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Nyheder2021juni08

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LÆGEMIDDEL MOD ALZHEIMERS GODKENDT I USA (ADUCANUMAB). After the second proposal FDA approved a drug for Alzheimers, but under the conditions that all the recipients of the drug will have to be monitored to confirm that the drug actually works (since in the experimental trial the memory of some patients did not improve).

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2021/jun/07/fda-announce-decision-new-alzheimers-drug-aducanumab
 
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KORT OVER HJERNEN MED ENKELTCELLERS NERVEFORBINDELSER: The new brain map contains details of the individual cell time and connections in brain tissue. Even though it's only for one cubic millimeter, the amount of gathered data is approximate similar to 3 decades worth of satellite images. This map could help to further understand the function of brains, but some scientists speculate that this map will have to be combined with other brain maps.
https://singularityhub.com/2021/06/06/google-and-harvard-unveil-the-largest-high-resolution-map-of-the-brain-yet/
 
 
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How America Fractured Into Four Parts
Nations, like individuals , tell stories in order to understand what they are, where they come from, and what they want to be. National narratives, like personal ones, are prone to sentimentality, grievance, pride, shame, self-blindness. There is never just one—they compete and constantly change. The most durable narratives are not the ones that stand up best to fact-checking. They're the ones th
12h
How to Turn Off Amazon Sidewalk
The company is enlisting your Echo and Ring devices into an internet-sharing mesh network starting Monday. It's not too late to opt out.
8h
99-million-year-old snail fossilized in amber while giving birth
Land snails are usually preserved as fossilized snail shells or imprints, while preservation of their soft bodies is a rarity. "Our new amber find is truly remarkable for this reason as well," explains Dr. Adrienne Jochum of the Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum Frankfurt and the Natural History Museum of the Burgergemeinde Bern, and she continues, "In a piece of Cretaceous
9h
Huge two-day underwater avalanche sent mud 1,000km into ocean
Event may have gone unnoticed had it not slowed data traffic between Nigeria and South Africa A vast underwater avalanche sent mud and sand more than 1,000km out into the ocean over the course of two days, rupturing submarine cables and disrupting internet traffic on Africa's western coast, scientists have revealed. The avalanche, the longest sediment flow ever recorded, travelled more than 1,100
19h
Knowledge of medicinal plants at risk as languages die out
Loss of linguistic diversity may lead to disappearance of age-old remedies unknown to science, study warns Knowledge of medicinal plants is at risk of disappearing as human languages become extinct, a new study has warned. Indigenous languages contain vast amounts of knowledge about ecosystem services provided by the natural world around them. However, more than 30% of the 7,400 languages on the
18h
What Makes Quantum Computing So Hard to Explain?
Quantum computers, you might have heard, are magical uber-machines that will soon cure cancer and global warming by trying all possible answers in different parallel universes. For 15 years, on my blog and elsewhere, I've railed against this cartoonish vision, trying to explain what I see as the subtler but ironically even more fascinating truth. I approach this as a public service and almost my.
7h
How do we know we're not living in a simulation like The Matrix?
The long-running series in which readers answer other readers' questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific and philosophical concepts Jack Freedom, Bristol Post your answers (and new questions) below or send them to nq@theguardian.com . A selection will be published on Sunday. Continue reading…
11h
Scientists Used CRISPR to Engineer a New 'Superbug' That's Invincible to All Viruses
Can we reprogram existing life at will? To synthetic biologists, the answer is yes. The central code for biology is simple. DNA letters, in groups of three, are translated into amino acids—Lego blocks that make proteins. Proteins build our bodies, regulate our metabolism, and allow us to function as living beings. Designing custom proteins often means you can redesign small aspects of life—for ex
8h
Can we vaccinate the world against Covid by the end of 2022?
Achieving herd immunity is possible – and necessary – but requires quick action, say experts Coronavirus – latest updates See all our coronavirus coverage As ambitious declarations go – even for Boris Johnson – it was a big one. At the weekend, the UK prime minister said he would urge the G7 leaders to vaccinate the world against Covid by the end of next year. But is this feasible? That rather de
9h
What Mia Farrow Knew
T he four-part HBO docuseries Allen v. Farrow opens with a gliding aerial shot of Manhattan, the camera moving slowly across Central Park: the baseball fields, the reservoir, the dark-green trees, lush summer, fecundity. But the music doesn't suggest summer splendor; it's ominous and portentous. We fly past the park, and the camera comes to rest at the grand facade of the Plaza Hotel, with its fa
11h
To Find the History of African American Women, Look to Their Handiwork
R ose was in existential distress that fateful winter in South Carolina in 1852. She was facing the deep kind of trouble that no one in our present time knows and that only an enslaved woman has felt. For Rose understood that, following the death of her legal owner, she or her little girl, Ashley, could be next on the auction block. Ripping loved ones apart was a common practice in a society stru
12h
Himalayan balsam: UK volunteers battle playboy of horticultural world
Cumbria is latest county to raise SOS as plant causes erosion and smothers other flowers Himalayan balsam's attractive exterior masks a deadly intent. Don't be fooled by its soothing name, pink flowers and pleasant perfume – according to ecologists, this invasive species chokes our waterways, causes riverbank erosion and is smothering our wild flowers at a terrifying rate. Determined to stop this
14h
What Is Pete Buttigieg Doing?
Pete Buttigieg stopped on a spring afternoon to pet an Amtrak-police dog on his way to greet the conductor and the rest of the crew. We were somewhere between Raleigh and Greensboro, North Carolina, traveling between two events aimed at promoting the Biden administration's $2 trillion infrastructure proposal. Although Buttigieg came closer to being the Democratic presidential nominee than senator
13h
The Evangelical Politician Who Doesn't Recognize His Faith—Or His Party
Bill Haslam is not a natural fit for the Donald Trump–era Republican Party. The former Tennessee governor checks certain GOP boxes: He favors low taxes and opposes abortion rights; his background is in business, including an executive role in his family's highly successful truck-stop chain. But during his time in office, Haslam also got in trouble with his base for vetoing a bill that would have
12h
Nasa spacecraft captures first closeups of Jupiter's largest moon in decades
Juno passed within 645 miles of Ganymede, the closest any spacecraft has come to the moon since 2000 Nasa's Juno spacecraft has provided the first closeups of Jupiter's largest moon in two decades. Juno zoomed past icy Ganymede on Monday, passing within 645 miles (1,038km). The last time a spacecraft came that close was in 2000 when Nasa's Galileo spacecraft swept past our solar system's biggest
18min
AI and the future of mankind
I made another post about this topic a few hours ago, and maybe I was a little too dark and pessimistic about the consequences of developing ai in the future, saying that it would take away all of our jobs in the upcoming decades making us feel useless because it will eventually develop to a point it when would do everything better than us, even in creative fields like art and music, but maybe th
37min
CO2 into Fuel!
I just saw the coolest thing today… carbon companies here in Vancouver are turning CO2 from our air, into fuel. That way, the environment gets cleaner, and the fossil-fuel powered cars get fuel. Comments? submitted by /u/Not_Normal2968 [link] [comments]
37min
The Atlantic Partners with Knotch to Deliver Content Intelligence
The Atlantic is the first publisher to partner with Knotch, a next-generation content intelligence platform that enables media outlets to provide advertisers with deep insights about the performance of sponsor content. Applying Knotch's industry-leading content intelligence technology to The Atlantic's branded content partnerships will elevate the standard for content marketing measurement in the
1h
The buck stops where? UNH research records longest-ever deer distance
Why did the deer cross the road? According to research from the University of New Hampshire to keep going and going and going. Researchers have discovered the longest distance ever recorded by an adult male white-tailed deer–300 kilometers, or close to 200 miles, in just over three weeks. The finding has important implications for population management and the transmission of disease, especially
2h
New population of pygmy blue whales discovered with help of bomb detectors
Blue whales may be the biggest animals in the world, but they're also some of the hardest to find. A team of scientists are confident they've discovered a new population of pygmy blue whales, the smallest subspecies of blue whales, in the Indian Ocean. And it was the whales' powerful singing — recorded by underwater bomb detectors — that gave them away.
2h
Radicalized and believing in conspiracies: Can the cycle be broken?
