Lifelong Education, the study examined perceived benefits of digital skills training among older adult l
7h
Hope feels dangerous in a pandemic – so I am trying to build happiness by focusing on small delights | Emma Beddington
I am not one of nature's sunbeams, but we all need optimism in our lives right now. Can looking for little moments of joy help? Apparently the fear of happiness has a name: cherophobia . You can check if you have it by answering a questionnaire that is halfway between teen mag summer quiz and the Edinburgh postnatal depression scale . "Having lots of joy and fun causes bad things to happen" – str
7h
Tiny genetic differences add up to big behavioral effects
Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) allow us to correlate genetic differences with behavioral traits. There is no single gene that explains behavior; rather, behavior arises from the complex interaction of many different genes, each of which only plays a small role. Society must be cautious as we learn more about behavioral genetics. Life flourishes with diversity, as diversity gives nature so
7h
How coronavirus aerosols travel through lungs
More than 65% of inhaled coronavirus particles reach the deepest region of our lungs where damage to cells can lead to low blood oxygen levels, new research has discovered, and more of these aerosols reach the right lung than the left.
8h
Radio halo detected in a low-mass galaxy cluster
Using the LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR), European astronomers have carried out radio observations of a low-mass galaxy cluster known as PSZ2G145.92-12.53, dubbed the Ant Cluster. In result, they identified a radio halo—a feature rarely found in low-mass galaxy clusters. The discovery is reported in a paper published May 28 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
8h
Honey bee sting: Key aspect of bee defense against hornets
Heat balling is an ingenious defense that has co-evolved to protect multiple honey bee species from hornet predators. Previous studies have shown that high temperature, increased concentration of CO2, and blockage of the hornet's respiratory system contribute to hornet death. However, the role of stinging by bees and hornets in heat balling remains relatively unexplored.
8h
Forest use changes life cycles of wildflowers
One of the most striking features of global warming is that the life rhythms of plants are changing all over the world. A study at the University of Tübingen has found that human land use can also significantly influence the pace of plant life cycles. In a comparative study, a research team from the Plant Evolutionary Ecology group surveyed one hundred forest sites of different management intensit
8h
World's first blood test for real-time monitoring of cancer treatment success
Cancer patients who are undergoing targeted therapy can look forward to a new blood test that could tell their doctors whether the treatment is working, within one day after the start of the treatment. This will significantly speed up the evaluation process and enable doctors to make adjustments to the treatment plan, if necessary, to improve patients' chances of recovery.
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SARS-CoV-2 variant and monitoring actions of the viral genome
A research group of the Department of Pharmacy and Biotechnology of the University of Bologna analyzed more than 1 million SARS-CoV-2 genome sequences. This analysis led to the identification of a new variant that has been spreading in recent weeks mostly in Mexico, but has also been found in Europe. Their paper, published in the Journal of Medical Virology, presents a variant whose scientific nam
8h
ALPALGA: The search for mountain snow microalgae
In glaciers, well above sea level, algae thrive. Normally invisible to the naked eye, they are often spotted by hikers trekking through the mountains in late spring as strikingly colored stretches of snow, in shades of ochre, orange and red. Known as "glacier blood," this coloring is the result of the punctual multiplication (or bloom) of the microalgae that inhabit the snow.
8h
The Pandemic Has Undone South Africa's National Parks
A n hour's drive south of Cape Town, at a small beach hidden from the main road by suburban houses, you'll find one of Africa's top tourist attractions: the Boulders colony of African penguins. These birds usually nest on hard-to-reach offshore islands, but at Boulders a cordon of residential blocks shields the beach and the surrounding dunes from land-based predators like the caracal lynx, and t
8h
Fauci's E-mails
A few years ago I was sued for libel, in a case I ultimately won in summary judgement where the other side had to pay for some of my legal costs because the judge deemed it unreasonable. But the case did proceed to discovery, which means each side gets to request information from the other. This included me turning over something like 40,000 e-mails. Search tools allow for sifting through these e
8h
How COVID changed schools outreach
Nature, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01517-7 Since lockdowns closed classrooms and labs, scientists have devised online activities to inspire the next generation of researchers.
