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FORSKERE HAR OPDAGET EN SAMMENHÆNG MELLEM TRYKKET INDEN FOR HJERNESKALLEN OG PERSONERNES BLODTRYK: Non-invasive sensor shows correlation between blood pressure and intracranial pressure

Scientists have discovered a correlation between blood pressure and intracranial pressure. Along with this, they also validated a non-invasive method to monitor intracranial pressure.  

 
Link:
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2021-06/fda-nss060721.php 
 
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Mystery of the gigantic Oort cloud from deep space explained
The Oort cloud is a gigantic "cloud" at the edge of the solar system, about 3,000 times the distance between the Earth and the Sun. Astronomers used computer simulations to reconstruct the first 100 million years of the Oort cloud's existence. The Oort cloud may consist of the "leftovers" from the solar system's formation Astronomers have calculated the first 100 million years of the history of t
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LATEST

Remember Anonymous? Now They're Threatening Elon Musk
Elon Meets Anon Elon Musk has drawn the ire of a lot of people: crypto investors , union organizers , and "Saturday Night Live" cast members , just to name a few. However, it wasn't until Friday did he get called out by a fairly surprising group: the hacktivist organization Anonymous. The group released a video threatening the Tesla CEO for his alleged manipulation of cryptocurrency markets, acco
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Shackled skeleton identified as rare evidence of slavery in Roman Britain
'Internationally significant' discovery of male with burial chains in Rutland is first of its kind His ankles secured with heavy, locked iron fetters, the enslaved man appears to have been thrown in a ditch – a final act of indignity in death. Now the discovery of the shackled male skeleton by workers in Rutland – thought to have been aged in his late 20s or early 30s – has been identified as rar
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Is human consciousness creating reality?
A new study claims networks of observers are responsible for determining physical reality. The scientists propose that observers generate the structures of time and space. The paper could help yield insights into the God Equation, which attempts to unify quantum mechanics and general relativity. Is there physical reality that is independent of us? Does objective reality exist at all? Or is the st
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Google and Harvard Unveil the Largest High-Resolution Map of the Brain Yet
Last Tuesday, teams from Google and Harvard published an intricate map of every cell and connection in a cubic millimeter of the human brain. The mapped region encompasses the various layers and cell types of the cerebral cortex, a region of brain tissue associated with higher-level cognition, such as thinking, planning, and language. According to Google , it's the largest brain map at this level
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Arctic rotifer lives after 24,000 years in a frozen state
Bdelloid rotifers are multicellular animals so small you need a microscope to see them. Despite their size, they're known for being tough, capable of surviving through drying, freezing, starvation, and low oxygen. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on June 7 have found that not only can they withstand being frozen, but they can also persist for at least 24,000 years in the S
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The Scandal Rocking the Evangelical World
"T his is an earthquake ," a prominent Christian writer told me. The publication of an extraordinary February 24, 2020, letter by Russell Moore, one of the most influential and respected evangelicals in America (and a friend), has shaken the Christian world. When the letter was written, Moore was the president of the Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission, the policy arm of the Southern Baptist
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A New Type Of COVID-19 Vaccine Could Debut Soon
Instead of putting genetic instructions into people whose cells then make a viral protein, the vaccines from Novavax, Medicago and Sanofi carry a spike protein payload. (Image credit: Alastair Grant/AP)
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Scientists: The Pandemic Might Have Caused Two Flu Strains to Go Extinct
Scientists believe that the COVID-19 pandemic safety measures such as masking and social distancing might have inadvertently resulted in several flu strains going extinct. Since March 2020, researchers haven't detected two previously common strains of the flu, according to Gizmodo . More specifically, the strains that are "missing" are the Yamagata lineage of influenza B, and the 3c3 clade of the
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Do aliens exist? I think we have enough on our plate already | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett
A Pentagon report on UFOs is almost here, but I'd rather not consider another looming disaster As a child, I loved unsolved mysteries, and I'm not talking about detective novels. I'm talking about those big, fat, cheaply printed volumes you could buy from Woolworths which anthologised everything from the Mary Celeste and the Loch Ness monster, to Kaspar Hauser to the Enfield poltergeist, throwing
14h
'Mix and match' Covid booster jabs may be offered in UK
Researchers testing whether second dose of different vaccine could generate stronger immune response Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Ministers are considering giving people a different type of Covid vaccine as an autumn booster, it has emerged, after early results from "mix and match" trials appeared to show promise for an enhanced immune response. Four different cor
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Elon Musk Says Money Isn't Real
The Real Economy As part of his trend of tweeting confusing takes and meme posts about currency , Tesla CEO Elon Musk took to Twitter and seemingly suggested that money isn't real. "Goods & services are the real economy, any form of money is simply the accounting thereof," Musk said in a tweet on Saturday . Goods & services are the real economy, any form of money is simply the accounting thereof
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Could a third wave of Covid be more serious than UK's first two?