If your idea of conspiracy theories entails aliens, UFOs, governmental cover-ups at Roswell Air Force Base, and the melody of The X-Files—you're not alone. That was, indeed, the classic notion, says Scott Tyson, an assistant professor of political science at the University of Rochester.
2h
Researchers create self-sustaining, intelligent, electronic microsystems from green material
A research team from the University of Massachusetts Amherst has created an electronic microsystem that can intelligently respond to information inputs without any external energy input, much like a self-autonomous living organism. The microsystem is constructed from a novel type of electronics that can process ultralow electronic signals and incorporates a device that can generate electricity "ou
2h
Increasing the memory capacity of intelligent systems based on the function of human neurons
Researchers from the University of Liège (Belgium) have recently developed a new artificial neuron inspired by the different modes of operation of human neurons. Called a Bistable Recurrent Cell (BRC), this process has enabled recurrent networks to learn temporal relationships of more than a thousand discrete time units where classical methods failed after only a hundred time units.
2h
Earth's meteorite impacts over past 500 million years tracked
For the first time, a unique study has tracked the meteorite flux to Earth over the past 500 million years. Contrary to current theories, researchers have determined that major collisions in the asteroid belt have not generally affected the number of impacts with Earth to any great extent.
2h
First glimpse of brains retrieving mistaken memories observed
Scientists have observed for the first time what it looks like in the key memory region of the brain when a mistake is made during a memory trial. The findings have implications for Alzheimer's disease research and advancements in memory storage and enhancement, with a discovery that also provides a view into differences between the physiological events in the brain during a correct memory versus
2h
UMass Amherst researchers create intelligent electronic microsystems from green material
A research team from the University of Massachusetts Amherst has created an electronic microsystem that can intelligently respond to information inputs without any external energy input, much like a self-autonomous living organism. The microsystem is constructed from a novel type of electronics that can process ultralow electronic signals and incorporates a device that can generate electricity "ou
2h
Cell Reports publishes data supporting the importance of ion channel, Kv7.2/7.3 as a target in ALS
QurAlis Corporation today announced the publication of an article in Cell Reports titled Human Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Excitability Phenotype Screen: Target Discovery and Validation by QurAlis founders Kasper Roet, Ph.D., Clifford Woolf, M.D., Ph.D., and Kevin Eggan, Ph.D., who pioneered a high-content, live-cell imaging screen using ALS patient-derived motor neurons in combination with a co
2h
Discovery of the oldest plant fossils on the African continent!
The analysis of very old plant fossils discovered in South Africa and dating from the Lower Devonian period documents the transition from barren continents to the green planet we know today. Cyrille Prestianni, a palaeobotanist at the EDDy Lab at the University of Liège (Belgium), participated in this study, the results of which have just been published in the journal Scientific Reports.
2h
X-ray flash imaging of laser-induced bubbles and shockwaves in water
The bubbles created by intense focused lasers in this experiment were ten times smaller and contained water vapour at a pressure around a hundred thousand times higher than orginary bubbles in water. They expand at supersonic speed, pushing a shockwave in front. Researchers led by University of Göttingen with Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton (DESY) and European X-Ray Free-Electron Laser (European X
2h
New Simulation Sheds Light on the Sun's Mysterious Cometary Cloud
Billions of kilometers away, far beyond the planets, asteroids, and lesser clumps of rock is the Oort Cloud. Well, probably. The sheath of comets surrounding our solar system is still theoretical, but it matches the available evidence. A new simulation from researchers at Leiden University in the Netherlands models the cloud in unprecedented detail, and that could help scientists understand how i
2h
Airborne transmission of SARS-CoV-2 calls for updated practices to prevent transmission
Despite updates from the World Health Organization, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Public Health Agency of Canada that the virus can be transmitted by short- and long-range aerosols, Canada's public health guidance has not been adequately updated to address this mode of transmission, argue authors of a commentary published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Jo
3h
Aerogels that suck up pollution just need a wash for reuse
A simple chemical process creates light and highly absorbent aerogels that can take a beating. Covalent organic frameworks (COFs), crystal structures with strong molecular bonds, can form a porous aerogel for use as a custom membrane in batteries or other devices or as an absorbent to remove pollutants from the environment. Conventional COFs are usually powders. For the new study, published in Ch
3h
Mechanochemical peptide bond formation behind the origins of life
The presence of amino acids on the prebiotic Earth is widely accepted, either coming from endogenous chemical processes or being delivered by extraterrestrial material. On the other hand, plausibly prebiotic pathways to peptides often rely on different aqueous approaches where condensation of amino acids is thermodynamically unfavorable. Now, chemists from the Ruđer Bošković Institute (RBI), in co
3h
From burglar alarms to black hole detectors: Super sensors as possible outputs of a quantum gravity experiment
Last year, Anupam Mazumdar, a physicist from the University of Groningen, together with colleagues from the UK proposed an experiment that could conclusively prove whether gravity is a quantum phenomenon. This experiment would focus on observing two relatively large, entangled quantum systems in free fall. In a new article, published on 4 June in Physical Review Research, the scientists describe i
3h
CO2 reaches its highest level in more than 4 million years
As surely as the rains fall and flowers blossom, the Northern Hemisphere awakens every June to another, less inspiring rite of spring—a new peak level for global atmospheric carbon dioxide. This year, that number is 419 carbon dioxide molecules for every million molecules of air, a.k.a. parts per million.
3h
Harnessing healthy behaviors to prevent dementia
Millions of adults could lower the chance that they'll ever need a drug to treat dementia including Alzheimer's disease, if they work with their primary care providers and use the power of prevention to keep their brains healthy. A recent review by a national panel of experts summarizes the evidence behind steps providers and patients can take to identify and change modifiable risk factors.
3h
Mapping a successful recovery
Mining involves moving a lot of rock, so some mess is expected. However, mining operations can continue to affect ecosystems long after activity has ended. Heavy metals and corrosive substances leach into the environment, preventing wildlife and vegetation from returning to the area.
4h
Puerto Rico isn't ready for climate-fueled hurricane season
Puerto Rico isn't ready for another hurricane season, let alone the effects of climate change, according to a new study. The research shows the island's outstanding capacity to produce record-breaking floods and trigger a large number of landslides. The new study, published in the journal Hydrology , builds on three prior studies that hydrologist Carlos Ramos-Scharrón of the University of Texas a
4h
From burglar alarms to black hole detectors
Last year, Anupam Mazumdar, a physicist from the University of Groningen, proposed an experiment that could conclusively prove whether gravity is a quantum phenomenon. In a new article, published on June 4, 2021 in Physical Review Research, he describes how two types of noise could be reduced and suggests that quantum interference could be applied in the production of a sensitive instrument that c
4h
Voice acting unlocks speech production, therapy knowledge
Many voice actors use a variety of speech vocalizations and patterns to create unique and memorable characters. How they create those amazing voices could help speech pathologists better understand the muscles involved for creating words and sounds. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Colette Feehan from Indiana University will talk about how voice actor performances can lead to better understanding abo
4h
Expert: No full stadiums until test or vax is required
It's not yet safe to bring back large crowds to stadiums for sporting events, according to a new analysis of COVID-19 risks. Some 135,000 fans gathered in the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the Indy 500 over the 2021 Memorial Day Weekend. Mathematician John E. McCarthy, who helped write a scientific formula and a paper regarding the risk analysis of fans attending sporting events, has a simple,
4h
Therapy extends life for patients with advanced prostate cancer
A new cancer treatment that uses engineered radioactive molecules to target prostate cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth extended survival for patients with advanced prostate cancer, according to a new study. The trial is the first to use this approach to demonstrate improvements in survival for prostate cancer patients . "These are exceptionally strong data." The results of the international p
4h
The dynamic epigenetic regulation of the inactive X chromosome in healthy human B cells is dysregulated in lupus patients [Genetics]
Systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) is a female-predominant disease characterized by autoimmune B cells and pathogenic autoantibody production. Individuals with two or more X chromosomes are at increased risk for SLE, suggesting that X-linked genes contribute to the observed sex bias of this disease. To normalize X-linked gene expression between sexes,…
4h
Early life stress is associated with earlier emergence of permanent molars [Social Sciences]
Exposure to adversity can accelerate biological aging. However, existing biomarkers of early aging are either costly and difficult to collect, like epigenetic signatures, or cannot be detected until late childhood, like pubertal onset. We evaluated the hypothesis that early adversity is associated with earlier molar eruption, an easily assessed measure…
4h
Selective filtering of excitatory inputs to nucleus accumbens by dopamine and serotonin [Neuroscience]
The detailed mechanisms by which dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) act in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) to influence motivated behaviors in distinct ways remain largely unknown. Here, we examined whether DA and 5-HT selectively modulate excitatory synaptic transmission in NAc medium spiny neurons in an input-specific manner. DA reduced excitatory…
4h
Temperature and population density influence SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the absence of nonpharmaceutical interventions [Medical Sciences]
As COVID-19 continues to spread across the world, it is increasingly important to understand the factors that influence its transmission. Seasonal variation driven by responses to changing environment has been shown to affect the transmission intensity of several coronaviruses. However, the impact of the environment on severe acute respiratory syndrome…
4h
Preventing plant disease pandemics
"The manuscript offers a unique and timely perspective on plant diseases, particularly in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic," said David Schmale, a co-author on the paper and a professor in the Virginia Tech School of Plant and Environmental Sciences in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.