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Seamlessly Manage Your Company's Apple Devices With Jamf Now
The benefits of providing smart devices for company employees are proven, even for small businesses. According to a 2016 Frost & Sullivan report, smartphone usage increases employee productivity by 34 percent. The even better news? The cost. A $500 device investment for an employee who earns $50,000 per year is roughly one work hour per month. An extra hour of work for a 34 percent jump in produc
9h
China's Fusion Reactor Sets World Record by Running for 101 Seconds
Fusion reactors like China's Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) could be the solution to humanity's energy woes. By harnessing the fusion power of the sun, scientists hope we can generate clean, abundant energy on Earth, but progress over the decades has been slow. Chinese state media has reported that EAST has taken a big step toward making fusion power a reality by keeping pla
9h
Deliver Better Writing With A Lifetime Subscription To ProWritingAid
One of the central ironies of modern life is that writing has become more important than ever before. Even the most visual social media uses text, we send emails constantly, and text our friends rather than call. Handwriting is even becoming a valuable diagnostic tool for Alzheimer's and other neurological disorders. The Award-Winning ProWritingAid Lifetime Subscription Bundle will help you becom
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Coronavirus Variants Have Nowhere to Hide
Any diagnostic test worth its salt has precision on its side. It can pinpoint the presence of this condition, but not that one; it can, when used for an infectious disease, distinguish between microbes that look very much the same. For most of the pandemic, that exactness has been a major asset for the hundreds of tests that detect SARS-CoV-2. But the discerning nature of most tests has also open
9h
The Paradox of Grief
Editor's Note: With Lori Gottlieb on book leave, Rebecca J. Rosen, the editor of "Dear Therapist," is filling in as The Atlantic's "Dear Therapist" archivist , pointing readers to some of Lori's most beloved columns. To grieve is to encounter a paradox. Loss is an inescapable human experience; most people—and certainly most adults—have endured the death of a loved one. And yet, loss can feel utte
9h
The Rise of Shareholder Politics
When asked whether public corporations should be legally forced to disclose their political donations, Gary Gensler, President Joe Biden's pick for chair of the Securities and Exchange Commission, said that the decision should be based on what investors want. To an outsider, this might sound like an evasive answer, in the grand tradition of confirmation hearings. The truth is that for the future
10h
Om betalsystemet kraschar – så bör vi agera
Svenskarna är beroende att att betalsystemen funkar när vi handlar. Men vad händer om de kraschar? För att ta reda på konsekvenserna har forskare utvecklat ett spel som låter aktörerna öva på scenariot. Nyckeln till en bra krishantering visade sig vara samarbete mellan alla aktörer. Maktlöshet är kanske den känsla som bäst kan beskriva hur vi känner när vi står där i affären och inte kan betala.
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Falling sperm counts aren't as alarming as they sound | Marion Boulicault and Meredith Reiches
Apocalyptic predictions about male infertility seem to be everywhere, but the science doesn't support them What's too small to see with the naked eye, made by half the population in batches of millions, and in alarmingly short supply? The answer, according to some scientists, is sperm. Specifically, researchers are concerned that men in the west have been producing fewer and fewer sperm since the
10h
US federal watchdog loses director to another government role
The U.S. Office of Research Integrity, which oversees investigations into allegations of misconduct in grants from the NIH, is once again without a permanent director. Elisabeth (Lis) Handley, who became director in 2019, has taken on a new role in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), of which ORI is a part. … Continue reading
10h
Can a Radical Treatment for Pedophilia Work Outside of Germany?
The German health ministry has supported a project to treat pedophilia with some $6 million per year since 2018, but so far, no other country has shown such support for a similar program. Klaus Beier wants to change that. "I'm confident we'll be able to establish our ideas in other countries," he says.