Analysis: Concern over Delta variant means decision on ending restrictions on 21 June hangs in balance Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Summer has nearly arrived and the UK is beginning to unlock from coronavirus restrictions, with a full lifting still on the cards in England on 21 June. Yet the spectre of the Delta variant is casting an ominous shadow, with concerns
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Jeff Bezos Says He's Going to Space in About a Month
Edge of Space Just two weeks after officially stepping down as Amazon's CEO on July 5, Jeff Bezos is ready for a vacation to the edge of space. Next month, the second richest man in the world will be rocketing to space on board a New Shepard spacecraft built by his space tourism company Blue Origin , the billionaire announced on Instagram on Sunday. "Ever since I was five years old, I've dreamed
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The Problem With Dropping Standards in the Name of Racial Equity
The classics department at Princeton University recently decided that the idea that classics majors ought to know Latin or Greek has been a mistake. Old-fashioned, perhaps. Until now, undergrads who wanted to major in the study of classical texts needed to come into the concentration with at least an intermediate level of Latin or Greek. But those students will no longer even have to learn either
7h
Jeff Bezos to go into space on first crewed flight of New Shepard rocket
Amazon founder's brother, Mark, and one other person will join Bezos onboard Blue Origin vessel on 20 July Jeff Bezos will no longer be the richest person on Earth on 20 July because the Amazon founder will be blasting off into space on the first crewed flight of his New Shepard rocket ship. Joining Bezos on the flight will be his younger brother, Mark, a former advertising executive and voluntee
8h
The Minister of Chaos
This article was published online on June 7, 2021. "N othing can go wrong!" Boris Johnson said, jumping into the driver's seat of a tram he was about to take for a test ride. "Nothing. Can. Go. Wrong." The prime minister was visiting a factory outside Birmingham, campaigning on behalf of the local mayor ahead of "Super Thursday"—a spate of elections across England, Scotland, and Wales in early Ma
16h
Covid live: too soon to say if 21 June can go ahead, says Hancock, amid calls for fully vaccinated to get more freedoms
Latest updates: health secretary says too soon to decide if delay is needed as Tony Blair says people with two jabs should face fewer restrictions Data on Delta variant splits scientists on lifting final Covid restrictions Share vaccines or climate deal will fail, rich countries told Allies claim Hancock raised alarm on early lifting of restrictions Other countries need vaccine before UK teenager
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HIV after Covid: Anthony Fauci and an army of researchers seek to regain momentum
In the summer of 1981, public health professionals faced a terrifying crisis. Their work helped shape victories against the current pandemic – but some fear hard-won ground is lost As Anthony Fauci marks 40 years since HIV emerged, he regrets how the extraordinary disruptions that Covid-19 have wreaked upon society have hampered efforts to tackle the major pandemic that preceded it. Related: 'Bra
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As the Delta variant spreads in England, our most vulnerable are losing protection | Christina Pagel
The Delta variant is surging, and the government's failure to act quickly will likely cost lives A new coronavirus variant that was first sequenced in India has been doubling about every eight days in England since early April. The Delta variant is now dominant in England, and according to a recent risk assessment from Public Health England (PHE), it has a substantially increased rate of transmis
6h
FDA approves first new Alzheimer's drug in almost 20 years
Usefulness of aducanumab is disputed but US approval will trigger push to make it available globally A controversial new drug for Alzheimer's disease, the first in nearly 20 years, was approved in the US on Monday, which will trigger pressure to make it available worldwide in spite of mixed evidence over its efficacy. While doctors, patients and the organisations that support them are desperate f
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Biden's Latest Challenge Could Be Insurmountable
F ive months into Joe Biden's presidency, his efforts at bipartisanship have yielded little progress. The depth of Republican intransigence has placed his presidency at a hinge point. If Biden can successfully mobilize his own party, he still has the chance to usher in the transformational vision that he's promised: Families get money to cover child-care expenses. High-speed internet reaches the
11h
Covid Delta variant 'about 40% more transmissible', says Matt Hancock
Under-30s to be offered jabs from next week but variant makes decision on easing rules in England 'more difficult' Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage The new Delta variant of coronavirus appears to be about 40% more transmissible than the variant it has largely replaced, Matt Hancock has said, making government decisions about whether to ease restrictions in England on
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Data on Delta variant splits scientists on lifting final Covid restrictions
Sage group advises against easing social distancing on 21 June, but others say it is too early to assess risks Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage Health experts remain divided over the dangers posed by the new Delta variant of Covid-19 and the risks it poses to the nation as ministers consider whether or not to lift lockdown later this month. Some argue that the new var
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Astronomers Find Secret Planet-Making Ingredient: Magnetic Fields
We like to think of ourselves as unique. That conceit may even be true when it comes to our cosmic neighborhood: Despite the fact that planets between the sizes of Earth and Neptune appear to be the most common in the cosmos, no such intermediate-mass planets can be found in the solar system. The problem is, our best theories of planet formation — cast as they are from the molds of what we observ
6h
European Commission drops plan to ban UK from science projects
Move comes after concerns from diplomats Britain was being treated as if it posed a similar risk to China The European Commission has dropped plans for a blanket ban on UK involvement in EU research on space projects and supercomputers after a backlash from member states and leading scientists. Thierry Breton, the former French finance minister who is now the EU internal market commissioner, had
6h
24,000-year-old organisms found frozen in Siberia can still reproduce
Russian scientists find bdelloid rotifers deep in remote permafrost A microscopic worm-like creature, labelled an " evolutionary scandal " by biologists for having thrived for millions of years without having sex, has now been shown to persist for at least 24,000 years in Siberian permafrost and then reproduce, researchers have found. Multicellular invertebrates that are solely female, bdelloid r