4h
Should I make a GitHub portfolio?
Hi fellow cogscier! I am soon to transition from my phd in cogsci to a postdoc, and I was wondering if making a GitHub portfolio is worth the effort and if it is something valuable in post graduate academia. I noticed that a lot of people/groups in academia have GitHub pages and repositories, but also that generally speaking they are developers of some sort of project (and I am obviously not). Sh
5h
Noisy homes during pandemic drive future design choices
Due to strict lockdowns, many of us have seen and heard our family and neighbors much more than ever before. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Ayca Sentop Dümen and Konca Saher from the Turkish Acoustical Society will discuss the effects of pandemic-related noise on people's satisfaction with their homes and how this may inform future design choices. Their presentation, 'Noise annoyance in dwellings d
5h
On Top of Everything Else, the Pandemic Messed With Our Morals
Throughout the pandemic, people have had to make impossibly tough decisions. Kathleen Turner, a 52-year-old intensive-care nurse in San Francisco, has been haunted by hers. Since COVID-19 patients started overwhelming her hospital last spring, she has had to give patients sedatives knowing they would likely have lasting negative health consequences, and systematically deny relatives a chance to s
5h
Machine learning reduces microscope data processing time from months to just seconds
With a new method that combines high-powered scanning force microscopes and machine learning, IBEC researchers have drastically reduced the processing time required to achieve nanoscale biochemical compositions map from electric images of eukaryotic cells in just seconds. Using earlier computation methods, processing one image could take even months. This study can provide an invaluable tool to bi
5h
Monarchs raised in captivity can orient themselves for migration, U of G study reveals
University of Guelph researchers found monarchs raised in captivity can successfully migrate if given time to orient themselves. They discovered this by equipping the butterflies with tiny radio transmitters and monitoring them for 200 km, debunking previous research that found the butterflies couldn't orient themselves. Monarchs released into the wild flew in the proper direction because they wer
5h
Helium rain probably falls inside Jupiter and Saturn
New experiments with lasers reveal evidence supporting the existence of helium rain inside planets composed primarily of hydrogen and helium, such as Jupiter and Saturn. Scientists made the prediction nearly 40 years ago, but achieving the experimental conditions necessary to test the hypothesis has not been possible. That is, until now. The new paper in Nature reveals evidence showing that heliu
5h
Feeling hot and bothered? It's complicated
Rising temperatures are increasingly affecting the quality of life in many regions, setting new challenges for architects, urban planners and healthcare systems. Researchers at KAUST have analyzed discomfort due to outdoor heat across Saudi Arabia and neighboring regions to help understand and combat the problem.
5h
New U-Pb zircon ages document Late Triassic Tianqiaoling flora of eastern Jinlin, NE China
The Late Triassic Tianqiaoling flora is well-known in China, and its discovery has changed our understanding of Chinese Late Triassic phytogeographical divisions. More broadly, this flora has great significance for the study of phytogeography in East Asia during this time. However, the previous dating of this flora was only evidenced by plant fossils and stratigraphic correlation, and the accurate
5h
Porpoises seem to cooperate in surprisingly sophisticated group hunting
When sailing along on the seas and you suddenly spot a porpoise's fin in the distance, chances are that you have only encountered a single animal. Porpoises are most often seen alone, but new research now suggests that they also roam in groups—and even enter into a sophisticated collaboration when hunting.
5h
Herded and hunted goat genomes from the dawn of domestication in the Zagros Mountains [Anthropology]
The Aceramic Neolithic (∼9600 to 7000 cal BC) period in the Zagros Mountains, western Iran, provides some of the earliest archaeological evidence of goat (Capra hircus) management and husbandry by circa 8200 cal BC, with detectable morphological change appearing ∼1,000 y later. To examine the genomic imprint of initial management…
5h
Phenotypic and genetic characterization of MERS coronaviruses from Africa to understand their zoonotic potential [Microbiology]
Coronaviruses are pathogens of pandemic potential. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) causes a zoonotic respiratory disease of global public health concern, and dromedary camels are the only proven source of zoonotic infection. More than 70% of MERS-CoV–infected dromedaries are found in East, North, and West Africa, but zoonotic MERS…
5h
Overcoming COVID-19 vaccination resistance when alternative policies affect the dynamics of conformism, social norms, and crowding out [Social Sciences]
What is an effective vaccination policy to end the COVID-19 pandemic? We address this question in a model of the dynamics of policy effectiveness drawing upon the results of a large panel survey implemented in Germany during the first and second waves of the pandemic. We observe increased opposition to…
5h
Inactivation of common airborne antigens by perfluoroalkyl chemicals modulates early life allergic asthma [Environmental Sciences]
Allergic asthma, driven by T helper 2 cell-mediated immune responses to common environmental antigens, remains the most common respiratory disease in children. Perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) are environmental contaminants of great concern, because of their wide application, persistence in the environment, and bioaccumulation. PFCs associate with immunological disorders including asthma and…
5h
The impact of a lack of mathematical education on brain development and future attainment [Neuroscience]
Formal education has a long-term impact on an individual's life. However, our knowledge of the effect of a specific lack of education, such as in mathematics, is currently poor but is highly relevant given the extant differences between countries in their educational curricula and the differences in opportunities to access…
5h
Homocysteine fibrillar assemblies display cross-talk with Alzheimer's disease {beta}-amyloid polypeptide [Biochemistry]
High levels of homocysteine are reported as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Correspondingly, inborn hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with an increased predisposition to the development of dementia in later stages of life. Yet, the mechanistic link between homocysteine accumulation and the pathological neurodegenerative processes is still elusive. Furthermore, despite…
5h
Targeting the tetraspanin CD81 reduces cancer invasion and metastasis [Medical Sciences]
Tetraspanins are an evolutionary conserved family of proteins involved in multiple aspects of cell physiology, including proliferation, migration and invasion, protein trafficking, and signal transduction; yet their detailed mechanism of action is unknown. Tetraspanins have no known natural ligands, but their engagement by antibodies has begun to reveal their role…
5h
Antipsychotic drugs counteract autophagy and mitophagy in multiple sclerosis [Neuroscience]
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disease characterized by myelin damage followed by axonal and ultimately neuronal loss. The etiology and physiopathology of MS are still elusive, and no fully effective therapy is yet available. We investigated the role in MS of autophagy (physiologically, a controlled intracellular pathway…
5h
Meeting the unmet needs of clinicians from AI systems showcased for cardiology with deep-learning-based ECG analysis [Medical Sciences]
Despite their great promise, artificial intelligence (AI) systems have yet to become ubiquitous in the daily practice of medicine largely due to several crucial unmet needs of healthcare practitioners. These include lack of explanations in clinically meaningful terms, handling the presence of unknown medical conditions, and transparency regarding the system's…
5h
Asteroid break-ups and meteorite delivery to Earth the past 500 million years [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]
The meteoritic material falling on Earth is believed to derive from large break-up or cratering events in the asteroid belt. The flux of extraterrestrial material would then vary in accordance with the timing of such asteroid family-forming events. In order to validate this, we investigated marine sediments representing 15 time-windows…
5h
Toward achieving persistent behavior change in household water conservation [Sustainability Science]
Achieving persistence in household behavior modification has been a central but elusive goal of environmental conservation attempts that rely on behavioral interventions. We implemented a habit change intervention, designed to achieve persistent change in household water conservation behavior in an affluent residential community in urban India. We found a 15…
5h
Cadherin puncta are interdigitated dynamic actin protrusions necessary for stable cadherin adhesion [Cell Biology]
Cadherins harness the actin cytoskeleton to build cohesive sheets of cells using paradoxically weak bonds, but the molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In one popular model, actin organizes cadherins into large, micrometer-sized clusters known as puncta. Myosin is thought to pull on these puncta to generate strong adhesion. Here, however,…
5h
Measuring social equity in urban energy use and interventions using fine-scale data [Sustainability Science]
Cities seek nuanced understanding of intraurban inequality in energy use, addressing both income and race, to inform equitable investment in climate actions. However, nationwide energy consumption surveys are limited (<6,000 samples in the United States), and utility-provided data are highly aggregated. Limited prior analyses suggest disparity in energy use intensity…