11h
Chemodivergent manganese-catalyzed C–H activation: modular synthesis of fluorogenic probes
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23462-9 Bioorthogonal diversification of peptides is generally dependent on impractical prefunctionalization methods. Here, the authors develop a manganese(I)-catalyzed C–H fluorescent labeling with BODIPY probes, which enables the development of activatable fluorophores to image cell function.
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SARS-CoV-2 RNAemia and proteomic trajectories inform prognostication in COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23494-1 Here the authors use RT-qPCR and mass spectrometry to analyze longitudinal blood samples from intensive care unit (ICU) COVID-19 patients and controls. They find that viral RNA and pentraxin-3 predict 28-day ICU mortality and that galectin-3-binding protein is an interaction partner of SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprot
11h
Multi-target mode of action of silver against Staphylococcus aureus endows it with capability to combat antibiotic resistance
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23659-y Silver (Ag) has been used as an antimicrobial agent since a long time, but its molecular mechanism of action was not elucidated due to technical challenges. Here, the authors develop a mass spectrometric approach to identify the Ag-proteome in Staphylococcus aureus, and capture a molecular snapshot of the dynami
11h
Genetic variation associated with thyroid autoimmunity shapes the systemic immune response to PD-1 checkpoint blockade
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23661-4 Endocrinopathies, such as thyroid autoimmunity, are common among patients treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. Here, by using a polygenic risk score (PRS) derived from a hypothyroidism GWAS, the authors show that cancer patients with high PRS are at increased risk of atezolizumab (anti-PD-L1)-induced thyro
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Pathogen effector recognition-dependent association of NRG1 with EDS1 and SAG101 in TNL receptor immunity
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23614-x For defence, plants deploy nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat (NLR) immune receptors to detect pathogens that signal via modular networks of downstream proteins. Here the authors report rapid induced association of non-interchangeable signalling pathway module components after NLR activation.
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The C5a/C5a receptor 1 axis controls tissue neovascularization through CXCL4 release from platelets
Nature Communications, Published online: 07 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23499-w As more intersection points between platelets and the immune system are found, the role of platelets for vessel growth in the adult organism remains unclear. The authors demonstrate that platelets negatively modulate revascularization through CXCL4 secretion induced by activation C5aR1 on their surface.
11h
Which US vaccine plans actually helped hard-hit communities?
Long before the first covid-19 vaccines went into arms, certain groups in the US felt the impact of the pandemic more severely: those who whose jobs had to be done in person , who were suddenly labeled "essential"; those who were shut out from government assistance ; and certain communities of color. Officials promised that the vaccine drive would be different, and that equity would be a priority
12h
Yemen's unique 'dragon's blood' island under threat
Centuries-old umbrella-shaped dragon's blood trees line the rugged peaks of Yemen's Socotra—a flagship symbol of the Indian Ocean archipelago's extraordinary biodiversity, but also a bleak warning of environmental crisis.
13h
Unwell Women by Elinor Cleghorn review – battle for the female body
The shocking mistreatment of women by the medical establishment is laid bare in a compelling social history During the recent anxieties about the AstraZeneca Covid vaccine and its possible link to blood clots, many women felt obliged to point out, on social media and in the press, that the risk of fatal thrombosis was significantly higher from using hormonal contraception, and yet this continues
13h
Udtørrede grundvandsmagasiner får storbyer til at synke
Mexico City er en af de storbyer, der synker som følge af grundvandsindvinding. Processen kan ikke standses, men dog bremses ved at mindske vandforbruget og anvende kunstig infiltration, hvor man pumper overflade- eller renset spildevand ned i undergrunden, påpeger dansk rådgiver.
13h
Udtørrede grundvands-magasiner får storbyer til at synke
Mexico City er en af de storbyer, der synker som følge af grundvandsindvinding. Processen kan ikke standses, men dog bremses af mindre vandforbrug og mere kunstig infiltration, hvor man pumper overflade- eller renset spildevand ned i undergrunden, påpeger dansk rådgiver.