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FDA Approves "Game-Changer" Weight Loss Drug
On Friday, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new weight-loss drug for the first time since 2014. And that's a big deal: around 70 percent of adults in the US are either overweight or obese — meaning this treatment, if it holds up as an effective non-surgical approach to losing weight, could have significant public health implications. The drug, called semaglutide and made by Da
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A few common bacteria account for majority of carbon use in soil
Just a few bacterial taxa found in ecosystems across the planet are responsible for more than half of carbon cycling in soils. These new findings, made by researchers at Northern Arizona University and published in Nature Communications this week, suggest that despite the diversity of microbial taxa found in wild soils gathered from four different ecosystems, only three to six groups of bacteria c
11h
Scientists Say That Declining Sperm Count Research Is Nonsense
A group of scientists have called into question recent research that sounded the alarm bells on declining sperm count. Researchers at Harvard's GenderSci Lab took a critical look at the 2017 study that concluded sperm count amongst men in Western countries have been dropping precipitously over the past four decades, according to The New York Times . Upon closer examination, they found that there
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My best friend at school moved in with us – and taught me to trust again
How a close and enduring relationship forged in the school playground turned my life around My school bully came in an unlikely package. She was a bushy-haired, bespectacled, briefcase-carrying pocket rocket who made my life miserable for a significant portion of Year 8 when I was 12 years old. I met her on the first day at our large and rowdy comprehensive school. With all my existing friends as
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How Academic Freedom Ends
Last month, a group of University of Hong Kong academics gathered on the third floor of the campus's Jockey Club Tower for a highly anticipated town hall. Nearly a year had passed since Beijing imposed a new security law on Hong Kong, arresting dozens of people , reengineering the territory's voting system , and seizing the assets of a publicly listed company linked to activists. Staff members at
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A new disease called halo blight threatens Michigan hop production
Michigan hop growers contend with unique challenges as a result of frequent rainfall and high humidity during the growing season. In 2018, growers approached Michigan State University researchers and the Michigan State University's Plant & Pest Diagnostics lab with concerns about a leaf blight they had never seen before. This was followed by reports of hop cones shattering during harvest and yield
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Clever biomolecular labelling enables identification of immune cells
Biomolecules regulate the biological functions inside every living cell. If scientists can understand the molecular mechanisms, then it is possible to detect severe dysfunction. At a molecular level, this can be achieved with fluorescent markers that are incorporated into the respective biomolecules. Researchers at the Universities of Göttingen and Edinburgh are now able to show that a complex of
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Popularity runs in families
To investigate the role genes play in the evolution of social structure, researchers created an experiment they likened to the 1998 film 'The Truman Show.' Genetically identical versions of 20 fruit flies were placed in 98 controlled enclosures, and video cameras recorded their interactions. The study revealed the same clones occupied the same social positions in each enclosure, regardless of livi
19min
Visualizing cement hydration on a molecular level
The concrete world that surrounds us owes its shape and durability to chemical reactions that start when ordinary Portland cement is mixed with water. Now, MIT scientists have demonstrated a way to watch these reactions under real-world conditions, an advance that may help researchers find ways to make concrete more sustainable.
21min
Correcting misperceptions about, and increasing empathy for, migrants
Many mainstream depictions of immigration at the southern border of the United States paint a dark picture, eliciting imagery of violent gang members and child trafficking. But how many undocumented immigrants are really involved in this kind of activity? Many people may be surprised to learn the answer is far fewer than they think.
21min
New connector for sustainable structures on Earth and in space
As part of his Master's degree in civil engineering, an EPFL (Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne) student developed a connector for use in building sustainable structures. His initial project has expanded into an online program for designing bamboo furniture that's stylish, modular and customizable. And now his connector is being looked at for use by astronauts in outer space.
21min
Darkened windows save migrating birds
Building lights are a deadly lure for the billions of birds that migrate at night, disrupting their natural navigation cues and leading to deadly collisions. But even if you can't turn out all the lights in a building, darkening even some windows at night during bird migration periods could be a major lifesaver for birds.
22min
Climate change a bigger threat to landscape biodiversity than emerald ash borer
The emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle native to Southeast Asia, threatens the entire ash tree population in North America and has already changed forested landscapes and caused tens of billions of dollars in lost revenue to the ash sawtimber industry since it arrived in the United States in the 1990s. Despite the devastating impact the beetle has had on forests in the eastern and midwestern pa
23min
Monoclonal antibody prevents HIV infection in monkeys, study finds
The experimental, lab-made antibody leronlimab can completely prevent nonhuman primates from being infected with the monkey form of HIV, new research published in Nature Communications shows. The results will inform a future human clinical trial evaluating leronlimab as a potential pre-exposure prophylaxis, or PrEP, therapy to prevent human infection from the virus that causes AIDS.
43min
New drug-formulation method may lead to smaller pills
About 60 percent of drugs on the market have hydrophobic molecules as their active ingredients. These drugs, which are not soluble in water, can be difficult to formulate into tablets because they need to be broken down into very small crystals in order to be absorbed by the human body.