5h
Accurate genomic variant detection in single cells with primary template-directed amplification [Genetics]
Improvements in whole genome amplification (WGA) would enable new types of basic and applied biomedical research, including studies of intratissue genetic diversity that require more accurate single-cell genotyping. Here, we present primary template-directed amplification (PTA), an isothermal WGA method that reproducibly captures >95% of the genomes of single cells in…
5h
CAP1 binds and activates adenylyl cyclase in mammalian cells [Biochemistry]
CAP1 (Cyclase-Associated Protein 1) is highly conserved in evolution. Originally identified in yeast as a bifunctional protein involved in Ras-adenylyl cyclase and F-actin dynamics regulation, the adenylyl cyclase component seems to be lost in mammalian cells. Prompted by our recent identification of the Ras-like small GTPase Rap1 as a GTP-independent…
5h
The balance of giving versus receiving social support and all-cause mortality in a US national sample [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]
While numerous studies exist on the benefits of social support (both receiving and giving), little research exists on how the balance between the support that individuals regularly give versus that which they receive from others relates to physical health. In a US national sample of 6,325 adults from the National…
5h
Eusociality in snapping shrimps is associated with larger genomes and an accumulation of transposable elements [Evolution]
Despite progress uncovering the genomic underpinnings of sociality, much less is known about how social living affects the genome. In different insect lineages, for example, eusocial species show both positive and negative associations between genome size and structure, highlighting the dynamic nature of the genome. Here, we explore the relationship…
5h
ALS- and FTD-associated missense mutations in TBK1 differentially disrupt mitophagy [Cell Biology]
TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) is a multifunctional kinase with an essential role in mitophagy, the selective clearance of damaged mitochondria. More than 90 distinct mutations in TBK1 are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and fronto-temporal dementia, including missense mutations that disrupt the abilities of TBK1 to dimerize, associate with…
5h
Drivers of fatal bird collisions in an urban center [Sustainability Science]
Millions of nocturnally migrating birds die each year from collisions with built structures, especially brightly illuminated buildings and communication towers. Reducing this source of mortality requires knowledge of important behavioral, meteorological, and anthropogenic factors, yet we lack an understanding of the interacting roles of migration, artificial lighting, and weather conditions…
5h
TMK1-based auxin signaling regulates abscisic acid responses via phosphorylating ABI1/2 in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]
Differential concentrations of phytohormone trigger distinct outputs, which provides a mechanism for the plasticity of plant development and an adaptation strategy among plants to changing environments. However, the underlying mechanisms of the differential responses remain unclear. Here we report that a high concentration of auxin, distinct from the effect of…
5h
Radiation-induced neoantigens broaden the immunotherapeutic window of cancers with low mutational loads [Immunology and Inflammation]
Immunotherapies are a promising advance in cancer treatment. However, because only a subset of cancer patients benefits from these treatments it is important to find mechanisms that will broaden the responding patient population. Generally, tumors with high mutational burdens have the potential to express greater numbers of mutant neoantigens. As…
5h
Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus Spike protein variants exhibit geographic differences in virulence [Microbiology]
Human Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) cases were detected primarily in the Middle East before a major outbreak occurred in South Korea in 2015. The Korean outbreak was initiated by a single infected individual, allowing studies of virus evolution in the absence of further MERS-CoV introduction into human populations. In…
5h
Single-cell analyses of renal cell cancers reveal insights into tumor microenvironment, cell of origin, and therapy response [Medical Sciences]
Diverse subtypes of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) display a wide spectrum of histomorphologies, proteogenomic alterations, immune cell infiltration patterns, and clinical behavior. Delineating the cells of origin for different RCC subtypes will provide mechanistic insights into their diverse pathobiology. Here, we employed single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) to develop benign and…
5h
STING inhibitors target the cyclic dinucleotide binding pocket [Immunology and Inflammation]
Cytosolic DNA activates cGAS (cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic AMP-GMP synthase)-STING (stimulator of interferon genes) signaling, which triggers interferon and inflammatory responses that help defend against microbial infection and cancer. However, aberrant cytosolic self-DNA in Aicardi–Goutière's syndrome and constituently active gain-of-function mutations in STING in STING-associated vasculopathy wi
5h
Swimming in circles can lead to exotic hyperuniform states of active living matter [Physics]
The study of hyperuniform states of matter is an emerging multidisciplinary field, influencing and linking developments across the physical sciences, mathematics, and biology (1, 2). A hyperuniform many-particle system in d-dimensional Euclidean space is characterized by an anomalous suppression of large-scale density fluctuations relative to those in typical disordered systems,…
5h
Editorial Expression of Concern: New class of transcription factors controls flagellar assembly by recruiting RNA polymerase II in Chlamydomonas [Editorial Expression of Concern]
CELL BIOLOGY PNAS is publishing an Editorial Expression of Concern regarding the following article: "New class of transcription factors controls flagellar assembly by recruiting RNA polymerase II in Chlamydomonas," by Lili Li, Guangmei Tian, Hai Peng, Dan Meng, Liang Wang, Xiao Hu, Cheng Tian, Miao He, Junfei Zhou, Lihong Chen,…
5h
'Concerning' number of Americans identify as anti-vaxxers
A study of more than 1,000 demographically representative participants found that about 22% of Americans self-identify as anti-vaxxers, and tend to embrace the label as a form of social identity. According to the study by researchers including Texas A&M University School of Public Health assistant professor Timothy Callaghan, 8% of this group "always" self-identify this way, with 14% "sometimes"
5h
Optimizing immunization with Sanaria® PfSPZ-CVac malaria vaccine
Sanaria and its collaborators have had to take a step by step empirical approach to optimizing immunization with PfSPZ vaccines to achieve a safe, effective, durable, and broadly protective malaria vaccine. Two recent landmark malaria vaccine studies have moved the optimization process forward and highlighted the strong protective efficacy of Sanaria® PfSPZ-CVac in malaria-naïve adults.
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Greed and the philosophy of wealth
It's common wisdom that most things in life are best in moderation. Most of us agree that owning property is okay but are hard-pressed to say why and when it has gone too far. Greed dominates your life if the pursuit of wealth is a higher priority than charity, kindness, and solidarity with others. The great Greek poet, Hesiod, wrote, "Observe due measure; moderation is best in all things." It's
5h
Science and performing arts against stereotypes
Stereotypes are knowledge structures integrated in our world representation which are hard to change. A team from the University of Barcelona and the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, in collaboration with the Èpica Foundation – La Fura dels Baus analysed how a performing experience could have a positive impact in reducing the population's bias against physical illnesses. This performing ex
6h
Everything Is Overcomplicated
Many Americans woke up this morning to discover that some of the most popular sites on the web were down. CNN, The New York Times , Reddit—even The Atlantic— all suffered issues. Was it a coordinated cyberattack? Something to do with Amazon Web Services? No, it was because of Fastly . As NPR explained , Fastly "provides vital but obscure behind-the-scenes cloud computing services to many of the w
6h
This programmable fiber has memories and can sense temperature
MIT researchers have created the first fiber with digital capabilities, able to sense, store, analyze, and infer activity after being sewn into a shirt. Yoel Fink, who is a professor in the departments of materials science and engineering and electrical engineering and computer science, a Research Laboratory of Electronics principal investigator, and the senior author on the study, says digital f
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An unprecedented survey of the 'nurseries' where stars are born
Astronomers have taken a big step forward in understanding the dark and violent places where stars are born.Over the past five years, an international team of researchers has conducted the first systematic survey of 'stellar nurseries' across our part of the universe, charting the more than 100,000 of these nurseries across more than 90 nearby galaxies and providing new insights into the origins o
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Organic molecules reveal clues about dying stars and outskirts of Milky Way
Researchers from the University of Arizona have detected organic molecules in planetary nebulae, the aftermaths of dying stars, and in the far reaches of the Milky Way, which have been deemed too cold and too removed from the galactic center to support such chemistries. They present their findings at the 238th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society, or AAS, held virtually from June 7-9.