13h
Resvanor under pandemin kopplas till klass
Med hjälp av blippningar från 1,8 miljoner individuella resekort har forskare från Kungliga tekniska högskolan, KTH, kartlagt stockholmarnas resvanor i kollektivtrafiken under våren och hösten år 2020. Statistiken är anonym, men genom att analysera varifrån morgonresorna startade kunde forskarna räkna ut var kortens ägare bodde. Detta kombinerades med data från SCB om saker som den genomsnittliga
13h
"COVID-19 vaccines are going to sterilize our womenfolk," Take 2
Antivaxxers have long claimed that vaccines, particularly HPV vaccines, can damage the ovaries and cause female infertility. That claim has been resurrected for COVID-19 vaccines. The first example relied on a dubious "similarity" between the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein and a placental protein. This time, it's the lipid nanoparticles attacking the ovaries, echoing very old claims about polysorbate-8
13h
Fantomtidsteori
Är stora delar av vår historia bara fake? Flera personer har hävdat att vissa perioder av etablerad historia är påhittad och aldrig har inträffat. Jesuiten Jean Hardouin (1646 – 1729) … Continued Inlägget dök först upp på Vetenskap och Folkbildning .
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The papers are coming from inside the house!
"It feels like half the higher-echelon professors at Jilin University have built their careers on these fairy-tales, with successions of papers itemising the interactions of ADAM10 or GRIM-19. […] if only they had published instead about the Tooth-Fairy circ-RNA and how it targets the Easter-Bunny Pathway…", – Smut Clyde
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How and when to watch the solar eclipse on Thursday
The moon will partially cover the sun in the UK later this week, but some parts of the northern hemisphere will experience a total eclipse This Thursday, Greenland, Iceland, the Arctic, most of Europe, much of North America and Asia will experience a solar eclipse. Most will see a partial eclipse, where the moon takes a bite out of the sun. From a few specific places in Russia, Greenland and Cana
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Scientists urge caution after Tony Blair backs UK 'Covid pass'
Allowing the fully vaccinated to enjoy more freedoms could stoke social division, say experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Scientists have urged caution after Tony Blair called for people fully vaccinated against Covid to have more freedoms than those who have not had both jabs, arguing it could stoke social divisions. A report from the Tony Blair Institute for Gl
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'The Minister of Chaos'—For The Atlantic's July/August Issue, Tom McTague Profiles Prime Minister Boris Johnson
Many Americans view Boris Johnson as the U.K.'s answer to Donald Trump––a perception that the prime minister desperately wants to dispel. "I'm laboriously trying to convey to an American audience that this is a category error that has been repeatedly made," Johnson says in a revealing and fascinating new profile on the cover of The Atlantic 's July/August issue. London-based Atlantic staff writer
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Pray Tell and the Church of Pose
This article contains spoilers through the series finale of Pose . In a recent interview with The Hollywood Reporter , the actor Billy Porter explained the monumental meaning of his role in the FX drama Pose , which aired its series finale tonight. Yes, he won his first Emmy in 2019 for portraying Pray Tell, the cantankerous fashion designer who moonlights as an emcee in New York City's undergrou
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Hospitalized individuals with active cancer more likely to die from COVID-19
New research indicates that patients hospitalized with active cancer were more likely to die from COVID-19 than those with a history of cancer or those without any cancer diagnosis. The findings published by Wiley early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, also indicate those with active blood cancers have the greatest risk of death due to COVID-19.