50min
Space travel weakens our immune systems: Now scientists may know why
Microgravity in space perturbs human physiology and is detrimental for astronaut health, a fact first realized during early Apollo missions when astronauts experienced inner ear disturbances, heart arrhythmia, low blood pressure, dehydration, and loss of calcium from their bones after their missions.
50min
Consciousness: The 'ghost in the machine', or nothing special?
As individuals, we feel that we know what consciousness is because we experience it daily. It's that intimate sense of personal awareness we carry around with us, and the accompanying feeling of ownership and control over our thoughts, emotions and memories. But science has not yet reached a consensus on the nature of consciousness – which has important implications for our belief in free will an
57min
Our Father's Day Gift Guide Has Something Awesome for Every Type of Dad
June's here, which means Father's Day is right around the corner. And after the past year, celebrating with dad is one of the best gifts we could have in 2021. Your number one guy has been there for you through thick and thin, gifting you a combination of awesome life advice, amazing technical advice, and awful dad jokes. The best way to return the favor is with an unparalleled Father's Day gift.
1h
In Oregon, new gun violence restraining orders appear to be used as intended, but could be used more proactively
Extreme risk protection orders (ERPOs), also known as gun violence restraining orders, are civil court orders that grant temporary restrictions on purchasing and possessing firearms for individuals determined by a civil court judge to be at extreme risk of committing violence against themselves or others. A new study examined ERPO use in Oregon in the first 15 months after it was adopted. The stud
1h
Do customer loyalty programs really help sellers make money?
Customer loyalty programs have been around for decades and are used to help businesses, marketers and sellers build a sustainable relationship with their customers. But do they work? A recent study sought to find out and researchers learned that yes, customer loyalty programs do work, but perhaps not in ways most may assume.
1h
Sensing what plants sense: Integrated framework helps scientists explain biology and predict crop performance
Scientists have invested great time and effort into making connections between a plant's genotype, or its genetic makeup, and its phenotype, or the plant's observable traits. Understanding a plant's genome helps plant biologists predict how that plant will perform in the real world, which can be useful for breeding crop varieties that will produce high yields or resist stress.
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Daily briefing: Microfossils reveal mysterious shark die-off
Nature, Published online: 04 June 2021; doi:10.1038/d41586-021-01531-9 Up to 90% of the global shark population was wiped out around 19 million years ago. Plus, a nasal spray that could provide COVID-19 protection, and a Q&A with Biden's new science adviser.
1h
Study shows cities can consider race and income in household energy efficiency programs
Climate change and social inequality are two pressing issues that often overlap. A new study led by Princeton researchers offers a roadmap for cities to address inequalities in energy use by providing fine-grained methods for measuring both income and racial disparities in energy use intensity. Energy use intensity, the amount of energy used per unit floor area, is often used as a proxy for assess
1h
Infrared imaging leaves invasive pythons nowhere to hide
For more than 25 years, Burmese pythons have been living and breeding in the Florida Everglades, where they prey on native wildlife and disrupt the region's delicate ecosystems. A new study shows that infrared cameras could make it easier to spot these invasive snakes in the Florida foliage, providing a new tool in the effort to remove them.
1h
A quantum step to a heat switch with no moving parts
Researchers have discovered a new electronic property at the frontier between the thermal and quantum sciences in a specially engineered metal alloy—and in the process identified a promising material for future devices that could turn heat on and off with the application of a magnetic "switch."
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New COVID-19 model reveals effectiveness of travel restrictions
More strategic and coordinated travel restrictions likely could have reduced the spread of COVID-19 in the early stages of the pandemic. That's according to new research published in Communications Physics. This finding stems from new modeling conducted by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.
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The US Navy Just Used a Drone to Refuel a Fighter Jet in Midair
Midair Refuel A drone just refueled a US fighter jet in midair for the first time, the US Navy announced today. An uncrewed MQ-25 Stingray, a drone purpose-built for aerial refueling that flew for the first time in September 2019, refueled the Navy's F/A-18 Super Hornet fighter jet after being launched from the MidAmerica Airport in Mascoutah, Illinois. The successful test goes to show that uncre
1h
New Study: Psychedelic Mushrooms Are as Effective as Antidepressants
A new phase II clinical study pitted psilocybin, the active compound in psychedelic shrooms, against a conventional selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant to see which served as a better treatment for depression — and the psilocybin seems to have held its own. Psilocybin performed about as well as the SSRI escitalopram as a treatment for moderate-to-severe major depressive d
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Researchers discover how cowpea mosaic plant virus activates immune system against cancer
Cowpea mosaic virus, when injected into cancerous tumors, stimulates the immune system to attack and often eliminate the tumor. In a new study, immunology researchers in Dartmouth's and Dartmouth-Hitchcock's Norris Cotton Cancer Center, in collaboration with researchers at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, characterize the previously unidentified pathways through
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Bacteria that 'eat' electricity can lock away CO2
Bacteria found in brackish sediments can "eat" electricity and, in the process, absorb and lock away climate-warming carbon dioxide, research finds. Global oceans absorb about 25% of the carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere when fossil fuels are burned. Electricity-eating bacteria known as photoferrotrophs could provide a boost to this essential process, according to the study. This unusua
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Only One Third of US Adults Would Take an Immortality Pill
A new survey of roughly 900 American adults says that actually no, people don't want to live forever. When asked whether they'd like to take a pill that would allow them to live forever at their current age, only about 33 percent of survey respondents said yes, according to research published in the Journal of Aging Studies . Another 42 percent said no, while the remaining 25 percent wasn't sure.