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Cosmic cartographers map nearby Universe revealing the diversity of star-forming galaxies
A team of astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has completed the first census of molecular clouds in the nearby universe, revealing that contrary to previous scientific opinion, these stellar nurseries do not all look and act the same. In fact, they're as diverse as the people, homes, neighborhoods and regions that make up our own world.
6h
Vitamin D may not actually protect against COVID-19
While previous research early in the pandemic suggested that vitamin D cuts the risk of contracting COVID-19, a new study finds there is no genetic evidence that it works as a protective measure against the coronavirus. "Vitamin D supplementation as a public health measure to improve outcomes is not supported by this study. Most importantly, our results suggest that investment in other therapeuti
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AI offers a better way to diagnose sleep disorders
An artificial intelligence algorithm can improve diagnoses, treatments, and our overall understanding of sleep disorders, researchers report. "The algorithm is extraordinarily precise. We completed various tests in which its performance rivaled that of the best doctors in the field, worldwide," says Mathias Perslev, a PhD in the computer science department at the University of Copenhagen and lead
7h
Femtosecond spectroscopy and first-principles calculations shed light on compositional dependence of
Researchers from Skoltech and Ludwig Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Germany have studied the fundamental properties of halide perovskite nanocrystals, a promising class of optoelectronic materials. Using a combination of theory and experiment, they were able to show and explain an intricate connection between composition, light-induced lattice dynamics, and the stability of the materials.
7h
Variabilities in children's speech perhaps not so concerning
Variations in children's speech has traditionally been attributed to developmental delays. Recent work suggests the reasons for variability are not so clear, and an immediate call for treatment may need to be reconsidered. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Margaret Cychosz from the University of Maryland will discuss the need to better understand these variations. Her presentation, 'Reconsidering vari
7h
Saving the climate with solar fuel
Produced in a sustainable way, synthetic fuels contribute to switching mobility to renewable energy and to achieving the climate goals in road traffic. In Empa's mobility demonstrator, move, researchers are investigating the production of synthetic methane from an energy, technical and economic perspective – a project with global potential.
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Non-optimal codons enable coronaviruses' promiscuity
Israeli researchers have found that "promiscuous", or multiple-host, viruses utilize significantly non-optimal codons (the DNA sequences which encode amino acids of the protein) compared to single-host viruses. All of the coronaviruses adopt non-optimal codons to infect multiple hosts. However, instead of being weakly expressed, coronaviruses proteins have been observed to be highly expressed. Thi
7h
A genomic single-cell map explains neuronal death in epilepsy
A multidisciplinary team led by researchers from the Spanish Research Council (CSIC) identifies the genomic cellular map associated with hippocampal sclerosis, a major histopathological condition of temporal lobe epilepsy. The study, published in Cell Reports, identifies cell-type specific transcriptional signatures of hyper-excitability and neurodegeneration, providing grounds for improved diagno
7h
Don't skip your routine check-up; here's why
The benefits of routine primary care doctor visits include chronic illness detection, cancer screenings and therefore should continue, despite some calls from healthcare leaders saying they're a waste of time. For at-risk populations, the check-ups are still vital, and all patients on Medicare and many insured patients pay $0 copay for annual wellness checks.
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Patient characteristics, subsequent health care use of SARS-CoV-2 testing initiation in safety-net health system
Researchers found differences in sociodemographic and clinical characteristics by entry location for SARS-CoV-2 testing within a safety-net health system. White and English-speaking individuals disproportionately initiated testing via telehealth visits, while black, Native American and non-English-speaking patients disproportionately initiated testing through the emergency department.
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Human brain replays new memories at 20 times the speed during waking rest
Neural replay during waking rest may contribute to memory consolidation of action sequences in humans, according to a study published June 8 in the journal Cell Reports. Brain imaging results revealed fast, repeated reactivation of a neural network representing a behavioral sequence that people were learning — approximately 20 times the speed of the new memory — especially while they were taking
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Scientists discover immune cell behavior that plays a key role in Alzheimer's disease
Immune cells in the brain, microglia, increase in number when encountering amyloid — proteins which cause Alzheimer's disease. This increase in number turns some microglia 'senescent,' meaning they cannot carry out their immune functions correctly.Senescent microglia in turn accelerate the accumulation of amyloid, the opposite of what they intend to do.Preventing the proliferation of immune cells
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A call for global oversight of unproven stem cell therapies
The promotion and marketing of unproven stem cell therapies is a global problem that needs a global solution, say experts in a perspective published June 8 in the journal Stem Cell Reports. The authors of the paper call for the World Health Organization (WHO) to establish an advisory committee on regenerative medicine to tackle this issue and provide guidance for countries around the world.
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No news is good news? Think again
An experiment in information sharing shows that no news often means people have something to hide. Other people seem to be blissfully unaware of this. The results suggest that market forces are insufficient to "close the information gap" between buyers and sellers. A proverb that never seems to die is the oft-heard, "No news is good news." However, a new study published in the American Economic J
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New research suggests mineral nanoparticles as ubiquitous enzyme mimetics in Earth systems
Globally, the Earth system has thousands of terragrams (Tg) (1 Tg = 1012g) of mineral nanoparticles moving around the planet each year. These mineral nanoparticles are ubiquitously distributed throughout the atmosphere, oceans, waters, soils, in and/or on most living organisms, and even within proteins such as ferritin. In natural environments, mineral nanozymes can be produced by two pathways: 't
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The Logic of the Filing Cabinet Is Everywhere
S eventeen years ago, just as the periodic cicadas were getting ready to arrive in droves in the eastern United States, Google announced Gmail , an exciting new email service. It had three key features: search, making it easy to find emails; storage, with what was then a mind-blowing 1 gigabyte; and speed, with emails threaded into conversations that ostensibly eliminated the need for cumbersome
7h
How to support yourself (and others) through grief | Nina Westbrook
In big and small ways, we all experience loss: whether it's the passing of a loved one, the close of a career or even the end of a dream. Explaining how to process many types of sorrow, marriage and family therapist Nina Westbrook highlights the importance of grief as a natural emotion and a powerful lens to help you imagine new futures — and shares ways to support yourself and others through dif
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Balancing speech intelligibility, face covering effectiveness in classrooms
A better understanding of the impacts of face masks and shields on acoustic transmission in classrooms could help optimize educational settings. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Laura and Rich Ruhala from Kennesaw State University will talk about how various types of face coverings may affect students' understanding of their teacher. Their presentation, "Acoustical transmission of face coverings used
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Researchers improve western North Pacific tropical cyclone intensity forecasts using the logistic growth equation
Tropical cyclones (TCs) are humbling and powerful forces of nature that can have tremendous impacts on people and human populations. Meteorologists have strived to improve TC forecasting skill, hoping to save lives. In the past few decades, TC track forecasts over the western North Pacific (WNP) have progressed considerably. However, TC intensity forecasts have improved insignificantly, with only
8h
Breakthrough towards solving the structural mystery of glass
Glass is one of the most common materials we use every day, but the detailed structure of this non-metallic and non-liquid material has always been a major mystery in science. A research team co-led by scientists at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has successfully discovered that the amorphous and crystalline metallic glass have the same structural building blocks. And it is the connectivity
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Binder-free MWW-type titanosilicate for selective and durable propylene epoxidation
Propylene oxide (PO) is one of the important propylene derivatives with high reactivity, which is used extensively as a raw material for the manufacture of numerous commercial chemicals. The titanosilicate-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide propylene oxide process (HPPO) is considered to be most advantageous because it is highly economical and ecofriendly, giving only H2O as the theoretical byproduct and
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Finding quasars: Rare extragalactic objects are now easier to spot
Astrophysicists from the University of Bath in the UK have developed a new method for pinpointing the whereabouts of extremely rare extragalactic objects. They hope their technique for finding 'changing-look quasars' will take scientists one step closer to unravelling one of greatest mysteries of the universe – how supermassive black holes grow. Quasars are believed to be responsible for regulatin
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Teaching drones to hear screams from catastrophe victims
Unmanned aerial vehicles may help emergency crews find those in need and provide situational awareness over a large area. During the 180th ASA Meeting, Macarena Varela from Fraunhofer FKIE will describe how a system using an array of microphones and advanced processing techniques could be a lifesaver for disaster victims. The session, "Bearing Estimation of Screams Using a Volumetric Microphone Ar
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Danske babyers tarme flyder med antibiotikaresistente bakterier
En undersøgelse af danske babyers tarme viser, at selv på dette meget tidlige tidspunkt i livet flyder tarmene med resistente bakterier. Bakterierne er endda resistente over for antibiotika, der er tiltænkt som de sidste udveje mod genstridige infektioner. Forsker bag opfordrer til påpasselighed med antibiotika til gravide.