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This Advanced Multivitamin Uses Mushrooms to Support a Health Immune System
The age-old adage says an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but the truth is fungi is actually the best way to support your immune system and avoid becoming ill. That's right, a recent study out of Pennsylvania State University found that mushrooms contain unusually high amounts of ergothioneine and glutathione, antioxidants known to protect cells from a variety of diseases such as cancer, heart
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Scientists can induce out-of-body experiences without drugs
This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink. Feeling centered and in control of your body is a part of being human that we take for granted in our daily lives. But for millions of people suffering from post-traumatic stress, epilepsy, or another neuropsychiatric condition, this sense of self can slip out their hands in moments of "dissociation." These dissociated states, w
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The Guardian view on the god of science: a divine but rational disagreement | Editorial
A key maths tool during the pandemic came about because of an 18th-century debate about Christianity. The lesson we can draw today is that moral philosophy matters Do the laws of science and mathematics explain everything, without any need to bring God into it? The pious once believed that wrathful deities could unleash plagues . As reason emerged in the temple of thinking, there was a move to cl
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This Country Plans to Be the First to Accept Bitcoin as Legal Tender
Crypto Legal Tender El Salvador is beginning efforts to accept bitcoin as legal tender — making it the first ever sovereign nation to do so. President Nayib Bukele announced that he would introduce legislation to accept the cryptocurrency as legal tender along with the US dollar, according to CNBC . The El Salvadoran president made his announcement in a video broadcast to Bitcoin 2021, a multiday
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Physics' greatest mystery: Michio Kaku explains the God Equation
"It's no exaggeration to say that the greatest minds of the entire human race have made proposals for this grand final theory of everything," says theoretical physicist Michio Kaku. This theory, also known as the God Equation, would unify all the basic concepts of physics into one. According to Kaku, the best, most "mathematically consistent" candidate so far is string theory, but there are objec
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Unknown Bird
Photo illustrations by Miki Lowe W. S. Merwin was a man of many callings. He was an incredibly prolific poet—he won the Pulitzer Prize twice , along with nearly every other major literary award. He also dedicated his life to environmentalism: After moving to a barren pineapple plantation in Hawaii in 1977, he painstakingly restored it to its natural state, growing back hundreds of species of palm
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'Our Next Option Was the Back of My Pickup'
Deep in the densely forested foothills of southern Oregon, near the town of Butte Falls, Lanette and Steve Martin lived with their son and his family—until last year, when a wildfire chased them away from their home. As embers the size of charcoal briquettes landed on their front deck, the retired couple and their family jumped into their cars, leaving behind five chickens and a cat. "If we'd wai
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1942: Isvintre og krig forsinker Rømødæmningen
Dæmningen er et beskæftigelsesprojekt, men skal dels støtte landvindingsarbejdet og etablere en fast forbindelse til øen, der i vintrene 1941 og 1942 har været afskåret fra fastlandet i op til to en halv måned, bortset fra en slædeforbindelse.
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Build And Secure Networks With This CompTIA and Cisco Certification Bundle
As technology advances, the jobs we do will change in ways we're just beginning to understand. Yet one job won't be going anywhere; we'll need legions of network engineers to design, build, upgrade, troubleshoot, and protect the clouds and connections we increasingly rely on. The Premium CompTIA & Cisco Networking Certification Prep Bundle helps both newbies and IT professionals upskill to build
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Maybe You Have to Be Disagreeable to Convert
The invitation to convert to Islam comes frequently if you travel in the Muslim world and are not visibly Muslim. Parts of the United States are similar— Have you accepted Jesus as your lord and savior? —although in countries such as Pakistan or Bangladesh or Sudan, the question arrives with even less preamble than its Christian equivalent in the Bible Belt. I have heard the entreaty from strange
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Cruise ships restart in Venice, bring environmental protests
The first cruise ship since the pandemic wended its way Saturday through the heart of Venice, escorted by triumphant water-spouting tugboats and elated port workers as it traveled down the Giudecca Canal but also protested by hundreds on land and a small armada of wooden boats waving "No Big Boats" flags.
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Will the future of warfare see an even more dehumanized experience of the soldier, or a return to an experience akin to the wars prior to the great war
"World war II was the war in which the technician finally won over the soldier" – Junger. In the trenches of the first world war, the then-unknown soldier, Ernst Junger would realize that the metaphysics of combat did not unfold as he expected. And, although, this might be obvious in retrospect, wars up to this point were not seen as a wasteful endeavor in which young men, many not even adults, w
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