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A cancer immunotherapy technique may prevent diabetes
This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink. Nearly 2 million Americans suffer from type 1 diabetes — a condition that causes drastic spikes or drops in sugar levels and, in turn, dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. It's a condition that must constantly be monitored, something that a lot of diabetics find mentally exhausting. One diabetic, Naomi, told the BBC that she couldn't
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RUDN University chemists created anti-hantavirus drugs 5 times more efficient than existing drugs
RUDN University chemists and their colleagues from Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk Institute of Organic Chemistry and The State Research Center of Virology and Biotechnology VECTOR have obtained a new class of compounds that inhibit the replication of the deadly Hantaan virus that affects blood vessels and internal organs of humans. The resulting substances were five times more effective
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This forest has stayed wild for 5,000 years—we can tell because of the soil
We sometimes think of the Amazon rainforest as unaltered by humans, a peek into the planet's past. In recent years, scientists have learned that many parts of the Amazon aren't untouched at all—they've been cultivated by Indigenous peoples for thousands of years, and mere centuries ago were the sites of cities and farmland. But that's not the case everywhere. In a new study in PNAS, researchers de
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Being social generates larger genomes in snapping shrimp
In an article scheduled to publish in PNAS, on June 7, 2021, a team of researchers led by Columbia University's Dustin R. Rubenstein, a Professor of Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Biology, found that within the same genus of marine snapping shrimp, Synalpheus, genome size and social behavior not only vary widely, but they are also co-evolving over time.
2h
Turning off lights can save migrating birds from crashing into buildings
Every night during the spring and fall migration seasons, thousands of birds are killed when they crash into illuminated windows, disoriented by the light. But a new study in PNAS shows that darkening just half of a building's windows can make a big difference for birds. Using decades' worth of data and birds collected by Field Museum scientists at Chicago's McCormick Place convention center, the
2h
Why do android robots have creepy physical faces instead of just a digital face on a screen?
Humanoid "Sophia" robot's face for reference AI robots of the future should not have physical faces. Physical faces on a head are permanent, cannot be replaced, have to have complex machinery, consume more power, and look creepy as all hell. Whereas a digital face on a screen can display the full range of human emotions, look realistic, easy to change/tweak, consume far less power. Here's an exam
2h
Why Aren't We Looking into Building Cities in Earth's Orbit instead of on Mars?
Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos want to build cities on Mars. That's cool, but why ? Mars is some of the least desirable real estate you can think of, even if we did terraform it, we'd be left with a rock so far from earth that even our high speed communications would suffer enough lag to make normal conversation impossible. If it were my money, I'd bet it on building orbital space colonies. Tomorrow's
2h
Blood test confirms COVID-19 vaccination in 5 minutes
A new rapid blood test could confirm if a person has received a COVID-19 vaccine while they wait to board a plane or enter a sporting event. One challenge as society reopens is identifying who has been vaccinated for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The new COVID-19 antibody test is similar to one used at home to determine blood type, where the user pricks a finger and places a drop of
2h
Drought and Sinkholes Threaten Farmers in Turkey
Chris McGrath, a photographer with Getty Images, recently spent time in Turkey's Konya province, where extreme drought conditions have been taking a heavy toll on farmers and the land. For farmers, the lack of rain gives them little option but to tap into the groundwater supplies to sustain their crops, forcing some to turn to installing illegal ground wells. However, the reliance on groundwater
2h
A new hope: A novel vaccine against COVID-19 is safe and induces antibody production
Vaccines are critical tools for fighting COVID-19, and new vaccines will expand overall vaccine availability. In an article recently published in Chinese Medical Journal, a research team use phase 1 and 2 clinical trial data to show that a vaccine called KCONVAC, which contains an inactivated virus, is safe and can stimulate antibody production. These findings support the initiation of a phase 3 t
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Donald Trump Says Bitcoin Is a "Scam"
Maybe it takes one to know one. Former president Donald Trump told Fox Business today that Bitcoin "seems like a scam" and that it only serves to undermine the US dollar. "The currency of this world should be the dollar," Trump said. "And I don't think we should have all of the Bitcoins of the world out there. I think they should regulate them very, very high." "I don't like it because it's anoth
2h
PNAS bans author for refusing to share algae strain
The Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) has sanctioned a researcher who violated the journal's policy by refusing to share a strain of algae that he used in a 2018 paper. Zhangfeng Hu was one of two corresponding authors, and the last author, of the paper, "New class of transcription factors controls flagellar … Continue reading
2h
The tech billionaire space race: who is Jeff Bezos up against?