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The Atlantic Daily: Inside 10 Downing Street With Boris Johnson
Every weekday evening, our editors guide you through the biggest stories of the day, help you discover new ideas, and surprise you with moments of delight. Subscribe to get this delivered to your inbox. You might think that you know Boris Johnson. But the British prime minister can still be a difficult read, our staff writer Tom McTague argues in our latest magazine cover story . "For three decad
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Review: AMD Radeon Pro W6800 Workstation GPU
Once again, AMD has introduced some rock-the-house workstation GPUs at competitive prices. The W6800 ($2249) and W6600 ($649) are designed to go head-to-head with Nvidia's best. We've been hammering away with a W6800 and are impressed. We'll relate what we've found, about both it and its smaller sibling the W6600, and thoughts about whether they are right for you. Spoiler alert: As with any GPU r
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Internal compression stocking helps against varicose veins
In cases of severe varicose vein disease, dilated veins are usually removed or destroyed. However, when patients later need a bypass due to circulatory problems, the large blood vessels are then not available as a substitute. In a multicenter study led by Dr. Dominic Mühlberger from the Vascular Surgery Department at Ruhr-Universität Bochum's St. Josef Hospital, researchers tested a vascular prese
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To prevent delirium, increase mobility, connection and sleep
Accelerated cognitive decline in patients with and without existing dementia is one of the most disturbing outcomes of hospitalizations for older adults, affecting at least 2.6 million Americans every year. But the condition, known as delirium, is believed to be preventable in up to 40% of hospital-acquired cases, and researchers at UC San Franciso wanted to see if simple tweaks, like avoiding nig
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Astronomers probe planetary nebula NGC 6302 with Hubble
Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), astronomers have conducted near-ultraviolet through near-infrared observations of a young planetary nebula (PN) known as NGC 6302. Results of the monitoring campaign, presented May 28 on arXiv.org, could help us better understand the nature of this PN.
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Early endeavors on the path to reliable quantum machine learning
Anyone who collects mushrooms knows that it is better to keep the poisonous and the non-poisonous ones apart. In such "classification problems," which require distinguishing certain objects from one another and to assign the objects we are looking for to certain classes by means of characteristics, computers already provide useful support.
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The Finnish Basic Income experiment failed to produce short-term employment effects
Finland carried out the first nationwide randomized experiment on basic income. A study by the VATT Institute for Economic Research and the Labour Institute for Economic Research shows that replacing minimum unemployment benefits with a basic income of equal size has minor employment effects at best. Additionally, participation in reemployment services remained high.
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Demonstration of quantum communication over optical fibers exceeding 600 km
The Cambridge Research Laboratory of Toshiba Europe today announced the first demonstration of quantum communication over optical fibers exceeding 600 km in length. The breakthrough will enable long-distance, quantum-secured information transfer between metropolitan areas, and is a major advance towards building the future quantum internet.
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Clever biomolecular labeling enables identification of immune cells
Biomolecules regulate the biological functions inside every living cell. If scientists can understand the molecular mechanisms of such functions, then it is possible to detect the severe dysfunction which can lead to illness. At a molecular level, this can be achieved with fluorescent markers that are specifically incorporated into the respective biomolecules. In the past, this has been achieved b
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Lead halide perovskites: A horse of a different color
Metal halide perovskites have been under intense investigation over the last decade due to the remarkable rise in their performance in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells or light-emitting diodes. Despite tremendous progress in this field, many fundamental aspects of the photophysics of perovskite materials remain unknown, such as a detailed understanding of their defect physics and charge
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NASA map gives most accurate space-based view of L.A.'s carbon dioxide
Using data from NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory 3 (OCO-3) instrument on the International Space Station, researchers have released one of the most accurate maps ever made from space of the human influence on carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The map shows tiny variations in airborne CO2 from one mile of the giant L.A. Basin to the next.
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Young T. rexes had a mighty strong bite
When they bit down, young Tyrannosaurus rexes exerted up to 5,641 newtons of force, somewhere between the jaw forces exerted by a hyena and a crocodile. That's less than their parents, which had a bite force of about 35,000 newtons, but it's a lot more than the puny biting power of humans—a measly 300 newtons. Jack Tseng, an assistant professor of integrative biology at the University of Californ
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Scientists can predict which women will have serious pregnancy complications
Pregnancy disorders are usually diagnosed during the second or third trimester of gestation when they have often already had a serious impact on the health of the mother and baby. The current methods to diagnose pregnancy disorders are not sensitive or reliable enough to identify all at risk pregnancies. Now scientists have found a way to test hormone levels in the placenta to predict which women
9h
Susceptibility of COPD patients to heart rate difference associated with exposure to metals in PM2.5
Susceptibility of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction associated with exposure to metals in particles with aerodynamic diameter ? 2.5 μm (PM2.5) remains poorly evidenced. Recently, based on a panel study in Beijing, China, Chinese researchers recruited both COPD patients and healthy controls and used heart rate (HR) as an index of cardiovas
9h
Native mosquitofish attack to keep invasive guppies out
In the battle of mosquitofish against guppies, researchers found that the native mosquitofish won. That's good for our ecosystems. Invasive species are one of the greatest threats to biodiversity as they damage ecosystems. Recent research shows managing invasive species costs $45 million each year in Florida. Count guppies among the invaders. A new study sheds light on the role that native specie
9h
CityU scientists make a breakthrough towards solving the structural mystery of glass
The detailed structure of glass has always been a major mystery in science. A research team co-led by scientists at City University of Hong Kong (CityU) has successfully discovered that the amorphous and crystalline metallic glass have the same structural building blocks. And it is the connectivity between these blocks that distinguishes the crystalline and amorphous states of the material. The fi
9h
New Monte Carlo code for solving radiative transfer equations
Recently, YANG Xiaolin and his collaborators from Yunnan Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a new fast code, Lemon (Linear Integral Equations' Monte Carlo Solver Based on Neumann Solution), aiming to solve the radiation transfer processes (RTPs) precisely. The scheme of the code is based on linear integral equation and its Neumann series solution. The study was published in
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Could the source of the GW190814 event be a black hole-strange quark star system?
On the 14th of August 2019, the LIGO-Virgo collaboration detected a gravitational wave signal believed to be associated with the merging of a binary stellar system composed of a black hole with a mass of 23 times the mass of the sun (M⊙) and a compact object with a mass of about 2.6 M⊙. The nature of GW190814ʼs secondary star is enigmatic, since, according to the current astronomical observations,
9h
UFOs: How to calculate the odds that an alien spaceship has been spotted
The US military has released previously classified photos and films related to unidentified flying object (UFO) sightings, which mostly show something blurry moving strangely. Still, I hear that a friend of a friend has gone from thinking there's a 1% chance that UFOs are aliens to now believing it is 50%. Is he rational?
9h
How COVID-19 wreaks havoc on human lungs
Scientists have published the first detailed atomic-level model of the SARS-CoV-2 'envelope' protein bound to a human protein essential for maintaining the lining of the lungs. The findings may speed the search for drugs to block the most severe effects of COVID-19.