As Amazon founder prepares to jet off in his Blue Origin vessel, can he compete with Elon Musk's SpaceX? Jeff Bezos to go into space on first crewed flight of New Shepard rocket Every billionaire needs something to spend their fortunes on. For Howard Hughes, it was the Spruce Goose; for Roman Abramovich, it's Chelsea FC. And for the current crop of tech moguls, it's space. Jeff Bezos has led the
2h
Lead halide perovskites — a horse of a different color
In a joint experimental and theoretical effort between Lund University (Sweden), the Russian Academy of Science (Russia), and the Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden at Technische Universität Dresden (Germany), researchers developed a novel spectroscopic technique for the study of charge carrier dynamics in lead halide perovskites — publication in the renowned journal Nature Communications.
2h
Two-thirds of women don't meet criteria to discontinue cervical cancer screening
Current guidelines recommend stopping cervical cancer screening at age 65, but women over age 65 make up over one in five new cervical cancer diagnoses, and are twice as likely to die after a cervical cancer diagnosis compared to younger women. New research from Boston Medical Center found that fewer than one in three women aged 64 to 66 met the criteria to discontinue cervical cancer screening wh
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What digital news can learn from readers' love of newspapers
How people consume news and take actions based on what they read, hear, or see, is different than how human brains process other types of information on a daily basis, according to new research. While the current state of the newspaper industry is in flux, the researchers discovered people still love reading newspapers. The researchers believe a newspaper's physical layout and structure could hel
3h
Brain-Reading Machine Detects Who You Have a Crush On
AI Matchmaker A new brain-computer interface system, trained to pick up on the neural activity of your brain when it sees a new person's face, is sophisticated enough to predict who you will and won't be attracted to. And by matching your neural patterns to existing data of other participants who already ran the gauntlet of headshots, the algorithm can supposedly predict whether users will find s
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Stream of stars extends thousands of light-years across the Milky Way
It's hard to see more than a handful of stars from Princeton University, because the lights from New York City, Princeton and Philadelphia prevent our sky from ever getting pitch black, but stargazers who get into more rural areas can see hundreds of naked-eye stars—and a few smudgy objects, too.
3h
Rejection and isolation aren't the same for preteens
Peer rejection and social network isolation aren't the same thing in early adolescence, according to new research. For years, psychology researchers have treated peer rejection and social network isolation as being somewhat interchangeable when it comes to early adolescence; it was thought that if kids fell into one of those two groups, they fell into the other. The new research finds that social
3h
From meat-production to urinary tract infections
In young women, Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a main cause of urinary tract infections (UTI), reaching 20% prevalence. Understanding the epidemiology of this microorganism can help identify its origin, distribution, causes, and risk factors. Now, ITQB NOVA researchers led by Maria Miragaia showed evidence that Staphylococcus saprophyticus can originate in food, namely in the meat-production chai
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Origin of first structures formed in galaxies like the Milky Way identified
An international team of scientists led from the Centre for Astrobiology (CAB, CSIC-INTA), with participation from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has used the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) to study a representative sample of galaxies, both disc and spheroidal, in a deep sky zone in the constellation of the Great Bear to characterize the properties of the stellar populations of ga
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Societal divisions could hinder EU climate policy
Many contemporary political conflicts are between those who would prioritize the needs of local or national communities and those with a more universal outlook. According to a new study by IASS researcher Silvia Weko, this split between 'communitarian' and "cosmopolitan" Europeans is also evident in their attitudes towards European climate policy. Achieving climate neutrality without exacerbating
3h
1,700+ methane 'super-emitters' dot the biggest US oil field
Researchers have identified more than 1,700 large sources of methane in an oil field that spans Texas and New Mexico, with about half of them likely being malfunctioning equipment. If even just the most persistent leaks—123 of these sources—were repaired, emissions of the potent greenhouse gas could drop by 55 tons an hour, the researchers say. That's 5.5% of all methane emissions from oil and ga
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'Blacklist' claim: Australian Research Council admits scanning applicants for 'sensitivities', China links
Research grant applicants 'entitled to know' if there is a secret blacklist operating: former research minister Kim Carr An Australian government agency has been accused of running a secret "blacklist" on researchers by scanning for information about individuals who apply to it for grants. The Australian Research Council has confirmed it collates information about potential "sensitivities" when i
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Health benefits of low protein-high carbohydrate diets depend on carb type
In a pre-clinical study that helps settle the debate on the pros and cons of carbs, Australian researchers have found the quality and type of carbohydrates eaten in combination with reduced protein levels severely impacts health outcomes. Researchers at the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre conducted the largest ever study of nutrient interactions by examining the health of mice on 33
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Twitter Bans Prominent Anti-Vaxxer and Conspiracy Theorist
Banned Author and conspiracy theorist Naomi Wolf has been suspended indefinitely from Twitter after spreading anti-vaccine misinformation on the platform, the BBC reports . It's a sign that social media platforms are finally starting to take vaccine-related misinformation seriously, despite allowing personalities like Wolf to disseminate dangerous and unfounded information for the entirety of the
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Hidden philosophy of the Pythagorean theorem
Ancient Greeks believed that fire, air, water, and earth were the four elements of the universe. Plato associated these four elements with 3D geometrical solids. Pythagoras may have believed that the right triangle formed the basis of all reality. In Plato's dialogue, the Timaeus , we are presented with the theory that the cosmos is constructed out of right triangles. This proposal Timaeus makes
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Smartwatch lights could turn on insulin genes to control diabetes
Researchers have developed a gene switch that the green LED light commercial smartwatches emit can "flip," an approach that could be used to treat diabetes in the future. Many modern fitness trackers and smartwatches feature integrated LEDs. The green light emitted, whether continuous or pulsed, penetrates the skin and can be used to measure the wearer's heart rate during physical activity or whi
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Nobody's been studying socially isolated kids — that's a problem
For years, psychology researchers have treated peer rejection and social network isolation as being somewhat interchangeable when it comes to early adolescence; it was thought that if kids fell into one of those two groups, they fell into the other. A recent study finds there is actually little overlap between the groups — and socially isolated kids face different risks.
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UEFA EURO forecast: France will be European Champion
After winning the FIFA World Cup, France could also win the European Football Championship – this is the conclusion of researchers from the Universities of Innsbruck (Austria) and Ghent (Belgium), the Technical Universities of Dortmund and Munich (Germany) and Molde University College (Norway). England and Spain also have a good chance of winning the title, according to the forecast.
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Burning Satellites Could Accidentally Geoengineer the Earth
Mega Consternation In the coming years, Earth's orbit is going to get a lot more crowded. Whether it's the tens of thousands of satellites SpaceX plans to launch as part of its Starlink megaconstellation, or the similar projects dubbed " Starnet ," by China and Project Kuiper by Amazon, there's about to be a whole lot of metal in the sky. And when those satellites inevitably die and come down to
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Nytt supertunt material skapat under extremtryck
Forskare har upptäckt ett nytt supertunt material, som förväntas ha samma eftertraktade egenskaper som grafen. Det består av beryllium- och kvävemolekyler som utsatts för extremt högt tryck. I materialen kommer vi kunna studera tillvarons minsta beståndsdelar, menar Igor Abrikosov, professor i teoretisk fysik. Tillsammans med forskare i bland annat Tyskland, Nederländerna, Frankrike och USA har f
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Insights into construction of metal chalcogenide supertetrahedral clusters
Nanoclusters, which consist of several or even thousands of atoms, represent an important intermediate state between microscopic atoms and macroscopic matter. A profound comprehension of the composition, structure, and properties of nanoclusters is crucial for exploring or extending their functional applications. Among the numerous types of nanoclusters, metal chalcogenide supertetrahedral cluster
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Generalizing the measurement postulate in quantum mechanics
The measurement postulate is crucial to quantum mechanics. If we measure a quantum system, we can only get one of the eigenvalues of the measured observable, such as position, energy and so on, with a probability. Immediately after the measurement, the system will collapse into the corresponding eigenstate instantly, known as state collapse. It is argued that the non-cloning theorem is actually a
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Quantifying the role of chance in professional football
In football, chance is defined as actions or situations occurring during the game that cannot be planned and are therefore difficult to train for. Take for instance deflected shots, balls that rebound off the post only to be kicked straight into the goal or goals that are unintentionally assisted by a defender. The primary focus of most researchers has been on analyzing success factors, to enable
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Statement on Request for Voluntary Recognition of Atlantic Editorial Union
Below is a letter sent today from The Atlantic 's editor in chief, Jeffrey Goldberg, to the editorial staff of The Atlantic , concerning our intention to work with the organizers on an agreement to voluntarily recognize a NewsGuild-affiliated Atlantic union of newsroom staff. Press contact: press@theatlantic.com Dear Everyone: As you are all aware, this morning we received a request to recognize
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How basic physics and chemistry constrain cellular functions in primitive and modern cells
A longstanding basic question in biology relates to how life satisfies the fundamental constraints put on it by physics and chemistry. Darwin's warm pond hypothesis for the origin of primordial cells is a familiar one. Advances have been made in mapping out the organic molecules that likely existed on the early Earth, and recently candidate prototypic pathways in early cells have been formulated.
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The genetic structures of closely related dragonflies in Yaeyama and Taiwan islands
The Amami, Okinawa region of Japan may be designated a World Heritage Site in July of 2021 based on the recent recommendation from the IUCN. The Iriomote wild cat is a symbolic species of the region, having evolved independently on the island. The area is home to many other highly endemic and unique evolutionary species. A research group comprised mostly of former students of Professor Koji Tojo's
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High blood lead levels found in indigenous peoples in Peruvian Amazonia
Lead is a toxic metal, and its widespread use has led to significant environmental pollution and public health problems in many parts of the world. This has led the WHO to include it on a list of ten chemicals that cause serious health problems. However, lead poisoning continues to affect many population groups. A study published today in open access in the journal Environment International found
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Fruit fly links sleep problems in autism to glial cells, blood-brain-barrier and serotonin
A Dutch-American research team, coordinated by Radboudumc, describes how sleep problems can arise in individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism and intellectual disability. Mimicking two genetic causes of autism in fruit flies, they uncovered that flies show the same sleep problems as the patients, that the disturbed sleep is caused by high levels of serotonin and that the origin
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The origin of the first structures formed in galaxies like the Milky Way identified
An international team of scientists led from the Centre for Astrobiology (CAB, CSIC-INTA), with participation from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), has used the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) to study a representative sample of galaxies, both disc and spheroidal, in a deep sky zone in the constellation of the Great Bear to characterize the properties of the stellar populations of ga
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Global youth draft 'Blue New Deal' to protect oceans: 'Time to end generational injustice'
Concerned youths on Monday deliver an ocean policy vision for policy-makers to address the declining state of the world's ocean.A carbon neutral economy, preserving biodiversity, achieving sustainable seafood production, and reforming ocean governance are the four fundamental pillars supporting policy recommendations debuted in the Global Blue New Deal, an ocean policy framework built around crowd
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New research shows trend toward unhealthy eating during pandemic
As COVID-19 spread throughout the world, our daily routines and behaviors changed drastically. A new study of more than 2,000 people in the U.S. found that the pandemic has also affected how we eat. The authors found a decrease in the consumption of many food groups, particularly healthy foods such as vegetables and whole grains, compared to before the pandemic.