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'Zombie frog' discovered: 3 new species described from the narrow-mouthed frog family
Together with an international team, Senckenberg scientists have described three new frog species from the northern Amazon region. The animals from the genus Synapturanus spend their lives buried underground and are therefore still virtually unexplored. The researchers assume that the species diversity of this genus from the family of narrow-mouthed frogs is at least six times higher than previous
9h
Machines can help wine grape industry survive labor shortage
Wine grape growers in California and elsewhere face increasing labor costs and severe labor shortages, making it difficult to manage and harvest a vineyard while maintaining profitability. Growers are increasingly turning to machines for pruning, canopy management and harvesting, but how well these practices are executed can substantially affect yield and quality. A new review by researchers at th
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Finding the weak points in radiation-resistant pancreatic cancer cells
Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancer subtypes not just because it is difficult to diagnose early, but because it is inherently resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In a recent study, scientists from Japan investigated the relationship that exists between the radiation resistance of pancreatic cancer cells, the natural cell cycle, and a cellular mechanism called autophagy, or "se
9h
Have trouble sleeping? You're at higher risk of dying, especially if you have diabetes
In the first-known study to examine the effect of the combination of insomnia and diabetes on mortality risk, participants who had both diabetes and frequent sleep disturbances were 87% more likely to die in following 9 years than those who did not have diabetes or frequent sleep difficulties. The study asked one simple question, which the study authors said clinicians and patients should be askin
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Researcher working to uncover key to cellular mechanisms in parasite
Toxoplasmosis is a common but usually non-life-threatening parasitic infection linked to contaminated food or water. While most people infected by Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii), the parasite responsible for toxoplasmosis, will have very mild or no symptoms at all, the parasite can persist in the body for long periods of time, possibly even an entire lifetime.
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Heat stress in U.S. may double by century's end
Periods of extremely high heat are projected to double across the lower 48 states by 2100 if the world continues to emit high levels of greenhouse gases, according to a new study in Earth's Future, an American Geophysical Union journal.
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Pyrrho and the Skeptical way of life: ignorance is bliss
Skepticism is the philosophy that there's very little that we can actually know with any certainty. Pyrrho is considered the father of Skepticism, and he believed we ought to suspend our judgment on all those things to which we can never find an answer. By giving up the dogmatic pursuit of some kind of resolution, we can be at peace with ourselves and stop getting wound up so easily. There's alwa
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How to help your pandemic puppy avoid doggy distress
Many people are living on pandemic time. Before COVID and after COVID, in other words. And the post-pandemic world is rapidly changing as more people get vaccinated. Students are going back to school, parents are going back to work—and pandemic puppies are feeling the loss. For anyone who welcomed a canine companion during stay-at-home life, here are some pointers (pun intended) for reducing doggy
9h
First global statistical analysis of harmful algal blooms
The first-ever global statistical analysis of trends in harmful algal blooms (HABs) has shown that, worldwide, there is no significant increase in HABs events, but that in some regions, events that include toxic species of algae affecting humans and wildlife are on the rise. In addition, the study finds that human activity, primarily aquaculture in coastal waters, and the economic impacts that HAB
10h
Days Off
I'll be taking a few days off here (nothing to do with the aducanumab approval – this has been planned for a while!) So barring some truly mighty developments, I'll see everyone here on Monday. Who knows what we'll be talking about by then! The post first appeared on In the Pipeline .
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Food systems offer huge opportunities to cut emissions, study finds
A new global analysis of greenhouse-gas emissions from food systems says that such emissions have been systematically underestimated—and points to major opportunities to cut them. The authors estimate that activities connected to food production and consumption produced the equivalent of 16 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide in 2018—one third of the human-produced total, and an 8 percent increa
10h
Compositional dependence of perovskite nanocrystal properties
Researchers from Skoltech and Ludwig Maximilians-Universität (LMU) in Germany have studied the fundamental properties of halide perovskite nanocrystals, a promising class of optoelectronic materials. Using a combination of theory and experiment, they were able to show and explain an intricate connection between composition, light-induced lattice dynamics, and stability of the materials. The paper
10h
Earth's meteorite impacts over past 500 million years
For the first time, a unique study conducted at Lund University in Sweden has tracked the meteorite flux to Earth over the past 500 million years. Contrary to current theories, researchers have determined that major collisions in the asteroid belt have not generally affected the number of impacts with Earth to any great extent.
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New X-ray map reveals growing supermassive black holes in next-gen survey fields
One of the largest X-ray surveys using the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton space observatory has mapped nearly 12,000 X-ray sources across three large, prime regions of the sky. The X-ray sources represent active galactic nuclei and galaxy clusters, and the survey captures the growth of the supermassive black holes at the cores of these galaxies. This X-ray survey complements previous X-ray sur
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Cities worldwide took space for cars and gave it to people during the pandemic. Will it stick?
The one constant during the pandemic is change, especially as it relates to how we use space. Since early 2020, a flurry of physical changes have taken place in our everyday lives, reshaping everything from how and where we gather to the way we shop for groceries, affecting public streets and spaces as well as the business sector. Localities and companies alike are facing challenges as they strive
10h
Scientists discover that coral 'winners' may now be losers
Examination of thousands of underwater photographs by San Fernando Valley high school students has led to the discovery that a species of Caribbean coral—deemed by marine biologists as a winner in the struggle against natural disasters and warming ocean waters—may now be losing the battle with climate change.
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Rosetta stone eruption on the sun could help explain solar explosions
In a dramatic, multi-staged eruption, the sun has revealed new clues that could help scientists solve the long-standing mystery of what causes the sun's powerful and unpredictable eruptions. Uncovering this fundamental physics could help scientists better predict the eruptions that cause dangerous space weather conditions at Earth.
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The Aducanumab Approval
As the world knows, the FDA approved Biogen's anti-amyloid antibody today, surely the first marketed drug whose Phase III trial was stopped for futility. I think this is one of the worst FDA decisions I have ever seen, because – like the advisory committee that reviewed the application, and like the FDA's own statisticians – I don't believe that Biogen really demonstrated efficacy. No problem app
10h
Why Arctic soil can go slip-sliding away
Slow-moving arctic soils form patterns that, from a distance, resemble those found in common fluids such as drips in paint and birthday cake icing. Los Alamos researchers and their collaborators analyzed existing arctic soil formations and compared them to viscous fluids, determining that there is a physical explanation for this pattern that is common to both Earth and Mars landscapes.
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Warmer climate threatens the seaweed forest
The future climate could have serious consequences for valuable coastal ecosystems. Warmer, more acidic, and less saline water make the bladderwrack more fragile and appetizing for snails and other grazers. This is shown in a new Ph.D. thesis from the University of Gothenburg.
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Intensified droughts will affect nitrogen emissions in rainfed agriculture
NO and N2O are major contributors to atmospheric pollution, and agriculture is a major source of both. Seasonal variation of precipitation input can affect plant growth, soil microbial activities, and emissions of NO and N2O. However, the complexity of the mechanisms and the temporal and spatial variations related to the emissions of NO and N2O in rainfed ecosystem are unclear.
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Nytt material attraktivt för solcellstillverkning
Forskare har utvecklat en teknik för att kartlägga det nya materialet perovskits unika egenskaper. Delvis har de coronapandemin att tacka för det. Perovskit är ett nytt material som lämpar sig ypperligt för produktion av solceller och lysdioder tack vare sina attraktiva egenskaper. De senaste tio åren har forskarvärlden försökt tränga djupare in i det mystiska materialets innersta väsen. I en stu
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CooperVision presents expansive ocular research during 2021 BCLA Virtual Conference
CooperVision today announced its scientific research program for the 2021 British Contact Lens Association Virtual Clinical Conference and Exhibition. More than papers and posters span a range of topics that underpin the contact lens industry's evolution, including new data and insights on the complex lifestyle factors involved with addressing presbyopia, misperceptions surrounding soft toric lens
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Evolutionary Compromises
Evolution if one of the most fascinating scientific phenomena because it is so complex and operates over such varying and long timescales. It's a real challenge to wrap one's head around. There is therefore a tendency to settle on overly simplistic evolutionary narratives. This is not a criticism, we all do this in an attempt to grapple with evolutionary thinking. The challenge is to recognize th
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UN: More harmful algal bloom impacts emerge amid rising seafood demand, coastal development
Published in a Nature journal, an unprecedented UN analysis of 9,500 Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) events recorded globally over 33 years shows harm rising in step with the aquaculture industry, marine exploitation and coastal development. 109 scientists in 35 countries conducted the 7-year study and report HAB events have increased in some regions, decreased or held steady elsewhere — creating the w
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Homeroom: The Pandemic's Potential Silver Lining for Kids
Editor's Note: Every Tuesday, Abby Freireich and Brian Platzer take questions from readers about their kids' education. Have one? Email them at homeroom@theatlantic.com. Dear Abby and Brian, The negative aspects of the past year are obvious, but I have also been trying to figure out what might be its silver linings, particularly for school-age kids. Will this generation be more flexible, adaptabl
12h
DNA-analyser kan rädda hotade arter
En art som utrotats från ett ställe på jorden kan återinföras. Men det är viktigt att inte få med individer med skadliga mutationer i arvsmassan. – Många arter är idag starkt hotade, både lokalt och globalt. I Sverige har vi helt förlorat flera arter, till exempel mellanspett och veronikanätfjäril. Dessa arter förekommer dock fortfarande på andra platser i Europa, vilket innebär att de skulle kun
12h
Programming nonreciprocity and reversibility in multistable mechanical metamaterials
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23690-z This work presents a mechanical metamaterial with 1D array of bistable arches where nonreciprocity and reversibility can be independently programmed. The effects of asymmetry both at the structural and element level on propagation of transition waves are examined.