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Study compares heart benefits of low-fat and plant-centered diets
There has been a long-standing debate as to whether a low-fat or a plant-centered diet is better at lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease. A new study that followed more than 4,700 people over 30 years, found that a plant-centered diet was associated with a lower long-term risk for cardiovascular disease. However, both diets were linked with lower LDL, or bad cholesterol, levels.
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When the economy goes down, so does the quality of our diets
According to a new study, adults overall ate more refined grains and solid fats and children increased their intake of added sugar during the recession. The impacts of the downturn were especially pronounced in food-insecure households, where individuals significantly reduced their intake of protein and dark green vegetables while increasing total sugars.
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Smartphone use associated with unhealthy eating and overweight in teens
Even moderate smartphone use may influence teens' diet and weight, according to a new study of more than 53,000 Korean adolescents. Teens who used a smartphone for more than 2 hours per day were significantly more likely to eat more junk food and fewer fruits and vegetables than those spending less time on their phone. Teens spending more than 3 hours per day on a smartphone were significantly mor
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Doping trick removes hurdle for next-gen solar cells
Researchers have figured out a way to overcome a key hurdle in making efficient perovskite solar cells, one that also sequesters CO2. Perovskite solar cells have progressed in recent years with rapid increases in power conversion efficiency (from 3% in 2006 to 25.5% today), making them more competitive with silicon-based photovoltaic cells. However, a number of challenges remain before they can b
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Physicist generalized the measurement postulate in quantum mechanics
Gui-Lu Long, professor at Tsinghua University and Beijing Academy of Quantum Information Sciences,generalized the well-known measurement postulate of quantum mechanics. Long extends it to measuring a partial wavefunction case. Measuring a partial wavefunction will either collapses the whole wavefunction into one eigenstate covered by the measured part (collapse-in), or destroys the measured part a
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Evolutional history of metal chalcogenide supertetrahedral clusters
Metal chalcogenide supertetrahedral clusters (MCSCs) are of significance for developing crystalline porous framework materials and atomically precise cluster chemistry. Early research focused on the synthetic and structural chemistry of MCSC-based porous semiconductor materials and their applications. Recently, focus has shifted to establish the atomically precise structure-composition-property re
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SMART researchers develop method for rapid, accurate detection of viruses
Researchers from the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have developed a new method for rapid and accurate detection of viral nucleic acids – a breakthrough that can be easily adapted to detect different DNA/RNA targets in viruses like the coronavirus. The method called RApid DIgital Crispr Approach (RADICA) is four times faster and
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Researchers find toxin from maple tree in cow's milk
Cows can pass on the hypoglycin A toxin through their milk, a study by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) in Toxins shows. The substance can cause severe symptoms in humans and animals. Small amounts of the toxin were detected in the raw milk of cows that grazed in a pasture exposed to sycamore maple. The team calls for further
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Antarctica: How have temperatures varied since the last glacial period?
Antarctica has experienced significant temperature changes, especially since the last glacial period. An international collaboration including scientists from the CNRS1 has now challenged previously accepted estimates of these variations, using new measurements published on June 4, 2021 in Science. Their study highlights differences in behavior between East and West Antarctica, connected in partic
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Fragility fractures cost European health care systems €56.9 billion annually
A new report by the International Osteoporosis Foundation draws attention to the burden of osteoporosis and the gaps/inequalities in the provision of primary and secondary prevention of fractures due to osteoporosis across Europe. 'SCOPE 2021: a new scorecard for osteoporosis in Europe' provides findings for 27 countries of the European Union as well as Switzerland and the UK, covering key indicat
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The molecular underpinnings of immune cell migration
Researchers from Osaka University discovered a novel molecular mechanism by which immune cells migrate and reach sites of infection. By studying dendritic cells, specialized immune cells that are responsible for the activation of lymph nodes during infections, they found that the lysosomal Ragulator complex is indispensable for cell migration. In the absence of the Ragulator complex in dendritic c
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Innovative batteries put flying cars on the horizon
Jet packs, robot maids and flying cars were all promises for the 21st century. We got mechanized, autonomous vacuum cleaners instead. Now a team of Penn State researchers are exploring the requirements for electric vertical takeoff and landing (eVTOL) vehicles and designing and testing potential battery power sources.
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Hubble images a galaxy in dazzling detail
This image features the spiral galaxy NGC 691, imaged in fantastic detail using Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). This galaxy is a member of the NGC 691 galaxy group named after it, which features a group of gravitationally bound galaxies that lie about 120 million light-years from Earth.
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