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Structural basis for SARS-CoV-2 envelope protein recognition of human cell junction protein PALS1
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23533-x SARS-CoV-2 viruses are known to hijack human proteins in order to facilitate their own virulence and replication. In this study, Liu and colleagues present structural analysis of how this phenomenon occurs between SARS-CoV-2 viral envelope protein and human PALS1. The findings provide insights in to viral-host r
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Adaptive and multifunctional hydrogel hybrid probes for long-term sensing and modulation of neural activity
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23802-9 Neural probes for experimental studies can cause tissue damage. Here the authors describe a probe incorporated with a hydrogel structure for adaptive bending stiffness to enable insertion to the rodent brain while minimising tissue damage.
13h
Heteromeric HSFA2/HSFA3 complexes drive transcriptional memory after heat stress in Arabidopsis
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23786-6 Moderate heat stress primes plants to acquire tolerance to subsequent, more severe heat stress. Here the authors show that the HSFA3 transcription factor forms a heteromeric complex with HSFA2 to sustain activated transcription of genes required for acquired thermotolerance by promoting H3K4 hyper-methylation.
13h
A molecular pathology, neurobiology, biochemical, genetic and neuroimaging study of progressive apraxia of speech
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23687-8 Progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS) is a neurodegenerative syndrome of multiple etiologies which affects spoken communication. Here, the authors characterized the molecular pathology, biochemistry, genetics and longitudinal neuroimaging of 32 autopsy-confirmed patients with PAOS who were followed over 10 years.
13h
A first constraint on basal melt-water production of the Greenland ice sheet
Nature Communications, Published online: 08 June 2021; doi:10.1038/s41467-021-23739-z Melting at the base of the Greenland Ice Sheet is often disregarded as a source of quantifiable mass loss. In this study, the authors find the basal mass loss is equivalent to 8% of the ice sheet's present imbalance, and that the loss of mass from basal melt is likely to increase in the future.
13h
A 5,000-year vegetation and fire history for tierra firme forests in the Medio Putumayo-Algodon watersheds, northeastern Peru [Anthropology]
This paper addresses an important debate in Amazonian studies; namely, the scale, intensity, and nature of human modification of the forests in prehistory. Phytolith and charcoal analysis of terrestrial soils underneath mature tierra firme (nonflooded, nonriverine) forests in the remote Medio Putumayo-Algodón watersheds, northeastern Peru, provide a vegetation and fire…
14h
Pre-Columbian fire management and control of climate-driven floodwaters over 3,500 years in southwestern Amazonia [Anthropology]
In landscapes that support economic and cultural activities, human communities actively manage environments and environmental change at a variety of spatial scales that complicate the effects of continental-scale climate. Here, we demonstrate how hydrological conditions were modified by humans against the backdrop of Holocene climate change in southwestern Amazonia. Paleoecological…
14h
Ai and society in the future
Will the development of ai cause us to be completely useless in the future? If a machine can do everything better than us, what's the point of our existence other than being lazy animals who just sit around doing nothing purposeful because ai has all the power? How can we prevent a dystopian scenario like this and still be the masters of our civilization and future? submitted by /u/JackAubrey01 [
14h
Antal syskon kan kopplas till risk för hjärt-kärlsjukdomar
Förstfödda löper lägre risk för hjärtinfarkt och stroke än sina syskon – om antalet syskon inte överskrider tre, för då är det tvärtom. Och personer utan syskon har högre risk för hjärtinfarkt och stroke senare i livet jämfört med de som har syskon. Det visar en befolkningsstudie från Lunds universitet. – Att veta hur många syskon en individ har och om hen är äldst eller inte, kan vara av stor ny
16h
The "Lab Leak": It's Not Enough to Say Accidents Happen – Facts So Romantic
So far no one has come up with any clear account of how a coronavirus escaped biosafety level 4 barriers. Photograph by MihasLi / Shutterstock Disasters evoke a search for who to blame. Mishandled disasters make that search vital for anyone whose actions or inactions may have amplified the catastrophe's damage. As the official United States COVID death toll reaches 600,000, those two dynamics hav
16h
Kan vanlig allergimedicin förbättra överlevnaden i vissa cancersjukdomar?
Vetenskap & hälsa har tidigare rapporterat om en studie från Lunds universitet där forskarna såg samband mellan förbättrad överlevnad vid malignt melanom och vanlig allergimedicin. Nu har samma forskare undersökt om de kan se liknande resultatet även i andra cancerformer. Vetenskap & hälsa ställde fyra frågor till Ildikó Fritz, en av forskarna bakom studien, om vad de sett för resultat.
16h
Anna Ploszajski: crafting to better understand material science – podcast
Material science allows us to understand the objects around us mathematically, but there is no formula to describe the sophistication of a handcrafted teacup. Dr Anna Ploszajski is a materials scientist who has travelled all over the UK, meeting makers to better understand her craft and theirs. She spoke to Shivani Dave about what she discovered and documented in her new book, Handmade. Continue
18h
Anna Ploszajski: crafting to better understand material science
Material science allows us to understand the objects around us mathematically, but there is no formula to describe the sophistication of a handcrafted teacup. Dr Anna Ploszajski is a materials scientist who has travelled all over the UK, meeting makers to better understand her craft and theirs. She spoke to Shivani Dave about what she discovered and documented in her new book, Handmade.. Help supp
18h
Is there a solution to the incredible obstacle of lower gravity on Mars that would allow colonization?
I'm excited to think that during my lifetime I could see astronauts orbit Mars and return and possibly even land. I know we are inching closer. What I struggle to understand is when I hear talk of colonizing Mars. Besides all of the other enormous obstacles that must be overcome and may be overcome the one I have not found an answer for is low gravity. It's shown to do terrible things to human li
20h
Massive plankton blooms with very different ecosystem impacts
"The big mystery about plankton is what controls its distribution and abundance, and what conditions lead to big plankton blooms," according to the author of a new study. Researchers explore this question and provide examples of conditions that lead to massive plankton blooms with vastly different potential impacts on the ecosystem.
20h
Carbon dioxide sensors in two urban areas registered big drop in emissions during COVID-19 pandemic
Carbon dioxide emissions in Los Angeles and the Washington DC/Baltimore regions fell roughly 33 percent in April of 2020 compared with previous years, as roads emptied and economic activity slowed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a new study. But while the emissions reductions are significant, the method that scientists used to measure them may have the greater long-term impact.
21h
This forest has stayed wild for 5,000 years — the soil shows it
Parts of the Amazon have been cultivated by Indigenous peoples for thousands of years, and mere centuries ago were the sites of cities and farmland, but other parts are 'untouched.' By examining microscopic bits of plant remains and charcoal in the soil, scientists learned that the Putumayo region of Peru's plant life hasn't changed much in 5,000 years, meaning that the people who have lived there
22h
Epilepsy to be cured completely?
Hi 🙂 I'd like to ask few questions that interest me a lot, yet I can't find much information about it. Thanks a lot to anybody who could answer any of them 🙂 It's said that there is no cure for epilepsy (apart from surgery), yet some people can come off medication after being seizure-free for 5+ years. How does it work? Does it mean that epilepsy potentially has got completely cured for that pe
23h
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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